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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. Read more
This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. The programme explores claims that our contemporary world can be best understood as a consumer society and a brand culture and explores how marketing and consumerism increasingly define our experiences, social relationships and civic infrastructure. As such we seek to analyse marketing behaviour with a view to better understand how it functions as a determinative mode of production and mediation whose influence reaches well beyond spheres of consumer behaviour and marketing management and into the realms of politics, culture and the environment.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/management/coursefinder/maconsumption,cultureandmarketing.aspx

Why choose this course?

We live in an age that is often described as a Consumer Culture, as though the primary way in which we relate to each other and understand ourselves is through our own consumer behaviour. In such a world everything becomes reconfigured according to the logic of marketing and branding. This course looks in-depth at the claims of a Consumer Culture and seeks to understand it and will engage in a number of theoretical areas: branding, marketing, bio-power and neoliberalism. In short, this is a programme that seeks to develop understandings of the world in which we now live.

Department research and industry highlights

- ESRC project - Branded Consumption and Social Identification: Young People and Alcohol
- ESRC Seminar Series Award for Motherhoods, Markets and Consumption 2009-2010

Course content and structure

You will study three core units and and three elective units (one in Marketing and one in Sociology) over the first two terms. In the third term you will complete a dissertation.

On completion of the programme graduates will have:
- Considered a wide range of theoretical issues relating to contemporary lives that form the basis of marketing practice.
- This knowledge may be useful for a career in marketing professions however the primary motivation for students should be the desire to understand.
- An opportunity to pursue a research career; or use their studies to augment and progress their current careers in fields such as marketing, education, health and social care, journalism, development, social policy and politics.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, group projects and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including:
- Senior Associate at Bank of China International
- Reporter at Xinhua News Agency
- Senior Associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers
- Finance Officer at Ealing Borough Council
- Relationship Manager (Investments) at Barclays Bank

This taught masters course equips postgraduate students with the subject knowledge and expertise required to pursue a successful career, or provides a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This cutting edge, skills-based postgraduate degree, accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and the Association for Business Psychology (ABP), enables you to select a pathway of occupational, business or consumer psychology and integrates multiple threads into one course to widen the scope for practical application and employment. Read more
This cutting edge, skills-based postgraduate degree, accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and the Association for Business Psychology (ABP), enables you to select a pathway of occupational, business or consumer psychology and integrates multiple threads into one course to widen the scope for practical application and employment.

More about this course

From learning how to select the best employees to developing advanced research skills, this postgraduate degree will prepare you for professional practice in a wide spectrum of careers.

Examining work and wellbeing, and motivation and engagement, alongside current research on leadership and consumer psychology, our experienced staff and guest lecturers share up-to-the minute practitioner insight.

You will study of occupational, business and consumer psychology in an industry context. Areas of analysis include recruitment and selection, training and development, stress management, work and wellbeing, motivation, engagement and leadership, organisational change, coaching and performance management. The course also examines the psychology of branding and consumer behaviour.

We have extensive professional networks and the University has a long-established reputation, successfully running psychology courses for over 20 years. You will enjoy an ongoing series of research seminars and links with European universities.

The degree also offers the BPS test user qualification as part of the course. Designed for professionals who use psychological or psychometric tests as part of their role, this nationally and internationally recognised qualification in test use also gives you free access to restricted psychometric and psychological tests, discounted rates on five Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) training courses and many more benefits besides.

Our lecturers are leaders in their field and are often called upon by the media to provide their expertise. Read ITV’s report by Course Leader Gary Pheiffer writing on the consumer psychology of retail sales.

Assessment is through academic essays, examinations, logbooks of professional practice, group work, client reports, oral presentations, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Association for Business Psychology. If you choose to take the occupational psychology route, this is also accredited by the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Dissertation and Professional Development (core, 60 credits)
-Managing Organisational Culture and Change (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (alternative core, 20 credits)
-Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (alternative core, 20 credits)
-Behaviour Change and Learning (option, 20 credits)
-Consumer Psychology for Marketing (option, 20 credits)
-Leadership, Engagement and Motivation (option, 20 credits)
-Psychological Assessment at Work (option, 20 credits)
-The Consumer Environment (option, 20 credits)
-Well-Being and Work (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Former students have taken up roles ranging from freelance employment advisors to senior change management consultants, and we are proud of our post MSc careers advice, and the support we give for progression to our doctorate programme.

Our graduates have gone on to work in occupational psychology, management, marketing, advertising, recruitment, research, performance consultancy, business, training, human resources and organisational change.

Previous students have gone on to Accenture, Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Rio Tinto, and in the public sector and government departments such as the Department for Work and Pensions.

Our student profiles provide more insight about our graduates. Rebecca Griffiths went on to deliver consultancy to large brands, and combine her people development and writing skills in a role as an employee engagement advisor. Change Management Consultant Ray Millican chose to study at London Met because the staff members were "approachable, realistic and very experienced in ‘real-world’ issues".

For those wishing to do the BPS Occupational Psychology chartership, post-MSc support is provided.

To become an occupational psychologist, a title protected by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), you must have Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society and be registered with the HCPC. For those wanting to achieve this, support and guidance is available through the University.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. Read more

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Graduate Certificate Program Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation

Workplace research indicates that managers and supervisors spend as much as forty percent of the workday resolving nonproductive conflict issues. Conflict that is poorly managed results in burdening costs for both the individual and the organization. Expanding worldwide development, the global economy, and population growth and associated social issues drive the intermingling of cultures and practices that increase the incidence of workplace conflict and destructive disagreement. Interest in and demand for conflict management has consequently risen.

The Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation provides students with the tools to manage, resolve, negotiate, and mediate conflict and to develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills for living and earning. Conflict management training actively engages the student in self-exploration regarding issues of perception, bigotry, bias, values, beliefs, differences, and culture. The student will learn how to verbally and physically converse without allowing differences to interfere with collaboration. Business, government, and community agencies value these skills to increase productivity and to maximize a positive workplace climate. The ability to creatively manage conflict is a skill that most employers value.

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School (graduate.ua.edu). Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 (services.graduate.ua.edu/catalog/14200.html) of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Application and Admission Criteria

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

The required courses for the certificate are as follows:

• CSM 525 Introduction to Consumer Conflict Resolution
• CSM 527 Consumer Mediation, Negotiation and Management/Advanced I/Emotional Intelligence
• CSM 528 Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management, & Negotiation/Advanced II
• CSM 559 Techniques of Consumer Counseling
• CSM 586 Consumer Human Capital Management/Advanced III

Find out how to apply here - https://studentaccounts.ua.edu/

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This course is ideal if you wish to pursue media, communications and cultural inquiry in order to develop a media-based career. Read more

Summary

This course is ideal if you wish to pursue media, communications and cultural inquiry in order to develop a media-based career.

On this course you will cover all aspects of media, communications and cultural studies, from exploring cultural theories and concepts such as Marxism, post-Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, post-colonialism and globalisation, to the developments and debates around media and cultural industries such as TV, film, print media and the internet. You will analysis the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations, especially in the changing media and web landscape.

You’ll be taught by staff who have strong research profiles with publications in the area of cultural studies theory, culture and politics, tabloid culture, reality television, psychoanalysis, television history and industry, the globalisation of media and culture, contemporary trends in the television industry, as well as travel writing.

You will become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC), giving you access to a diverse programme of research seminars, symposia and special events organised in collaboration with institutions such as the British Film Institute. Your studies are complemented by visiting lectures given by media and cultural industry professionals such as film makers and scholars from other institutions.

Roehampton's location in London is ideal for media and culture students as you can take advantage of your location by immersing yourself in the wealth of creative cultural institutions and media companies that the capital has to offer, unrivalled by any other city in the UK.

Content

On the course, you will gain an in depth understanding of the role of the media in everyday life, and of its relation to culture and formations of identity and subjectivity.

You will be introduced to, and evaluate, a number of influential and important communication theories and concepts associated with the public sphere, globalisation, promotional culture, media organisations and new media, as well as discourse analysis.

You will engage with the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations and explore debates around social difference through a consideration of various defining conditions including gender, class, ethnicity, history, nationality, sexuality, taste and consumer choices.

You will also explore the representation of social reality and the social self in both mass and new media. By focusing on a range of non-fiction formats including reality television, ‘unscripted’ video, user-generated content and the development of the social web, you will address established and newer scholarly debates concerning ‘truth telling’, confession, surveillance and the production of knowledge about the self and its place in the world.

You’ll end the year by undertaking a dissertation or research project which will give you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you.

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This degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in marketing. Read more
This degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in marketing. It explores the principles, theoretical concepts and practice of marketing within the context of business and management and will focus on developing academic and applied skills in Marketing including advertising, brand management and loyalty, customer service, public relations and market research.

For the Advanced Taught Programme students will choose four Applied Business Projects from a list which currently includes the following titles:

1. e-Business and Value Chain
2. Human Resource Management
3. International Business
4. Investment and Private Banking
5. Operations Management
6. Business Planning

Compulsory modules:

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

International Marketing: The globalization of companies is the involvement of customers, producers, suppliers, retailers and other stakeholders in the global marketing process. International marketing reflects the trend of companies selling products and services across national boundaries. This module provides an overview of contemporary international marketing issues and trends as well as the international marketing planning process. On completion, students will be conversant with the theories, instruments, realities, debates and recent developments in the field, and be capable of researching, devising and applying solutions to key decisions regarding international market entry strategies and the development and management of global brands.

Consumer Behaviour in a Global & Digital World: This module will introduce students to the main theories which purport to explain consumer behaviour from the perspective of gaining an understanding of the consumer as an individual as well as how consumers are influenced by their cultural environment. Given that the internet has become an essential part of modern day life this module will provide students with an understanding of how consumer behaviour is impacted as a result of changes in the way goods and services are marketed and sold online. This module also examines the critical issues and trends whereby the internet has changed consumer behaviour spanning across traditional/geographic boundaries.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

International Marketing Communication: This module examines the processes by which integrated marketing communications (IMC) programs are planned, developed and executed. Individual communication vehicles included in an Integrated Marketing Communication plan are explored.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Your optional modules must include AT LEAST ONE of the following:

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Other optional modules include:

New Venture Creation: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Marketing Financial Services: This module surveys the tools of modern financial services marketing, focussing on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed.

Public Sector Management: This module identifies the distinctive characteristics of the public sector in a competitive market-driven environment. Organisational forms in the public sector are reviewed, in the light of the changing culture of public services, competition, best value and public expectations.

Global Business and Culture: This module will enable students to develop a systematic understanding of the challenges of managing across national boundaries. Culture is assessed in the context of a range of contemporary classifications and discussed in a variety of conceptual, methodological and practical situations relating to the measurement and application of culture at various levels of analysis (national, industry, corporate, individual). On completion, students will be conversant with the theories, instruments, realities, debates and recent developments in the field, and be capable of researching, devising and applying solutions to key decisions involving culture as an input. Case studies are used to illustrate the complexities of cross-cultural negotiations, international expansion, and cross-border alliances/ mergers & acquisitions.

International Business: This module analyses the conditions in the international environment that drive trade between nations involving multinational enterprises (MNEs), small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the public sector.

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The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. Read more
The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. It draws on theories of print culture and book history to identify the ideological challenges to the culture of publishing and the ways in which contemporary practice has been shaped by social, economic and technological developments. The course is taught by specialists in the field and is closely linked to our renowned MA in Publishing. The core programme focuses on the theory and practice of authorship, textual production, dissemination and reception in the period 1870 to the present day.

In addition,you have the opportunity to take elective MA modules in Publishing, English and History, enabling the study of the interrelations between these disciplines.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/book-history-and-publishing-culture/

Why choose this course?

- The MA in Book History and Publishing Studies provides you with the academic skills and knowledge to extend your studies in this burgeoning and interdisciplinary field.

- This programme provides you with access to a specific selection of the vocationally oriented modules on the master's publishing programmes.

- The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Arts) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing studies and print culture in Europe. We offer full-time and part-time courses with a variety of exit awards to suit your needs and career aspirations.

- Studying any of the publishing programmes at Oxford Brookes gives you excellent employment prospects, opportunities for extensive industry links and networking in the global publishing centre of Oxford, unrivalled access to work experience and international internships, and specialist careers advice including our Working in Publishing Day.

- You will be part of large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise which will provide you with comprehensive coverage of publishing, from mass market books to magazines; print and digital dissemination.

- You will have access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes, and access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Book Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library.

- You will have the opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt, London and Bologna, and to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

- There is an industry advisory board attached to the publishing courses with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House. Additionally, we have links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods across the course. Most modules use more than one learning and teaching method. This ensures that you are exposed to a range of different learning opportunities, which helps maintain your motivation and interest.

Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures designed to provide students with the foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable them to achieve the learning outcomes for the module

- seminars and workshops designed to encourage students to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test their understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop their transferable skills and to encourage deeper learning

- field trips to book fairs, libraries and publishing archives to enable students to undertake research in print culture and publishing history

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for dissertations or major projects

- resource-based learning materials in several of our modules and virtual learning environment to support student learning through Computer Assisted Assessment and Computer Assisted Learning.

Approach to assessment

Assessment for the programme is by written course work. The assignments include researched essays, project work and the opportunity to contribute to an online journal.

Specialist facilities

Students on the course have access to the Bodleian Library and archives of local publishers, including the Oxford University Press, for research. The library at Oxford Brookes has an extensive collection of texts and journals about publishing, as well as a special collection on publishing in Africa. It also houses the Booker Archive and the André Deutsch Archive.

Field trips

A place on the tutor-led field trip to Frankfurt Book Fair which is held in October is available for applicants who have accepted their place by mid-July. The Bologna Book Fair, which occurs in the spring is also tutor-led with arranged interviews with publishers, but students organise their own flights and accommodation. The London Book Fair, also held in the spring, offers students volunteer opportunities in addition to meetings with publishers and access to many of the seminars that are held during the fair.
Attendance pattern
Attendance at lectures and seminars varies with your chosen modules. In most cases, you will have at least two days in the week without formal tutor contact hours. These times are emphasised here because you can use this time for work experience with local publishers and with fellow students in group work as preparation for presentations and reports.

How this course helps you develop

Academic writing and research skills are honed to a high level during this programme. In the second semester, assessment for the compulsory module involves contribution of a research article for an online journal. Students are also involved in the academic editing and design of the journal which is available to the public. This practice enables student to demonstrate excellence in archival and secondary research activities.

Careers

The course provides excellent prospects for students interested in further academic study in the interdisciplinary fields of media, publishing studies, cultural production and book history. In addition, students go on to work in academic publishing and are equipped to succeed in editorial positions in publishing.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girls' magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

OICPS carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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The program is structured in in two different blocks. core requirements and majors. Read more

Program Structure

The program is structured in in two different blocks: core requirements and majors.
In the first block student will develop advanced knowledge and competencies in the areas of intellectual property rights, data analysis, strategic management and corporate governance, comparative cultural policies and fundraising, project and event management, consumer relationship management and cultural mediation, performance management and evaluation,
In the second block, the student will choose one of the following major including compulsory and elective courses and workshops which aim at better defining and specializing students’ skills and professional orientation in different fields and subsector in the creative economy:

- Arts Markets, Heritage and Culture;
- Cities, Tourism and Events;
- Fashion and Design;
- Media;
- Performing Arts and Enterteinment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

The Master of Science in Economics and Management in Arts, Culture, Media and Entertainment has the following educational objectives:

- provide a business preparation (management control, planning management, marketing, government and strategy) taking into account the different business functions in order to work in the areas of contemporary arts, cultural heritage, media, tourism, show business and fashion; and to understand the evolution in the arts and culture;
- provide a unitary understanding in the various sectors of arts, culture, the media and entertainment, especially in the choice of strategy, governance and economic character of companies belonging to the same field;
- complete the business and juridical studies providing competences in subjects as economics and quantitative and juridical, so as to develop interdisciplinary problem analysis skills;
- develop competences via educational activities inside and outside the classroom which promote student-teacher interaction and interaction between the students themselves as well as complex problem analysis and problem solving skills, ability to present and discuss the results of one’s work;
- promote competence (in the business area) in the use of English and of a second EU language to work effectively and efficiently in one’s profession.

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The MSc Culture and Society gives its students the opportunity to develop expertise in the social study of cultural processes. Its ethos emphasises tight integration of leading-edge cultural theory, innovative methodologies and attention to the most significant cultural trends and practices, globally and locally. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Culture and Society gives its students the opportunity to develop expertise in the social study of cultural processes. Its ethos emphasises tight integration of leading-edge cultural theory, innovative methodologies and attention to the most significant cultural trends and practices, globally and locally.

Cultural Theory and Forms is a compulsory course designed to support you in developing a foundation in sociological approaches to cultural research. Through optional courses you are free to study and research any social processes that fall within the many broad understandings of ‘culture’. You may take courses on, or pursue independent research projects towards dissertations in areas such as textual or visual analyses of cultural texts; ethnographies of culture and media industries; studies of urban space, design or city culture; consumption and consumer culture; multi-culturalism and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; class and cultural capital.

Graduate destinations

Graduates have gone on to a diverse range of destinations including doctoral degrees, cultural policy and management jobs, teaching, creative industries (including advertising and marketing), performance arts and more.

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A distinct, research-led course based on contemporary theory and case material which is challenging and innovative. Read more
A distinct, research-led course based on contemporary theory and case material which is challenging and innovative. Our academics have expertise in cutting edge consumer and culture industry research and is best suited to students who have a keen interest in developing an intellectual understanding of the theories underpinning marketing concepts and processes.

This course will:
- provide you with an in-depth and critical understanding of a world increasingly defined by a culture of consumerism and the role played by marketing activities in building strong customer relationships and business opportunities.

- develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the contemporary issues relating to marketing, consumers and culture

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/management/coursefinder/mamarketing.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the course is at the cutting edge of contemporary marketing and has a distinctive quality in matters relating to consumer culture and critical perspectives.

- with the option to take elective units in areas such as Arts or Sports Marketing, Digital Media Marketing, and Marketing Ethics, the course offers the opportunity to learn more about specialised topics.

- the Marketing Group has an international profile and regularly hosts visits by leading international marketing academics.

- the course hosts a ‘Marketing Camp’, where leading international scholars present their research to faculty and students.

- our academic marketing cohort is the largest in the University of London, with 10 members.

Department research and industry highlights

- ESRC project - Branded Consumption and Social Identification: Young People and Alcohol

- ESRCSeminar Series Award for Motherhoods, Markets and Consumption 2009-2010

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- developed a systematic understanding of marketing practice together with a critical awareness of current issues at the forefront of marketing in society

- evaluated critically the relevant academic literature

- evaluated research methodologies and undertaken research into marketing in society

- developed a theoretical and empirical knowledge of marketing and employed a variety of academically based marketing techniques and practices

- acquired a range of conceptual, technical and personal skills

- developed an understanding of the use and value of the case study method.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different marketing-related areas, including:
- Sales Officer at Standard Chartered
- Category Analyst at Kantar World Panel UK
- Research Assistant at Maritz Research Europe
- Private Banker at ICICI Bank
- Marketing Consultant at Viewpress TV

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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If you have ambitious sports management dreams such as being involved in major sport leagues, global sports branding or international sporting events, this course could help you realise those dreams, as it has for our previous graduates. Read more
If you have ambitious sports management dreams such as being involved in major sport leagues, global sports branding or international sporting events, this course could help you realise those dreams, as it has for our previous graduates.

We take an innovative approach to the advanced study of sports management, from the sub-disciplines of HRM, marketing, finance and strategy, to their application via global sports organisations and events. You will learn adaptability, creative capacity and a solutions-focused approach.

We will connect you directly to networks of international, national and regional sport. The international reputation of this course means you are provided with privileged access to key decision-makers in the sports world. We offer unique opportunities, such as an international field visit which, in previous years, has been to Lausanne, Switzerland – home of the International Olympic Committee and many of the world’s international sport federations.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - please view the relevant web-page for more information:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-sport-management-dtfisx6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-sport-management-dtpiso6/

Learn From The Best

Our staff are leading experts in the field of international sport management. They have worked with organisations including Adidas, Sky Sports, Red Bull, Sport England, the Football League, and the Lawn Tennis Association. Staff also sit on the boards of organisations including the World Association of Sport Management, the European Association of Sport Management, the Chartered Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity (CIMPSA), and the Leisure Studies Association.

Whether you are interested in traditional sports, emerging sports, e-sports, or marketing through sport, the MSc International Sport Management has been designed to support your academic and vocational development. Staff with significant sport business experience and contacts with industry partners teach the Masters course in a sport department, rather than a business school. What this means is that all of your modules are related to sport and are taught by people who understand the relationship between theory, practice, and industry requirements.

Teaching And Assessment

Modules covered on the course include: The Sport Marketing Process; International Resource Management in Sport; Strategic Management for Sport; International Sport Event Management; and The Research Process.

Our assessments are based on the types of tasks that sports managers are required to perform, such as writing reports, making presentations, evaluating information, financial analysis and developing strategic plans. You will undertake an applied research project to complete your Masters.

All students have the support of a guidance tutor and will meet with them regularly throughout the course to help with personal and professional issues that arise.

Module Overview
SP0742 - Sports Development in Contemporary Society (Optional, 20 Credits)
SP0743 - Applied Sport Research Project (Core, 60 Credits)
SP0744 - Integrated Sport Marketing Communication (Optional, 20 Credits)
SP0745 - International Resource Management for Sport (Core, 20 Credits)
SP0746 - International Sport Event Management (Core, 20 Credits)
SP0747 - Strategic Management for Sport (Core, 20 Credits)
SP0748 - The Research Process (Core, 20 Credits)
SP0749 - The Sport Marketing Process (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Through interactive lectures from staff and visiting experts, seminars and workshops, you’ll undertake task-based learning activities that draw upon academic and professional research resources.

You’ll benefit from an action-learning approach that will help you to develop a personal toolkit of the diverse and complex skills and knowledge needed to become a creative organisational change agent.

The course’s specialised sports focus connects you directly to networks of international, national and regional sport, providing a unique insight into the global sports industry.

In recent years, we have offered a field trip to Lausanne, Switzerland, home of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), numerous international sport federations, and many other leading agencies in international sport. During this trip, which we believe is unique in the sector, students meet with representatives from these top-level international agencies to learn about current issues in international sport management.

Research-Rich Learning

Northumbria is ranked in the top 30 for excellence in sport and exercise science research power, according to REF 2014, making it the best rated university in the North East in this discipline.

Your research skills will be developed via a reflective research portfolio in semester 1. In semester 2 you will choose the focus of your dissertation study and will be encouraged to create new knowledge that can help to inform the academic and/or professional communities of international sport management.

Immersion in academic literature is a central tenet of the course, balanced with an applied professional focus. The exploration of sport management issues and debates with an international theme enhance the course’s depth and breadth of insight and critical evaluation.

Staff are actively researching a range of topics in the field including branding and consumer culture, volunteer management, organisational evolution in sport, and fan behaviour and emerging digital technologies at live sporting events.

Give Your Career An Edge

Sport attracts the very best managers, and throughout this course you will acquire and apply the knowledge and skills required by the international sport industry and the wider management professions.

Employability is embedded into this course through industry engagement opportunities, presentations by guest speakers, visits to sports venues and events and by participating in the international field visit.

Our strategy of embedding employability and enterprise throughout this course is highly successful with graduates achieving high levels of employment in graduate-level jobs globally.

You will have volunteer and employment opportunities within University sport to help you to develop your skills, experience and network, and will be encouraged and supported to find this work.

Your Future

The sport industry has changed significantly in recent years but it continues to be a dynamic and innovative working environment, creating challenges and well-paid career opportunities for knowledgeable sport managers.

Graduates of the MSc International Sports Management will have distinctive skill sets with the ability to critically discuss the concepts and key functions of international sport management as well as being able to analyse and avaluate strategy, organisational structures and design, plus organisational behaviour and operations in international, European and UK-based sports organisations.

You will be able to critically discuss the management of resources, the marketing of sport products, the strategic direction of sport organisations and the ethical, environmental and legal issues underpinning international sport management.

Graduates of this course are successfully building international careers in organisations including the International Paralympic Committee, FIBA (the International Basketball Federation), UEFA Euro 2016, Triathlon Australia, British Cycling, Pacific Sport, Basketball Bundesliga, British Athletics, Liverpool FC, the German Olympic Sport Confederation, the Rugby Football Union, the Hellenic Volleyball Federation and the Great Run Company.

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Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the early modernists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the early modern world from the mid-fifteenth century through to the early nineteenth. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of early modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Early Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of early modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of industrial revolution, of vernacular architecture and of early modern globalisation. Early Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the History of Medicine, consumer culture, print and information, court culture, ecclesiastical and intellectual history, and political thought. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Early Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

Archives and Sources (15 credits)
Issues in Early Modern History (30 credits)
*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)

Critical Practice (15 credits)
Option module (30 credits)

Easter Term (April-June)

Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9199&title=Early+Modern+History&code=V1K607&type=MA&year=2016#essentials; a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Early Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature. Read more
This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature.

Degree information

Students develop a thorough understanding of modern theories of literature, the contexts of literature and the interaction between literatures, and gain practical experience in comparative literary studies. The programme also develops the critical and analytical skills necessary for research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are two pathways through the programme: taught and research.

Taught: two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: two core modules (60 credits), one optional module (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Modern Literary Theory
-Comparative Literary Studies

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Revolutions in Literature: Writing China's Twenthieth Century
-Apocalypse Literature
-Consumer Culture in Literature
-Readings in Twentieth Century Chinese Literature and Culture: Family, Childhood, Gender
-Performance, visual media and popular culture in Africa
-Theoretical Issues in history and Literature
-Language, Culture & History
-Topics in Cultural Studies
-Translation Studies
-Comparative Medieval literature
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics, and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
-Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
-Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning
Teaching and supervision are organised on an interdepartmental basis. Teaching sessions are envisaged as interactive, with a limited amount of lecturing and an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. Assessment is based on a combination of shorter and longer essays and the dissertation.

Careers

Publishing, academic teaching, research and journalism are the most common destinations for graduates with an MA in Comparative Literature but the civil service, teaching or employment as a translator or copywriter are becoming increasingly attractive alternatives.

First career destinations of recent graduates include: London Business School, Marketing and Administration Assistant; Jaca Book, Editorial Intern; Macmillan Publishing, Editorial Assistant; Sokol Books Ltd, Antiquarian book-dealing Assistant; Sports Alliance, Lead Copywriter; Sage Publishing, Editorial Assistant; Ministry of Education, Seminar Organisation; British Library, Library Assistant; Chinese University of Hong Kong, Product co-ordinator; and Burlington Danes Academy, Graduate Teacher of English.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Executive, Felda Investment Corporation
-Editor, University of International Business and Economy Press
-Marketing Executive, I.B.Tauris
-Comparative Literature, University College London (UCL)
-PhD English, University of Leicester

Why study this degree at UCL?

With its exceptional range of modern and ancient languages and cultures, UCL provides a comprehensive environment for comparative literary study.

Departments housed in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities cover Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Ancient Greek, Hebrew, Icelandic, Italian, Latin, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish and Yiddish. The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) deals with all the major languages, literatures and cultures of Central and Eastern Europe. A co-operation agreement with SOAS, University of London, covers teaching as well as research and ensures global coverage.

Many UCL staff have comparative and interdisciplinary research interests in addition to their subject specialism. We are particularly interested in innovative approaches to literary and cultural studies, and in research with a comparative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary focus, including research in the following fields: literary and cultural theory, material and visual cultures, reception studies, themes and genres, cultural history, comparative gender and performance studies, translation studies, diaspora and migration studies, and new media.

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The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. Read more
The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. You will gain insight into the ideologically charged meanings of identity, self‑expression and embodiment.

Our Cultural Studies program allows you to engage critically with culture in its manifest expressions. Using real-world examples across the topics of popular culture, media, gender, sexuality, globalisation and consumer culture, you will analyse cultural forms and debate their significance in relation to given contexts.

Cultural Studies will lead you to question identity, community, representation, power, values and the practice of everyday life. The course draws on diverse critical perspectives as you gain the theoretical tools to understand how culture is produced, circulated and lived.

The Master of Cultural Studies is the only specialised program in Australia. Housed in the internationally recognised Department of Gender and Cultural Studies – a leading centre for research into gender and culture – you will critically engage in a dynamic postgraduate community and learn under the guidance of esteemed researchers in the field.

An optional cultural studies internship also gives you the opportunity to undertake cultural research in a business, government or non-governmental body, enhancing your appreciation of applied cultural work.
The Master of Cultural Studies assumes no background in the field; however those familiar with the discipline are also welcome to extend their knowledge.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities. Read more

Overview

This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities.

We study the major traditions of cultural theory, including semiology, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalysis, and Frankfurt School theories of the aesthetic, the media and technology. This training enables you to shape your thinking critically and develop your interests in a rigorously analytical context.

These theoretical and historical perspectives allow us to tease out the critical charge embedded in the notion of culture itself, and the transformative potential of creative and critical work in the arts and humanities.

Close reading and textuality are at the heart of the course, encouraging you to think critically about issues of modernity and postmodernity, the postcolonial, subjectivity and sexuality.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Diverse and Dynamic

Founded in 1987 (as MA Cultural Studies), and situated in the School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, this programme appeals to students from across the humanities who are interested in a broad range of objects and genres including literature, film and the visual arts, performance, music, and philosophy.

You’ll work alongside students in different creative and critical disciplines and benefit from the diverse research interests of our tutors. It’s a dynamic environment where you’ll gain valuable knowledge and skills in a city with a vibrant cultural life.

Leeds University Library is one of the major academic research libraries in the UK with extensive print, online and manuscript collections. The University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them. The School houses Parallax, published by Taylor and Francis, an internationally distributed journal of cultural theory and analysis.

Course Content

The two modules that sit at the heart of this course will develop your understanding of cultural theory over time.

You’ll develop an understanding of the ideas of “commodity” and “commodity fetish” that are central to the study of consumer culture, as well as issues around language, sign and discourse and subjectivity. Then you’ll put this into the context of the development of cultural studies, focusing on thinkers from Rousseau to Kant and Homi Bhabha. You’ll use film and other texts to explore these ideas.

In each semester you’ll also have the chance to specialise when you choose from a range of optional modules. From Derrida and deconstruction to medieval art, representations of the Holocaust, technology and the media, Jewish culture and aesthetic theory, you’ll be able to focus on topics that suit your personal interests.

At the same time, you’ll build your knowledge of research methods and improve your own skills. To demonstrate all you’ve learned, you’ll work towards presenting your research at a symposium in Semester 2 and complete a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

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