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Masters Degrees (Control Of Infectious Disease)

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This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. Read more
This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. The course will train students in all aspects of the control of infectious diseases and prepare them for a career in a range of organisations.

This course will equip students with specialised skills that will facilitate a career in the control of infectious diseases as staff of health ministries, health departments, national or international disease control agencies, aid organisations or universities.

The majority of the research projects are performed overseas, with collaborating public health or research organisations and NGOs. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this overseas opportunity, which is crucial to the nature of the course.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/cid_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/intercalating/index.html)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- investigate the transmission of endemic and epidemic infections

- select appropriate methods of control

- design, implement and evaluate co-ordinated control methods

- assess constraints of local public health delivery systems

- manage available resources in the context of the control of infectious diseases

- focus their efforts on particular geographical regions or specific diseases

Structure

Term 1:

After orientation, students take two compulsory modules: Basic Statistics and Introduction to Disease Agents & Their Control, which focus on the life cycle and characteristics of infectious disease agents according to their principal transmission routes; the principal intervention strategies used to combat infectious diseases; and examples of successes, partial successes and failures in intervention programmes against infectious diseases.

In addition, students take one of the following module combinations:

- Basic Epidemiology; Health Economics; and Health Policy, Process and Power
- Extended Epidemiology and Health Economics or Health Policy, Process and Power

An interdisciplinary approach is emphasised which takes account of the social, political and economic context in which health systems operate.

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:

Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Health Care Evaluation*
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infections
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Clinical Virology
Economic Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Research Design & Analysis
Study Design: Writing a Study Proposal.

- Slot 2:

Clinical Bacteriology 1*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Health Systems
Qualitative Methodologies

- Slot 3:

Applied Communicable Disease Control*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health*
Economic Analysis for Health Policy*
Medical Anthropology & Public Health*
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health*
Tropical Environmental Health*
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination*
Basic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology

- Slot 4:

Clinical Bacteriology 2*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights
Globalisation & Health; Sexual Health
Vector Biology & Parasite Infections

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries*
Integrated Vector Management*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Integrating Module: Health Services Management
Mycology
Nutrition Programme Planning
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tcid.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project studying aspects of an intervention programme, for submission by early September. If appropriate, this may take the form of an optional period in a relevant overseas location. Most students on this course undertake projects overseas. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html#sixth

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Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man. Read more
Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man.

It offers specialist practical training in the diagnosis of important viral and bacterial diseases of global animal and human health importance.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Microbiology and Veterinary Immunology
-Microbial Genetics
-Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Non-vector)
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Vector)
-Infectious Diseases of Animals - Practical sessions (APHA, Pirbright ^ PHE/VMD)
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Gastro-intestinal Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Respiratory Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Multi-system Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: CNS/Skin Diseases of Animals
-Research Project

WHO IS THE PROGRAMME FOR?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:
-Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
-Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
-Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
-To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding
-The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
-The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
-The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
-The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
-Modes of control of infectious diseases
-Modes of transmission
-The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
-Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
-Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
-Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
-Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills
-Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
-Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
-Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
-Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Key/transferable skills
-Problem solve
-Evaluate and exploit new technology
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral, written and visual means
-Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common goal/outcome
-Apply basic statistical and numerical skills to data
-Use information technology including specialist packages

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Public health and communicable disease control focuses on tropical population health needs, particularly the spread of infectious disease. Read more

What is public health and communicable disease control?

Public health and communicable disease control focuses on tropical population health needs, particularly the spread of infectious disease.

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for health professionals with a suitable undergraduate degree or recognised professional qualification in a relevant discipline. It provides the skills and knowledge to use infection controls within hospitals and health care settings, particularly in rural and remote areas.

Course learning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
Upon successful completion of the Master of Public Health, graduates will be able to:
*Devise appropriate strategies to detect, prevent and control communicable and non-communicable diseases ensuring safe and healthy environments for tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically assess, analyse and communicate public health information relevant to tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Critically reflect upon the socio-ecological nature of health promotion and its application in optimising the health and wellbeing of tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon and engage in professional public health practice based on ethical decision-making and an evidence based approach, including consideration of recent developments in the field
*Apply advanced human, project and organisational management skills within a public health and policy context to effect efficient and equitable gains in public health
*Apply knowledge of research principles and methods to plan and ethically execute a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of scholarship.

Graduates with a MPH Health Promotion major will also be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of public health, with depth in population health assessment and health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation.

Graduates with a MPH Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness major will also be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of public health, with depth in disaster health and humanitarian response

Graduates with an MPH Aeromedical Retrieval major will also be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of public health, with depth in the epidemiology, history, physiological effects, and management of patients undergoing aeromedical retrieval in a range of aircraft and settings including the impact of ethical, cultural, legal and financial issues

Graduate with a MPH Communicable Diseases major will also be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of public health, with depth in principles of communicable disease control.

Award title

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia. James Cook University has:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Infectious diseases remain a major contributor to the global burden of disease, with HIV, malaria, measles, diarrhoeal disease and respiratory infections responsible for over 50% of premature deaths worldwide. Read more
Infectious diseases remain a major contributor to the global burden of disease, with HIV, malaria, measles, diarrhoeal disease and respiratory infections responsible for over 50% of premature deaths worldwide. However the availability of resources for interventions is limited in comparison with the scale of the challenges faced. Over the last decade there has been increasing recognition of the value of epidemiological analysis and mathematical modelling in aiding the design and interpretation of clinical trials from a population perspective and, downstream, to guide implementation, monitoring and evaluation of intervention effectiveness. The Epidemiology, Evolution and Control of Infectious Diseases (EECID) stream provides a research-based training in infectious disease epidemiology, mathematical modelling and statistics, genetics and evolution, and computational methods. The focus of the course is inter-disciplinary, with a strong applied public health element.

Based in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology in the Faculty of Medicine, the stream provides an opportunity to learn, in a supportive and stimulating environment, from leaders in the field who are actively engaged in research and advise leading public health professionals, policy-makers, governments, international organisations and pharmaceutical companies, both nationally and internationally, on a range of diseases include pandemic influenza, HIV, TB, malaria, polio and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).

This stream is linked to the Wellcome Trust 4-year PhD programme in the Epidemiology, Evolution and Control of Infectious Diseases which includes up to 5 funded studentships each year. Up to 3 further 1+3 MRC studentships are also available each year.

The emphasis of the course will be to provide a thorough training in epidemiology, mathematical modelling and statistics, and genetics and evolution, as applied to infectious diseases. This research-orientated training will incorporate taught material, practical sessions in statistical software (R) and C programming as well as wider generic training in the research and communication skills needed to interact with public health agencies. Through the two research-based projects students will be exposed to the latest developments in the field and will gain first-hand experience in applying the methods they are taught to questions of public-health relevance.

Individuals who complete the course will have developed the ability to:

-Describe the biology, epidemiology and control of major global infectious diseases
-Interpret and present epidemiological data
-Undertake statistical analysis of infectious disease data including applying modern methods for statistical inference
-Develop and apply mathematical models to understand infectious disease dynamics, evolution and control
-Analyse genetic data using modern techniques and interpret their relevance to infectious disease epidemiology
-Critically evaluate research papers and reports
-Write and defend research reports and publications
-Communicate effectively through writing, oral presentations and IT to facilitate further study or employment in epidemiology and public health
-Exercise a range of transferable skills

This will be achieved through a course of lectures, seminars, tutorials and technical workshops. Please note that Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates for part-completion are not available for this course.

The stream will be based in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology on the St Mary’s campus of Imperial College London.

Each student chooses two projects over the course of the year from the wide range available. Students are guided in this choice by the stream organiser and their personal tutor and are advised to take contrasting projects to ensure a balanced training.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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Our Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases, directed by Professor Andrew Pollard of Oxford University Department of Paediatrics, is designed to provide a variety of different teaching methods (face-to-face and online) directing students through the syllabus required in the EU for clinical training in the subspecialty. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases, directed by Professor Andrew Pollard of Oxford University Department of Paediatrics, is designed to provide a variety of different teaching methods (face-to-face and online) directing students through the syllabus required in the EU for clinical training in the subspecialty. The Programme will also be appropriate for those outside the EU.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/pgdip-in-paediatric-infectious-diseases

Description

The Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases is supported by the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID), the Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS (PENTA), and the IIC Course: Oxford.

Worldwide, two thirds of the deaths in children under five years of age are caused by infectious diseases, and the prevention and treatment of infections in children is the number one priority for global health.

Reflecting this imperative, we recognise that investment in research and intervention programmes related to leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality, including acute respiratory infections, measles, infectious diarrhoea, malaria, HIV, and TB is vitally important. We believe that professionally-oriented education in paediatric infectious diseases is essential in the training of clinicians and clinical academics who will provide the future leadership in this key area for global health.

The Postgraduate Diploma also places the practice of paediatric infectious diseases in the broader context of applied sciences, such as pathogenesis, population biology and epidemiology. The Programme focuses on clinical (applied) aspects, underpinned by basic science to provide both breadth and depth.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases is a part-time two-year programme taught via a blend of online and residential components.

Syllabus:

- Infectious Syndromes
- Therapeutics and Infection Control
- Epidemiology, Immunity and Immunization
- Bacterial Infections
- Important Viral Infections and Prions
- Imported and Tropical Diseases and Mycobacterial Infection
- Congenital and Neonatal Infection, Sexually Transmitted Disease, and Parasitic Disease
- The Immunocompromised Host
- Fungal Infection

Dates:
The 2016 Paediatric Infectious Diseases Programme starts in September 2016. The next PENTA-ESPID HIV course online component beings in May 2016, with the residential component taking place in October 2016. The Infection and Immunity in Children: Oxford residential course takes place in June/July each year.

The Postgraduate Diploma is normally completed within two years.

The following course components can be taken before applying for the Postgraduate Diploma and if successfully completed and if taken within two years of starting the Postgraduate Diploma, then these elements of the Programme requirements will normally be dispensed:The Infection and Immunity in Children course, which runs each summer in Oxford, and thePENTA-ESPID online and residential HIV course. For example, the online PENTA-ESPID paediatric HIV Medicine course starts in May each year culminating in the residential course in October. Whether undertaken before registration for the Postgraduate Diploma or within the two-year duration of the Postgraduate Diploma, all components must be completed in order to satisfy the requirements of the Postgraduate Diploma. See the course structure above for further details.

Course aims

The Programme will provide students with:

- Knowledge and critical understanding of the well-established principles of paediatric infectious diseases, and of the way in which those principles have developed

- An ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied, including, where appropriate, the application of those principles the real world of paediatrics

- Knowledge of the main methods of enquiry in the paediatric infectious diseases and ability to evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems

- An understanding of the limits of your knowledge, and how this influences analyses and interpretations based on that knowledge

At the end of the Programme students will know and understand how to:

- Use your broad knowledge of paediatric infectious disease in your practice and have learnt where to find the necessary resources when you have reached your limit of knowledge

- Understand how to find evidence-based information to facilitate rational decision making in diagnosis and management of children with infection

- Effectively communicate information, arguments, and analysis about paediatric infection, in a variety of forms, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- Undertake further training, develop existing skills, and acquire new competences that will enable you to assume significant responsibility within organisations

- Qualities and transferable skills necessary for your future career in paediatrics and infectious diseases

Assessment methods

Assessment is via "formative elements" (online case rounds and discussions and multiple choice sessions) and "summative elements" (including written assignments, an oral presentation and an examination).

Formative elements:

- Online Case Rounds: at least seven ESPID case rounds over two years.
- Online Case Discussions in paediatric HIV medicine ([email protected]): actively participate in one four-week session over two years.
- Online multiple choice sessions: at least six sessions over two years.

Summative elements:

Written assignments:
Three written assignments of no more than 4000 words each over the course of two years.

Year 1: Oral presentation
A short oral presentation based on one of the written assignments.

Year 2: Examination
An examination consisting of multiple choice questions in paediatric infectious diseases.

Teaching methods

There are three main teaching elements to the Programme:

- A two-year online course in Paediatric Infectious Diseases which covers the full syllabus outlined above with online tutor support and student discussion forums

- Two residential courses in Oxford: Infection and Immunity in Children.

- A PENTA_ESPID online course Training for Paediatric HIV in Europe (paediatric HIV medicine) followed by a PENTA_ESPID residential course in Rome: Training for Paediatric HIV in Europe (paediatric HIV medicine).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Read more
This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Students will gain specialised skills in the molecular biology of infectious diseases, and will cover all aspects of major vector-borne diseases. The course also offers a thorough grounding in the systematics of medically important arthropods, processes regulating vector populations, and the biology of vector–parasite and vector–vertebrate interactions.

Graduates enter operational control programmes, applied basic research and academic fields. Students benefit from close interaction with staff who have extensive international expertise.

The James Busvine Memorial Medal and Prize, donated by Professor James Busvine in 1987, is awarded each year for outstanding performance.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/medic_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of the biology of vectors and intermediate hosts of human pathogens together with methods for their control

- describe the biology, pathogenesis and diagnosis of parasitic infections in humans and relate these to human health and disease control strategies

- demonstrate a range of specialised technical and analytical skills relevant to vectors and vector-borne diseases

- design and carry out a research project on biology or control of disease vectors, analyse and interpret the results and prepare a report including a critical literature review

- design, undertake and evaluate vector control interventions, and show written and verbal competence in communicating scientific information

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by three compulsory core modules:

- Parasitology & Entomology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies
- Critical Skills for Tropical Medicine

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Some modules can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Molecular Biology & Recombinant Techniques

- Slot 2:
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination (compulsory)

- Slot 4:
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Population Dynamics & Projections

- Slot 5:
Integrated Vector Management (compulsory)

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tbcd.html

Residential Field Trip

There is a compulsory one week field course, after the Term 3 examinations, on vector and parasite sampling and identification methods. The cost of £630 is included in the field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a field or laboratory research project on an appropriate entomological topic, for submission by early September.

Titles of some of the recent summer projects completed by students on this MSc

Due to our collaborative networking, students are given the opportunity to conduct research projects overseas. This unique experience provides students with skills that are highly desirable to potential employers. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html#sixth

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This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Read more
This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Students will gain specialised skills in applying scientific concepts, evaluating scientific data and carrying out modern immunological techniques. Students will benefit from the unique mix of immunology, vaccinology, molecular biology, virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology and clinical medicine at the School.

Infectious diseases represent an increasingly important cause of human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Vaccine development is thus of great importance in terms of global health. In parallel with this growth, there has been a dramatic increase in studies to identify the innate, humoral or cellular immunological mechanisms which confer immunity to pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. As a result, increasing numbers of scientists, clinicians and veterinarians wish to develop their knowledge and skills in these areas.

The flexible nature of the course allows students to focus on attaining a broader understanding of infectious disease through attending taught units. Students can also undertake an extended research project within groups led by experienced team leaders. Such projects can involve basic investigations of immune mechanisms or applied field based studies.

Graduates from this course go into research positions in academia and industry, and further training such as PhD study.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/iid_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msiid.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate specialist knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of host immunity to infection against the diverse range of pathogens which confront human populations

- apply this specialist knowledge to a range of practical skills and techniques, in particular modern molecular and cellular techniques for assessing immune responses to pathogens

- critically assess, select and apply appropriate research methods to investigate basic immunological mechanisms and applied issues in the immunology of infection

- critically evaluate primary scientific data and the published scientific literature

- integrate and present key immunological concepts at an advanced level, both verbally and in written form

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by two compulsory modules:

- Immunology of Infectious Diseases
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Advanced Immunology 1 (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Advanced Immunology 2 (compulsory)

- Slot 3:
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology*
Clinical Immunology*
Extended Project*
Basic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries

- Slot 4:
Extended Project*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications*
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights
Genetic Epidemiology

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Extended Project*
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection*
Mycology*

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tiid.html

Residential Field Trip

Towards the end of Term 1, students get the opportunity to hear about the latest, most exciting aspects of immunological research at the British Society of Immunology Congress. The cost is included in the £500 field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on an immunological subject, for submission by early September. Some of these projects may take place with collaborating scientists overseas or in other colleges or institutes in the UK. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msiid.html#sixth

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Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

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This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. The course offers a wide choice of modules and provides training in clinical tropical medicine at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases.

The Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (DTM&H):
All students going on the MSc will take the Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Students with a prior DTM&H, or holding 60 Masters level credits from the East African Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene may apply for exemption from Term 1 via accreditation of prior learning.

Careers

Graduates from this course have taken a wide variety of career paths including further research in epidemiology, parasite immunology; field research programmes or international organisations concerned with health care delivery in conflict settings or humanitarian crises; or returned to academic or medical positions in low- and middle-income countries.

Awards

The Frederick Murgatroyd Award is awarded each year for the best student of the year. Donated by Mrs Murgatroyd in memory of her husband, who held the Wellcome Chair of Clinical Tropical Medicine in 1950 and 1951.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/tmih_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- understand and describe the causation, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and control of the major parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases of developing countries

- demonstrate knowledge and skills in diagnostic parasitology and other simple laboratory methods

- understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, including selecting appropriate study designs

- apply and interpret basic statistical tests for the analysis of quantitative data

- critically evaluate published literature in order to make appropriate clinical decisions

- communicate relevant medical knowledge to patients, health care professionals, colleagues and other groups

- understand the basic sciences underlying clinical and public health practice

Structure

Term 1:
All students follow the course for the DTM&H. Term 1 consists entirely of the DTM&H lectures, seminars, laboratory practical and clinical sessions, and is examined through the DTM&H examination and resulting in the award of the Diploma and 60 Master's level credits at the end of Term 1.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Recognising that students have diverse backgrounds and experience, the course director considers requests to take any module within the School's portfolio, provided that this is appropriate for the student.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Clinical Virology*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Advanced Immunology 1
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infection
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco
Economic Evaluation
Generalised Liner Models
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques
Research Design & Analysis
Sociological Approaches to Health
Study Design: Writing a Proposal

- Slot 2:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Advanced Immunology 2
Clinical Bacteriology 1
Family Planning Programmes
Health Systems; History & Health
Molecular Virology; Non Communicable Eye Disease
Population, Poverty and Environment
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Applied Communicable Disease Control
Clinical Immunology
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Implementing Eye Care: Skills and Resources
Medical Anthropology and Public Health
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination

- Slot 4:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights*
Global Disability and Health*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Bacteriology 2
Design & Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes
Environmental Epidemiology
Evaluation of Public Health Interventions
Genetic Epidemiology
Globalisation & Health
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Nutrition Related Chronic Diseases
Population Dynamics & Projections
Reviewing the Literature
Sexual Health
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Mycology*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Analysing Survey & Population Data
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Environmental Health Policy
Integrated Vector Management
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection
Nutrition Programme Planning
Pathogen Genomics
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/ttmi.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project in a subject of their choice, for submission by early September. Projects may involve writing up and analysing work carried out before coming to the School, a literature review, or a research study proposal. Some students gather data overseas or in the UK for analysis within the project. Such projects require early planning.

Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html#sixth

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Study for a Masters-level qualification at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. International Public Health offers a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants. Read more
Study for a Masters-level qualification at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. International Public Health offers a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants.

•Masters degree available to study full time (one year) and part time (two years)
•Study at LJMU's world renowned Centre for Public Health
•Develop a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants
•Follow a curriculum informed by key international strategies, the Sustainable Development Goals and Social Determinants of Health
•Support and guidance for placement learning opportunities
•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

Course content focuses on public health issues in low and middle income countries although you will also, of course, gain a valuable insight into public health issues in the UK and the rest of Europe.

The course will enhance your capacity to improve the health of the populations you serve and reduce health inequality. It will also develop your critical, analytical, research, collaborative working and evaluation skills - all key requirements in the dynamic public health sector.
The Centre for Public Health offers a flexible approach to learning with full and part time study options available. Many modules are stand-alone CPD courses, helping you to plan your education around your work and family life.

With an emphasis on guided independent learning, you can expect to attend University two days a week (full time) or one day a week (part time). You can, however, spread your learning over a longer period if you prefer.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Core Modules:

Intercultural Learning

Aims to introduce and enhance core learning skills within an intercultural environment. Learning to learn, study, read, write and reflect within a new environment can be challenging and particularly in a new country. Learning how to learn together, share ideas, develop key learning skills and support others are key facets of this module. The module is underpinned by thinking around the internationalisation of higher education.

International Health

Explores the idea of international health and human development. It examines both the determinants of health, and aspects of health system development. It evaluates a number of international strategies aimed at health for all and explores the role of primary health care in local level health improvement.

Global Health

Aims to examine the key processes of globalization and how they impact on the health of populations and their environments. Key public health risks are identified and their strategic response at the global level evaluated. Issues explored include: global disease, risk and surveillance; alcohol and tobacco control; globesity and non-communicable disease; HIV/AIDS; pollution and climate change.

Epidemiology

Examines the principles and tools of epidemiology and disease surveillance. These principles are then applied to an understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases and assessment of health inequalities through tools such as health needs assessment and their role in protecting and improving population health.

Public Health: Policy and Practice

Introduces students to the concepts and underpinning theories associated with the public health approach and practices associated with the promotion and protection of population health. The module reviews historical as well as contemporary public health approaches, policies and strategies. There is a particular focus on examining health inequalities and measures to reduce them. The aim is to identify local, national and international strategic responses to both improving health and reducing health inequalities.

Research Methods

Encourages students to develop their skills as a potential producer of research, as well as their ability to systematically evaluate research outcomes from a variety of sources. In addition, students engage in a variety of data analysis techniques. The module covers quantitative, qualitative, mixed, creative and participatory methodologies.​

Option Modules:

Violence

Violence is now regarded as a critical public health concern. The impact of violence on the health of individuals, families and the wider society adds to an increasing burden of ill-health and cost to health and other welfare services. This module critically examines a range of key issues related to violence and health from international, national and local perspectives. It demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary public health approach when addressing the causes of violence, building prevention control strategies, and promoting safety. The Public Health Institute is a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention http://www.cph.org.uk/expertise/violence .

Health Improvement

Encourages students to develop knowledge and competence in the area of health improvement. The module covers a number of core health improvement approaches: health promotion, prevention, health behaviour change and community participation. It considers the relevancy and value of these approaches to different population groups from a global perspective.

Health Protection

Examines the components and structure of health protection activity. The risks to public health from both communicable and non-infectious environmental hazards are explored in detail. The infrastructure of health emergency planning is critically analysed.

Systematic Review

This module provides a complete guide and hands on approach to developing a research question and learning the methods and key processes involved in completing a systematic review. Systematic review is a cross cutting methodology which can be used in a variety of disciplines and through interdisciplinary collaboration. The module can be taken by anybody from any discipline who wants to increase their skill set in the methodology. The focus will be on application of the systematic review methods to a chosen field of investigation.​

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change.

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- check at. http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione. http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply. Instructions in English. http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento2011&keyIF0362. Read more

Admission Notice now available

- check at
http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione
http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply

Instructions in English:
http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento=2011&key=IF0362
.

Biotechnologies for Food Science

In the 2016-2017 academic year, the University of Padova inaugurated a new curriculum of the Master Degree “Biotechnology applied to Food Security and Nutrition” (Second Cycle Degree) entitled “Biotechnologies for Food Science " to be entirely taught in English.
The “Biotechnologies for Food Science " Master degree (MSc) is an interdisciplinary and research-oriented Master of Science Programme and explores how to produce healthier and safer food following a cross-cutting, farm/field-to-fork approach. It is focused on the application of advanced biotechnologies in food production and safety and it is the ideal trait-d’union between the requests of consumers, of producers in the agro-food sector and research applied to production and food-safety.
The course has a strong component on cutting-edge methods, such as genomics, bioinformatics, proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnologies, all in the context of animal and crop production as well as food quality and safety. Theoretical lessons are mixed with practical training, offering hands-on experience in advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis together with substantial lab sessions in bioinformatics. Lectures will deal with food production, hygiene and quality, molecular methods of agro-food analyses, effects of agro-biotech products on human beings and environments. Moreover environmental stresses, disease mechanisms, pathogens and pests will be treated as essential to understand how to protect crop and farm animals and how food might impact on human health: the lectures move across animal infectious disease, immunology, microbiology, plant pests and pathogens as well as abiotic stresses to show how biotechnology might help preventing disease and improve food production. As consumers are increasingly worried about the presence of contaminants in food and on the real origin of what they eat; the Programme includes a course in food toxicology and regulation, and one on traceability for food authentication.
Our Programme is based at the Agripolis campus, where are located four departments of the School of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine of the University of Padova, all of which contribute to the MSc course, offering the best opportunities for a rich, cross-disciplinary experience in a highly qualified scientific environment.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students from the EU and abroad, interested in learning and implementing effective value-added practices for the production of high-quality food products both in the EU and in international markets. English knowledge must be minimum at B2 level (CEFR). Applying students might possibly have a three-year Bachelor’s degree in a field connected with the Master’s curriculum. Good background in molecular biology, biochemistry, and microbiology is requested.

How is the programme organised?

Biotechnologies for Food Science is a 2-year Master programme (120 ECTS, equivalent to a Master of Science). Requirements for graduation include courses and preparation and defense of the Master thesis. Students will be encouraged to spend a period of their studies abroad, through Erasmus+ or other local programmes and agreements. Financial support to meet part of the cost for thesis work is granted to best students.
Visit the MSc “Biotechnologies for Food Science” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione) for more details.

Teaching methods

Teaching takes place in an international environment and includes lectures and laboratory activities, practical exercises and seminars by experts; opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in the sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere. The Programme assists students to find suitable internship opportunities with qualified laboratories in Italy and abroad.
Examinations are written or oral and assess students’ participation also through reports, presentations, and group work.

Course structure

During the two-years MSc course students attend the following 12 course units

Applied genomics for animal and crop improvement
Applied Bionformatics
Food Microbiology and Food Microbial Biotechnology
Molecular basis of disease, immunology, and transmissible diseases
Laboratory of advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis
Biotechnology for crop production
Epidemiology and risk analysis
Traceability tools for species authentication  
Advanced technologies for the agrifood sector (nanotechnologies, proteomics, metabolomics)
Biotechnology for plant protection
Food toxicology and food regulation
Foreign language (English)

First year
During the first year of the programme the student will acquire knowledge on animal and crop genomics, focusing on the most advanced methods for high throughput genomic analysis (transcriptomics, genome-wide SNP analysis, epigenomics) and on the most recent approaches for selective breeding (genomic selection, genomic prediction). In parallel, the student will learn how bioinformatics tools might be applied to manage large sets of data, how biological data bases are organized and how to link different types of data. Extensive practical training in bioinformatics will be offered with various sessions in a dedicated lab. Food-borne pathogens and the positive role of microorganisms in food processes will be examined in an integrated microbiology course, while the molecular basis of pathology, host-response to infection, epidemiology, and diagnostics of transmissible diseases will form the basis of two courses. A course on biotechnology for crop production will introduce the molecular and physiological basis of crop production. Biotechnological approaches to improve crop yield, with particular attention to fruit production, and to reduce impact of abiotic stresses will examined. Molecular tools for food traceability and an intensive practical lab in DNA/RNA/protein analysis applied to food control will conclude the first year.

Second year
In the second year, the first semester have three courses. One will focus on novel technologies (proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnology) and their application to food production. A second one will extend knowledge on plant biotechnology exploring advanced technologies for crop disease and pest management. A third one will deal with contaminants in food and food legislation. The second semester is completely dedicated to lab internship. It is possible to join a research lab in the campus or to have a working stage in the private sector.
link to the Campus descriptions:
http://youtu.be/gR4qcWUXvGg

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Study for a Masters at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This well-established Public Health MSc offers a research-informed learning environment which reflects the latest sector developments. Read more
Study for a Masters at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This well-established Public Health MSc offers a research-informed learning environment which reflects the latest sector developments.

•Masters degree available to study full time (one year) and part time (two years)
•Develop knowledge and skills aligned to the Public Health Training Curriculum and The Public Health Skills and Career Framework
•Study at LJMU's world renowned Centre for Public Health
•Benefit from the research-led content of this longstanding programme
•Enjoy a flexible approach to study and network with full and part time students from differing backgrounds
•Look forward to career opportunities in local authorities, the health sector, voluntary sector, private sector or research
•Support and guidance for placement learning
•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

Attracting students from a variety of backgrounds, this course prides itself on its inclusive approach, bringing together different disciplines and enabling you to learn from your peers as well as course tutors.

You will explore population health from a number of perspectives, enhancing your understanding of the people and processes involved in promoting public health and reducing health inequalities.

You will learn how the social determinants of health underpin our theoretical understanding of health and health inequalities.
The course has a flexible approach to learning with full and part time study options available. Many modules are stand-alone CPD courses, helping you to study at your own pace and plan your education around your work and family life.

With an emphasis on guided independent learning, you can expect to attend University two days a week (full time) or one day a week (part time). You can, however, spread your learning over a longer period if required.
On joining the course you will be appointed a personal tutor who will provide academic and pastoral support. You will also have at least one supervisor for the duration of your dissertation module.

Formal Teaching takes place in Tithebarn Street which is part of the city centre campus. This vibrant location offers everything you could possibly need during your studies. Tutorial space is also available in the Henry Cotton buildin.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Core Modules:

Epidemiology

Examines the principles and tools of epidemiology and disease surveillance. These principles are then applied to an understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases and assessment of health inequalities through tools such as health needs assessment and their role in protecting and improving population health.

Public Health: Policy and Practice

Introduces students to the concepts and underpinning theories associated with the public health approach and practices related to the promotion and protection of population health. It reviews historical as well as contemporary public health approaches, policies & strategies. There is a particular focus on examining health inequalities and measures to reduce them. The aim is to identify local, national and international strategic responses to both improving health and reducing health inequalities.

Research Methods

Encourages students to develop their skills as a potential producer of research, as well as their ability to systematically evaluate research outcomes from a variety of sources. In addition, students engage in a variety of data analysis techniques. The module covers quantitative, qualitative, mixed, creative and participatory methodologies.

Health Improvement

Encourages students to develop knowledge and competence in the area of health improvement. The module covers a number of core health improvement approaches: health promotion, prevention, health behaviour change and community participation. It considers the relevancy and value of these approaches to different population groups from a global perspective.

Health Protection

The components and structure of health protection activity are examined. The risks to public health from both communicable and non-infectious environmental hazards are explored in detail. The infrastructure of health emergency planning is critically analysed.

Option Modules:

​Violence

Violence is now regarded as a critical public health concern. The impact of violence on the health of individuals, families and the wider society adds to an increasing burden of ill-health and cost to health and other welfare services. This module critically examines a range of key issues related to violence and health from international, national and local perspectives. It demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary public health approach when addressing the causes of violence, building prevention control strategies, and promoting safety. The Public Health Institute is a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention http://www.cph.org.uk/expertise/violence/.

Systematic Review

​Provides a complete guide and hands on approach to developing a research question and learning the methods and key processes involved in completing a systematic review. Systematic review is a cross cutting methodology which can be used in a variety of disciplines and through interdisciplinary collaboration. The module can be taken by anybody from any discipline who wants to increase their skill set in the methodology. The focus is on application of the systematic review methods to a chosen field of investigation.

Work Related Learning

This is either a project that participants undertake at their place of work or as part of an organised work related placement. The project forms the basis of an action learning process whereby participants reflect on their ability to achieve personal and organisational goals, solve problems and meet self-appointed learning outcomes.

Global Health

Aims to examine the key processes of globalisation and how they impact on the health of populations and their environments. Key public health risks are identified and their strategic response at the global level evaluated. Issues explored include: global disease, risk and surveillance; alcohol and tobacco control; globesity and non-communicable disease; HIV/AIDS; pollution and climate change.​

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change.

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This programme aims to provide animal health specialists, scientists and public health specialists with an understanding of the conceptual basis of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Read more
This programme aims to provide animal health specialists, scientists and public health specialists with an understanding of the conceptual basis of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Optional modules make the studies suitable for people from a range of professional backgrounds.

Our Veterinary Epidemiology course graduates find that the international recognition and prestige of their degree opens doors and creates opportunities in their careers.

Modules are designed for self-study using materials provided and with full support from RVC academic experts. Everything you require will be mailed to you, including textbooks and reading material. A Virtual Learning Environment and an on-line library are also available.

Under the microscope

The programme aims to provide you with an understanding of the role of veterinary epidemiology and economics in the design and delivery of effective livestock services, and knowledge of risk analysis approaches in food safety and how human health can be protected through control of zoonotic diseases. The programme also aims to equip you with skills in basic and advanced statistical methods in order to undertake epidemiological investigations and disease modelling.

The course

The course modules provide an essential introduction to a variety of approaches, methods and subjects. These modules are designed to equip you with the preliminary practical and intellectual skills necessary for progression to the next level.

Within the Postgraduate Diploma and the MSc, there is a natural progression from the core modules to the optional modules. Within the selection of optional modules, there is an element of choice in subject matter and disciplinary areas of study. Although the optional modules may not in themselves be more difficult, students will develop a greater understanding and a sophistication of thinking as they work through the modules.

You are required to study three compulsory core modules:
- Epidemiology and animal health economics
- Statistical methods in veterinary epidemiology
- Veterinary public health

Plus four further optional modules selected from:
- Advanced statistical methods in veterinary epidemiology
- Developing and monitoring of livestock production systems
- Economics for livestock development and policy
- Management of infectious disease outbreaks in animal populations
- Research, design, management and grant application writing
- Surveillance and investigation of animal health
- Research project in veterinary epidemiology and public health (MSc only)

How will I learn?

This course is a distance learning course, meaning that you can further your studies without attending the RVC in person.

At the start of the course, you will receive a Study Pack consisting of a study guide, reader and textbooks/CDs. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) allows studies to be portable, by offering on-line access to the programme handbook, study guide, student discussion board, structured academic tutorials, as well as past exam papers/examiners reports (for the previous 2 years).

A tutorial calendar will be released at the beginning of the academic year and students are advised to plan for these sessions, as academic queries will be answered during tutorials only. Although non-compulsory, indicative study calendars are available and provide an indication of the time to spend on each section.

Examinations take place annually in October, however, the flexibility of the programme allows exams to be deferred, if necessary.

A five-year period is offered to complete the MSc degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate, with an average completion time of three years. A two year period is offered for completion of Individual Modules.

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, graduates will be able to -

- Improve the health and production of livestock
- Understand the interaction of livestock with people and the environment
- Gain an overview of the factors that influence livestock production (including components on nutrition, reproduction, disease, welfare and the environment)
- Implement control strategies by integrating this knowledge with the principles of epidemiology, economics and disease control within the context of management and infrastructure
- Address the interaction between livestock and the public, in terms of zoonotic disease and clean food production
- Communicate effectively on the health of animal and human populations to a range of audiences, including the general public, farmers, politicians and other key policy makers
- Comprehensive appreciation of welfare and ethical issues connected with farm animal practice
- Formulate a hypothesis and undertake a research project, analyze and present data and how to develop a grant application

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