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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has gained a significant international profile as one of the key international centres for research and training in computational mechanics and engineering. As a student on the Master's course in Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics, you will be provided with in-depth, multidisciplinary training in the application of the finite element method and related state-of-the-art numerical and computational techniques to the solution and simulation of highly challenging problems in engineering analysis and design.

Key Features of Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics MSc

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering is acknowledged internationally as the leading UK centre for computational engineering research. It represents an interdisciplinary group of researchers who are active in computational or applied mechanics. It is unrivalled concentration of knowledge and expertise in this field. Many numerical techniques currently in use in commercial simulation software have originated from Swansea University.

The Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course is a two-year postgraduate programme run by an international consortium of four leading European Universities, namely Swansea University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Spain), École Centrale de Nantes (France) and University of Stuttgart (Germany) in cooperation with the International Centre for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE, Spain).

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will gain a general knowledge of the theory of computational mechanics, including the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, appreciate the worth of undertaking a computational simulation in an industrial context, and be provided with training in the development of new software for the improved simulation of current engineering problems.

In the first year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will follow an agreed common set of core modules leading to common examinations in Swansea or Barcelona. In addition, an industrial placement will take place during this year, where you will have the opportunity to be exposed to the use of computational mechanics within an industrial context. For the second year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics, you will move to one of the other Universities, depending upon your preferred specialisation, to complete a series of taught modules and the research thesis. There will be a wide choice of specialisation areas (i.e. fluids, structures, aerospace, biomedical) by incorporating modules from the four Universities. This allows you to experience postgraduate education in more than one European institution.

Modules

Modules on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study the following core modules (together with elective modules):

Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Continuum Mechanics
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Industrial Project
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Finite Element in Fluids
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Reservoir Modelling and Simulation

Accreditation

The Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

See http://www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

This degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

On the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will have the opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge in computational mechanics in an industrial context.

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course you will be placed in engineering industries, consultancies or research institutions that have an interest and expertise in computational mechanics. Typically, you will be trained by the relevant industry in the use of their in-house or commercial computational mechanics software.

You will also gain knowledge and expertise on the use of the particular range of commercial software used in the industry where you are placed.

Careers

The next decade will experience an explosive growth in the demand for accurate and reliable numerical simulation and optimisation of engineering systems.

Computational mechanics will become even more multidisciplinary than in the past and many technological tools will be, for instance, integrated to explore biological systems and submicron devices. This will have a major impact in our everyday lives.

Employment can be found in a broad range of engineering industries as this course provides the skills for the modelling, formulation, analysis and implementation of simulation tools for advanced engineering problems.



Student Quotes

“I gained immensely from the high quality coursework, extensive research support, confluence of cultures and unforgettable friendship.”

Prabhu Muthuganeisan, MSc Computational Mechanics

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The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Read more
The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Expertise in the group encompasses a broad range of topics, including Continuum Mechanics, Analysis & Dynamical Systems, Industrial & Applied Mathematics, Inverse Problems, Mathematical Finance, and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing. The group has a strongly interdisciplinary research ethos, which it pursues in areas such as Mathematics in the Life Sciences, Uncertainty Quantification & Data Science, and within the Manchester Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics.

The Applied Mathematics group offers the MSc in Applied Mathematics as an entry point to graduate study. The MSc has two pathways, reflecting the existing strengths within the group in numerical analysis and in industrial mathematics. The MSc consists of five core modules (total 75 credits) covering the main areas of mathematical techniques, modelling and computing skills necessary to become a modern applied mathematician. Students then choose three options, chosen from specific pathways in numerical analysis and industrial modelling (total 45 credits). Finally, a dissertation (60 credits) is undertaken with supervision from a member of staff in the applied mathematics group with the possibility of co-supervision with an industrial sponsor.

Aims

The course aims to develop core skills in applied mathematics and allows students to specialise in industrial modelling or numerical analysis, in preparation for study towards a PhD or a career using mathematics within industry. An important element is the course regarding transferable skills which will link with academics and employers to deliver important skills for a successful transition to a research career or the industrial workplace.

Special features

The course features a transferable skills module, with guest lectures from industrial partners. Some dissertation projects and short internships will also be available with industry.

Teaching and learning

Students take eight taught modules and write a dissertation. The taught modules feature a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, coursework, and computing and modelling projects (both individually and in groups). The modules on Scientific Computing and Transferable Skills particularly involve significant project work. Modules are examined through both coursework and examinations.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment comprises course work, exams in January and May, followed by a dissertation carried out and written up between June and September. The dissertation counts for 60 credits of the 180 credits and is chosen from a range of available projects, including projects suggested by industrial partners.

Course unit details

CORE (75 credits)
1. Mathematical methods
2. Partial Differential Equations
3. Scientific Computing
4. Dynamical Systems
5. Transferrable skills for mathematicians

Industrial modelling pathway
1 Continuum mechanics
2. Stability theory
3. Conservation and transport laws

Numerical analysis pathway
1. Numerical linear algebra
2. Finite Elements
3. Optimization and variational calculus

Career opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a career in research (via entry into a PhD programme) or direct entry into industry. Possible subsequent PhD programmes would be those in mathematics, computer science, or one of the many science and engineering disciplines where applied mathematics is crucial. The programme develops many computational, analytical, and modelling skills, which are valued by a wide range of employers. Specialist skills in scientific computing are valued in the science, engineering, and financial sector.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This MSc programme offers you an advanced level of study in specific aspects of mechanical engineering which are in demand from industry. Read more
This MSc programme offers you an advanced level of study in specific aspects of mechanical engineering which are in demand from industry. It is an ideal bridging programme for those graduates seeking to register as a Chartered Engineer with the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

Course details

You study the core modules in CAD/CAM and Product Development, Finite Element Methods and Machine Design and you select three additional modules from Automotive Engineering and Vehicle Design, Manufacturing Systems, Project Management and Enterprise, Supply Chain Management and Applied Continuum Mechanics.

Professional accreditation

Our MSc Mechanical Engineering is accredited to CEng level by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council. Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC).

The accredited Masters-level award will provide you with the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills in preparation for your registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

What you study

For the Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

Core modules
-CAD/CAM and Product Developments
-Finite Element Methods
-Machine Design
-Practical Health and Safety Skills
-Project Management and Enterprise
-Research and Study Skills

And three optional modules
-Applied Continuum Mechanics
-Automotive Engineering and Vehicle Design
-Manufacturing Systems
-Supply Chain Management

MSc candidates
-Project

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

You learn through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Lectures provide the theoretical underpinning while practical sessions give you the opportunity to put theory into practice, applying your knowledge to specific problems.

Tutorials and seminars provide a context for interactive learning and allow you to explore relevant topics in depth. In addition to the taught sessions, you undertake a substantive MSc research project.

Assessment varies from module to module. The assessment methodology could include in-course assignments, design exercises, technical reports, presentations or formal examinations. For your MSc project you prepare a dissertation.

Employability

Mechanical engineers typically secure employment in structural engineering, research and development, automotive engineering and design, the aerospace industry, manufacturing, processing and chemical industries as well as management positions.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has been at the forefront of international research in the area of computational engineering. Internationally renowned engineers at Swansea pioneered the development of numerical techniques, such as the finite element method, and associated computational procedures that have enabled the solution of many complex engineering problems. As a student on the Master's course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will find the course utilises the expertise of academic staff to provide high-quality postgraduate training.

Key Features: Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry and there is further emphasis to apply the methodology to other important areas such as medicine and the life sciences.

This Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course provides a solid foundation in computer modelling and the finite element method in particular.

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, within which this course is run, has excellent computing facilities, including a state-of-the-art multi-processor super computer with virtual reality facilities and high-speed networking.

Modules

Modules on the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Reservoir Modelling and Simulation
Solid Mechanics
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Computational Case Study
Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Accreditation

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Hardware includes a 450 cpu Cluster, high-end graphics workstations and high-speed network links. Extensive software packages include both in-house developed and 'off-the-shelf' commercial.

Links with Industry

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Careers

Employment in a wide range of industries, which require the skills developed during the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course, from aerospace to the medical sector. Computational modelling techniques have developed in importance to provide solutions to complex problems and as a graduate of this course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will be able to utilise your highly sought-after skills in industry or research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

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This course critically examines the role of agriculture (including horticulture) and agricultural research in addressing the major challenges and opportunities related to agricultural intensification and environmental sustainability in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the developing world. Read more
This course critically examines the role of agriculture (including horticulture) and agricultural research in addressing the major challenges and opportunities related to agricultural intensification and environmental sustainability in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the developing world. A flexible course is offered, including a horticulture pathway. The course explains the roles of agriculture and horticulture in development and the different biophysical, economic and social environments in which they are practised.

Recent research developments and innovative practices in response to challenges such as poverty, climate change and environmental sustainability are elaborated upon and supported by field visits. The factors that influence and enhance the relevance, quality and impact of research and farmer innovation processes are described.

Graduates are well suited to working along the research to-development continuum – whether in research, extension or development, within international and national institutions.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Rethinking agricultural development (including horticulture): implementing solutions
-Agriculture in the tropics
-Experimental agriculture/horticulture
Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.
Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae

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The Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics offers courses, taught by experts, across a wide range. Mathematics is highly developed yet continually growing, providing new insights and applications. Read more
The Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics offers courses, taught by experts, across a wide range. Mathematics is highly developed yet continually growing, providing new insights and applications. It is the medium for expressing knowledge about many physical phenomena and is concerned with patterns, systems, and structures unrestricted by any specific application, but also allows for applications across many disciplines.

Why this programme

◾Mathematics at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School has a strong international reputation in pure and applied mathematics research and our PGT programmes in Mathematics offer a large range of courses ranging from pure algebra and analysis to courses on mathematical biology and fluids.
◾You will be taught by experts across a wide range of pure and applied mathematics and you will develop a mature understanding of fundamental theories and analytical skills applicable to many situations.
◾You will participate in an extensive and varied seminar programme, are taught by internationally renowned lecturers and experience a wide variety of projects.
◾Our students graduate with a varied skill set, including core professional skills, and a portfolio of substantive applied and practical work.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics include lectures, laboratory classes, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in project work.

If you are studying for the MSc you will take a total of 120 credits from a mixture of Level-4 Honours courses, Level-M courses and courses delivered by the Scottish Mathematical Sciences Training Centre (SMSTC).

You will take courses worth a minimum of 90 credits from Level-M courses and those delivered by the SMSTC. The remaining 30 credits may be chosen from final-year Level-H courses. The Level-M courses offered in a particular session will depend on student demand. Below are courses currently offered at these levels, but the options may vary from year to year.

Level-H courses (10 or 20 credits)
◾Algebraic & geometric topology
◾Continuum mechanics & elasticity
◾Differential geometry
◾Fluid mechanics
◾Functional analysis
◾Further complex analysis
◾Galois theory
◾Mathematical biology
◾Mathematical physics
◾Numerical methods
◾Number theory
◾Partial differential equations
◾Topics in algebra.

Level-M courses (20 credits)
◾Advanced algebraic & geometric topology
◾Advanced differential geometry & topology
◾Advanced functional analysis
◾Advanced methods in differential equations
◾Advanced numerical methods
◾Biological & physiological fluid mechanics
◾Commutative algebra & algebraic geometry
◾Elasticity
◾Further topics in group theory
◾Lie groups, lie algebras & their representations
◾Magnetohydrodynamics
◾Operator algebras
◾Solitons
◾Special relativity & classical field theory.

SMSTC courses (20 credits)
◾Advanced Functional Analysis
◾Advanced Mathematical Methods

The project titles are offered each year by academic staff and so change annually.

Career prospects

Career opportunities are diverse and varied and include academia, teaching, industry and finance.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to positions such as:
Maths Tutor at a university.

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-black-british-writing/. Read more
This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-black-british-writing/

Introducing the MA Black British Writing - “It’s a story that hasn’t really been told”
This MA is:
- World first. Nowhere else in the world can you study this field in such a richly, referenced way - in the actual country where the writing is produced.
- Cross-disciplinary in teaching, studies, research. Writing as perceived in its broadest form on and off the page and screen.
- Collaborative. It will be taught by Professor Joan Anim-Addo and Dr Deirdre Osborne, who share its vision and will co-teach the modules.
- Inclusive. We welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people – those seeking academic careers, professionals who are returning to learning, artists who wish to develop their analytic and critical thinking skills.
- Connected to local, national and international research streams. Both tutors have well-established research profiles with publications, and track records in convening public events in the field.

Why is this an important degree?

"“A Master’s degree programme that enables the serious study of the creative and artistic history and achievement of black British novelists, poets, short story writers, essayists, and playwrights.”
Professor R. Victoria Arana, Howard University, Washington DC

At the end of 2011 it was reported that of over 14,000 university professors in the UK, only 50 were black and overwhelmingly, outside the humanities disciplines. This was followed by confirmations that there are still no black managers in British premiership soccer (despite black footballers’ eminence in the sport), no sustained presence of black cricketers in the national team (despite the long-standing presence of the West Indies team in international competitions), and in turn, by findings that no sustained promotion trajectory exists for black police officers into the higher ranks of the police service, (while black males continue to be disproportionately stopped and searched by white police). In the light of such a broader social context, this MA is timely and necessary.

“It will produce path-breaking research and creative production based on this programme’s design, setting and leadership.”
Professor Lauri Ramey, California State University

Many established scholars of contemporary literature working in Britain, Europe, Africa, and Asia occasionally teach a module or two incorporating Black British writers, do research on Black British texts, and publish articles and books on these interests, However, this Goldsmiths MA in Black British Writing means the University of London will break new ground in preparing and empowering scholar-specialists in this growing and exciting field of study.

“I fully endorse this course because I believe in its intellectual and cultural necessity.”
Kwame Kwei-Armah, playwright and Artistic Director, Centerstage, Baltimore

If the humanities are to serve the indigenous multi-cultures of Britain, the building of a critical infrastructure that retrieves, assesses and articulates a fuller compass of inclusion is vital for intellectual and public awareness. In studying this MA, you will become part of this process.

“A landmark for Black culture.”
Hannah Pool, journalist

The MA provides opportunities to experience events featuring many of the writers and practitioners studied. It also gives you contact with contemporary Black British writing, drama and performance from within Britain. You will have access to the Black Plays Archive at the Royal National Theatre as part of fieldwork tasks and further research.

“From my hundreds of visits to schools, colleges and libraries in the last ten years or so, I know there is a hunger out there for black British writing. This course will add to the fabric of British literature.”
Alex Wheatle MBE, novelist

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Deirdre Osborne

Overview

The MA draws upon the expertise of literary, drama and theatre specialists from the Departments of Theatre and Performance and the Centre for Caribbean Studies.

The degree is made up of:

two compulsory core modules
a dissertation
two option modules
Full-time students study both compulsory modules and two options and write their dissertation across one year of study.

Part-time students select one compulsory module and one option per year across two years and write their dissertation in their second year of study.

Intermediate exit points

It's possible to exit the programme early with a Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate if specific learning outcomes have been achieved. These options can be discussed with the course convenor.

Skills

You will develop transferable writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. Your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced. You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical, political and literary issues that shape and impact upon contemporary literary and performance texts.

We are oriented towards serving your individual goals and aspirations for self-development; it will generate an articulable body of transferable knowledge and skills.

Besides developing your knowledge of best current research methods and of facts and concepts specific to the featured field of study, the proposed programme will offer training in:

discerning vital literary and dramatic roots
recognising how the dynamics of creative and cultural movements interrelate
exchanging information effectively within a variety of intellectual, creative arts, and local communities

Careers

The MA’s design allows for a diverse range of applications of its contents to careers including education, counselling, community arts, arts practice, social services, cultural organisations, or towards research degrees (MPhil; PhD).

Our courses consolidate the influential presence of contemporary Black British writing. It is recognised as both intrinsic to conceptions of British cultural heritage but also distinctive within the body of British writing.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is one of a range of special educational needs courses that are offered by the University of South Wales at postgraduate level. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is one of a range of special educational needs courses that are offered by the University of South Wales at postgraduate level.

This course is for you if you have at least two years experience of working with students with SpLD and are looking to gain a qualification to enable you to apply to the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) for either Approved Teacher Status (ATS or ATS HE/FE) or an Associate Membership of the BDA (AMBDA or AMBDA FE/HE).

The course may also be of interest to other approved professionals, such as speech and language or occupational therapists and educational psychologists.

The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is recognised by the British Dyslexia Association for the award of Associate Member of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA). It is also recognised by the Joint Council for Qualifications as the appropriate training for completing Access Arrangements in Secondary Schools.

Those who have obtained the PG Diploma in Spld (AMBDA) are eligible to assess and diagnose dyslexia.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1280-postgraduate-diploma-sen-specific-learning-difficulties

What you study

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma SEN in SpLD you must pass four taught modules:

• Understanding Learning Difficulties and Disabilities which is taught on the campus or can be accessed via e-learning
• Specific Learning Difficulties
• Managing and Supporting Children and Young People with Specific Learning Difficulties
• Research Methodology

Both SpLD modules focus not only upon specific difficulties in literacy and numeracy, but address the wider spectrum of potentially associated conditions eg. Dyspraxia, Attention Deficit Disorder and Asperger’s Syndrome.

The course enables participants to gain knowledge of:

• The vast range of differences within the SpLD continuum
• Current research on the identification of learners experiencing problems with literacy and numeracy
• Assessing individual learning needs, using both standardised and non-standardised methods
• Planning programmes of work for individual pupils based on initial and on-going assessment
• The effects on learning, self esteem and behaviour of SpLD
• Monitoring the progress of learners who may show uneven or intermittent standards of achievement
• A variety of strategies and resources, including ICT and technical aids, for assisting pupil organisation, drafting and presentation of work
• The monitoring, evaluation and auditing responsibilities within school or service, in respect of the quality of provision for pupils with SpLD.

Learning and teaching methods

Students undertake two modules in year one, and two modules in year two. Both SpLD modules are taught on Monday evenings for three hours on campus over a period of 12 consecutive weeks.

Assessment methods

The first module is assessed on the basis of a written assignment of 5,000 words (or equivalent).

The second module is assessed in two ways:
- For students seeking a professional award, the successful completion of 30 hours of teaching experience and assessment of relevant files (equivalent to 5,000 words)

- For other participants, one 5,000 word assignment, or the equivalent

Employment Prospects

Most students proceed to the MA dissertation, in order to achieve the award of MA SEN.

Following successful completion of the course, some students have gained posts as school and college SENCOs, specialist tutors in SPLD services, set up their own SpLD consultancies, or become LEA Advisors. Others have published books and papers on the subject and gained doctorate awards.

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Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists. Read more
Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists.

As a play therapist, you will help children come to terms with traumatic events in their lives through the use of play, where the child has the freedom and opportunity to express themselves by recreating their own world during their time with you.

Whether you're looking for a change in career, wanting to add therapeutic play to your existing psychological therapies, social work or medical skillset, or if you are a graduate just starting out in the field, this professional course, delivered in partnership with the Academy of Play and Child Psychotherapy Ltd (APAC), allows you to work under supervision with individual children who have slight to moderate problems. Please note that all applications and queries for this course will be dealt with by APAC, and that start dates may differ depending on your location of study. Find out more on the APAC website

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: we entered an increased number of units for this assessment, up from 11% in 2008 to 33% in 201.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/therapeuticplay_pgcert

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will be able to practise, with the guidance of a supervisor, using therapeutic play skills in schools and other settings including primary health care, providing emotional support for slight to moderate problems with individual children. If you are already working as a self-employed play therapist, this qualification will give you added confidence to continue working and offering your services as a practitioner.

- Play Therapist
- Play Worker
- Children's Nurse
- Nursery Nurse

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will undertake 100 hours of clinical practice in either a primary school, special needs school, nursery, primary health care, hospital, care home or adoption and foster care setting, where you will apply your learning in a practical setting.

Our Faculty of Health and Social Sciences has a well-established Playwork team and over recent years has developed close links with APAC and professional organisations Play Therapy UK and Play Therapy International.

Modules

Orientation and Setting Up Play Therapy Practice Using Non-Directive Play Therapy
You will be introduced to the principles of non-directive play and the therapeutic play continuum so you will be prepared to work one to one with children who have slight to moderate social, emotional and behaviour difficulties.

Using Expressive Arts Therapy to Reach the Unconscious
Add to your repertoire of play therapy tools and conditions, and study the main research methods that are applicable to play therapy and the fundamentals of neurobiology showing the beneficial effects of play.

Using Symbolic Play Therapy Tools and Metaphor Safely
Gain a sound working knowledge of child protection issues and add to your repertoire of therapeutic play media by including art, therapeutic story telling, movement, clay and sand therapy.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This exciting, innovative two year pre-registration course is the first of its kind in Scotland that is underpinned by masters level education, enabling you to become a highly educated nurse with longer term potential for management, leadership, consultancy, educational and research roles. Read more
This exciting, innovative two year pre-registration course is the first of its kind in Scotland that is underpinned by masters level education, enabling you to become a highly educated nurse with longer term potential for management, leadership, consultancy, educational and research roles.

About the programme

Designed for graduates with an appropriate degree in health, biological or social sciences, nursing or a related subject wishing to change careers, this programme will prepare student nurses for professional registration. There is a strong evidence-based focus which develops existing knowledge and research skills and you will engage in a combination of theory, clinical simulation, reflection, personal development planning and practice learning experiences. Ongoing assessment, practical experience and clinical simulation will develop nurses who are fit-for-practice.

Note: Overseas applicants, in addition, must complete the academic version of the British Council International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test and achieve at least 7.0 in the listening and reading sections, at least 7.0 in the writing and speaking sections and at least an overall score of 7.0 (NMC Circular 1/2007).

Practical experience

Practice learning experiences are available in one of five West of Scotland health boards: NHS Ayrshire and Arran; NHS Dumfries and Galloway; NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde; NHS Lanarkshire and NHS The State Hospital. You will experience the 24 hour/7 day continuum of care which represents contemporary healthcare delivery, enhancing your clinical skills and integrating theory with practice. This also includes private, independent and voluntary organisations.

Your learning

The programme has three parts containing a mixture of theory and practice core modules. There are three 20 credit modules in Part 1 and 2 with Part 3 consisting of a 60 credit theory/practice dissertation module.

The programme aims to prepare student nurses for professional registration, with key components including the delivery of person-centred care, compassionate care, values-based care, the patient safety agenda and professional, legal and ethical issues.

A recognised innovative feature of the programme is the approach of clinical simulation used for skills demonstration, practice, and development throughout the programme which allows you to practise skills in a safe, realistic environment.

Our Careers Adviser says

UWS produces nurses who are fit-for-practice and who will contribute to the leadership of a competent, dynamic workforce. Graduates
secure employment within a range of healthcare areas.

Professional accreditation

This programme is approved by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Graduates are eligible to apply for professional registration within their specific field.

State-of-the-art facilities

Our campuses are equipped with artificial simulated environments with contemporary healthcare technology, where you’ll learn in a realistic context, to put your knowledge into practice. The unpredictability of patient symptoms are mimicked using sophisticated software in a clinical ward setting, ranging from low to high dependency beds.

Investment in the Domus Initiative – an older adult artificial home environment – provides you with experience in caring for older people and dementia care. In a first for the Scottish university sector, we have established A Community Orientated Resource for Nursing (ACORN) where students can practice within a simulated primary care environment.

Lanarkshire and Paisley campuses also provide midwifery students with excellent learning and teaching environments with facilities and equipment that includes a birthing room with maternal simulator and a birthing pool for simulated water births.

Life-changing research

We work jointly with a range of partners, both nationally and internationally, on our research interests, and this directly informs teaching at UWS – which means that you’ll learn from the experts.

Our programmes are informed by practice and all of our academic staff are members of the School’s Institute of Healthcare Policy and
Practice. Some of our most recent initiatives include –

• the launch of a new resource, ‘Jenny’s Diary’, which will provide an invaluable tool for families and practitioners to help people with a learning disability understand their diagnosis of dementia

• the development of a new ‘Philosophy of Care’ in partnership with Broomfield Court Care Home in Glasgow, which will look at ways of enhancing the culture and care within a care setting

• we have collaborated with Ayrshire Hospice to launch the first University Hospice in Scotland to help improve the lives of people with life-limiting illness, their families, partners and carers across Ayrshire & Arran; and Ardgowan Hospice in Greenock, with it becoming a University Teaching Hospice and launching a two-year research project with the University aimed at revolutionising the way palliative
care is delivered to improve the patient journey

• the launch of Dumfries & Galloway Recovery College – the first of its kind in Scotland – which offers short courses designed to enhance self-belief, identify ambitions and encourage learning

• in partnership with Edinburgh Napier University and the University of Edinburgh, the mental health team lead research into the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical and academic performance in student nurses

• we are working with the Glasgow Improving Cancer Journey Programme to evaluate this groundbreaking intervention in cancer care in Scotland

• we have launched a new state-of-the-art microbiology lab which will form a research base in the fight against Healthcare Associated Infection

• a collaboration with a number of European partners to develop shared academic and practicebased programmes to prepare family health nurses in Europe

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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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