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Masters Degrees (Consumption)

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This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. Read more
This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. The programme explores claims that our contemporary world can be best understood as a consumer society and a brand culture and explores how marketing and consumerism increasingly define our experiences, social relationships and civic infrastructure. As such we seek to analyse marketing behaviour with a view to better understand how it functions as a determinative mode of production and mediation whose influence reaches well beyond spheres of consumer behaviour and marketing management and into the realms of politics, culture and the environment.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/management/coursefinder/maconsumption,cultureandmarketing.aspx

Why choose this course?

We live in an age that is often described as a Consumer Culture, as though the primary way in which we relate to each other and understand ourselves is through our own consumer behaviour. In such a world everything becomes reconfigured according to the logic of marketing and branding. This course looks in-depth at the claims of a Consumer Culture and seeks to understand it and will engage in a number of theoretical areas: branding, marketing, bio-power and neoliberalism. In short, this is a programme that seeks to develop understandings of the world in which we now live.

Department research and industry highlights

- ESRC project - Branded Consumption and Social Identification: Young People and Alcohol
- ESRC Seminar Series Award for Motherhoods, Markets and Consumption 2009-2010

Course content and structure

You will study three core units and and three elective units (one in Marketing and one in Sociology) over the first two terms. In the third term you will complete a dissertation.

On completion of the programme graduates will have:
- Considered a wide range of theoretical issues relating to contemporary lives that form the basis of marketing practice.
- This knowledge may be useful for a career in marketing professions however the primary motivation for students should be the desire to understand.
- An opportunity to pursue a research career; or use their studies to augment and progress their current careers in fields such as marketing, education, health and social care, journalism, development, social policy and politics.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, group projects and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including:
- Senior Associate at Bank of China International
- Reporter at Xinhua News Agency
- Senior Associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers
- Finance Officer at Ealing Borough Council
- Relationship Manager (Investments) at Barclays Bank

This taught masters course equips postgraduate students with the subject knowledge and expertise required to pursue a successful career, or provides a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MSc in Marketing, Consumption & Society takes a 360 degree view of the business of Marketing, addressing pertinent issues from the perspectives of organisations, consumers and society. Read more
The MSc in Marketing, Consumption & Society takes a 360 degree view of the business of Marketing, addressing pertinent issues from the perspectives of organisations, consumers and society.

This programme brings together a strong foundation in Marketing principles and theories, a variety of research approaches, a range of practical applications and a focus on experiential learning techniques enabling us to deliver both a thorough Marketing education and a set of key transferable skills required for the world of Marketing work.

A number of internships with leading Marketing companies are available to selected candidates on completion of the programme.

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The Nutrition and Health programme studies nutrition and health at the (sub)cellular, individual and population level. Nutrition and Health focuses on the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in human health and disease. Read more

MSc Nutrition and Health

The Nutrition and Health programme studies nutrition and health at the (sub)cellular, individual and population level.

Programme summary

Nutrition and Health focuses on the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in human health and disease. This role is studied from a biomedical perspective at the individual and population levels. In addition, the mechanisms underlying beneficial and adverse effects are studied at the sub-cellular (DNA), cellular and organ/ organism levels. Human nutrition is a multidisciplinary field of expertise. To solve problems in nutrition and health, you must consider chemical and biochemical characteristics, physiological and biomedical aspects, the social and behavioural context of nutrition, and the relationships between these factors. Solving problems in this domain requires multidisciplinary biomedical knowledge and skills as well as an interdisciplinary approach to communication with experts in human nutrition and other fields.

Specialisations

The specialisations within Nutrition and Health are:

Epidemiology and Public Health
Epidemiologists try to determine causal relationships in large groups of people, such as the elderly or people with cardiovascular problems; between food, lifestyle and the development of diseases. Research results act as starting points for health advice and lead to a greater understanding of cause and effect. If you know that certain behaviour leads to a disease, that behaviour can be addressed, and the effectiveness of the efforts to do so can be measured. You will be helping to improve the overall health of people and may be able to prevent food-related diseases from developing.

Complete Online Master
From September 2015, Wageningen University started the specialisation "Nutritional Epidemiology and Public Health" as the first complete online Master of Science. For more information go to http://www.wageningenuniversity.eu/onlinemaster

Nutritional Physiology and Health Status
In this specialisation, you will study various age groups and situations, such as growth, pregnancy, and food consumption behaviour. You will also review special situations including serious diseases (clinical food), during sports and activity. You may also research the food consumption behaviour and habits of individuals and how you may be able to influence that, for example, through portion sizes. In short, you will review different aspects and will learn what the effects are of food consumption patterns and the physiological processes on the body and what that means for the status of its health and illness.

Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology
In this specialisation, you will learn to use techniques, at molecular and cellular levels, to discover the mechanism driving the relationship between food and health. In toxicology, you will learn to study the possible poisonous effects of substances present in food. For instance, new ingredients in food products and additives, but also natural substances present in our food. The relationship between food consumption, food and medicines can also be researched and through this research, you will find many new leads to improving our health.

Sensory Science
This specialisation is positioned at the interface of the programmes Food Technology and Nutrition and Health. Sensory scientists deal with the way humans perceive the world and act upon sensory input. They address how sensory systems function, from stimulation and perception to cognition and behaviour. You will work with humans and products in different contexts and study the way in which product properties affect, for example, sensory perception. The study always keeps a link to the application of this knowledge in the fields of human health and the design, production and consumption of attractive healthy foods.

Your future career

Many of our graduates begin working as researchers or PhD students. Another group becomes advisors, trainers or take up other jobs in the private sector. The majority of graduates finds employment at universities (including university medical centres), research institutes (TNO Nutrition or RIVM), in the public sector (national, regional and local governments, Netherlands Nutrition Centre, District Health Authorities) or companies involved with nutrition, pharmacology and toxicology (Unilever, Nutricia, Friesland Campina, Danone Research, Novartis). As graduates progress in their careers, they usually advance to a (more) managerial level.

Alumna Pascalle Weijzen.
Pascalle did a thesis in Epidemiology and Sensory Science. After her graduation, she did a PhD project on the dynamics of food choice and sensory specific satiety. She joined FrieslandCampina afterwards, as a Researcher Sensory & Consumer Science, where she has been responsible for innovation projects aiming at strategies to stimulate healthy food choices. “I really feel I can contribute to profit for the company and to public health at the same time. In this job I still benefit from the broad nutrition and sensory expertise, the strong academic level of thinking, and the worldwide expert network which I built up during my MSc and PhD degrees.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Safety
Health and Society (specialisation)

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?. Read more
Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on human nutrition and related behaviour and consumption from the perspectives of public health nutrition, nutrition physiology and the social sciences. The programme is built around human nutrition, food behaviour and consumership, as well as related research methods.

The goal of the Master’s programme is to enable you to:
-Understand the significance of nutrition to bodily functions and health.
-Understand the social and cultural aspects that affect the food choices of individuals and communities and know how to influence them.
-Form an opinion about the multifarious issues regarding nutrition and consumption.
-Be able to analyse and solve nutritional issues and related cultural questions in an ecological and socially sustainable manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/masters-programme-in-human-nutrition-and-food-behaviour-master-of-science-2-years/1.2.246.562.17.53446974973

Programme Contents

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on:
-The role of nutrition and other lifestyle factors in promoting health and preventing illness.
-The mechanisms through which food impacts our body at the level of molecular biology.
-Food services and their management.
-Consumption behaviour and food choices, and means of influencing them and communicating about them.
-Food culture, food politics and social movements.
-Research methods in the fields of nutrition and food behaviour.
-The Master’s thesis.
-Other studies, which you can choose according to your interests.

The multidisciplinary nature of the Master’s Programme at the University of Helsinki provides numerous options for other studies. You can choose studies at other Finnish or international universities.

The courses incorporate different methods of study, such as:
-Contact teaching, lectures.
-Group work.
-Oral presentations.
-Written reports (individual, pair, group).
-Independent study.
-Laboratory work and other assignments and related reports.
-Learning journals, oral group examinations, written examinations, take-home essays.
-Seminars.

The diversity of learning methods enhances your development and application of critical thought, argumentation and problem-solving skills.

Selection of the Major

In the Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour, you can choose between three focal areas:
-Nutritional physiology: The impact of nutrition and other lifestyle factors on bodily functions and health, as well as the underlying mechanisms at the level of molecular biology.
-Public health nutrition and food services: Insight into the nutritional factors affecting the health of a country’s population and population groups and the use of this insight to promote health, as well as nutritional questions related to food services and the food industry.
-Food behaviour in a changing society: The ways in which food choices are linked to individual, cultural and social factors, the construction of identity, the consumption society, as well as food and health policies.

Programme Structure

With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including the Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-60 credits of other studies, which can include studies from your own degree programme or other degree programmes, a practical training period or international studies.
-Career orientation and career planning.
-A personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme qualifies you for work in expert, teaching, research and managerial positions in the public sector, NGOs and companies, and as an independent entrepreneur. The education provides you with profound field-specific competence and skills in knowledge work, as well as a solid professional identity.

Examples of duties available to graduates include:
-Expert in nutrition and food.
-Product manager.
-Product development manager, development manager.
-Director of food services.
-Researcher, special researcher.
-Planning officer.
-Senior inspector.
-Senior teacher or lecturer at a university of applied sciences.
-Growth entrepreneur.
-Journalist, press officer, content provider.

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The Manchester Metropolitan University Food Innovation MSc is a taught postgraduate course available with one year of full-time study, or three to five… Read more
The Manchester Metropolitan University Food Innovation MSc is a taught postgraduate course available with one year of full-time study, or three to five years of part-time study.Students complete a selection of core modules followed by a dissertation project in order to earn a full Master of Science degree.This course offers graduates from food, nutrition or an appropriate science-related subject the opportunity to progress into research, industrial or management positions in the food and nutrition industry. The course aims to give you industry relevant practical experience whilst exploring the global and local trends in food processing and food innovations. You will examine the evidence supporting the relationship between nutrition, health and lifestyle and the physiological implications of under and over nutrition throughout the life-cycle. You will learn how to analyse the issues influencing purchasing behaviour of consumers and how to evaluate various marketing strategies within the industry.Features and benefits of the course-Student membership of the Institute of Food Science and Technology http://www.ifst.org) -Up-to-date, relevant course content.-Access to state-of-the-art facilities, using the latest technology.About the CourseThroughout the course you will study a range of methods for assessing nutritional status and dietary intake. You will look in-depth at the role of nutrition and diet in high-risk groups and in relation to specific health disorders and learn to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention studies aimed at improving health.As a student of this course you will automatically be enrolled as a student member of the Institute of Food Science and Technology (ifst.org) which will give you access to membership benefits, networking and career development opportunities.Core UnitsDissertation and Research MethodsThis self-directed unit encompasses the learning and reflective analysis required to undertake a significant research project (qualitative / quantitative) related to a discipline area. It includes teaching in research methods and is an opportunity to develop academically in a chosen area of food management.Food Innovation and Product DevelopmentInnovation is an essential part of food business. Newly formulated products can deliver functional health benefits, add value, and enhance market growth. Yet 75-90% of new food products fail within a year of launch. Success in the NPD process requires a blend of business savvy with a wide range of technical research skills, in the areas of re-formulation science, food physical chemistry and sensory analysis. You will acquire and develop knowledge in these areas to become informed about current and emerging issues in food innovation, through consumer and industry perspectives around food production and consumption. Food ManagementThe food industry is the most dynamic and innovative sectors of any economy. This unit applies economics, management and marketing to challenges facing food businesses.Food Nutritional BiochemistryThis unit will evaluate and critically analyse the developments at the forefront of nutritional / food biochemistry including macronutrients, micronutrients and food processing.Food Quality and ProcessingThis unit examines the essential elements involved in the processing, preservation and packaging of food. You will undertake food processing and analytical practicals.Food Safety and Hygiene ManagementThis unit delivers core material in food microbiology, inspection, analysis, food borne disease and strategic frameworks for controlling food borne infectionGlobal Food Security and SustainabilityIssues of sustainability and food security provide critical considerations for contemporary management and operations in the food industries, from manufacturing to retail and consumption of food; the implications ranging from the local to the global social and environmental impact of commercial food consumption.Assessment detailsAssignments including critical review articles, presentations, practical experiments and data analysis reports, case studies and an independent dissertation.FundingThe following postgraduate funding may be available to study the Food Innovation MSc at Manchester Metropolitan University.UK postgraduate loans:English Postgraduate Loans – Offering up to £10,280 for eligible UK or EU students ordinarily resident in England, or EU students moving to England to study.Welsh Postgraduate Loans – Offering up to £10,280 for eligible UK or EU students ordinarily resident in Wales.Scottish Postgraduate Loans – Offering up to £10,000 for eligible UK or EU students ordinarily resident in Scotland.Northern Irish Postgraduate Loans – Offering up to £5,500 for eligible UK or EU students ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland.Erasmus funding:Erasmus Masters Loans – Offering up to €18,000 for eligible students to study a Masters abroad.Funding from FindAMasters:FindAMasters Scholarships – Offering up to £5,000 to new UK, EU and international postgraduates. FeesFull Time (UK / EU): £7,560 per yearFull-Time (international): £13,050 per yearPart Time (UK / EU): £840 per 20 creditsPart Time (international)L £1,450 per 20 credits

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The Management, Economics and Consumer Studies programme deals with the interrelationships between producers, consumers and society-at-large. Read more

MSc Management Economics and Consumer Studies

The Management, Economics and Consumer Studies programme deals with the interrelationships between producers, consumers and society-at-large. We offer specialisations for students with a Social Sciences background as well as a technical Life Sciences background.

Programme summary

During the programme, students will study the dynamics in the agro-food chain involving suppliers, producers, retailers and consumers; focusing on how they affect each other and how they affect, and are affected by, the economy and society. The domain of this programme is business and all the components of industry including production, distribution and final use or consumption. It covers managerial, economic, sociological and environmental aspects – internal and external – of households and businesses in the Netherlands, Europe and the rest of the world, in both developed and developing countries.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Management Economics and Consumer Studies you can choose from four specialisations. Each specialisation trains you to become an expert in that field.

Management Studies
This specialisation includes several options. Students can investigate and analyse the strategies and operations of companies in production and distribution networks as well as the dynamic decision-making processes involved in production. Alternatively, you may choose to focus on the various aspects of marketing and consumer behaviour in business, agribusiness and the food industry. It is also possible to acquire expertise in facility management, information systems, operations research (logistics), information management or quantitative decision modelling.

Consumer Studies
This specialisation allows you to study the behaviour, lifestyles and consumption patterns of consumers and households. Students will acquire insight into the economic and sociological aspects of consumers and households, and the factors determining consumption behaviour and patterns. Alternatively, the role of communication between the various actors in the food chain or consumer technology can be studied.

Economics, Environment and Governance
Students analyse the economic behaviour of various participants in the agricultural sector and rural areas in developed countries or study the pivotal role of agricultural and rural development in low-income countries. You can also specialise in Public Administration and Policy if you are interested in the governance of complex problems in domains of sustainable agriculture, climate change or water management. If students are more interested in environmental issues, they can focus on the economic or policy aspects of national and international environmental problems or the processes of environmentally-induced social change in modern industrial and developing societies.

Management, Innovation and Life Sciences
The goal of this specialisation, especially designed for students with a life science background, is to integrate technical and managerial knowledge. Examples of how this interaction can be of optimal use are complex innovation processes in production, logistics or market development. These processes have a high technological character in which innovation plays a central role and for which good communication and managerial skills are necessary. Three different profiles can be studied within this specialisation: innovation management, innovation in decision support and economics, and innovation in operations management.

Your future career

Graduates have career prospects as managers, consultants, researchers and teachers in the public or private sector. Career opportunities are found within financial institutions, marketing agencies or in the field of consumer affairs. Also, alumni work as policy makers in government agencies or non-profit organisations, in development and innovation in life science related businesses or organisations.

Alumnus Bart Zwartjes.
Innovate a new chip flavour, assist in expanding an encyclopedia made by consumers (Wikipedia), or write a review of a purchased product. These are just a few examples of co-creating as a consumer. Co-creation is a joint effort by company and consumer and companies have a lot to gain by this. Namely, 50-70% of all product innovations fail at market entry. Co-creation allows companies to offer products and services that meet consumer needs better. But why would consumers spend their free time helping out companies? Currently Bart works as a consultant for Cap-Gemini advising businesses on how to make successful use of co-creation.

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Applied Communication Science
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Development and Rural Innovation.

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The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Read more
The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Applications are particularly welcome from graduates who would like to study in the following areas:

- Transnational Communication and Globalization
- Political Communication
- Gender and Ethnicity
- Influence and Representation
- Production and Consumption

There are three possible routes that students can follow:

1) M.Phil or Ph.D by Research
2) Ph.D by Research under the ESRC’s 1+3 Scheme
3) ‘New Route’ or integrated Ph.D

It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice from the Centre’s Postgraduate Tutor at an early stage to ensure that they are aware of all the available options.

Subject specific modules available include (list is subject to variation):

Research Methods in Media and Communications (20 credits)
Contemporary issues in Media and Cultural Studies (20 credits)
Processes and Structures in Mass Communications (20 credits)
The Study of Mass Media Audiences (20 credits)
The International Context of Mass Communication (10 credits)
Political Communication (10 credits)
Option modules include: Film as Mass Communication (10 credits), Advertising and Cultural Consumption (10 credits) and News Management, Communication and Social Problems (10 credits).

Start month(s): January, April, July and October

Duration: Full time, at least 2 years for the M.Phil, at least 3 years for the Ph.D, 4 years for the ‘New Route’ or Integrated Ph.D scheme.

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This marketing masters is designed to help you evolve into a critically informed professional with the key analytic and strategic skills employers need. Read more
This marketing masters is designed to help you evolve into a critically informed professional with the key analytic and strategic skills employers need.

During your studies, you will be introduced to ideas that will improve your strategic thinking and your ability to devise creative solutions to marketing problems.

Distinctiveness within the diet of study comes from a focus on the contemporary consumer. Today’s consumer is more marketing savvy, more environmentally aware of the responsibilities associated with the market place, and has greater engagement with technology. Understanding this emergent being is crucial to marketing practitioners in developing innovation within the marketing field. This greater understanding will help marketers to develop more appropriate strategies and communications methods and thus facilitate more effective bi-directional communication which will assist with organisational success, but also with the creation of a more satisfied customer base. The inclusion of modules such as ‘Innovation in Consumerism and Market Research’, ‘Trends in Marketing’ and ‘Social and Sustainability Marketing’ will allow the student to focus in depth on the matters that are crucial in developing organisational success that pays due regard to the customer base.

Course content allows you to focus on how research can inform practice, and strengthen performance in complex modern markets. You will explore why organisations adopt certain marketing strategies and tactics, and how practices are likely to evolve in today’s rapidly changing international business environment.

Your studies will also focus on the increased importance of brand and reputation management, the modern driving force of new media, and the challenge of re-appropriating traditional approaches to communications.

You will challenge the broad-based concepts and philosophies of modern marketing and consider the importance of a customer-centric, service dominant approach to marketing, where the balance of power is shifting from marketer to consumer. You will gain an insight into emerging trends in contemporary marketing practice, underpinned by cutting-edge approaches to managing an organisation’s reputation and its brands. You will also learn how to communicate with the end consumer and other stakeholders through traditional and new media.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/507-msc-marketing

What you will study

Throughout your studies, you will explore a wide range of marketing philosophies and functions, challenging traditional methods and contemporary thinking. Research skills will focus on the effect of new and emerging media on modern organisational thinking. You will test issues surrounding areas such as corporate ethics, branding, and marketing strategy, as well as question communications theory and develop new ideas in line with marketing thinking and consumption.

Modules you will study:

- Strategic Marketing
This module critically examines the key elements of strategic marketing and its interface with business strategy.

- Research Methods
Develop your understanding and skills of research in a management and/or professional development context whilst undertaking a critical review of research methodologies and methods.

- Brands and Reputation Management
This module aims to provide a critique of the key theoretical underpinning surrounding the consumption, construction and reputation management of brands – a key responsibility for modern PR practitioners.

- Social and Sustainability Marketing
You will gain an understanding of social, economic, ecological issues in domestic and global markets.

- Trends in Marketing
You will learn about contemporary and emergent issues in marketing.

- Creativity in Advertising and Promotion
On this module you will learn about the best use of creative processes of ads and promotion.

- Dissertation
A significant piece of research into an appropriate area of study.

Learning and teaching methods

There is a varied lecture and seminar programme, case studies, visits, and analyses of contemporary marketing campaigns. Teaching is delivered by a team of research-active academics who maintain close links with the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM). You will have access to some of the world’s top marketing journals and publications, as well as specialist guest lectures.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course will enable students with a limited marketing background to enhance their employability and skills, and will also enable those established practitioners to consolidate their knowledge through the contextualisation of theory within practice and vice versa. This will allow a deeper understanding of the discipline within the field.

This course has been designed to meet the development needs of those who want a career in marketing. As such, it reflects the requirements of dynamic organisations of various sizes and types, in a range of sectors.

Our marketing graduates can be found in a variety of senior marketing positions with national retailers, international charities, leading financial institutions and professional sports clubs.

Many graduates have also set up their own consultancy firms or continue their studies to doctoral level, becoming experts in their own specialist fields of marketing.

Assessment methods

Assessment is assignment-based, so you can explore each subject to develop your critical and analytical skills. The final requirement is a dissertation or business research project, where you will examine an aspect of marketing in depth.

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The CIM accredited MSc Marketing draws upon the unique expertise the Business School has in the areas of marketing and society, consumer behaviour, psychology, and branding. Read more

The CIM accredited MSc Marketing draws upon the unique expertise the Business School has in the areas of marketing and society, consumer behaviour, psychology, and branding. It is especially relevant for those seeking a career as a marketing professional equipped with an understanding of how marketing and consumption work at the level of the individual and across society.

Many of the course materials such as lectures, seminars and research data will be provided in a downloadable format. The programme will develop your understanding of the theory of marketing as well as a broad range of managerial skills and knowledge for contributing to a global economy. The core modules are augmented by specialist optional modules to enable you to build up a knowledge base to suit your individual interests.

Programme structure

During the programme you will study modules (including the dissertation) totalling 180 credits.

Please note that programme structures may be subject to change.

• Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the Business School postgraduate module list at http://business-school.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/postgraduate/modules/

Compulsory modules

Recent examples of compulsory modules are as follows; Marketing Analysis & Research Term 1; Marketing Strategy Term 1; Integrated Marketing Communications Term 1; Advanced Marketing Seminars Term 2; Understanding Consumer Behaviour Term 2; Dissertation (Marketing) Term 2.

Optional modules

Some recent examples are as follows; Accounting for International Managers; Entrepreneurship: New Venture Development Leadership and Global Challenges; Principles of International Business; Tourism and Marketing; Brand Design; Consumption, Markets & Culture; Services Marketing; Purchasing and Supply Chain Management; Digital Business Models; Digital Marketing Strategy.



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A distinct, research-led course based on contemporary theory and case material which is challenging and innovative. Read more
A distinct, research-led course based on contemporary theory and case material which is challenging and innovative. Our academics have expertise in cutting edge consumer and culture industry research and is best suited to students who have a keen interest in developing an intellectual understanding of the theories underpinning marketing concepts and processes.

This course will:
- provide you with an in-depth and critical understanding of a world increasingly defined by a culture of consumerism and the role played by marketing activities in building strong customer relationships and business opportunities.

- develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the contemporary issues relating to marketing, consumers and culture

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/management/coursefinder/mamarketing.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the course is at the cutting edge of contemporary marketing and has a distinctive quality in matters relating to consumer culture and critical perspectives.

- with the option to take elective units in areas such as Arts or Sports Marketing, Digital Media Marketing, and Marketing Ethics, the course offers the opportunity to learn more about specialised topics.

- the Marketing Group has an international profile and regularly hosts visits by leading international marketing academics.

- the course hosts a ‘Marketing Camp’, where leading international scholars present their research to faculty and students.

- our academic marketing cohort is the largest in the University of London, with 10 members.

Department research and industry highlights

- ESRC project - Branded Consumption and Social Identification: Young People and Alcohol

- ESRCSeminar Series Award for Motherhoods, Markets and Consumption 2009-2010

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- developed a systematic understanding of marketing practice together with a critical awareness of current issues at the forefront of marketing in society

- evaluated critically the relevant academic literature

- evaluated research methodologies and undertaken research into marketing in society

- developed a theoretical and empirical knowledge of marketing and employed a variety of academically based marketing techniques and practices

- acquired a range of conceptual, technical and personal skills

- developed an understanding of the use and value of the case study method.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different marketing-related areas, including:
- Sales Officer at Standard Chartered
- Category Analyst at Kantar World Panel UK
- Research Assistant at Maritz Research Europe
- Private Banker at ICICI Bank
- Marketing Consultant at Viewpress TV

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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The Department of Anthropology and Sociology teaches the discipline of Social Anthropology with special reference to the societies and cultures of Asia and Africa, both past and present. Read more
The Department of Anthropology and Sociology teaches the discipline of Social Anthropology with special reference to the societies and cultures of Asia and Africa, both past and present. The emphasis given to particular regions and approaches varies with current trends in the discipline and contemporary global developments.

Course detail

You will examine behaviour in social groups, for instance the social organisation of a particular person: customs, economic and political organisation, law and conflict resolution, patterns of consumption and exchange, kinship and family structure, gender relations, childrearing and socialisation and religion.

Additionally you will gain skills that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying social anthropology at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective, where you will benefit from the exceptional global expertise of SOAS anthropologists while gaining a broad education in the subject, and an irrepressible curiosity about the world.

Expert at where the world is changing

Scholars in Anthropology have an impact on the world outside of academia—on law and government, in the arts and on public media and we are amongst the most respected in the field of social and cultural anthropology in the UK.

At SOAS, Anthropology is at the heart of the university, one of its largest and most important subjects. It is central to the shared objective of widening horizons, fostering cross-cultural perspectives, challenging taken-for-granted assumptions, and critical engagement with urgent issues.

Suitability

The MA degree programme in Social Anthropology is designed on a modular basis offering different pathways to suit, broadly, three categories of student:

• Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics and/or more regional and language-based study;

• Students with little or no previous knowledge of social anthropology wishing to acquire a broad knowledge of the discipline;

• Students with little or no previous knowledge of social anthropology wishing to take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree in anthropology, who are required to pass all the examinations with appropriately high marks.

Format and assessment

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
• Comparative Studies of Society and Culture
• Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology
• Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

The remaining unit(s) of your programme may then be selected from the Option Courses listed on our website.

Careers

A Masters in Social Anthropology at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will leave the graduate with an advanced understanding of behaviour in social groups, for instance the social organization of a particular person: customs, economic and political organization, law and conflict resolution, patterns of consumption and exchange, kinship and family structure, gender relations, childrearing and socialization and religion.

Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course of study offers graduates and experienced practitioners in food, nutrition and science and health related subjects the opportunity to move into research, health, and management positions in the food and nutrition sectors. Read more
This course of study offers graduates and experienced practitioners in food, nutrition and science and health related subjects the opportunity to move into research, health, and management positions in the food and nutrition sectors.

The course aims to give you cutting edge and relevant practical experience in nutrition, health and nutritional product development, alongside exploring the global and local impacts of sustainable food, diet and nutrition. You will examine the evidence supporting the relationship between nutrition, health and lifestyle, the impact of social and corporate responsibilities on sustainable food production and consumption, and the impact on diet and health. The medical and physiological implications of under and over nutrition throughout the life-cycle are a key feature of the programme. You will also have the opportunity to learn how to analyse the factors influencing the food consumption behaviour of consumers. The course also provides you with the opportunity to meet, engage and network with numerous food and nutrition enterprises at a leading Food Symposium and Conference.

Features and benefits of the course

-As a student of this course you will automatically be enrolled as a student member of the Institute of Food Science and Technology (http://www.ifst.org) which will give you access to membership benefits, networking and career development opportunities.
-MMU have invested in the latest body composition, exercise physiology and food technology equipment that you will use during the practical sessions on the course.
-Combination of flexible learning supported by tutorials.
-Postgraduates are eligible to become Associate Nutritionists via non-direct entry with the Association for Nutrition (AfN) http://www.associationfornutrition.org/

About the Course

Throughout the course you will study a range of methods for assessing nutritional status and dietary intake. You will look in-depth at the role of nutrition and diet in high-risk groups and in relation to specific health disorders and learn to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention studies aimed at improving health.

The course is designed to give you an excellent experience in the study of food, nutrition and health and will develop your critical and analytical skills in the scientific, commercial and social policy aspects of nutrition.

Assessment details

Assignments including critical review articles, presentations, practical experiments and data analysis reports, case studies and an independent dissertation.

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We are surrounded by advertising, marketing and media campaigns in a hugely competitive world-wide marketplace and these areas play an important commercial function within businesses and organisations. Read more
We are surrounded by advertising, marketing and media campaigns in a hugely competitive world-wide marketplace and these areas play an important commercial function within businesses and organisations.

This course brings together expertise from our top-rated Department of Sociology and Essex Business School. You investigate key theoretical and substantive debates in the critical study of advertising, marketing and media, and analyse the advertising industries in Britain, North America and newly emerging economies like India.

You explore topics including:
-Recent developments from actor network theory on market devices
-Concepts of advertising, marketing and consumption
-Contemporary marketing and management
-Media and communications
-Developing brand cultures

You will also be introduced to primary research materials, like market research data, examining debates about the historical rise of marketing-orientated businesses and the growth of the advertising agency.

Essex Business School takes you beyond the basics of a business education. Our strong emphasis on ethics and sustainable business practice in the global economy, and our expertise in international management, accounting and finance, will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary for your future career in an increasingly complex business world.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Within Essex Business School, our staff specialise in areas including SMEs, business-to-business relationship marketing, branding, marketing management, new product development and social entrepreneurship.

While maintaining core engagement with contemporary marketing practice, our staff enrich our courses with novel marketing ideas drawn from both the contemporary business world and cutting-edge academic research.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates
-Our landmark new Essex Business School building on our Colchester Campus is the first zero carbon business school in the UK. Set around a lush winter garden, the Eden-style dome gives the building its own micro-climate.

Our new building provides you with a stunning new work environment, offering:
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Terminals offering direct use of Bloomberg data, information and analytics
-A light and spacious lecture theatre, with seating for 250 students
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-Dedicated office space for student entrepreneurs
-Networking opportunities with visiting businesses
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Advertising, Marketing and the Media
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity
-Dissertation
-Strategic Brand Communication
-Critical Marketing
-Consumption, political economy and sustainability
-Sociological Research Design
-Digital Economy (optional)

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