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This is an intensive interdisciplinary programme, designed to explore issues such as child law and how it is implemented through policy and practice, and the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child for child welfare, disability, education, family studies, juvenile justice, social policy and social work. Read more

Programme description

This is an intensive interdisciplinary programme, designed to explore issues such as child law and how it is implemented through policy and practice, and the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child for child welfare, disability, education, family studies, juvenile justice, social policy and social work.

This programme responds to the increasing importance of the study of childhood in disciplines as widespread as philosophy, sociology and geography. It offers an opportunity to develop skills in research and consultation with children and young people.

You’ll examine the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and gain knowledge and analytical perspectives on particular areas of legislation, policy, theory and practice that affect children. The programme benefits from the childhood studies expertise of academic staff across the University.

Programme structure

Teaching combines lectures, seminars and tutorials, plus a combination of essays and assessed coursework. You will complete three compulsory courses and three option courses followed by an independently researched dissertation.

Career opportunities

This qualification serves both as a conversion course if you wish to pursue careers working with children or children’s issues, and as a career development opportunity if you already have experience in these fields.

Graduates have gone on to a variety of posts, such as employment with national and international non-governmental organisations, research posts and PhD study, and national and local government positions.

You will develop a range of transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.

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Childhood is accorded a special status under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and child welfare forms a policy focus for states across the globe. Read more
Childhood is accorded a special status under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and child welfare forms a policy focus for states across the globe. Within the UK, child health and social care has received considerable support under the government's modernising agenda leading to an increase in childcare provision, employment opportunities and a growing evidence and academic knowledge base. The School of Social Work has been active in developments in child care practice and research and has developed a strong child care research group which has contributed to our success in establishing a research profile of national and international significance. The school is home to the Centre for Childhood and Youth research [‘TheCentre’] led by Professors Nigel Thomas and Andy Bilson and is an active member of the Making Research Count Network.

The course takes a research-applied approach to examining contemporary practice and service provision and also offers opportunities to engage in research and theoretical work. It is made up of three parts:

Core childcare modules which critically examine conventional developmental approaches and more recent research on contemporary childhoods; contemporary national and international research, policy and practice concerning children's safety and protection; the ways in which relevant legislation and guidance including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child [UNCRC]; Children Acts, 1989 and 2004, Every Child Matters and the Human Rights Act are currently being applied in the UK and the part law plays in constructing appropriate roles for children.

Further core modules provide for knowledge and skills development in Research Methods, and the critical exploration of the contemporary contexts of service developments in children's services.

A research based dissertation.

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The International Community increasingly faces the task of addressing a plethora of environmental challenges. Read more
The International Community increasingly faces the task of addressing a plethora of environmental challenges. The LLM Environmental law provides an insight into the international legal response to these various challenges which include global warming, ozone layer depletion, the over-exploitation by mankind of wildlife species and the destruction of vital habitat sites.

Many environmental problems require an international response. This course aims to provide the student with an insight into international environmental law with a focus on the general themes and principles in this area, the law relating to the protection of biodiversity, and that which endeavours to prevent or at least minimise the impact of transfrontier pollution.

The modules taught on this course cover a wide range of issues of contemporary relevance. The underlying purpose is to provide a solid grounding in the basic principles of European Community and international environmental law as applied in a particular context.

How has international environmental law evolved historically? Who are the main actors in the field? What key principles underpin regulation? What do we mean by the pursuit of “sustainable development”? How is the law in this area enforced? Treaty regimes explored include those relating to acid deposition, climate change, ozone layer depletion, nuclear contamination and freshwater pollution. In addition, an insight will be given to the various treaty regimes that seek to address the continuing pressures on the world’s biodiversity. For example, how is commercial whaling now regulated? What system is in place to regulate trade in endangered species? What of the protection of wetlands, Antarctica, world heritage and of migratory species?

Modern techniques of environmental regulation are also addressed, such as the funding mechanisms for international environmental treaties (e.g. Biodiversity Convention, Ozone Layer Convention) and the procedural requirement for environmental impact assessment of certain activities under international and European Community law.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading and most exciting LLM programmes available.

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Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Read more
Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Our research specialisms include American studies and the literary periods Early Modern, Victorian, and Modern and Contemporary.

Additional areas of expertise include linguistics, Irish studies, drama, and the history of the book. We guarantee all students that each module will include components relating to our stated research specialisms.

Alongside our flagship ‘Research Mentoring’ module—where students work under the mentorship of a range of literary experts, studying the research they are currently undertaking – this allows students to follow a specific specialism through their MA.

Study areas include resources for advanced research, research mentorship, icons and iconoclasts, boundaries and transgressions, texts and technology, and a dissertation.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

Programme modules

This is not a conclusive but typical structure of the programme.

Programme modules:
Semester 1

- Icons and Iconoclasts
This module considers issues in literary history, particularly those of canonisation, the politics of reputation, fashion, and posterity, and the processes by which certain writers and texts become culturally embedded and certain others do not. It also examines ideas of formal and generic convention and reception history. In seminars, students will look at either a single text (which could be ‘iconic’ and canonical, ‘iconoclastic’ and unassimilated by cultural institutions such as universities, or a text which is deemed canonical despite its apparent rejection of convention, respectability, etc., e.g. Ulysses), or pit an ‘iconic’ and an ‘iconoclastic’ text against each other. The module will be driven by authors and texts rather than by overarching theoretical considerations. For example, one could read an H.G. Wells scientific romance' such as The Time Machine (1895) against a less well-known example of Victorian or Edwardian science fiction, or pit a familiar early modern drama alongside one which is less often studied or performed. The course will fashion a series of dialogues between writers, texts, history and audiences. These dialogues will range across historical eras appropriate to the research interests of staff teaching on the module, so coverage may vary from one year to another.

- Resources for Advanced Research
The module aims to introduce students to a range of different research methods; develop their research skills to Master’s level; and enhance their library skills. It also aims to introduce them to different ways of engaging in research cultures appropriate to the focus of their studies; enable them to develop a research profile; and gain skills in the presentation of their research. The module prepares students for the Dissertation module and aims to provide them with skills useful for disseminating the results of their dissertation after they graduate.

- Research Mentorship
From a list of available faculty, students choose four staff members (mentors) to work with in three-week blocks throughout the semester. They study what the staff member is currently researching, giving them a unique insight into current research as it happens. The process is one of mentorship and academic shadowing. The reading is likely to be a mixture of primary and secondary texts, and potentially an introduction to specific research questions and methodologies. Staff will be offered in groups, e.g. for every three weeks, there should be between three to five members of staff to choose from and, as far as possible, there will be a spread of expertise so that students can follow an area of faculty research specialism as much as possible. This may include the early-modern, Victorian, or Modern and Contemporary literary periods, American studies, or Irish Studies.

Semester 2:
- Boundaries and Transgressions
This module aims to identify and explore forms of transgression in a wide range of written texts from the early modern period to the present. Working with members of staff with a variety of research specialisms, students will assess what is at stake – aesthetically, culturally and ideologically – in boundary-crossings of very diverse kinds. ‘Boundaries and Transgressions’ will be issue-led, analysing some of the conceptual, temporal and spatial crossings performed by literary texts. This module offers students an exciting opportunity to consider mutations in literary transgression during some four hundred years. Cultural boundaries will appear as violated rather than safely policed (as when gender divides break down, or the body and the mind mingle promiscuously, or the human is entangled with – not shielded from – the animal). Elsewhere, the module will explore texts that cross periods (writings in which, for example, Victorianism and modernism interweave) or range across plural geographies (American literature, say, that refuses a posture of national autonomy and traverses the Atlantic or the Pacific).

- Texts and Technologies
This module focuses upon how texts and technologies have developed in intertwined manners. As technology changes, so can texts, their modes of distribution, their social and cultural significance and influence, and their manner of being collected, stored, and accessed. The module seeks to explore how texts and technology have influenced each other in different historical periods; to examine the response to communication technology in literary and theoretical texts; and to trace fundamental changes in literature and literary research brought about by radical technological developments such as the printing press, the internet, digital analysis, and digital data storage. How do changes in technology alter the way we experience texts and how we use them?

Summer
- Dissertation
The module enables students to initiate, devise, develop and successfully complete a research-based dissertation, and to further their knowledge and practical experience of research methods and techniques in English Studies. Students will identify an area of study that they would like to develop further. The module will consist of independent research, but students will meet with, and receive oral and written feedback from, an individual supervisor. The supervisor will give guidance on the subject matter, focus, structure and research area of the dissertation. Between Easter and the end of semester they can submit up to 5,000 words in draft form for comment and discuss the development of their chapters with their supervisors. Students will then work independently after the end of the semester to produce a 15,000 word dissertation.

Careers and further study

This programme meets the needs of students seeking to qualify for entry to a research degree, teachers of literature and those wishing to update their knowledge or develop their own research skills.

Why choose Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough?

The School of Arts, English and Drama is renowned as one of the world’s top places for studying the visual, literary and performing arts, offering outstanding opportunities across its wide remit. Each course is designed to inspire talented individuals with the drive and determination to succeed.

We provide many exciting ways to enhance skills, including research-led teaching by recognised international scholars, access to multi-million pound facilities, contact with prominent industry links, and superb entrepreneurial support.

A unique range of post-graduate taught programmes and research opportunities encompass art, design, history, theory, performance, postmedieval literature, linguistics studies.

We offer a unique range of postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities which encompasses art, design, theory, performance by practice, post-medieval literature, creative writing, linguistics and theatre

- Facilities
Our students have full access to our state-of-the-art facilities, which offer a tantalising number of creative possibilities. They provide industry standard outputs, and you will receive an unparalleled level of professional training in using them.

- Career Prospects
Over 92% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Our students develop excellent transferable skills because of the range of topics studied on our courses and the diversity of teaching and learning methods we use.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

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The specialist LLM in European Union (EU) Law offers a thorough grounding in the law of the European Union across many commercial disciplines as well as the critically important European Convention on Human Rights. Read more
The specialist LLM in European Union (EU) Law offers a thorough grounding in the law of the European Union across many commercial disciplines as well as the critically important European Convention on Human Rights.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in European Union law will be of significant advantage to those who seek to work in professional, public and commercial sectors involving EU law rules and practices. As the influence of the European Union in international governance continues to grow, this specialism should also attract international students seeking to develop a career in research and policy at a global level.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in European Union Law provides you with the knowledge, skills and insight required for the practice and application of European Union (EU) law. The City Law School is one of very few Higher Education institutions in the UK offering as broad a range of electives in European Union related legal subjects.

This exciting course will equip you with the fundamentals of European Union law including free movement rules within the EU, EU business regulation, EU public law, EU procedural law, and EU Competition law. Other less common areas, including human rights would also be investigated in the key electives. You will have the opportunity to research novel and developing areas of EU law under the guidance of expert EU law tutors.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the Institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle.

Assessment

Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-Air and Space Law
-European Integration: Law, Politics, Institutions
-Human Rights in the EU
-EU Litigation
-Substantive EU Competition Law
-European Business Regulation I: Foundations, Goods, Workers, Citizenship
-European Business Regulation II: Establishment, Services, Capital, Harmonisation
-Regulation of Online Entertainment

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

Graduates with an LLM in European Union Law will be very well-placed to pursue a legal career, which requires in-depth knowledge of European Union law and/or the European Convention on Human Rights.

Many of our graduates enter the legal profession, either in the UK as solicitors or barristers, or in overseas jurisdictions; others find employment in the public sector or in non-governmental agencies and organisations. This course is also particularly helpful for students who wish to work as officials at the European Union or the Council of Europe. The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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Humber’s Event Management graduate certificate program is one of the most comprehensive event management programs available. Read more
Humber’s Event Management graduate certificate program is one of the most comprehensive event management programs available. You will learn to design, develop, co-ordinate and manage a broad range of events from corporate meeting planning, film, documentary and music festivals, not-for-profit experiential events and galas, brand experience consumer events and trade shows, to name a few. Additionally, you will gain transferable, practical knowledge and skills in management practices such as planning, design, marketing, human resource and volunteer management, sponsorship, catering management, budgeting, risk management, and event evaluation. Faculty are chosen for their expertise and experience in the event management field, and many continue to work in the industry.

Modules

Semester 1
• BEMP 5001: Event Planning
• BEMP 5002: Event Production
• BEMP 5003: Event Financial Management
• BEMP 5004: Event Marketing
• BEMP 5006: Sales and Sponsorship
• BISM 5001: Computer Skills for Event Managers
• WORK 5005: Career Development and Pre-Placement Seminar

Semester 2
• BEMP 5000: The Event Industry
• BEMP 5007: Business Law for Event Management
• BEMP 5008: Human Resources and Volunteer Management
• BEMP 5009: Catering Management
• BEMP 5100: Event Project
• WORK 5120: Event Management Field Placement
• WORK 5570: Industry Seminar

Work Placement

Gain hands-on experience in the industry with a 160-hour (minimum) work placement that will give you the opportunity to apply in a real business what you have learned in the classroom. Students initiate the placement with the aid of faculty, targeting companies in the Greater Toronto Area. Placements can be completed on a part-time basis throughout the academic year or full time once classes finish.

Your Career

The event industry is a rapidly growing segment of virtually every sector of society. Events are part of public, not-for-profit, charitable, private and corporate sectors. The events industry is used to stimulate economies, increase tourism, develop community awareness, increase public involvement, enhance education, improve quality of life, generate revenue and market products. Professional event managers, working with stakeholders, are required to plan, organize, staff, direct, co-ordinate and evaluate events that meet client needs.

Potential areas of employment available to qualified graduates include tourism and economic development; arts and culture; wedding planning; sports and recreation; meeting and convention planning; business associations; entertainment; municipal, provincial or federal governments; not-for-profit and charitable organizations; trade shows and expositions; hospitality and travel; community organizations; and convention centres. Entry-level positions include event co-ordinator, marketing assistant, special events organizer, promotion co-ordinator, account representative, trade show planner, conference co-ordinator and corporate meeting planner.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. Read more
International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. It encompasses issues relating to the creation of legal obligations, recognition of states, the role of international organisations, liability for international crimes and dispute settlement, as well as questions such as the use of force, environmental protection, human rights and regulation of international trade and investment.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, enabling students to tailor the course to their areas of particular interest to facilitate their career aspirations. It is open to both law and non-law graduates.

As well as the LLM in International Law, we offer four specialised international law LLM courses along with an LLM by Research.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-law/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Rsearch is fundamental to the Law School and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the last REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres.

Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics who are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised.

The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. Read more
As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. These include constitutional law, the law relating to the single market, competition law, environmental law, employment law, the law on migration, and human rights law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of European Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM106 EU Constitutional Law I - Concepts, Values and Principles (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM107 EU Constitutional Law II - Governance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM190 EU Healthcare law: Rights, Policies and Instruments (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM317 Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM318 Competition and the State: Regulation of public services in the EU (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)

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The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels. Read more
The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels.

Human Rights Collegium at Queen Mary

The Human Rights Collegium is the first association between a university and a non-governmental organisation established to provide scholarly expertise, research and teaching on national and international human rights. The Human Rights Collegium is based at Queen Mary, University of London and is a consortium of members of the School of Law and the British Institute of Human Rights. The collegium's aim is to focus on areas that are at the forefront of human rights to help contribute to its progressive development and to benefit the community. These rights include socio-economic rights; rights of women; international child rights and the rights of other vulnerable groups.

Internships

Queen Mary LLM students have the opportunity to apply for three summer internships with the British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR).

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Human Rights Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM035 Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM038 Human Rights of Women (45 credits)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM078 Mental Health Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)

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The University of Nottingham is widely recognised as a centre of excellence in European law. The LLM in European Law attracts students from all over the world with an interest in the governance of Europe and the role of its institutions in the global legal order. Read more
The University of Nottingham is widely recognised as a centre of excellence in European law. The LLM in European Law attracts students from all over the world with an interest in the governance of Europe and the role of its institutions in the global legal order. We offer a broad perspective that encompasses both the law of the supranational European Union and the intergovernmental Council of Europe, including the European Convention on Human Rights.

The School provides a welcoming environment – educational, social and cultural – for the study of European law. Students enjoy participating in seminars led by leading scholars drawn from the School and its specialist centres, including the Human Rights Law Centre, the Centre for Environmental Law and the Public Procurement Research Group. We have a thriving European Law Society that organises seminars and events open to all. Recent visitors include Advocate General Eleanor Sharpston of the European Court of Justice and Professor Joseph Weiler of New York University.

The Programme Director of the LLM is Professor Jeffrey Kenner, who is Chair of European Law and convenor of a popular module on International Relations Law of the EU. Professor Niamh Moloney, the Chair of Capital Markets Law, has introduced a new module on EU Financial Services Law. We also have recruited new colleagues with expertise in European Law, including Dr Emilie Cloatre, Dr Aris Georgopoulos, Dr Annamaria La Chimia and Dr Ping Wang. The arrival of new colleagues enables us to plan to introduce more options in the future. It also means that we will be able to expand our highly regarded PhD and MPhil programmes.

European Law is an area of established expertise and activity at Nottingham. It has a bright and exciting future of which we warmly hope you will be a part.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading and most exciting LLM programmes available.

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The LLM in Public International law is designed for those candidates who seek the qualification of a general public international lawyer, but with a range of specialist interests (as in environmental protection, or world trade or humanitarian warfare or human rights). Read more
The LLM in Public International law is designed for those candidates who seek the qualification of a general public international lawyer, but with a range of specialist interests (as in environmental protection, or world trade or humanitarian warfare or human rights).

This degree School of Law not only allows candidates to develop an excellent grounding in the techniques of argument and interpretation of international law with special reference to its sources (such as treaties and custom) but also to acquire some expertise in how these elements are put to the test in very different contexts (compare for example, the notion of the international law of development, which enjoys a more recent history of legal intervention, with the international regulation of the sue of force, whose history is often traced back to the 1907 Hague Convention Respecting the Limitation of the Employment of Force for the Recovery of Contract Debts). We seek, therefore, to produce a well-rounded, or general, international lawyer who is sufficiently equipped in the basic methodologies of the discipline but who, at the same time, has a general awareness of the various sub-realms of public international law applies (and has been applied) therein.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading and most exciting LLM programmes available

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The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course). Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/law-gdl/

Why choose this course?

- Expert and highly-qualified teaching team, with over 20 years' experience of delivering the GDL

- An active student law society, and a course intake limited to 100 students, which promotes a friendly, personal and supportive learning environment

- A 99%+ pass rate, and 20% above national average rate for number of merit awards and above

- Access to the excellent Bodleian Law Library

- Strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career

- Opportunities to boost employability skills through participation in internal and national mooting and client interviewing competitions as well as a national award winning pro bono scheme

Teaching and learning

Diverse teaching methods (predominantly two hour lectures and one-and-a-half hour workshops) are employed throughout the GDL programme in order to give you the best opportunity to acquire legal knowledge and skills.

A number of those teaching on the GDL have qualifications and experience as barristers or solicitors, and a significant number of others hold research degrees.

Assessments (both coursework and exams) are spread throughout the course so that you will have an ongoing awareness of your progress. These teaching and assessment methods are described in the course handbook, and their effectiveness is monitored and analysed by students and staff in the module feedback system and the GDL annual review process.

Practical skills

In recognition of the professional nature of the course, our GDL places special emphasis on helping you to gain the legal skills you need to acquire to be a successful lawyer.

- Mooting
Mooting is a must on the CV of any aspiring barrister, and for many aspiring solicitors. Mooting gives you the chance to test your advocacy skills in a safe but exciting environment, and the opportunity to hear other students argue and learn from the questioning of the judges.
The School of Law runs a mooting competition each year and enters its champion mooting team into the English Speaking Union/Essex Court Chambers National Mooting Competition. In 2012 the Oxford Brookes GDL Mooting Team won the national final of the English Speaking Union/Essex Court National Mooting Competition, and went on to win the Commonwealth Mooting Championship in Cape Town in April 2013.

- Client Interviewing
Client interviewing is one of the key skills which every lawyer needs. GDL students, coached by members of staff, have the opportunity to take part in an annual internal Client Interviewing Competition here at Oxford Brookes.

The winners of the internal competition go on to take part in the regional and national finals of the Client Interviewing Competition of England and Wales. The winning team from the national finals has the opportunity to go forward to the International Client Consultation Competition which is hosted internationally and which includes students from around the world.

In recent years Brookes GDL students have had great success in the National Client Interviewing Competition. They achieved third place in the National Final in both 2009 and 2011, and won the National Final in 2010, going on to be overall runners-up in the International Client Consultation Competition 2010 in Hong Kong. In 2012 the Brookes student team were overall runners-up in the national final and won the trophy for best GDL team.

- Pro Bono Activity
Pro Bono offers students a valuable introduction to the world of legal practice, and involvement in pro bono work helps to demonstrate to potential employers a student's commitment to the law.

Students wishing to be involved in pro bono work can do so through our established pro bono scheme, winner of the Solicitors Pro Bono group national award.

In 2010 and 2013, GDL students were shortlisted for the Attorney General's National Student Pro Bono Awards for 'Best Contribution by an Individual Student' and attended the awards ceremonies at the houses of parliament.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford Brookes has strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career in law.

Events such as the annual Oxford Law Fair further enhance opportunities for professional networking.

Careers

Having completed the GDL most students go on to become solicitors or barristers by taking the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

- Training contracts
Many of our students come to the GDL having already obtained training contracts with solicitors’ firms, and their GDL studies are funded by these firms.

- Scholarships for barristers
Oxford Brookes GDL students going to the bar are exceptionally successful in securing much sought-after funding and scholarships. Each year a significant proportion of Brookes students gain prestigious scholarships through the Inns of Court.

- Further careers options with law
A small number of our students use the legal knowledge and analytical skills gained through the GDL course to pursue a business, public sector or financial career, or continue on to further academic study.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

There is a wide range of research interests among staff, with particular strengths in the areas of public law, international law and human rights, employment, religion and the law, criminal justice, and IT and the law. In the latest government research rating exercise, the 2014 REF, 85% of staff research output is internationally recognised.

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

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This degree is designed primarily for students with no previous specialisation in marine science such as graduates with a degree in biological sciences, chemistry or materials science, physics, maths, environmental science, physical geography or related disciplines. Read more

Summary

This degree is designed primarily for students with no previous specialisation in marine science such as graduates with a degree in biological sciences, chemistry or materials science, physics, maths, environmental science, physical geography or related disciplines. The programme includes compulsory introductory modules that provide a foundation in interdisciplinary marine science, along with the opportunity to specialise in particular areas through an option of modules, as well as research project experience with marine scientists at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS). To highlight the specialisations possible, we have developed “pathways” of suggested module choices, which include: Marine Biology and Ecology; Physical Oceanography and Climate Dynamics; Marine Biogeochemistry; Marine Geology and Geophysics; Marine Resources and Law

Students can either follow one of these “pathways”, or mix options from different pathways, where the timetable allows, to pursue broader interests. Employment in the marine environmental sector is a common destination for MSc Oceanography graduates, and as the degree is a “conversion” to marine science from “pure” science backgrounds, around one-third of graduates also go on to PhD research in marine sciences.

Modules

Semester one

Core introductory modules: Biological Oceanography; Chemical Oceanography; Marine Geology; Physical Oceanography Plus: Key Skills and Literature Review

Optional modules: two from: Applied and Marine Geophysics; Biogeochemical Cycles in the Earth System; Coastal Sediment Dynamics; Computational Data Analysis for Geophysicists and Ocean Scientists; Deep-sea Ecology; Geodynamics and Solid Earth Geophysics; International Maritime and Environmental Law; Introductory Remote Sensing of the Oceans; Large-scale Ocean Processes; Microfossils, Environment and Time; Zooplankton Ecology and Processes

Semester two

Optional modules: three from: Global Ocean Carbon Cycle, Ocean Acidification and Climate; Applied Coastal Sediment Dynamics; Climate Dynamics; Ecological Modelling; Environmental Radioactivity and Radiochemistry; Global Climate Cycles; Global Ocean Monitoring; Seafloor Exploration and Surveying 2; Structure and Dynamics of Marine Communities; UN Convention on the Law of the Sea

Plus: Key Skills and Literature Review Research project: From June to September, students work full-time on an independent research project that represents one-third of the MSc degree.

Visit our website for further information...



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You will focus on a particular area of oceanography, which may be influenced by the subject area of your first degree, and develop specific knowledge and skills in areas determined by the modules you select and the nature of the research you undertake. Read more

Summary

You will focus on a particular area of oceanography, which may be influenced by the subject area of your first degree, and develop specific knowledge and skills in areas determined by the modules you select and the nature of the research you undertake. The MRes is a research-led programme that differs from the MSc in focusing less on taught modules and more on the research project (about two-thirds of the year).

Modules

Semester one Core modules: Contemporary Topics in Ocean and Earth Science; plus one from: Introduction to Biological Oceanography; Introduction to Chemical Oceanography; Introduction to Marine Geology; Introduction to Physical Oceanography

Optional module: one from: Biogeochemical Cycles in the Earth System; Computational Data Analysis for Geophysicist and Ocean Scientists; Deep-sea Ecology; International Maritime and Environmental Law; Introductory Remote Sensing of the Oceans; Large scale Ocean Processes; Zooplankton Ecology and Processes

Semester two
Optional module: one from: Applied Biogeochemistry and Pollution; Applied Coastal Sediment Dynamics; Climate Dynamics; Ecological Modelling; Environmental Radioactivity and Radiochemistry; Global Climate Cycles; Reproduction in Marine Animals; Sea Floor Exploration and Surveying 2; Structure and Dynamics of Marine Communities; UN Convention on the Law of the Sea

Plus research project

Visit our website for further information...



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The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels.

International wildlife trade is big business and ranges from high volume timber and fishery products to the more traditional wildlife products from endangered species used in horticultural, pet, leather and medicinal trades. International trade and over-use are implicated in the decline of around one third of threatened species.

Equally, many of the world’s poorest people depend on the use or sale of wildlife products for their livelihood. Meeting the twin goals of reducing poverty and stemming the rate of species loss requires improved management of trade in natural resources.

The programme examines the dynamics of international wildlife trade from all angles: the practical mechanisms set up to regulate wildlife trade, the ecological assumptions, social, cultural and economic drivers of trade, along with the challenges, pressures and the political environment that underlines relevant international law and policy.

This pathway is designed for people from areas such as government management and scientific authorities, NGOs, international agencies and donors who are working to improve sustainability of wildlife trade. It examines a number of mechanisms for delivering sustainable wildlife trade, especially the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), with whom DICE has developed a Memorandum of Understanding to offer this pathway.

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Benefit from DICE members' expertise and in-depth knowledge of CITES and wildlife trade

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Heathrow Animal Reception Centre and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey. Previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with leading organisations involved in the monitoring of wildlife trade and enforcement of regulations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests:

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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