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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?. Read more
In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?

On our MA Sociolinguistics, you address questions like these through exploration of the stylistic, cognitive and functional aspects of language variation and change. We familiarise you with the foundations of contemporary sociolinguistics, including:
-Language variation and change
-Ethnography of speaking
-Multilingualism
-Discourse

We additionally offer modules in some of the most prominent sub-disciplines in linguistics such as variation theory, socio-pragmatics, conversation analysis, language contact, language and gender, and language rights.

You also gain first-hand experience of interview, questionnaire and observation data and learn quantitative and qualitative methodologies for coding and analysing sociolinguistic interview and questionnaire data.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Sociocultural Linguistics
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Our MRes Psychology research-focused course will give you in-depth theoretical understanding, knowledge and practical experience of key research paradigms, research designs and statistical techniques used in psychology and, more broadly, in the social sciences. Read more

Our MRes Psychology research-focused course will give you in-depth theoretical understanding, knowledge and practical experience of key research paradigms, research designs and statistical techniques used in psychology and, more broadly, in the social sciences.

You will receive extensive training in:

  • quantitative methods: path analysis, hierarchical regression analysis, multi-level modelling, signal detection analysis and non-linear regression models;
  • qualitative methods: focus groups, interviewing skills, IPA, thematic analysis, grounded theory, discourse analysis and conversation analysis. 

You will also receive training in meta-analytical techniques, experience sampling, physiological recording methods, eye-tracking and working with children.

Our MRes focuses on various forms of dissemination activity including:

  • writing academic papers;
  • preparing posters;
  • writing summaries;
  • data presentation;
  • collaborating and communicating with stakeholders (eg patients, health professionals, teachers, NHS managers);
  • writing and communicating with the public and professional psychologists.

You will also develop your critical thinking skills. We encourage you to question the evidence base of many assertions made in the media.

We will train you in the ability to take published articles in a number of domains of psychology and critically analyse components such as theoretical assumptions, methodologies used, data analysis (both qualitative and quantitative) and interpretation of the data. We will point you to wider domains of critical thinking in the realm of science.

This MRes provides one-year, master's-level postgraduate training that constitutes the first year of ESRC 1+3 postgraduate PhD studentships awarded through the ESRC Northwest Doctoral Training College for full-time, part-time and CASE students.

Teaching and learning

Course units are taught using a combination of lecture-seminars, workshops, problem-based learning exercises, worked examples, self-paced online training, student presentations and independent supervised study.

You are required to attend weekly research seminars given by visiting speakers throughout the year, as well as research and career management skills courses, a variety of which are provided by the University's careers service. This training will equip you with both academic and transferable skills, including oral and written communication, time management and information management skills.

You will also have the opportunity to attend a teaching assistant/demonstrators course and language courses provided by the University's Language Centre.

Key academic staff

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is by examination, continuous assessment in the form of essays, practical reports and exercises, and a dissertation.

Course unit details

Full-time MRes students take six taught course units. Full-time PGDip students take the same six course units, but no dissertation.

Typical taught compulsory course units include:

  • Research skills and a research dissertation
  • Advance Statistics Workshops (eg path analysis, meta-analysis)
  • Using Advanced Statistics in Psychology (eg linear and non-linear regression)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (eg Grounded theory, discourse analysis)
  • Practical Issues in Psychological Research (eg working with children, RCTs)
  • Advanced General Methods in Psychology (eg experience sampling, eye-tracking).

You will work collaboratively with your supervisor(s) to produce a high quality dissertation using qualitative, quantitative or mixed research methods. Dissertation work is supported by taught sessions including topics such as literature searching, designing a programme of research and critical thinking skills.

Career opportunities

Our course is designed primarily for students wishing to pursue research careers in psychology. It is also likely to be attractive if you wish to extend your training, with an emphasis on research methods, and if you work in social or health services, or in marketing and cognate disciplines.

Past careers and destinations of our MRes students have included:

  • PhD student
  • Graduate Market Researcher
  • Psychology Assistant
  • Independent Mental Health Advocate
  • Research Assistant
  • NHS Financial Management Graduate Scheme
  • Clinical Psychology Doctorate
  • Technical Analyst at NICE
  • Project Manager in Medical Electronics
  • Graduate Researcher.


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The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. Read more
The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. This necessitates a more sophisticated environmental manager who can interpret legislative and audit requirements and deliver them in a manner conducive to continued economic development, whilst recognising the market trends. The aim of this programme is to develop skills in the delivery of economic activities related to environment, green technology and sustainability. The programme includes highly topical case studies from across these sectors reflecting changing strategies and alternative approaches. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Environment, Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.
Testimonials

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Business Planning for the Green Economy: This module explores the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan which incorporates environmental planning and management. It takes the student through the actual process of developing a business plan and its different components, the market and sustainability. Specific topics include:

Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial role in relation to the initiation and development of a sustainable business
Key environmental factors of business development
The differences between the entrepreneur and the environmental manager, and the problems faced by small growth firms in sustainable growth.
The importance and complexity of entrepreneurship and environmentalism within a large firm environment

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Strategic Environmental Management: This module is designed to provide a an understanding of the principles of sustainable development, environmental legislation, environmental auditing and assesment, and green technological development. Specific topics include:

Sustainable development
Environmental legislation
Environmental auditing
Environmental assessment
Corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investment
Life cycle analysis

Green Technology: This module reviews the environmental consequences of economic activities, including energy generation, waste management, food and water supply, consumer goods. It then goes on to consider recent policy initiatives and drivers and examines key green technologies. Specific topics include:

Development and deployment of green technologies
Environment impacts of energy generation
Green technology policies and initiatives
Green technologies - commerce, ideas and concepts
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for green technologies

Part 2:

For MBA Environmental Management, you must complete Part 2 by undertaking a relevant dissertation.

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Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. Read more
Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. The aim of the programme is to provide graduates with a range of management knowledge and skills, together with a thorough foundation in information management, information technology, and its commercial applications. The programme includes topical case studies, and reflects contemporary developments within the sector. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Web Technologies: This module provides an understanding of the basic technologies and structures for developing web applications, including internet resource creation, search techniques and programming languages for creating web content. You will create and use multimedia content in web applications, and gain familiarity with technologies for creating secure web applications. Specific topics include:

Internet concepts; networks; ISO 7 layer model; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; ftp; telnet; HTTP
WWW concepts; Internet resources; URI, and URI resolution, URL, URN; relation to XML namespaces; search engines; search algorithms; search engine optimisation
JavaScript; PHP; CSS; programming tools and environments
Multimedia; WWW support for multimedia; file compression
Internet Security; Cryptography; standards for the Internet; public key systems; signatures; authentication; trust management; electronic cash; security issues; firewalls
Web programming; HTML; XML; form input; CGI scripting; Perl programming

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Databases: This module shows how to design a database and intelligently query a database using SQL; and provides an introductory level of understanding in database systems. A mini project is carried out towards the end of the module. This project allows you to complete the entire development process, from informal user requirements, to ER/EER modelling, transformation into relations, normalisation, and finally to the SQL commands to create and query the database. Specific topics include:

Characteristics of a relational database
ER/EER modelling of simple applications
Relational model and relational algebra
Transformation of an ER/EER model into a relational database
Normalisation techniques
Uses of SQL language to create and query a database

Technologies for Internet Systems: This module introduces technologies and tools for Internet Systems and e-commerce systems. Technologies and structures for developing web applications are examined. Technical issues for implementing an e-system, and commonly-available technology components, are covered. You will implement a practical web based e-commerce system using relevant technologies, taking into account current market implementation. Specific topics include:

e-commerce ideas and concepts
Internet concepts; networks; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; telnet; HTTP
Architectures and technologies, e-payment, e-commerce software and hardware, e-security, auctions
Design and implementation: HTML, XML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM, SVG
Research awareness: agent-based e-commerce; web services; grid computing; virtual organisations

Information Systems: This module examines the major types and components of Information Systems, their functions, benefits and limitations. The theoretical underpinnings of Information Systems are analysed. You will study the main business and personal uses of Information Systems, and how such systems are developed, procured and deployed. Specific topics include:

Understanding the nature of organisations and the people within them, and their use of information for strategic business purposes
The influence of human and organisational factors on the successful introduction of information systems
Methods and techniques involved in project and programme management
The importance of business processes and techniques for process modelling

Part 2:

For MBA Information Management, you MUST:

Complete two of the following Applied Business Projects: Business Planning; e-Business and Chain Value; Human Resource Management; International Business; Operations Management; Investment and Private Banking.
Write a Computing project, Software Hut. Software Hut is a project in which students (in groups) analyse, design and implement a software product for an organisation.

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The Cross-Cultural Communication and Applied Linguistics MA provides theoretical, research and practical training in areas of international and intercultural communication. Read more
The Cross-Cultural Communication and Applied Linguistics MA provides theoretical, research and practical training in areas of international and intercultural communication. It also provides training on the analysis of language in use, in a variety of settings and on the teaching and learning of English as a second language.

The Applied Linguistics Pathway is a specialism on the Cross-Cultural Communication MA. It is designed for students who wish to combine the study of cross-cultural communication (CCC) with the study of language as it is used in a wide range of settings. If you are interested in gaining knowledge and expertise in the new approaches and techniques for teaching English as a second or foreign language you would also benefit from this course.

This specialist pathway is delivered by academic staff in applied linguistics and communication within the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences. It offers a wide range of optional modules in the areas of applied linguistics and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

You will have the opportunity to develop:
-An understanding of the theories, principles, concepts and methodologies in applied linguistics and TESOL
-A critical awareness of key issues or debates concerning teaching and learning English as a second/foreign language
-In-depth knowledge of methodologies and techniques applicable to research in areas of applied linguistics and TESOL, including corpus linguistics, multimodal analysis, discourse analysis and conversation analysis.

The applied linguistics academic staff have teaching and research expertise in:
-Second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis
-Classroom interaction
-Multimodal interaction
-Teaching and learning English through media and technology
-Teacher development

If you are interested in a career in language teaching, but have little or no previous teaching experience, this pathway offers the option of introductory modules in TESOL. These provide a thorough grounding in the practical skills and knowledge for language teaching and learning.

Work experience

You are encouraged to apply your research interests to real world case studies, particularly of international organisations or workplaces with which you have a connection.

For example, your empirical project submitted in research file three can be in connection with voluntary work (for a charity or NGO) or an internship, arranged over the summer towards the end of the course.

As a part time student you can conduct a research project of relevance to your employer and/or industry.

Pathway

The Cross-Cultural Communication MA has six specialist pathways:
-Applied Linguistics
-Education
-International Management
-International Marketing
-Media
-International Relations

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

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Why study at Roehampton. There is a strong emphasis on the application of linguistic knowledge in the classroom. A flexible choice of modules allows you to specialise in areas that interest you. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • There is a strong emphasis on the application of linguistic knowledge in the classroom.
  • A flexible choice of modules allows you to specialise in areas that interest you.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This course is designed to help you develop the skills and experience you need for a successful career in English teaching.

There is a demand throughout the world for graduates with qualifications and expertise in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL). Our MA in TESOL is designed for students who are intending to have a career in English teaching. It will also be of interest to those who are already teachers of English and would like to increase their professional expertise by advancing their analytical knowledge of English and up-to-date teaching methods.

On the programme you will gain an in depth understanding of the structure of language at different levels of analysis and the relationship between language and use. You will explore how people learn languages, how English can be taught and gain an excellent understanding of the assessment and testing which those you will be teaching will be preparing for. 

You will research, discuss and evaluate a range of perspectives on the language teaching curriculum, and its delivery, with which to make informed decisions with regard to policy and practice. You will also have opportunity to study a range of optional modules and undertake a dissertation in an area that is of particular interest to you and suits your career plans.

As an Applied Linguistics and TESOL student you will become a member of Centre for Research in English Language and Linguistics (CRELL), a thriving forum for researchers with theoretical insight and varying interests such as politics and functionality of language.

Content

In your first semester, you will be introduced to the essential syntactic and morphological patterns of English. You will investigate the place of formal grammar in the description and teaching of language and study a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of syntax and morphology and apply these to learning challenges in future TESOL contexts.

In your second semester, you will explore the theories of learning a second language and look critically at the nature of discourse as the central feature of human interaction. You will also gain a solid foundation in approaches such as conversation analysis and pragmatics; narrative analysis; critical discourse analysis and genre analysis.

You will take the year-long module ‘Research Methods’, where you will be introduced to different methodological approaches employed in sociolinguistic and applied linguistic research and gain an excellent understanding of techniques such as participant-observation, eliciting, recording and storing natural speech data.

A range of optional modules are also currently available, such as ‘Principles and Practice in Language Teaching’, where you will explore the central concerns of the language learning curriculum. In ‘Language Testing’ you will gain an in depth understanding of, and be able to evaluate, the assessments which those learning English will be preparing for. You will also undertake a dissertation, where you will have the opportunity to explore the topic that suits your interests.

Modules

Some of the modules we currently offer include:

  • Theories of Second Language Learning
  • Syntax and Morphology for Language Teaching
  • Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching
  • Research Methods
  • Principles and Practice in Language Teaching
  • Language Testing
  • Dissertation

Career options

There are excellent opportunities around the world for teachers with an MA in TESOL. Related career possibilities include policy adviser, trainer of trainers, and designer of teaching materials. Applied linguistics is a very useful basis for a range of careers in publishing, editing and communication.

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Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education. Read more
Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education.

Our MA is designed for people who want to know more about how foreign or second languages (particularly English) are learned, and how different kinds of classroom practice might affect proficiency. You explore different approaches to understanding language and language acquisition, and the methods that can be used to investigate language learning and teaching. You select a mixture of modules on language learning and its application to classroom practices.

You can choose areas of special study from a wide range of options, including:
-Teaching speaking and listening skills to language learners
-Psychological factors in second language learning
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Age and bilingual development

You'll also be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Applied Linguistics
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Language Learning
-Research Methods I
-Research Methods II
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Study the nuts and bolts of language. sound systems, word structure, sentence structure, and how meaning is conveyed. Learn about the different theories that have been proposed to account for human linguistic ability. Read more
Study the nuts and bolts of language: sound systems, word structure, sentence structure, and how meaning is conveyed. Learn about the different theories that have been proposed to account for human linguistic ability. In this degree you will learn what human languages share, and where they differ.

Our course will interest you if you want a formal and empirical grounding in all core areas of linguistics, and are keen to evaluate the major theoretical approaches in these disciplines.

You study topics including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Syntactic theory
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Phonetics

Our optional modules are in the related fields of applied linguistics, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World University Rankings 2016 for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Syntactic Theory I
-Advanced Phonology
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Syntactic Theory II
-Semantics
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism. Read more
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism.

You build a programme best-suited to your individual needs. This course is ideal if you need to study on a part-time basis and wish to fit your course choices in with your existing commitments, as you can also study on an accumulation basis over a period of up to five years.

The optional modules you choose come from a broad list including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Syntax

You also gain a basic familiarity with some common research methodologies and paradigms used in linguistics. You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. This takes place between April and September.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. Read more
Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. You must have a draft research proposal at your application stage, and a supervisor is assigned to you to guide your choice of modules and work on your dissertation.

On this course, you gain familiarity with contemporary work in sociolinguistics and related fields such as conversation analysis, and acquire the theoretical and practical skills to pursue original research.

You cover topics including:
-Quantitative and qualitative methodologies for analysing sociolinguistic data
-Interview, questionnaire and observation data
-Sociocultural factors in language use
-Variationist sociolinguistic theory

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned (REF 2014). Their books dominate the reading lists at other universities. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, and Christina Gkonou focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
Meet other language enthusiasts through our student-run Linguistics Society
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

On our course you develop key employability skills including thinking analytically, research design, data collection using quantitative and qualitative methods, data analysis and essay writing. Our course can lead to a career in areas such as academia, secondary school teaching, forensics, publishing, administration, and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MRes Analysing Language Use
-Dissertation (Research)
-CA I - Conversation and Social Interaction
-Language and Sex
-Pragmatics: Discourse and Rhetoric
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)

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Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Read more
Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Our MA Psycholinguistics provides you with a thorough grounding in research from the perspective of linguistics on human language processing, the representation of language in the brain, and first and second language acquisition.

You cover the processing and acquisition of sounds, words and sentences, look at different kinds of language disorders, and investigate the relevance of data from human language processing to our understanding of the nature of language. You also learn how to design and conduct experiments, and analyse the results from them.

Our researchers are using experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders. We combine a wide range of methodologies: corpora, infant behavioural studies at the babylab, response time and eye movement measures for adults

You can choose areas of special study including:
-How words are represented and accessed in the mind
-How speakers understand sentences in real time
-Music, language and the brain
-Children’s English

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our MA Psycholinguistics can lead to further research in the form of a PhD, or can lead you to a career in areas such as speech therapy, teaching, publishing, journalism, administration and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Several of our MA Psycholinguistics graduates have taken up academic posts at top universities including the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the Universities of Tübingen, Hamburg, Kobe, and Thessaloniki.

Example structure

-Phonological Development
-Sentence Processing
-Experimental Design and Analysis
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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This course is designed to bring your basic knowledge of the description of English language to a high level of competence. It covers a range of topics reflecting staff expertise, including conversation analysis, stylistics, critical discourse analysis and pragmatics. Read more
This course is designed to bring your basic knowledge of the description of English language to a high level of competence.

It covers a range of topics reflecting staff expertise, including conversation analysis, stylistics, critical discourse analysis and pragmatics. You will be given the chance to engage with cutting-edge research in your area.

Any or all of the modules on this course can be taken via the distance learning option, which offers flexibility that will be of particular appeal to those who have special needs of various kinds.

There is an emphasis on the practical analysis of language in use, including spoken and written language, and literary or non-literary texts.

Your tutors are active in their own specialist areas and recognised by the Higher Education Academy.* You can be confident that your studies are led by experts with flair and enthusiasm, renowned nationally and internationally for their excellence in teaching and research. As leading researchers in their fields of expertise, your tutors are published authors, award-winners and acclaimed thinkers. Indeed, 75% of work submitted for the most recent Research Assessment Exercise was said to be 'internationally significant' and 'world leading'. (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

We have a vibrant research community of both national and international students. We run regular research seminars led by our staff, visiting guest speakers, and our own students. We also organise and host conferences which reflect the research interests of our academic staff.

Our department is home to the internationally-recognised Stylistics Research Centre and our academic staff hold official positions in the Poetics and Linguistics Association , the world's leading organisation for the study of linguistics.

Our department is also home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Intercultural Politeness Research, which hosts internationally-reputed experts and which operates with the support of the Linguistics Politeness Research Group.

permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching

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About the course. You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose. Read more

About the course

You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose.

There are four pathways to choose from: Literary Linguistics, Social and Historical Approaches, Structural and Theoretical Linguistics, and Modern Languages (co-run with the School of Modern Languages and Cultures). You can follow one exclusively or combine the four.

  • The Literary Linguistics pathway examines a range of approaches to literary linguistic study including cognitive poetics, corpus stylistics and narratology
  • Social and Historical Approaches investigates complex real-world language problems in different social and historical contexts
  • Structural and Theoretical Linguistics explores the foundational mental structures and processes underlying language
  • Modern Languages offers students the opportunity to study similar aspects of Slavic, Germanic and/or Romance languages

As your understanding of theory develops, you’ll learn how to analyse language and how to carry out research projects. If you choose a work placement, you might also develop skills in marketing, archiving, teaching or publishing.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.

Core module

Research Methods

Examples of optional modules

  • Linguistics in Context
  • Linguistics in Practice
  • Research Practice
  • Literary Language: narrative and cognition
  • Literary Language: history and culture
  • Work Placement with Research Project

Teaching and assessment

The MA offers world-leading expertise in all areas of English language and linguistics, and is therefore capable of offering the best possible support for students’ interests on any topic. You’ll benefit from our expertise in many fields, from language variation and change, psycholinguistics and syntax to conversation analysis, dialectology and the language–literature interface. Our enthusiastic staff publish internationally. Within the School of English, we hold weekly research seminars which give you the chance to hear about the latest developments.

You’ll be taught through seminars and workshops. There are also work placement opportunities in schools, museums, libraries or local businesses. Assessment varies by module, but includes essays and presentations.



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The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more

The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.

All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory): 

  • Grammatical Theory
  • Semantics and Pragmatics
  • Phonetics and Phonology

The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

If you wish to discover more about the academic staff in the department, please visit:http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/about/people/staff-directory/linguistics-english-language-staff/

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed at the end of the semester during which they are offered. All taught course units except Introduction to Grammatical Theory and Phonetics and Phonology are assessed by examined coursework only. All course units include formative assessments to ensure interim feedback during the semester.

Deadlines for assessments are stated in the MA in Linguistics and English Language 2016-2017 Programme Handbook .

Course unit details

The Linguistics MA consists of the following elements:

  • At least two of the following compulsory core course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory (15 credits), Phonetics and Phonology (15 credits), Semantics and Pragmatics (15 credits)
  • Research Methods I and II (2 x 15 credits)
  • Optional course units (60 credits altogether)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Alternatives to the compulsory course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory and/or Phonetics and Phonology may be chosen if students can provide evidence of having covered comparable material in their undergraduate degree; in borderline cases, students may be asked to take a proficiency test in Welcome Week.

The optional course units can be selected to follow specialised pathways, which include Sociolinguistics, Phonetics and Phonology, Syntax and Semantics, Typology, and Romani Linguistics. One or two course units may take the form of Directed Reading units, which are individual or small group seminars about set readings on a particular topic. These are available after consultation with an appropriated member of staff and the PGT Officer. One or two course units may also be taken from a list of MA course units available in other subject areas within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, or from a list of enhanced Level-3 undergraduate course units in Linguistics and English Language, which supplement the MA specific course units on offer.

For details of postgraduate course units currently on offer, please refer to the Programme Handbook.

Facilities

All postgraduate students on this programme can make use of the purpose-designed Centre for Graduate Studies within the Ellen Wilkinson Building. The Centre opened in 2014 and provides state-of-the-art facilities for postgraduate study. These include 30 computers, LaserJet printers, `hot-desk' facilities for around 50 students (including workstation facilities for students with disabilities), and 132 secure lockers. The Centre is a meeting place for postgraduate taught and postgraduate research students, and also has several areas to relax, socialise and network.

In addition to the Centre for Graduate Studies, the University has five major computer clusters, together with many smaller clusters. In total there are more than 10,000 PCs and workstations across the campus. All provide access to standard office software as well as specialist programs, and all are connected to the campus network and internet. Every student is registered for email, file storage and internet access. If more demanding computer access is required, our specialist computing division Manchester Computing can provide high-end and specialist computing services.

The University Library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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