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The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population. Read more

The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population.

Learning objectives

The Master trains professionals to contribute to development cooperation with creativity, personality and competence by interpreting local and international events, interacting with stakeholders, identifying and managing environmentally and local culture-friendly interventions. This Master provides students with multidisciplinary training and specialized technical and managerial competences.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Students who have completed the Master in International Cooperation and Development are working in various national and international institutions and organizations: NGOs, public administration, private companies, dealing with poverty eradication, emergency, development, migration, institution and democracy building in many different countries. The Master supports the students professional career in cooperation and development, building on their previous background and expertise.

Curriculum

The Master in International Cooperation and Development is structured as four complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Scientific Training. The first level provides students of different academic backgrounds with a multidisciplinary education on various dimensions of development processes aimed at acquiring the relevant economic, political, historical, legal, institutional and managerial competences, with a special focus on fighting against poverty and fostering social inclusion. Areas of study:

● Economic and human development

● Geopolitics

● Trade and finance for development

● Development law and institutions

● Project cycle management

2nd level - Professional Training. The second level intends to develop practical skills required to operate in development and emergency cooperation: actors and strategies for conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction, natural disaster management, development programs and projects concerning poverty eradication, food security, environmental sustainability, community-based development initiatives.  Areas of study:

● Development actors and strategies

● Crisis prevention, relief and recovery

● Development aid and governance

● Partnerships for human rights and development

● Enhancing cooperative skills

3rd level and 4th level - Project Work and Internship

Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to development cooperation, under the supervision of a MIC&D professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience. The Master is then completed with an internship within one of the ASERI partner institutions or other entities whose mission and activities are consistent with the program.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in International Cooperation and Development offers high quality training to a group of 25 students from all continents. The learning platform includes lectures, seminars and a tutored internship. A faculty composed of scholars and professionals from international institutions and non-governmental organizations shares its experience with the class.

Faculty members:

● Prof. Simona Beretta - MIC&D Director, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Anni Arial - consultant in land governance, former FAO officer

● Dr. Sara Balestri - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Frank Cinque - ALTIS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Luigi Curini - Università degli Studi di Milano

● Prof. Paul H. Dembinski - University of Fribourg

● Dr. Giuliano Gargioni - Global Tuberculosis Programme, WHO, Geneva

● Dr. Christophe Golay - Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

● Prof. Xuewu Gu - University of Bonn

● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Mario Agostino Maggioni - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Alberto Monguzzi - International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Budapest

● Prof. Mathias Nebel - Institut Catholique de Paris

● Dr. Valeria Patruno - IAL Puglia s.r.l.

● Dr. Giovanna Prennushi - The World Bank, Washington

● Dr. Manuela Prina - European Training Foundation, Turin

● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Javier Revilla Diez - Global South Studies Center, University of Cologne

● Prof. Michele Riccardi - Transcrime, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Andrea Rossi - UNICEF, Kathmandu

● Dr. Javier Schunk - PCM Trainer

● Dr. Nicola Strazzari - Vision Plus Media Enterprises, Turin

● Dr. Manuela Tortora - UNCTAD, Geneva

● Prof. Teodora Erika Uberti - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Roberto Zoboli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Professionals from international institutions, non-govern- mental organizations, applied researchers

ASERI - a center of excellence

Since its foundation in 1995, ASERI has formed young professionals in the fields of international relations and international cooperation, in a stimulating, multidisciplinary learning environment. Students from all over the world, faculty, and professionals find a unique space for discovering new opportunities for their professional enhancement and create a valuable network for future collaboration.

Our experts

Both academics and experienced professionals share their knowledge with students during group activities at ASERI, fostering critical and innovative thinking in facing development and emergency challenges.

Job ready

The Master in International Cooperation and Development provides an opportunity for learning critical and systematic analytical tools, and practical competences for international cooperation. Personal skills are developed in class work and enhanced during the curricular internship.

Global perspective

Students from all continents find at ASERI a unique opportunity for meeting an international faculty. They learn how to cooperate for a world of dignity, justice and peace by practicing cooperation with each other, in a rich and challenging multicultural environment.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarships cover 25% of the tuition fees.

Language proficiency

Applicants whose first language is not English will need to have either: TOEFL iBT overall score of at least 80; or Academic IELTS overall score of at least 6.0; or successfully completed a degree program taught in the English language.



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Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. Read more
Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

The Security Dilemma.
Face-to-face diplomacy.
Peace building, alliances and institutions
Emotions in crises and conflicts
The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma.
The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War.
US-Iran nuclear relations.
The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China.

Our students explore cutting edge scholarship through three core modules: Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics, Global Cooperation in Practice, and our exclusive training programme on Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation. In addition, our new module Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation examines the psychological determinants of political choices and behaviours. Our programme allows for a truly interdisciplinary training in understanding and tackling the challenges of complex international tensions.

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: Trust; Political Settlements; International Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Who is the programme for?

Our MSc degree is designed for students interested in international relations, political psychology and security studies. Our students share a common goal: to advance their academic training, establish a policy-related career, work in government, international organizations and NGOs, or serve as mediators, negotiators and diplomats to address intractable conflicts at all levels of world politics.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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What is the Master of Cultures and Development Studies all about? . The Master of Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies (CADES) aims to enhance the . Read more

What is the Master of Cultures and Development Studies all about? 

The Master of Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies (CADES) aims to enhance the multidisciplinary and intercultural expertise and skills of students and professionals involved in or interested in advisory, policy or educational assignments in the international and development sectors. Rooted in contemporary social and cultural anthropology, the programme draws on various disciplines and fields of study and deploys a wealth of relevant perspectives. Its approach builds on current insights into the complex dynamics of on-going economic and informational globalisation and the development of multiple modernities, inter alia.

Following multi-sited research conducted at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Africa (IARA) and the Interculturalism, Migration and Minority Research Centre (IMMRC), the programme counters the mainstream Western perspective and stimulates an integrated approach to development issues. Taking this into account, the programme does not offer its students a practical toolkit, but rather tends to question whether available tools are suitable and applicable in any given context.

Having learned to relate domain-specific knowledge within the evolving international debates, our graduates go on to a large variety of jobs in ngo’s, international organisations, development cooperation, education, social and medical services, advisory organisations, international relations, enterprises, and research. 

International

During the programme, students have the opportunity to carry out an internship and acquire international experience. The internship can be included in the curriculum provided that it covers at least 6 weeks and starts after classes have finished (end of June). Students taking up the internship can only complete the CADES programme after 1 and a half years.

Is this the right programme for me?

Ideal prospective students have an interest in advocacy, policy or educational assignments in the international and/or intercultural cooperation context. They are interested in anthropological and cultural-specific views on sustainable development and opt for an interdisciplinary academic preparation towards a better understanding of development paradigms.

Objectives

The aim of the programme is to increase the student's interdisciplinary and intercultural expertise with a view to fulfilling advisory, policy-making and educational functions within international and/or intercultural development and cooperation. This is achieved by providing them with conceptual and practical experience in the processes of information transmission, international cooperation, globalization and cultural assertiveness. The programme places the accent on anthropology, but is relevant to various academic disciplines.

By the end of the programme, the student will have acquired:

  • knowledge and understanding of the scholarly framework in which intercultural problems can be clarified with respect to various academic and social themes;
  • skill in the analysis of practical and theoretical problems from an intercultural perspective; setting up, executing and evaluating research projects; drafting diagnoses, plans and recommendations; use and/or design of instruments for the optimization of situations in practical situations; critical reflection on the content of practical interventions; linking theoretical concepts to practical acts; guiding and developing innovations;
  • the skills necessary for adequate communication and reporting.

Career paths

CADES offers students a broad international and interdisciplinary background with which to confront developmental issues from an anthropological perspective. Graduates find employment in:

  • ngo's
  • international organisations
  • development cooperation
  • education
  • social and medical services
  • advisory organisations
  • international relations
  • private and public enterprises
  • research


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Introduction. The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. Read more

Introduction

The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. In Semester 2, research methods continues and students take two option modules from a range of choices that focus on the Middle East, Africa, Migration and Resource Conflicts amongst others.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full time - MSc-12 months; PG Diploma-9 months; PG Certificate-3 months Part time - MSc-27 months; PG Diploma-21 months; PG Certificate-9 months

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Matias Margulis

Course objectives

The course looks at the dynamics of international conflict and cooperation in light of major developments such as the end of the Cold War, the 9/11 terror attacks and the Arab Spring. The course takes a thematic approach to conflict resolution and the role of international organisations to focus on the role of conflict prevention and management in specific geographical areas in addition to the development and regulation of conflict in relation to factors such as natural resources and migration.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc contains core modules related to international conflict and cooperation as well as a range of options modules to explore issues in more depth. It also features a research skills module.

Delivery and assessment

Modules will typically be delivered in the evenings by lecture and seminar, although the emphasis will be on student participation and discussion, workshop sessions, as well as a variety of formal and informal presentations. Assessment is by presentations, essays and the dissertation.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the vast majority of the outputs submitted by the History and Politics staff were graded as international quality and a significant proportion was of ‘World-leading’ quality. All staff in History and Politics were assessed, an indicator of how central research is to our activity.

Career opportunities

The MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation is a gateway to employment in government agencies, the NGO sector and international organisations as well as into PhD study, research and academia. The course provides a background in conflict study, the role of international organisations and a thematic and geographical focus on distinct areas and problems as well as analysis of solutions. The academic skills aspects of the course also provide a background to undertake further research.

Employability

Our students learn a variety of skills to enhance their attractiveness to employers such as presentation skills, the ability to undertake research, analysis of complex data, writing skills, team work and communication, in addition to a variety of knowledge associated with international politics in relation to global issues, international organisations, concepts and theories.



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We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?. Read more
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?

Our course helps you to understand the evolving field of conflict resolution, exploring the causes and effects of destructive conflict across the world, and scrutinising the theory and practice of how this can be managed peacefully. We provide you with a framework for understanding conflict resolution in inter- and intra-state issues, focusing on topics including:
-Mediation, negotiation, and collaborative problem solving
-Using conflict data sets and drawing geographical maps
-International development and human rights
-International relations and security studies
-Global and comparative politics

You additionally might have the option of studying an extracurricular module on non-violent movements, offered in collaboration with Slobdan Djinovic and Srdja Popovic of the Centre for Nonviolent Action and Strategies in Belgrade. This exciting course, previously offered at many US universities including Colorado College, Harvard University and New York University, has never been offered anywhere else in Europe.

Our dynamic, interdisciplinary approach combines traditional methods with contemporary theory and practices of non-violent movements, and we encourage you to experience the practical as well as the theoretical application of these topics through examining real case studies of international conflict.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. You benefit from staff expertise in both conflict studies and international relations, with conflict and cooperation forming a core part of our Department of Government.

Our key teaching staff for this course are Professor Han Dorussen, Professor Ismene Gizelis, and Professor Kristian Gleditsch.

Professor Dorussen is Associate Editor for the Journal of Peace Research, and specialises in the relationship between trade and conflict, the use of economic policies in international politics, the governance of post-conflict societies, and policy convergence in the European Union. He has recently completed fieldwork examining the impact of the UN mission on the perception of security in Timor Leste.

Professor Gizelis specialises in conflict dynamics, peacekeeping, gender equality and post-conflict reconstruction, and communicable diseases. In addition, Professor Gizelis is acting as Core Investigator on a new research project, ‘Armed Conflict and Maternal Health in Sub-Saharan Africa’ (2014-16), with the innovative aim of going beyond consideration of the direct effect of interventions to also consider relevant political, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

Professor Gleditsch’s research focuses on conflict and cooperation, democratisation, and spatial dimensions of social and political processes. He is the director of a large EU-funded research project on non-violent actions. He is also the director of the Michael Nicholson Centre of Conflict and Cooperation.

Specialist facilities

-The Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation is distinctive in its scientific approach to the study of conflict, emphasising rigorous formal theory and the development of systematic data and statistical methods for evaluating theory
-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-Make use of web-assisted learning, simulations, and challenging role-playing exercises
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Conflict Resolution will prepare you for a career in areas such as non-governmental organisations, international and national government, or the private sector.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Conflict Resolution
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Macroeconomics (Advanced)
-Economics of the European Union
-Economics of Transition
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
-Environmental Economics
-Psycho Analytic Theory
-Psychoanalysis of Groups and Organisations (optional)
-Thinking Psychoanalytically (optional)
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)
-Media Theory (optional)
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Texts and Documents (optional)
-Ethnography (optional)
-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Formative Debates in Criminology (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (optional)
-Topics in Contemporary Social Theory (optional)
-Sociological Research Design (optional)
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Introduction to Survey Design and Management (optional)
-Applied Sampling (optional)
-Dealing with Survey Non-response (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design (optional)
-Work-Based Project

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history.

This programme takes you to these roots. A multidisciplinary study path introduces you to various aspects of European society, culture and politics. Along the way, it draws from the strengths of Nordic research on Europe, with its strong focus on regional cooperation, diversity, identities, institutions, culture and the politics of history and memory. You will get to know the Nordic countries from a European perspective and Europe from a Nordic perspective.

Studying the ways in which Europeans cooperate, how European states and societies are interconnected, and how they are governed, forms an important part of the programme. Besides looking at the processes of integration and the evolution and functioning of the European Union, the programme highlights the significance of regional cooperation in the Nordic context, the EU’s relations with its neighbours and its place in the global system.

At the end of your studies, you will have gained a broad understanding of European issues and acquired advanced research skills. You will be ready to work in a wide range of expert positions that require independent and creative thinking, in both the public and private sectors.

The programme consists of joint courses and specialisation studies. One of the available options is to specialise in Nordic Studies. ENS is the only Nordic Studies programme taught in English in the Nordic countries.

The Master's Programme in European and Nordic Studies is offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Arts.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website: http://www.helsinki.fi/en/programmes/master/european-and-nordic-studies

Pro­gramme con­tents

The programme consists of a multidisciplinary selection of courses that introduce you to various aspects of Europe, the Nordic countries, and the Baltic Sea Region.

The topics addressed in the joint courses include, for example, contemporary European politics, cooperation and conflict in European history, Nordic societies and cultures, and institutions, ideologies and identities in Europe. You will also learn about nations and nationalism, political and social protest, (Nordic) welfare models, the European Union and Nordic cooperation, European legal traditions, and the politics of memory.

The programme involves substantial interaction between you and your teachers. You will complete several writing assignments and research papers along the way, culminating in a Master’s thesis in your second year. Some courses use active learning or flipped classroom pedagogy.

The content of your studies also depends on your own choices. In addition to core courses that provide you with a deep multidisciplinary understanding of Europe, the degree includes specialisation studies of your own choosing.

If you specialise in Nordic studies, you will have access to some courses taught at the programme for Nordic Literature and the Kultur och Kommunikation Master’s programme.

You also have plenty of other options. The University of Helsinki is a large research university. As a student in ENS you will have access to a rich variety of specialised courses in many faculties and schools. Check the section on research focus to see what we are particularly good at in Helsinki.



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Water resources, indispensable basis for development, food supply and health, become ever scarcer and more polluted. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) offers solutions to the water crisis in linking water to other vital resources. Read more
Water resources, indispensable basis for development, food supply and health, become ever scarcer and more polluted. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) offers solutions to the water crisis in linking water to other vital resources. It regards the whole water cycle in connection with human interventions as the basis for sustainable water management. Worldwide, there is a high and growing demand for experts adequately trained in the concepts of IWRM. Next to the technical and managerial knowledge related to water resources, these experts should also be familiar with the practices of project funding and international cooperation. Projects between Europe and Arab countries need experts who are familiar with the culture, language and politics of both sides and are well trained in intercultural communication.

The objective of the program is to form such experts and to promote the concept of IWRM within the context of European-Arab cooperation. Target groups of the program are recently graduated professionals with working experience in public or private institutions, authorities and enterprises of the water sector. The applicants should be active in or dealing with water or natural resources management and have an interest in learning and working in an intercultural and multi-disciplinary environment.

The profile of the Master’s program is application-oriented. Besides providing the participants with an overview on the water sector in general, the aim is to educate experts in the field of Integrated Water Resources Management. This requires a diversification of their knowledge and leads to the capability of cross-linked thinking. The answer to complex environmental and water related problems requires economic and managerial competencies more than classical technical knowledge. The consolidation of different disciplines has not only a methodological dimension, but a cultural and a human component as well, because interdisciplinary team work requires knowledge sharing and effective communication.

Contents

This master is a cooperation between the University of Jordan and TH Köln (University of Applied Sciences)

Some of the core modules covered in this master include: Management of natural resources systems, International Cooperation and Development, Economics and governance. These are complimented by regional modules in Jordan, such as: Water and agriculture in the MENA region, Sanitation and public health, Water supply and Water system analysis. Parallel to these modules, you will learn Methods and Tools such as using the Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing, environmental monitoring and Statistics, and learn to apply the knowledge in Projects.

Tuition

Basic course fees for field trips, conference participation and course material
Registration fees in Jordan and Germany
Tuition fees in Jordan for non-scholarship holders

Funding

Applicants may receive one of the limited numbers of scholarships. Available are full time scholarships from the DAAD EPOS Program for applicants from DAC-list countries.

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We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?. Read more
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?

Our course helps you to understand the evolving field of conflict resolution, exploring the causes and effects of destructive conflict across the world, and scrutinising the theory and practice of how this can be managed peacefully. We provide you with a framework for understanding conflict resolution in inter- and intra-state issues, focusing on topics including:
-Mediation, negotiation, and collaborative problem solving
-Using conflict data sets and drawing geographical maps
-International development and human rights
-International relations and security studies
-Global and comparative politics

You additionally might have the option of studying an extracurricular module on non-violent movements, offered in collaboration with Slobdan Djinovic and Srdja Popovic of the Centre for Nonviolent Action and Strategies in Belgrade. This exciting course, previously offered at many US universities including Colorado College, Harvard University and New York University, has never been offered anywhere else in Europe.

Our dynamic, interdisciplinary approach combines traditional methods with contemporary theory and practices of non-violent movements, and we encourage you to experience the practical as well as the theoretical application of these topics through examining real case studies of international conflict.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. You benefit from staff expertise in both conflict studies and international relations, with conflict and cooperation forming a core part of our Department of Government.

Our key teaching staff for this course are Professor Han Dorussen, Professor Ismene Gizelis, and Professor Kristian Gleditsch.

Professor Dorussen is Associate Editor for the Journal of Peace Research, and specialises in the relationship between trade and conflict, the use of economic policies in international politics, the governance of post-conflict societies, and policy convergence in the European Union. He has recently completed fieldwork examining the impact of the UN mission on the perception of security in Timor Leste.

Professor Gizelis specialises in conflict dynamics, peacekeeping, gender equality and post-conflict reconstruction, and communicable diseases. In addition, Professor Gizelis is acting as Core Investigator on a new research project, ‘Armed Conflict and Maternal Health in Sub-Saharan Africa’ (2014-16), with the innovative aim of going beyond consideration of the direct effect of interventions to also consider relevant political, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

Professor Gleditsch’s research focuses on conflict and cooperation, democratisation, and spatial dimensions of social and political processes. He is the director of a large EU-funded research project on non-violent actions. He is also the director of the Michael Nicholson Centre of Conflict and Cooperation.

Specialist facilities

-The Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation is distinctive in its scientific approach to the study of conflict, emphasising rigorous formal theory and the development of systematic data and statistical methods for evaluating theory
-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-Make use of web-assisted learning, simulations, and challenging role-playing exercises
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MSc Conflict Resolution will prepare you for a career in areas such as non-governmental organisations, international and national government, or the private sector.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Conflict Resolution
-Advanced Research Methods
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Macroeconomics (Advanced)
-Economics of the European Union
-Economics of Transition
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
-Environmental Economics
-Psycho Analytic Theory
-Psychoanalysis of Groups and Organisations (optional)
-Thinking Psychoanalytically (optional)
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)
-Media Theory (optional)
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Texts and Documents (optional)
-Ethnography (optional)
-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Formative Debates in Criminology (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (optional)
-Topics in Contemporary Social Theory (optional)
-Sociological Research Design (optional)
-Finance, Globalisation and the Crash of 2008 (optional)
-Colonialism, Cultural Diversity and Human Rights (optional)
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Introduction to Survey Design and Management (optional)
-Applied Sampling (optional)

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Water resources, indispensable basis for development, food supply and health, become ever scarcer and more polluted. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) offers solutions to the water crisis in linking water to other vital resources. Read more
Water resources, indispensable basis for development, food supply and health, become ever scarcer and more polluted. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) offers solutions to the water crisis in linking water to other vital resources. It regards the whole water cycle in connection with human interventions as the basis for sustainable water management. Worldwide, there is a high and growing demand for experts adequately trained in the concepts of IWRM. Next to the technical and managerial knowledge related to water resources, these experts should also be familiar with the practices of project funding and international cooperation.

The objective of the program is to form such experts and to promote the concept of IWRM. Participants are provided with appropriate knowledge and skills to analyze current problems related to the usage and management of water and related resources.

Target groups of the program are recently graduated pro-fessionals with working experience in public or private institutions, authorities and enterprises of the water sector. The applicants should be active in or dealing with water or natural resources management and have an interest in learning and working in an intercultural and multidisciplinary environment.

The profile of the Master’s program is application-oriented. The aim is, besides providing the participants with an overview on the water sector in general, to educate experts in the field of Integrated Water Resources Management. This requires a diversification of their knowledge and leads to the capability of cross-linked thinking. The answer to complex environmental and water related problems requires economic and managerial competencies more than classical technical knowledge.

The consolidation of different disciplines has not only a methodological dimension but a cultural and a human one, because interdisciplinary team work requires knowledge sharing and effective communication.

Contents

Basic Modules: Water Science Principles of IWRM Water Economics Management Water Governance Water System Management International Cooperation Team Project Elective Modules: Technology Water Demand Management Tools

At TH Köln (University of Applied Sciences)

Current global trends such as population and economic growth as well as climate change exert increasing pressure on water resources worldwide, which are the basis for food production, urban and industrial water supplies and hydropower. Experts are needed who understand that multiple problems of water resources management can only be addressed through a holistic approach considering both technical and socioeconomic problems of resources use. These experts should also have knowledge of the practices of project funding and international cooperation.

Tuition

Semester contribution fees, additional fees for field trips, conference participation and course materials. For more information on the semester contribution fees: https://www.th-koeln.de/en/academics/fees_5908.php

Funding

Applicants may receive one of the limited numbers of scholarships. Available are full time scholarships from the DAAD EPOS Program for applicants from DAC-list countries.

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Learning and living Europe. Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul. The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies. Read more

Learning and living Europe: Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the present times. Its encompassing teaching method at the crossroads of theory and practice helps the students to gain thorough academic expertise in European affairs as well as a first hand-insight into the work as a Policy Officer at a European institution or international organisation. With its leitmotiv "Learning and living Europe", the programme follows an original approach that distinguishes it from other Master's courses in European Studies and International Relations: the European integration and global studies programme is taught in English and takes place in three different study locations: Berlin, Nice, Rome or Istanbul. After two common terms, the participants have the possibility to chose between two options for the spring term: they can opt to finish their studies either in Rome or in Istanbul.

Programme

Berlin, Germany

The academic year starts in Berlin (from October to December), it encompasses classes on the basics of all the four modules (Conflict and cooperation in the international system, European integration and external action; Federalism and multi-level governance; Globalisation and sustainable development), completed by the seminar « Project cycle management », the core part of the fifth module "Professional Skills Workshops".

Nice, France

In Nice, teaching focuses on the current international order, examining the reasons for conflict and the perspectives for cooperation. Lectures explore Europe's policies in diverse fields (trade, democracy promotion, conflict resolution, climate change, development aid) to explain how important a role the EU plays on the international stage.

At the same time, the programme looks into the current challenges the European integration project is facing (euroscepticism, the challenges of economic governance, Brexit, refugee crisis). During this term, students take their mid-term exams.

A one-week study trip takes the students to European and international institutions in Brussels, Strasbourg and Luxembourg. Visits to the European Council, the European Commission and NATO are highlights of the stay in Brussels, whereas Strasbourg hosts not only the headquarters of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rignts, but also the plenary sessions of the European Parliament.

Rome, Italy or Istanbul, Turkey

According to their choice, students will do their third trimester either in Rome or in Istanbul.

In Rome, special focus is given to the Mediterranean region and Africa with particular emphasis on the issues of migration, poverty and food security. Students will visit relevant UN institutions.

In Istanbul, students study the changing EU-Turkey relations and focus on area studies of the Black Sea region, the Caucasus including ENP, and Central Asia.

During the third term, students have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict and cooperation in the international system

A theoretically grounded approach to revisit the continuities and changes of international relations. Following a theoretical introduction into the grand schools of thought of international relations theory, we will approach the interdisciplinary field of conflict and violence studies. From its very beginning, understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of 'International Relations' as an academic discipline. A special focus will be given to inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts in both the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Ukraine to Syria.

European Integration and external action

This module aims at familiarising the students, who could well become the next generation of European and international decision-makers, with an expert knowledge of the structures, institutions, and problems of the European Union.We focus firstly on the historical development of European integration and then go on to analyse the Union’s institutions and study the basics of EU law. The last part of the program is devoted to the different policies of the EU and especially emphasises the challenges of enlargement.

Federalism, multi-level governance and conflict resolution

For the last fifteen years, federalism has known a revival as an international field of studies. In this framework, three major developments can be considered. The first is the study of the European Union, not analysed any more as a process of integration but in terms of federal institutional comparative approach. The second development is multi-level governance, that can be conceived as an extension of federalism as it deals with any form of multi-tier institutional system. This cooperative/competitive approach has appeared to understand the institutional consequences of the process of globalisation in post-industrialised societies, and of the subsequent changing of nature of sovereignty in the relevant states. Eventually, federalism has become a tool of conflict resolution, in order to resolve violent conflicts all over the world.

Economy, globalisation and sustainable development

The module puts a specific focus on the role of the EU as an economic actor on the global stage, with its opportunities and challenges driven both by European specific evolutions and globalisation trends. Finally, the module proposes an introduction to global sustainable development issues (climate change, access to water, etc.), as they are among the most decisive challenges that will shape the future of the world economy.

Professional Skills Workshops

This module equips the participants with the professional skills and competences that will enable them to work in the context of the European and international organisations. They will take actively part in several simulation games and follow workshops on project cycle management, intercultural management, as well as on mediation and negotiation.

The deadline for applications is 15 May 2018.



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Master's specialisation in Globalisation, Migration and Development. You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Read more

Master's specialisation in Globalisation, Migration and Development

You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Core issues on which this master specialisation will focus include: changing relationships of global and local societies through the rise of new social and spatial inequalities brought about by global processes, migration and mobility and the emergence of transnational identities versus local interpretations in so-called multicultural societies. Overall we give particular emphasis to the relationship with urban contexts of these issues, but do also link it up with rural domains, e.g. in studying sustainability of livelihood strategies and development policies in different regions.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd

Career prospects

Our graduates are employed in a wide range of jobs in- and outside the Netherlands. To give some insight in the scope of the work they do we have categorised this as follows, adding that this list is not exhaustive:

1. Working for the Dutch government at local, regional, national and international levels regarding development issues such as poverty, livelihoods, social exclusion and empowerment:

- Policymaker / programme researcher for city municipalities focusing on integration and multi-cultural issues, especially in the low-income neighbourhoods;

- Policy development expert for Provincial Governments in The Netherlands;

- Policy expert or programme/field officer with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

- Programme officer with Nuffic (Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher education)

2. Working as an NGO practitioner in development cooperation:

- Field officer for Max Havelaar or Fair Trade, visiting developing countries to establish business contracts with local farmer organisations;

- Research officer for the Centre for the Promotion of Imports from developing countries (http://www.cbi.nl/) promoting and facilitating entry of entrepreneurs from developing countries in the European market.

- Researcher/programme officer with development aid related organisations such as: Cordaid, VSO, SNV, Novib/Oxfam, Hivos and COS (Association of Centres for international cooperation at the provincial level), or a migrant (umbrella) organisation.

3. Pursuing an academic career (research and education) with one of many research institutes studying migration, globalisation, integration or development issues in the Netherlands and abroad:

- Conducting highly innovative PhD research on migration and development, health and urbanisation, the rural impact of globalisation, etc. (see http://www.nwo.nl/ for past research proposals)

- Working for a research institute/organisation involved with migration and globalisation: e.g. MPI, IOM, Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The concept of the German “Energiewende” – literally, energy transition – has gained international attention. It includes a variety of measures that aim at making Europe’s largest economy free of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Read more

Program Background

The concept of the German “Energiewende” – literally, energy transition – has gained international attention. It includes a variety of measures that aim at making Europe’s largest economy free of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. In order to attain this, all areas of energy production and consumption will have to go through a transition process. Besides mobility and industry, buildings are therefore one of the key factors for a successful Energiewende.

Most of all, this implies re-directing from a mainly fossil-fueled energy supply towards renewable energies and a much more energy-efficient use of energy in buildings and urban areas. This is one of the largest and most urgent challenges of current urban development and other social disciplines.

Finding solutions to such a complex challenge means that a multitude of actors from business, society, and public administration take part in the process and influence it with their differing and often conflicting interests. Resulting from this is the need for skilled workers who both understand all stakeholders and are able to work with them.

Building Sustainability

Strategic concepts for communication and cooperation in large-scale projects are crucial for their success. Whereas, “simply” building a house has become a manageable task, things become much more complicated when considering the urban environment and wider interests such as energy efficiency. The Master program, Building Sustainability focuses therefore, not only on technical and economic perspectives, but also aims at imparting relevant knowledge from other disciplines. This means that the scope of the program is both broad and specific at the same time. The combination of technology, management and sustainability-related topics is therefore a unique opportunity for young professionals to extend their skills.

The MBA program Building Sustainability – Management Methods for Energy Efficiency will teach students skills, methods and concepts to consider different approaches, to understand them and to align them for reaching sustainable solutions. Such competences are not only important in the context of the Energiewende but they are indispensable in every building, construction and real estate project that takes energy efficiency and other sustainability criteria into account.

The idea is that sustainable project results that consider economic, ecological and social aspects can only be achieved in extensive cooperation of all stakeholders. Managing and moderating such a cooperation is one of the major challenges of implementing sustainability in building projects of all scales. The program aims therefore on enabling students to understand the complexity of planning and management processes and to develop according solutions. This will happen in modules with different approaches: some will teach facts and numbers, others will facilitate connections between different fields and the softer skills of mediating between them and some are designed to apply these competences to practical projects.

The TU-Campus EUREF is located on the EUREF (European Energy Forum) campus in Berlin-Schöneberg. This former industrial area has been developed into a research hub for energy efficiency, renewable energies and smart grids. Students will gain insight into the numerous real-life examples of building sustainability without having to leave the campus.

Students and graduates

The program addresses a broad group of professionals with varying academic backgrounds, mostly in engineering and technology, management, economics, architecture and urban or environmental planning. However, applicants with other academic backgrounds coupled with working experience in a related field are also encouraged to apply, personal motivation plays an important role in the selection process. Class diversity is one of its greatest assets, as students will not only learn from lecturers with science and business backgrounds, but also from each other.
Graduates will be able to moderate and manage complex projects in the construction, real estate, and planning sector. They will be able to assess the project from technical, ecological and economic perspectives and find solutions which take all stakeholders into account.

Curriculum

The first semester focuses on the basis for successful and sustainable projects. Two comprehensive modules in the fields of building technology and project management will allow students to work on their first, closely guided group project. A lecture series about the sustainable reorganization of building and urban structures with special regard to energy management and the energy market accompanies these modules.

The second semester focuses on the interdisciplinary aspects of building sustainability. It addresses real estate economics and the issue of energy-efficient societies in a global context. Together with the knowledge and skills attained in the first semester, students will conduct a comprehensive and interdisciplinary group project. At the same time, specialization starts and students can choose between deepening their knowledge in either technology and innovation management or in Smart Buildings.

The specialization continues in the third semester, either by completing the technology and innovation module or the technical module with the follow-up course Integration of Renewable Energies. All students take a module in Life Cycle Analysis to complete the holistic approach of sustainability and write their Master thesis. Graduates will earn a degree awarded from the Technische Universität Berlin.

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As Latin American and Caribbean Countries (LAC) experience economic development, concerns on environmental degradation and contamination continue to grow. Read more
As Latin American and Caribbean Countries (LAC) experience economic development, concerns on environmental degradation and contamination continue to grow. The region faces serious challenges such as climate change and natural disasters; and under conditions of population growth, social conflict, urbanization and industrialization efficient environmental policies and programs are required to sustainably manage the natural resources.

The objective of the double degree master program is to qualify professionals and experts in the field of environmental and natural resources management with the necessary skills, tools and methods in the context of international cooperation with a clear focus on German/European Latin American cooperation. Graduates are able to analyze and solve complex environmental problems in their specific socio-cultural and political contexts, given the technical and economic potentials of both regions.

The ENREM program is based on the curricula of the two accredited master programs:

• “Maestria en Ciencias Ambientales”at the Programa Multidisciplinario de Posgrado en Ciencias Ambientales (PMPCA) at University San Luis Potosí (UASLP) in Mexico and
• “Natural Resources Management and Development” at the Institute for Technology and Resources Management in the Tropics and Subtropics (ITT) at TH Köln - University of Applied Sciences in Germany.

The ENREM Master program targets professionals of different academic backgrounds with experience related to the natural resources sector. They seek to deepen their knowledge in Environment and Resources Management and wish to acquire management and leadership skills as well as regional and intercultural competences within the context of international – especially German-Latin American cooperation – and at the same time provide their work experience and regional knowledge to the mutual learning and intercultural environment.

In an interdisciplinary learning environment, students diversify their knowledge and build the capacity to think transdisciplinarily and laterally, as well as team and leadership skills, among them intercultural abilities. These competencies shall equip the graduates with the ability to analyze, characterize and solve complex problems of environmental and natural resources management and well as foster sustainable development, all in line with the SDGs agenda.

Contents

The double degree master program runs for four semesters and starts in winter term (august) of each year. The first two semesters will take place in San Luis Potosí (Mexico), the third in Cologne (Germany) and the last semester is exclusively for the development of the master thesis project either in Mexico, another Latin American Country or Germany depending in the thesis topic.

Courses in Mexico are mainly implemented in Spanish while the official teaching language at ITT is English.

The course is structured through mandatory and elective modules, and is accompanied by practical experiences, exercises, team projects and seminars throughout the program.

The mandatory modules are organized in Core Modules and Project Modules, these modules provides the student with a general overview of different disciplines relevant to natural resources. The elective modules in the second and third semester are organized into two blocks, one in their area of “specialization elective related to the topics of natural resources management” and the other from the “Methods and Tools”.

Each of the two partner universities has a different focus related to the following areas:
• UASLP, Mexico: Prevention and Control, Environmental Assessment, Renewable Natural Resources, Environmental Management, Environmental and Health.
• TH Köln, Germany: Environmental and Land use Management, Urban and Regional Management complemented by Integrated Water Resources Management and/ or Renewable Energy Management

Tuition

Basic course fees for field trips, conference participation and course material,
Registration fees at both universities

Funding

The limited numbers of scholarship for covering living expenses are provided by:
• The Mexican national Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT): partial scholarship
• The German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD): full scholarship

There is no additional application required to apply for the scholarships. Acceptance to the master’s program does not guarantee a scholarship.

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The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. Read more
The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. It should be of interest to a wide range of individuals concerned both academically and professionally with contemporary security issues, challenges and problems. The course is taught by academics specialist in their field and who contribute to current legal and policy debates. It has been set up in such a way as to allow a flexible and contextual approach to the topics discussed.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teachings and Learning is predominantly through weekly synchronous and asynchronous online workshops. The learning ethos is to draw on the range and experience of our diverse student cohort

Our extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from within and outside the jurisdiction.

Modules are assessed by coursework which comprises of a 1000 word essay plan which feeds into a 3000 word essay. This method of assessment has proved very popular with students as it provides useful feedback for their final submissions.

The course is supported by the University’s web-based Blackboard facility with ICT an integral part of the programme. The University subscribes to extensive electronic legal data bases and journals while all students are registered users of UCLan’s network with a dedicated network space accessible remotely.

GRADUATE CAREERS

As well as international career prospects, this LLM also offers excellent domestic career prospects such as central and local governments; social work, probation, youth and community work; and the police, prison and immigration services. Security litigation is also a growing area of legal practice.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This LLM will introduce students to the substantive doctrine, values and policies of international criminal law by looking at different academic perspectives on international criminal law (ICL) and national, regional and international security as well as the nature, sources and rationale for ICL. Consideration will be given to the institutions of ICL: UN, ICJ, ICTY, ICTR and ICC as well as the history and development of the ICC (International Criminal Court). The 1998 Rome Statute, ICC Jurisdiction, internal organisation, and the first completed trials will be covered and students will be asked to critique the ICC using constitutional and political arguments for and against its creation and maintenance. Core offences under ICL such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression and torture will be examined alongside the defences to ICL charges. There will be a detailed case study of the legal prohibition of incitement to genocide and associated racism demonstrating the challenges to regional and international security.

Transnational police and security cooperation such as Interpol, Europol and Eurojust will be considered as well as the transnational legal dimensions to “national security” including within the context of the European and international human rights law and policy.

Students will develop an understanding of how international law functions in the maintenance of maritime security and peaceful uses of the oceans. The general legal framework, the UN Law of the Sea Convention and IMO Regulations will all be considered. Piracy and maritime terrorism and the freedom of the seas and navigational rights will be examined as well as the proliferation of security initiatives, maritime interdiction and maritime boundary disputes.

Terrorism has been a significant challenge to international peace and security for many years: especially since the advent of Islamist terror groups such as Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the late 1990s, culminating in the “9/11” atrocities of 2001. The train bombings in Madrid in 2004 and in London in 2005 and more recently the rise of Islamist terror groups in the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa serve only to remind us of the serious threat terrorism poses to international security.

This LLM examines incidents of international terrorism and the obligations states have to protect themselves from acts and threats of terrorism. Transnational legal responses to terrorism will also be considered together with an assessment of the rights of individuals suspected of terrorism in the pursuit of protecting human security.

The programme will provide students with expertise, analytical and reflective skills. The programme aims to provide a learning experience that will enable students to develop their academic ability, to further develop their careers and to assist them in making a positive contribution to the wider, global and national community.

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