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This specialist course has been rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted for 14 years with particular highlights being the high quality school placements, excellent partnerships with museums, galleries and the wider arts community and the managements and quality assurance of the programme. Read more
This specialist course has been rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted for 14 years with particular highlights being the high quality school placements, excellent partnerships with museums, galleries and the wider arts community and the managements and quality assurance of the programme.

Because the course has been built around partnerships with primary, secondary and special schools, museums and galleries, community groups and artists, it offers you the opportunity to gain a PGCE in Secondary Art, Craft and Design Education with Qualified Teacher Status.

It will prepare you to become a highly effective practitioner, able to make a significant contribution to education and equipped to teach pupils across the range of art, crafts and design.

You’ll spend the majority of your time in two contrasting secondary school placements, with the remaining time at Northumbria University or at sites including museums, galleries, studios and workshops.

Thanks to our exclusive partnership with the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, you’ll also have access to BALTIC’s extensive library and archive.

Learn From The Best

This course will encourage you to challenge and develop your own personal philosophy and pedagogy by learning from a wide field of experienced practitioners.

Our delivery team include senior schools leaders, outstanding subject specialist teachers, research active lecturers, professionals from galleries, museums and creative organisations, artists, makers and designers.

They all model the attributes of an outstanding subject teacher and will encourage you to pursue and develop your own personal areas of expertise and interest by harnessing your prior experience and practice.

The majority of teaching staff are partners in external organisations including schools, museums and galleries across the North East, with a breath of expertise in arts, craft and design education. They include staff from our partner, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.

Teaching And Assessment

The course has two main components; school based placements in two contrasting schools and an arranged timetable of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials enrichment days, studio days and project days.

The arranged timetable explores four main areas: professional knowledge and generic educational practice; art education practice and knowledge; art education skills and knowledge; and art education research, theory and philosophy.

You’ll also get the chance to customise project briefs, co-design enrichment opportunities and address art, craft and design subject knowledge and skills gaps, plus undertake a primary placement and have placements in post 16 education to explore the transition stages.

You’ll be assessed using a variety of strategies including written assignments, presentations and reflective professional portfolios. You’ll also undergo in-school assessment of your professional conduct and the planning and teaching of lessons.

This assessment enables you to have the maximum impact on pupil progress and demonstrate that you meet the requirements to be awarded a PGCE and Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) aligned to the Teachers’ Standards 2012.

Module Overview
TE6674 - Professional Studies: Art, Craft and Design (NC, 30 Credits)
TE6675 - Professional Placements: Secondary Art, Craft and Design (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7055 - Contemporary Issues & Practice in Art and Design Education (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7056 - Inquiry of Current Issues in Art Education (NC, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

You’ll spend a minimum of 120 days, which will be the majority of your time, in two contrasting secondary school placements. They will be carefully matched to your individual academic and professional requirements, making sure you get great opportunities based on your needs.

You’ll also spend a significant amount of time at BALTIC and in our partnership museums, galleries and schools where you’ll be guided and mentored by experienced teachers and senior leaders.

Your training will include access to specialist art equipment including kilns, studio based equipment and materials – both on campus, and also across the partner organisations that you train in.

On top of that, you’ll be able to tap into our well-established network of subject-specialist, dedicated link tutors, all experienced senior leaders in arts education in secondary schools. They will ensure you make the best possible progress and are well prepared for your transition into teaching.

Digital learning is integrated and embedded into the course, from e-learning platforms to digital communication and presentations, and you’ll also use our e-learning portal, social networking platforms, digital communication tools and collaborative tools.

Research-Rich Learning

Arts education is an area rich in ongoing research, which is strongly reflected in the content of this course.

Our members of teaching staff come from a wide range of backgrounds and have a diverse range of research interests and expertise.

Prominent and key research areas include arts education; craft education; how arts can improve health and wellbeing; being an artist teacher; creative and cultural sector partnerships and collaborations. Other topics covered include ceramics in education; education in museums and galleries; quality assurance in schools; and creativity in education.

These fascinating areas are all explored and applied across and throughout the breadth of teaching on this course.

Give Your Career An Edge

Graduates from this course enjoy a consistently high employment rate and many students secure a position even before graduation.

This programme has outstanding recruitment, regularly recording excellent employability for its graduates. In 2015, 95% secured a job within three months of graduation and 100% within six months of graduation.

The vast majority of students who study this course go into secondary arts education, but those who don’t often choose to work in educational roles in museums and galleries or have gone on to successfully work in international arts education and administration.

Most of our recent graduates are based in the UK but some are tapping into the growing demand for outstanding graduates with a PGCE in schools across Europe and the Middle East.

Your Future

Many of our former students have told us that this course was transformative for them, both professionally and personally, providing long term impacts on their careers, with many jumping up the career ladder to middle and senior leadership.

Many graduates also decide to return to the programme to support our trainee teachers by guest lecturing, mentoring and developments research in arts education through the programme.

Becoming a secondary art teacher has the potential to be a hugely satisfying professional choice, and you’ll be able to make an immeasurable impact on students throughout the lifetime of your career.

The course carries a consistent record of delivering fantastic opportunities for progression after completion, with high employability levels and overall year-on-year outstanding satisfaction from students.

Your placements in two contrasting school settings aim to provide you with the best possible all-round experience of teaching at secondary level, which will stand you in excellent stead when it comes to applying for teaching roles.

If you decide to continue your studies, successful completion of this course means you could carry 60 credits forward towards a full or part time Masters degree at Northumbria making it cheaper and quicker.

With an excellent national reputation and plenty of choices and opportunities on this programme to make it a really personalised experience, your professional career in arts education can really take off.

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Master of Fine Arts in the Book Arts Program began in 1985, and emphasizes the art and craft of making books by hand. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts in the Book Arts Program began in 1985, and emphasizes the art and craft of making books by hand. We are located in the College of Communication and Information Sciences, School of Library and Information Studies, at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; a verdant, traditional campus located on the banks of the mighty Black Warrior River.

Visit the website https://bookarts.ua.edu/

The program leading to the M.F.A. in the Book Arts degree is a 60-credit hour course of study comprising four basic areas: printing/publishing, bookbinding, papermaking, and the history of the book. These areas do not work in isolation. Connections between them are made as often as possible. Our emphasis is on the book as an integrated unit, although there is opportunity for a student who wishes to pursue a specific interest in one or more of these areas after the initial general year of study. We are interested in developing craft skills based on historical principles and techniques, and the artistic expression that follows.

The M.F.A in the Book Arts Program develops book artists who have well-honed technical knowledge of the various facets of contemporary bookmaking, and who have an understanding of the historical evolution of the book including its materiality, and the role of the book in society. Courses explore the reconciliation of modern sensibilities with historic craft. It is to be remembered that the M.F.A. degree, and the 2.5-3 years leading to it, is a starting point in what is a lifelong process of acquiring skills and sensibilities in the art and craft of making books.

We accept up to eight new students each year. Our students are highly motivated, and come from various undergraduate backgrounds and work experiences. We have four graduate assistantships available yearly, on a competitive basis, plus three Windgate Fellowships.

The general goal for the M.F.A. program is to develop professional artisans who are technically proficient in the book arts and cognizant of the historical background in which these various crafts evolved and of the professional environment in which our graduates will work. To reach this goal, the school has created the following two specific goals and enabling objectives.

1. To provide students with an education that inculcates craft skills required for proficiency in the book arts, and that develops a sound foundation for the aesthetics and methodology of these arts:

a. Provide each student with fundamental technical skills in each of the crafts comprised by the book arts

b. Ready each student to apply these skills and techniques in the marketplace

c. Provide advanced technical skills in each student’s area of professional specialization

d. Create in each student a desire to acquire and upgrade skills beyond the formal program

e. Provide and reinforce in each student an appreciation for the aesthetics of the crafts

f. Facilitate the choice by the end of the first semester of an initial professional specialization in either printing or binding

g. Maintain a faculty whose members are recognized leaders in their fields

2. To enhance the professional status of artisans engaged in the book arts:

a. Acquaint students with the heritage, responsibilities, trends, and standards of the profession

b. Instill in students a concept of the interrelationship of the book arts

c. Enlist faculty to assist the book arts community by helping to establish standards, by supporting professional organizations, by offering continuing educational opportunities, and by serving as consultants and lecturers

d. Encourage faculty to publish and exhibit original works whenever appropriate

e. Encourage faculty to conduct research and disseminate findings to practitioners and teachers in the book arts community

Applicants are required to submit either the general portion of the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test in support of the application for admission. Ideally, prospective students should submit a portfolio of their work (in their area of experience), and if at all possible be interviewed by the book arts faculty. For detailed information about the application process please see the Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/).

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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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The MA in Theatre Directing run in collaboration with the multi-award winning Orange Tree Theatre is designed to explore the art and techniques of theatre directing within the context of contemporary theatre making. Read more
The MA in Theatre Directing run in collaboration with the multi-award winning Orange Tree Theatre is designed to explore the art and techniques of theatre directing within the context of contemporary theatre making.

The MA in Theatre Directing is predominantly housed at The Orange Tree in Richmond, enabling students to embed their practice in the working life of this award-winning theatre. Modules are taught by both academics and theatre directors with the assistance of professional actors in the practical classes.

The programme is both academic and vocational. It aims to provide an advanced understanding of theatre production processes within a context of both contemporary theatre making and the dramatic tradition. It further aims to develop students’ craft skills and technical abilities in order to prepare them for a career in theatre directing.

The programme is aimed both at graduates who wish to advance their understanding of theatre practice in order to develop their work to a professional standard and at theatre professionals who wish to formalise their experience with a course of study and a qualification.

Why St Mary's?

Directing workshops explore rehearsal techniques, script analysis, performance, design and technical aspects of production. A key module focuses on directing as a career. There is a particular emphasis on the study of the working relationship between the director and the performer.

At the end of the course students present a showcase production at the Orange Tree, or another London fringe theatre. Study is over one year full-time or two years part-time.

Previous graduates have found assistant and associate directing work with all of the major companies, including the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre, Out of Joint and the Royal Court.

The Drama department has three fully equipped studios and a large theatre for rehearsal purposes. Technical and administrative staff support the programme throughout the year and students are provided with a production budget for their end-of-year production.

Course Content

The programme is both academic and vocational. It aims to provide an advanced understanding of theatre production processes within a context of both contemporary theatremaking and the dramatic tradition. It further aims to develop students’ craft skills and technical abilities in order to prepare them for a career in theatre directing.

The programme is aimed, then, at graduates who wish both to advance their understanding of theatre practice and to develop their work to a professional standard. It is further aimed at theatre professionals who wish to formalise their experience with a course of study and a qualification, as well as giving some the possibility of a career change to directing.

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more
The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

◾Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
◾We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
◾Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
◾Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:
◾encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
◾provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
◾familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
◾and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.

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MA Ceramics is a challenging course that embraces the unique creative potential of clay and diversity of opportunities within ceramics. Read more
MA Ceramics is a challenging course that embraces the unique creative potential of clay and diversity of opportunities within ceramics. This postgraduate course embraces all facets of ceramic work, including: craft and design, functional or decorative, one-off or mass production and sculptural and architectural.

Postgraduate Ceramics is rooted in ‘making’, the course offers a distinctive blend of practice and theory, with the theoretical components underpinning and informing the practical components of the course. The fundamental philosophy of the course is providing the opportunity for students to explore and realise their individual aspirations and potential; creating a framework for students to develop the skills necessary for a career in professional practice. Through discussion with course supervisors, students are able to form a uniquely individual, tailor made programme of study.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The course has links with UK based ceramic organisations and events, together with a number of international ceramics programmes; allowing the opportunity for overseas study.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Through the collective community, students have access to a wide range of staff expertise and extensive workshops and studio resources. All MA Course Tutors are highly regarded professional practitioners. They are actively involved within various facets of ceramic research and regularly publish and exhibit their work both nationally and internationally.

There are broad outlines to the nature of the deliverable aspects for assessment, but the final form of the assessment strategy and criteria is the result of collaboration between student and staff.

FURTHER INFORMATION

You get to see the best of contemporary work and the most influential historical work. Final year study is tailored to individual student interests and professional opportunity. Tutors have both national and international profiles and are well known for their innovative approach to the discipline.

Work within any area of contemporary ceramic practice – design (tableware, sanitary-ware, domestic products, surface, architectural etc.), production (prototyping, hand formed, or sculptural) or applied technology.

The theoretical modules inform and underpin the practical aspects of the course, providing the contextual framework for the study of contemporary ceramic design and craft practice. Throughout the duration of the course, students are required to keep an on-going 'reflective diary' that is used to record all lines of enquiry, development of ideas, critical reflection and analysis.

By the end of the programme all students should have a cohesive body of work to a professional standard and be able to clearly articulate a sound intellectual rationale and a broader critical viewpoint. The programme culminates in public exhibition of their work. The course forms part of a broader ‘community’ of MA design courses, encouraging an interchange of ideas and wider critical appreciation.

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This practice based course would suit those who wish to re-examine the direction of their previous studies or wish to explore some area of design related personal interest in depth. Read more
This practice based course would suit those who wish to re-examine the direction of their previous studies or wish to explore some area of design related personal interest in depth. Applicants are required to produce an initial statement of intent which broadly outlines their intended programme of study usually (but not exclusively) concerning further exploration of a topic within the area of 3D Design or Visual Communication. Informal enquiries are welcomed and may be followed by an advisory interview to assist in the determination of this if required. Entry is generally through an undergraduate degree in an Art and Design discipline, although we encourage applicants with other relevant professional experience.

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE

Semester 1
-Design Practice 1
-Research for Creative Design Practice 1

Semester 2
-Advanced Practice 2
-Research for Creative Design Practice 2/3

Semester 3
-Design Practice 3
-Postgraduate Project/Dissertation

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The course is essentially a practice based programme, so it is likely you will spend the majority of your time working in either craft workshops or design studios. Students taking a more theoretical approach are likely to spend more time researching, or away from the University examining design led commercial or manufacturing activity. The programme is made up of 'practice' modules, supported by core modules - Research and Creative Perspectives, providing the theoretical and contextual underpinning to each student's programme. These modules are delivered through a programme of lectures, seminars and tutorials and provide a forum for exploring and debating the contexts of contemporary design and craft practice.

Both practical and theoretical elements of the course will be assessed at the end of each module. At the final assessment point at the end of the course, students have the opportunity of putting on a public exhibition of their work.

FURTHER INFORMATION

UCLan’s MA Design course exists within the framework of the University modular scheme. Full-time study is based over 3 semesters, with 3 modules studied each semester. Each semester comprises a double 'practice' module and a single 'theoretical' module - Research and Creative Perspectives. Part-time study is based over 5 semesters. The programme concludes with the double Practice module - Final Project Realisation, bringing together all practical and theoretical aspects of the course, through a major investigation into a particular personal area of study, leading to final assessment presentation / public exhibition. The postgraduate dissertation allows students to develop a major piece of theoretical work supporting their practice. Throughout the duration of the course students are required to keep an ongoing 'Reflective Diary' that is used to record all lines of enquiry, development of ideas, critical reflection and analysis.

The Northern School of Design offers an MA in Design by full-time or part-time study. The course encompasses a diverse range of craft and design activities across the areas of Visual Communication and Applied Arts, and places particular emphasis on 'practice', whilst also exploring the academic issues that underpin designing and making. The course aims to develop students' intellectual and imaginative power through a programme of study which forms cohesion between theory and practice. Whilst offering graduates, practising artists and designers the opportunity to develop their individual interests, the course will be made up of students representing a range of subject disciplines. This opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences is seen as a key element of the study programme.

The MA is a taught programme with one day's tuition per week (currently a Friday) supplemented by private study by negotiation. A special feature of the course is the unique blend of practice and theory which underpins the student projects. The course is taught by tutors who are themselves professional design practitioners and play a prominent role in the University's research activities. We have well equipped studios and workshops, supported by highly skilled technical staff. Supporting the craft workshops and design studios, we have excellent suites of high spec computers for CAD, assignment writing and image manipulation. The University has excellent library / study facilities with a very extensive collection of design books and periodicals, together with many e-resources and support.

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MA Curatorial Practise focuses on curating as a contemporary practice, bringing together history, theory and practice. We ask what is it that makes the role of the curator distinct, and how do we understand the essentials of curating, when it has become such a buzzword. Read more
MA Curatorial Practise focuses on curating as a contemporary practice, bringing together history, theory and practice. We ask what is it that makes the role of the curator distinct, and how do we understand the essentials of curating, when it has become such a buzzword.

The course embraces contemporary curating in historic and collection-based settings as well as contemporary venues, digital, ‘pop-up’ and site specific contexts. It is delivered by experts in the field and working curators.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course covers a wide range of curatorial approaches, from management of historical collections to creative curating of cutting edge contemporary art, craft and design. Our students come from a wide variety of backgrounds; we challenge you to develop your interests, while understanding what you share with others across our discipline. Engagement and understanding audiences are central to curatorial practice.

Engagement and understanding audiences are central to curatorial practice. You’ll develop experience in ways of sharing and presenting ideas throughout the course.

If you're studying the course full-time you will study two modules per trimester, alternatively part-time students will study one per trimester.

MODULES

Research Methodologies will introduce the generic research methodologies and the ways subject specific material, analysis and evaluation techniques can be a vehicle for personal study.

In The Role of the Curator we consider the politics of curating, real-world issues and discuss the changing role of the curator.

Collections and Collecting considers the nature of collecting and the influence of collecting on curatorial practice.

Reaching Audiences allows you to present or study a live project to a real audience.

The Master's Project is an assessment that can include a dissertation, the study of historical or archival case studies, curating an exhibition or project in a venue, or forms of digital production.

For detailed information on each of the modules go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-curatorial-practice/

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught in seminars, complemented with field visits to key venues facilitated by lead curators. We adopt a practice-led approach; while some sessions are delivered by our academics, others are delivered by our collaborators and relate to particular case studies or collections.

You’ll frequently link your study to internships, volunteering and project work.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Project based work can be developed and assessed as part of the course. Real life projects can be pursued in response to assessment assignments, especially in relation to the final 'Master's Project' double module.

For more information on assessment methods, please go to our course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-curatorial-practice/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Recent graduates have found work in: .

• Curatorial work in museums and galleries
• Galleries/Arts administration
• Self-employed freelance curatorial work and consultancy
• Publishing and media work
• Education, gallery and museum learning and teaching
• General project management outside the visual arts and museums
• Critical writing
• Academic study and teaching

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The MA Fashion degree is aimed at ambitious, talented graduates looking to enter or progress in the fashion industry and be at the forefront of global innovation and creativity. Read more
The MA Fashion degree is aimed at ambitious, talented graduates looking to enter or progress in the fashion industry and be at the forefront of global innovation and creativity. Through theory and practice you will explore fashion within a diverse range of markets and contexts; challenging the boundaries of the discipline. The curriculum will be highly relevant to both fashion graduates and those already working in the industry looking to advance their skills and knowledge. With a focus on preparing you both intellectually and professionally for employment, the course will support students to master craftsmanship and couture techniques at the same time as developing innovative, conceptual designs that break new ground.

Visiting industry professionals and studio technicians will support your exploration of traditional technical skills such as pattern cutting, garment construction, bespoke tailoring, experimental cutting and draping methods; the traditions and craft of haute couture; hand and machine finishing techniques and the use of contemporary technologies. You will be guided to refine your practice and choose to specialise in either womenswear or menswear.

As the reputation of Fashion at NUA continues to grow we continue to invest. From our campus in the heart of Norwich’s cultural quarter you will have access to industry standard resources and exceptional facilities, including three fully-equipped open plan studios overlooking the river, providing a creative and supportive environment in which to refine and professionalise your practice. With industry standard equipment you will be encouraged to take risks, challenge yourself and be open minded as you progress to the high level of practice expected.

Creative thinking and innovation are at the core of the MA philosophy and you will engage with students from across the postgraduate community to share opportunities and debate contemporary issues. You will be given the opportunity to work within specialist workshops and studios across all University departments including photography, textiles and graphic design. Through professional collaborations, live projects, guest lectures and study visits you will begin to make contacts, promote your work and embark on your professional career whilst still a student. These complement the core studio, workshop and taught sessions on research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills, meaning that on leaving NUA, graduates will be equipped to work within a broad spectrum of roles in the fashion industry.

Course Leader, Sue Chowles’ high profile career has seen her freelance for John Flett, Bodymap, Bernstock/Speirs and Harvey Nichols before forming international designer fashion label. As Design Director of Chowles-Munday she exhibited at London Fashion Week and was commissioned to design a collection exclusively for Liberty’s of London. Her distinguished career in fashion higher education has seen her fulfil lecturing positions at Nottingham Polytechnic, BA Subject Leader at the University of Brighton, MA Principal Lecturer at the London College of Fashion and the Sri Lankan Institute of Design and Technology. Her current research investigates the importance of preserving the integrity of couture craftsmanship and how it is vital that future generations are educated and informed to protect the heritage of traditional skills.

The course tutors - all industry practitioners themselves - have sold their own labels through Harrods and Harvey Nichols and worked for designers including French Connection, Nicole Farhi and Roland Mouret. With this technical and creative guidance you will be encouraged to experiment with processes and materials, and contextualise your work as the tutors support you in promoting your work within the creative sector. You will also learn how to place your work against the backdrop of design history and current trends, as you question and extend the boundaries of your design.

Scholarship and funding information is available. Norwich will be taken over by a festival of contemporary art in key venues across the city in the summer of 2016, as one of four host cities for the 8th edition of the British Art Show. The biggest touring exhibition of contemporary art in the UK has selected Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) as its lead partner in Norwich. See NUA website for details: http://www.nua.ac.uk

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We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Read more

We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Even in an increasing digital age in which the global economy and market continues to expand, the physical nature of materials is always present but it changes and is subject to contextual particularities, such as traditional practices, availability of resource and skills, emerging materials and technologies such as digital fabrication.

The programme focuses on process; the direct experience of using and making with materials; how materials are used in creative works, design and production; how new opportunities and ideas may evolve through reflective practice.

The programme employs a cross disciplinary approach and uses the workshops and expertise across Edinburgh College of Art. You will work with many materials including glass, textiles, metals, timber and concrete. You will also access and use various methods of digital fabrication such as additive manufacture and CNC routing and laser cutting.

The programme addresses directly important contemporary issues of economy, inclusion and sustainability, through the practical, collaborative and individual projects.

The programme is available to students from a variety of design and creative material practice, art, design, craft, and architecture backgrounds and from more traditional technologically based disciplines, such as engineering, looking to expand their skills and understanding in both material techniques and collaborative practice.

Programme structure

The programme is largely workshop- and studio-based. You will gain experience and expertise from a variety of tutors, support staff and technicians.

Periods will be spent in different workshops of the ECA, to explore materials and technique including: metals, glass, textiles and architecture.

As you progress through the programme you will acquire both skills and understanding of various materials, apply these in a series of projects that consider contemporary issues, culminating in a self-directed project, developed from your own experience.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Material Practice seeks to provide core learning outcomes:

  • To understand and develop further skills in materials technique and processes
  • To explore and develop cross disciplinary design and creative practice
  • To understand the evolving nature of material practice and digital fabrication
  • To understand explore contemporary issues and themes through material investigations
  • To formulate and undertake cross-disciplinary research in materials and material practice

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist with the many and various cross-disciplinary practices that operate in design professions such as product design, manufacturing, architecture and art practice.

Graduates can direct their career, having furthered their skills, explored and developed cross disciplinary design and creative practice and explored contemporary issues and themes. During the programme there will be opportunities to meet with other designers and industries.

The programme will also help those that wish to develop their own practice as fabricators, designers. artists or contractors.



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Rooted in material investigation, this course allows exploration of ceramics through art, craft and design contexts. You’ll develop skills and knowledge through an exciting combination of material investigation and research. Read more
Rooted in material investigation, this course allows exploration of ceramics through art, craft and design contexts. You’ll develop skills and knowledge through an exciting combination of material investigation and research. This will allow you to contextualise your practice in relation to current debates in art, craft and design and to develop an individual production strategy.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

You’ll receive specialised ceramics tuition from a dedicated team of academic and technical staff within the ceramics area, as well as from regular part-time lecturers and visiting practitioner/artists.You’ll be part of a lively ceramics community, based around comprehensive workshop provision and studio spaces. As postgraduate students, you’ll have the opportunity to extend and hone making skills in conjunction with developing your understanding of how a ceramics specialisation might relate to production in art, craft or design contexts.

MODULE STRUCTURE

In the first trimester, you’ll establish the direction of your creative practice through studio and workshop-based making. Research Methodologies will provide you with a strong sense of methodical purpose when thinking through and about your practise.

In the second trimester, you’ll negotiate a proposal for self-directed study. You’ll deepen your knowledge and understanding of debates in ceramics, situating the personal interests and concerns that inform your work within an appropriate contemporary context.

The final trimester comprises an individually negotiated and self-initiated body of work building on the knowledge and skills already acquired. You'll be supervised by tutorial through to completion.

For detailed information on modules and course structure go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-design-ceramics/

DISTANCE LEARNING ROUTE

Students may choose to take some or all of the modules on this course by distance learning. Teaching and tutorial support will be delivered via a combination of computer-based learning and campus visits, with assessment matched to your particular interests and needs.

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll receive specialised ceramics tuition from a dedicated team of academic and technical staff within the ceramics area, as well as from regular part-time lecturers and visiting practitioner/artists. Peer interaction across the school, along with the group dynamic within the course, is seen as critical to your learning experience. Lectures, seminars, group critiques and trips will also be central to your learning experience.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Practice modules are assessed through studio exhibition of work with a supporting statement; theory modules through written assignment and verbal presentation. The final Masters Project is assessed through exhibition and Evaluative Report. There are no written examinations.

For more information on teaching and assessment, please go to our course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-design-ceramics/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include:
• Exhibiting
• Ceramic design and museum work
• Arts administration
• Public art
• Research
• Teaching

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The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:
> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask
> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte
> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance
> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

CONTEMPORARY STRAND

The Contemporary strand addresses the actor’s relationship with the writer, from Early Modern times to the present day through the exploration of:
> Shakespeare and his legacy
> Chekhov, Stanislavski and the birth of naturalism
> the actor and 20th century playwriting
> new writing and the development of new work.

The Contemporary strand combines teaching in practical voice, movement and acting techniques with an exploration of some of the key playwrights that have helped forge the canon of Western theatre, from the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists to Chekhov and from Beckett to Kane. Uniquely, it explores the relationship between the two artists at the core of much Western theatre: the actor and the writer.
From Shakespeare and the King’s Men to the work of modern day producing houses, plays are frequently developed in collaboration between actors and writers, sometimes directly and sometimes mediated by a director. Students are encouraged to explore their role as creative artists in relation to writers and the written word. Throughout the course you will have the chance to work with, and alongside, writers on plays in development, both the next generation of playwrights on the MA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media, and established playwrights with a track record of produced plays.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage
of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa
Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools
Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.

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The Masters in Playwriting & Dramaturgy gives you a practical and theoretical engagement with the many forms of writing and production for theatre. Read more
The Masters in Playwriting & Dramaturgy gives you a practical and theoretical engagement with the many forms of writing and production for theatre. The programme is designed for those wishing to develop playwriting skills and knowledge of script development and support, opening the way to many theatre roles, including dramaturgy.

Why this programme

◾Theatre Studies at Glasgow is one of the longest-established theatre programmes in the UK. Our internationally renowned reputation for research, practice and teaching ensures an ideal environment for the pursuit of Masters study.
◾A significant part of the programme is delivered by professional writers and dramaturges, ensuring you engage with a wide variety of practices and that the programme content is relevant and up to date with the latest trends in theatre.
◾The programme includes the opportunity for playwrights to develop a major script, through workshops and staged readings with actors and directors.
◾In addition to masterclasses and workshops with external specialists, the work placement or internship builds on our long-term links and collaborations with an extensive number of theatre practitioners and arts organisations, including the National Theatre of Scotland, the Playwrights’ Studio, the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), The Tron and the Citizens’ Theatre.
◾The city of Glasgow provides an unbeatable location for the programme. Glasgow is home to a huge variety of theatres and nationally significant theatre organisations that produce and show a range from the experimental and risky to the traditional and repertory, from canonical and new writing to devised and physical performance.

Programme structure

Our programme is the only one in Scotland that combines playwriting with dramaturgy. You will undertake core practical playwriting courses and core dramaturgy courses before choosing to specialise in one pathway.

A significant part of the programme is delivered by professional writers and dramaturges. This programme also includes the opportunity for playwrights to develop a major script, through workshops and staged readings with actors and directors.

Core teaching is delivered in two semesters, followed by an independent desk- or practice-based project.

Our core courses introduce you to the foundations of both playwriting as a craft, and dramaturgy as a historical and contemporary practice.

In addition, core courses develop other skills useful to the role of the dramaturg and the practitioner, including critical reading, writing and reflection, independent research skills (such as archival and audience research), and presentation skills.

These courses will also prepare you to pursue doctoral study in the future.

Courses include
◾Playwriting
◾Dramaturgy: Histories and Practices
◾Reading and Interpreting Performance
◾Dramaturgical Work Placement
◾Research Methods
◾Independent Research Project.

Career prospects

The design of the Playwriting & Dramaturgy programme is intended to develop both the practical and critical skills of students. There is both subject-specific development (including knowledge of playwriting as a craft and dramaturgy as a role, working knowledge of the playwriting process, in-depth knowledge of plays and processes of textual and production analyses) alongside more generic skills development (including presentation skills – written and oral, a capacity for critical reflection, project management, team work, and independent research skills).

Theatre studentsThe role of the dramaturg is becoming increasingly recognised within the theatre industries, as is the capacity of playwrights to apply their skills and knowledge to other tasks (including, for example, providing script development support for emerging writers). This programme aims to equip playwrights and potential dramaturges with knowledge of other writing roles in theatre.

The critical components of this programme also provide a good foundation for students wishing to progress to doctoral study.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to become commissioned playwrights, production dramaturges, theatre critics, literary advisors, doctoral students, theatre makers and academics.

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Educating and developing future leaders and decision makers. Team taught by all SSI academics, it will involve leading academics from across the University and senior practitioners from the private sector, intelligence community, the military, NGOs, international organisations and across government. Read more

PROGRAMME SUMMARY

• Educating and developing future leaders and decision makers
• Team taught by all SSI academics, it will involve leading academics from across the University and senior practitioners from the private sector, intelligence community, the military, NGOs, international organisations and across government
• Innovative teaching includes crisis management simulations with practitioners and at NATO Allied Rapid Reaction Corps HQ
• Fieldtrips to the Balkans and Brussels to view strategic security issues at first hand
• Exposure to Whitehall and participation in joint conferences with the Royal United Services Institute
• Excellent networking and mentor and peer support

FOCUS ON CONTEMPORARY SECURITY

Focusing on insecurity in the contemporary world, you will examine the nature of strategy and how it relates to both policy and action in a fast-evolving and volatile international system. This is a world where questions are being asked of traditional institutions and levers of state-craft. There is a pressing need for creative, disciplined thinkers able to turn their ideas into action.

The MA considers threats to national, international and human security, ranging from interstate conflicts to more diverse contemporary security challenges, such as terrorism, organised crime, resource denial and cyber security. You will investigate the drivers of instability, such as competition for resources in an age of increasing demand and financial austerity and look in detail at how the instruments of strategy, such as diplomacy and strategic communications, might be more effectively integrated.
You will learn how to design and manage strategic responses to crises, considering how decisions are made and the causes and consequences of miscalculation. This is not a war studies degree, but you will become familiar with the various forms of violent conflict, and learn through case studies, how the consequences are managed and, ideally, resolved.

STRATEGY IN ACTION

The way we teach this programme is unique. Our aim is not just to expand your theoretical knowledge but to develop conceptual and practical skills in strategic analysis, planning and leadership which you will be able to apply wherever you decide to make your career (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/strategy/ma/learningandteaching/).

The MA, is taught by a carefully selected mix of internationally-respected academic experts and leading practitioners from the public, private and third sectors. Learning will have practical application, relevance and be informed by the latest thinking and hard-won experience.

Drawing on simulation and scenario-planning techniques employed by industry, government and the military, you will learn how to design and implement strategy in conditions mirroring the complexity, uncertainty and pressure experienced by senior leaders everywhere: strategy making is a transferable skill in many sectors.
Participating in exercises run on campus and, for example, at the NATO Allied Rapid Reaction Corps HQ, you will hone the strategic skills demanded of those holding top positions in international organisations, NGOs, the private sector, government and the security sector, and those who support them.

FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE

To learn more about strategy in action, you will visit international organisations and engage with think tanks and policymakers to hear from and debate with those involved in dealing with insecurity, conflict and its aftermath. Overseas field trips to post-conflict zones in the Balkans and elsewhere in Europe will give you an enhanced and intensely personal perspective of the complexities, dilemmas and consequences of security strategy (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/strategy/ma/learningandteaching/fieldtrips/).

Our innovative interdisciplinary approach will equip you with a multi-dimensional understanding of the nature of confrontation, crisis and conflict, including the political, legal, social, economic, information and military levers.

The MA will provide you with invaluable skills, insight, knowledge, and connections (via our unrivalled network of Honorary Professors and Fellows http://www.exeter.ac.uk/strategy/people/honoraryappointments/) if you wish to pursue a career in policy-making, diplomacy, the private sector, in an NGO, in the military, the media – indeed, any environment requiring strategic acumen, insight and leadership.

As an MA Applied Security Strategy graduate, we hope you will be part of a life-long network of learning and shared experience fostered by teamwork and collaboration on the course and continued through an enduring affiliation with the Strategy and Security Institute.

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