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The MSc in Supervision and Consultation. Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers. Read more
The MSc in Supervision and Consultation: Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers.

Coaching and organisational consultation skills build from this, whilst research findings inform the development of practice.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme has been designed to be flexible and responsive to the specific needs of those training, ensuring it is relevant to their particular work circumstances.

The varied professional backgrounds of students facilitates lively discussion and in-depth consideration of the application of psychotherapeutic concepts to their supervision, consultation and coaching practice.

Teaching is provided both by academic staff and experienced practitioners, who use a variety of training methods, including experiential exercises, audio-visual recordings, formal lectures and seminars.

Different psychotherapeutic and psychological approaches to supervision, consultation and coaching are taught so that practitioners can better satisfy the needs of individuals, teams and organisations seeking their services.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation is studied over two academic years and is part-time. All MSc students are initially registered for one academic year, and successful completion of all modules in the first year leads to progression into year two.

This is a specialised training course which leads to advanced knowledge and practice in the supervision and coaching of staff, and consultation to teams and organisations. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Models of Learning, Supervision and Consultation
-Frameworks of Supervision and Consultation
-Supervision of Supervision and Consultation
-Research Methods in Supervision and Consultation
-Integrative Practice
-Working with Organisations and their Contexts
-Supervision and Consultation Practice
-Organisational Supervision and Consultation
-Research Dissertation in Supervision and Consultation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Develop advanced competencies to practice supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring within applied health, social care and educational settings
-Conceptualise supervision/consultation/coaching/mentoring theory and practice clearly
-Develop a range of specific and transferable supervisory, consultation, coaching and mentoring skills and competencies
-Develop ethical awareness and relational/self-reflexivity
-Supervise/consult/coach/mentor across a range of contexts and with a range of clients/supervisees/consultees
-Practise supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring in a culturally attuned way

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme aims to promote a high-quality, vocational education which is intellectually rigorous and responsive to the changing demands of public services, the non-statutory sector and private practice.

There is a focus on ethical practice and a good understanding of the importance of a capacity to work with social difference and disadvantage in order to provide professional practice that reaches out to the widest possible range of need.

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic knowledge and in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to the chosen supervision and consultation pathway
-A systematic knowledge and in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to organisational consultation and coaching
-Originality in the critical application of theoretical, research and applied knowledge related to the training, learning, management, guidance, coaching and support needs of individual clients/supervisees/consultees, teams and organisations
-An understanding of the research process.

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in applied settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to critically evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self-evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate approaches and techniques relevant to staff and organisational supervision and consultation

Professional practical skills
-The competencies and skills needed to supervise pre- and post-qualification education, health and social care professionals following one of the four specific modality supervision and consultation pathways: CBT, Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Integrative, in culturally attuned and socially inclusive ways
-The competencies and skills needed to coach qualified health and social care professionals following one of the four specific modality organisational supervision and consultation pathways: CBT, Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Integrative, in culturally attuned and socially inclusive ways
-The competencies and skills needed to consult to teams and organisations in a flexible and responsive way through the integration of psychological approaches
-The competencies needed to provide supervision/coaching/consultation to individuals, groups, teams, and organisations
-A capacity to design and carry out a range of innovative and responsive practice approaches, and a cogent research dissertation related to supervision, coaching and consultation practice within applied context, including organisations and teams
-A capacity to negotiate and respond to feedback as part of routine professional practice

Application and evaluation
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in a variety of applied settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self-evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate supervision, consultation and coaching approaches and techniques relevant to individual staff, teams and organisations across applied settings

Synthesis and creativity
-An ability to conduct research and produce a high quality research dissertation. This includes the ability to select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
-An ability to identify modifications needed to existing organisational practices and team structures and their frameworks of working and therefore to propose new areas for investigation and development, and new solutions or alternative applications of methodological approaches

Ethical understanding
-A sophisticated understanding of ethical concerns in applied practice and research in order to anticipate ethical dilemmas
-A sophisticated capacity to identify and understand professional challenges when dealing with ethical dilemmas and how to formulate solutions in dialogue with colleagues, clients and supervisors when they arise in applied professional practice, organisational settings and research

Key / transferable skills
-A range of transferable skills necessary for employment, including critical reasoning, problem solving, group working, organisational work, oral and written communication, taking initiative and personal responsibility in complex team and organisational contexts, an understanding of the research base to practice and a capacity to undertake relevant research and apply the results
-A learning ethos to allow for on-going CPD

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The PGDip in Supervision and Consultation. Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers. Read more
The PGDip in Supervision and Consultation: Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers.

Coaching and organisational consultation practice are built on pre-existing supervision and consultation skills.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme has been designed to be flexible and responsive to the specific needs of those training, ensuring it is relevant to their particular work circumstances.

The varied professional backgrounds of students facilitate lively discussion and in-depth consideration of the application of psychotherapeutic concepts to their supervision, consultation and coaching practice.

Teaching is provided both by academic staff and experienced practitioners, who use a variety of training methods, including experiential exercises, audio-visual recordings, formal lectures and seminars.

Different psychotherapeutic and psychological approaches to supervision, consultation and coaching are taught so that practitioners can better satisfy the needs of individuals, teams and organisations seeking their services.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation is studied over two academic years and is part-time. All MSc students are initially registered for one academic year, and successful completion of all modules in the first year leads to progression into year two.

This is a specialised training course which leads to advanced knowledge and practice in the supervision and coaching of staff, and consultation to teams and organisations. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Models of Learning, Supervision and Consultation
-Frameworks of Supervision and Consultation
-Research Methods in Supervision and Consultation
-Integrative Practice
-Working with Organisations and their Contexts
-Supervision and Consultation Practice
-Organisational Supervision and Consultation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Develop advanced competencies to practice supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring within applied health, social care and educational settings
-Conceptualise supervision/consultation/coaching/mentoring theory and practice clearly
-Develop a range of specific and transferable supervisory, consultation, coaching and mentoring skills and competencies
-Develop ethical awareness and relational/self-reflexivity
-Supervise/consult/coach/mentor across a range of contexts and with a range of clients/supervisees/consultees
-Practise supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring in a culturally attuned way

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic knowledge and in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to the chosen supervision and consultation pathway
-A systematic knowledge and in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to organisational consultation and coaching
-Originality in the critical application of theoretical, research and applied knowledge related to the training, learning, management, guidance, coaching and support needs of individual clients/supervisees/consultees, teams and organisations
-An understanding of the research process

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in supervision, consultation and organisational settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self- evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate approaches and techniques relevant to supervision, consultation and organisations

Professional practical skills
-The competencies and skills needed to supervise pre- and post-qualification education, health and social care professionals following one of the four specific modality supervision and consultation pathways: CBT, Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Integrative, in culturally attuned and socially inclusive ways
-The competencies and skills needed to coach qualified health and social care professionals following one of the four specific modality organisational supervision and consultation pathways: CBT, Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Integrative, in culturally attuned and socially inclusive ways
-The competencies and skills needed to consult to individuals, teams and organisations in a flexible and responsive way through the integration of psychological approaches
-The competencies needed to provide supervision/coaching/consultation to individuals, groups, teams, and organisations
-A capacity to design and carry out a range of innovative and responsive practice approaches related to supervision, coaching and consultation practice within applied contexts including organisations and teams
-A capacity to negotiate and respond to feedback as part of routine professional practice

Application and evaluation
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in a variety of applied settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self-evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate supervision, consultation and coaching approaches and techniques relevant to individual staff, teams and organisations across applied settings

Synthesis and creativity
-An ability to identify modifications needed to existing organisational practices and team structures and their frameworks of working and propose new solutions and new areas for development

Ethical understanding
-A sophisticated understanding of ethical concerns in applied practice and research in order to anticipate ethical dilemmas
-A sophisticated capacity to identify and understand professional challenges when dealing with ethical dilemmas and how to formulate solutions in dialogue with colleagues, clients and supervisors when they arise in applied professional practice, and organisational settings

Key / transferable skills
-A range of transferable skills necessary for employment, including critical reasoning, problem solving, group working, organisational work, oral and written communication, taking initiative and personal responsibility in complex team and organisational contexts
-A learning ethos to allow for on-going CPD

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The PG Cert Supervision and Consultation. Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to enhance their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers. Read more
The PG Cert Supervision and Consultation: Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to enhance their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers.

It satisfies the requirements for registration as a supervisor for some health related professions.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme has been designed to be flexible and responsive to the specific needs of those training, ensuring it is relevant to their particular work circumstances.

The varied professional backgrounds of students facilitates lively discussion and in-depth consideration of the application of psychotherapeutic concepts to their supervision and consultation practice.

Teaching is provided both by academic staff and experienced practitioners, who use a variety of training methods, including experiential exercises, audio-visual recordings, formal lectures and seminars.

Different psychotherapeutic and psychological approaches to supervision and consultation are taught so that practitioners can better satisfy the needs of individuals and teams seeking their services.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation is studied over two academic years and is part-time. All MSc students are initially registered for one academic year, and successful completion of all modules in the first year leads to progression into year two.

This is a specialised training course which leads to advanced knowledge and practice in the supervision and coaching of staff, and consultation to teams and organisations. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Models of Learning, Supervision and Consultation
-Frameworks of Supervision and Consultation
-Supervision of Supervision and Consultation
-Integrative Practice
-Supervision and Consultation Practice

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Develop advanced competencies to practice supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring within applied health, social care and educational settings
-Conceptualise supervision/consultation/coaching/mentoring theory and practice clearly
-Develop a range of specific and transferable supervisory, consultation, coaching and mentoring skills and competencies
-Develop ethical awareness and relational/self-reflexivity
-Supervise/consult/coach/mentor across a range of contexts and with a range of clients/supervisees/consultees
-Practise supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring in a culturally attuned way

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic knowledge and in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to the chosen supervision and consultation pathway
-Originality in the critical application of theoretical, research and applied knowledge related to the training, learning, management, guidance and support needs of individual supervisees/consultees and teams

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in applied settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self-evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate approaches and techniques relevant to supervision and consultation

Professional practical skills
-The competencies and skills needed to supervise pre- and post-qualification education, health and msocial care professionals following one of the four specific modality supervision pathways: CBT, Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Integrative, in culturally attuned and socially inclusive ways
-The competencies and skills needed to consult to individuals and teams in a flexible and responsive way through the integration of psychological approaches
-The competencies needed to provide supervision and consultation to individuals, groups and teams
-A capacity to design and carry out a range of innovative and responsive practice approaches related to supervision and consultation practice with individuals and teams
-A capacity to negotiate and respond to feedback as part of routine professional practice

Application and evaluation
-An ability to systematically deal with complex issues in specific applied settings as demonstrated by problem solving
-An ability to evaluate outcomes and respond to feedback as part of a process of continuous self-evaluation and professional development
-An ability to independently critically evaluate approaches and techniques relevant to individual and team supervision and consultation

Synthesis and creativity
-An ability to identify learning and supervision needs of individuals and teams related to existing structures and theoretical frameworks and propose new solutions or new areas of development

Ethical understanding
-A sophisticated understanding of ethical concerns in order to anticipate ethical dilemmas in applied practice
-An awareness of ethical dilemmas and how to formulate solutions in dialogue with colleagues, clients and supervisors when they arise in applied professional practice

Key / transeferable skills
-A range of transferable skills necessary for employment, including critical reasoning, problem solving, group working, oral and written communication, taking initiative and taking personal responsibility in complex team contexts
-A learning ethos to allow for on-going CPD

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The aim of this MSc is to promote awareness of psychosocial aspects within any field of humanitarian work, whether in the UK or overseas. Read more
The aim of this MSc is to promote awareness of psychosocial aspects within any field of humanitarian work, whether in the UK or overseas. The programme aims to raise awareness of the different contexts that affect psychosocial well-being and access to appropriate services. The programme also aims to introduce students to different types of consultation, in recognition that most of the services provided through humanitarian agencies are delivered in response to crises or emergencies, are time limited and rely on the engagement of local populations. Consultation skills include those of engagement, development of trust, facilitation, enabling and the identification of a process by which information can be accessed, shared and evaluated.

The focus of psychosocial consultation for this programme is the collaboration with different groups to facilitate understanding of different psychosocial needs. Groups include beneficiaries; aid workers; volunteers; staff; managers; partner organisations and stakeholders, all of whom require safety, security and good psychosocial support in order to facilitate the successful completion and evaluation of projects in the UK and overseas.

The programme is understood to be the first of its kind, focusing on psychosocial issues within international humanitarian contexts (e.g. personal communication from Director of HR Services, People in Aid).

Read less
This course is aimed at all healthcare professionals including Physiotherapists, Paramedics and nurses. This course is designed to enrich personal and professional development in consultation knowledge and skills to improve clinical competence. Read more
This course is aimed at all healthcare professionals including Physiotherapists, Paramedics and nurses.

This course is designed to enrich personal and professional development in consultation knowledge and skills to improve clinical competence. This course offers an exciting opportunity to explore the expanding field of advanced practice and is aimed at all those working in areas of healthcare within their respective primary or secondary care organisations.

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop sound knowledge of anatomy and physiology and the way in which deviation from the normal may occur. It aims to enhance the students' ability to assess the patient holistically using a range of different assessment methods through systematic clinical examination of the patients' health history and the budy systems.

Through this, students will learn to manage complete episodes of care, working in partnership with others, delegation and referral as appropriate to optimise health outcomes and resources, as well as providing direct support to patients.

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The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Read more
The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Through sets of specialist modules, skills-oriented classes and workshops, and dissertation research it provides the opportunity to advance your skills and knowledge in archaeology with a view to progressing to doctoral level research, or to pick up vital transferable skills ready for working in commercial archaeology or in the wider employment market.

A unique feature of our MA is the provision of specialist strands within which students study, allowing them to gain breadth and depth in their understanding of particular periods, areas and topics. The current strands are:
-Prehistory
-Egypt / Ancient India / Near East (EAINE)
-The Classical World
-Medieval and Post Medieval Archaeology

By the end of this course, students will have had a chance to engage in advanced collection, management and analysis of archaeological data and materials; to develop a sound understanding of current archaeological approaches, concepts and practice; and to acquire specialist skills and knowledge related to their strand from our team of leading experts in the field.

Course Structure

The MA in Archaeology is a 180 credit course composed of several modules including two 15 credit modules aimed at imparting skills in archaeological research and practice, and two 30 credit specialist modules relating to the strands (usually one each, per term). A 20,000 word dissertation worth 90 credits is developed over the course of the second and third terms, and the summer, in consultation with an appointed supervisor, usually in the student’s strand.

In discussion with the department, students can take a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study in lieu of the practical skills module. There is also the option of substituting a strand specialist module with another MA module on offer in the department, and in some instances, one offered by another department in the University. For example, in recent years students have substituted a strand specialist module with a full 30 credit course on Biomolecular and Isotopic Archaeology run by the department; and The Anglo-Saxon World, an interdisciplinary course run by English, History and Archaeology. The options available vary from year to year; students should consult with the department to check for updates periodically.

Part-time students are expected to complete the course in 2 years. Typically part time students complete the two 15 credit and two 30 credit modules in the first year and the dissertation in the second year.

Module Details

Research and Study Skills in Social Archaeology (RSSSA) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 1 and aims to provide you with information and skills relevant to pursuing archaeological research for your MA dissertation and beyond. It combines thematic classes/seminars on key topics in archaeology with lectures and workshops introducing fundamental datasets and software applications for archaeology, and assisting the development of advanced visual and written communication skills.

Practical Research and Study Skills (PRSS) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 2. Students select two from a range of options in hands-on ‘Master Classes’ led by professionals and academic experts, typically taught through short blocks of workshops. These classes provide the opportunity to develop professional capacity skills, assessed through ‘authentic’ assignments, such as reports one would be expected to produce as a professional in the fields of archaeology, museums and galleries or cultural heritage.

As noted above, it is possible to substitute PRSS with a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study.

Research Topics – 30 credits
Research Topics are detailed courses focussing on particular periods, areas or themes, and are taught by the Department’s leading experts on their specialist topics. Teaching is typically delivered through a series of lectures and small group seminars/tutorials, usually over one term with sessions each week, but sometimes over the year with biweekly sessions.

Students typically chose two modules relevant to their strands, although in consultation with their academic advisor they may opt for a course which is not directly related to their strand. It is possible, as noted above, to substitute one of the Research Topic modules for another MA module run by the department. In consultation with the Department, it may also be possible to substitute a Research Topic for an MA module run by another department, or for a multi-departmental module.

Recent Research Topics can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Dissertation
The dissertation (90 credits, c. 20,000 words) allows students to develop their own line of inquiry and in depth exploration of a topic of interest to them, with the guidance of a supervisor who is usually in their strand. This may be on a topic related to a Research Topic course they have followed, but may be drawn from previous or other interests. Support is available to guide students in designing their research projects and acquiring the skills necessary for carrying out research and analysis, both through the RSSSA programme and through academic advisors and dissertation supervisors

Learning and Teaching

A full summary of the programme's learning and teaching methods can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#learning

Other admission requirements

Applicants are requested to indicate their interest in the strand they wish to follow in the personal statement of their application. Prior knowledge of strand specific areas is not mandatory, but an ability to prove previous interest or experience in the strand area would be an advantage for your application.

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A flagship programme for any primary care educator. This is the only Health Education Yorkshire and Humber approved programme for intending GP trainers that offers teaching on consultation skills. Read more

Programme Information

A flagship programme for any primary care educator. This is the only Health Education Yorkshire and Humber approved programme for intending GP trainers that offers teaching on consultation skills.

This course enables professionals working and teaching in primary care to develop the skills to critically examine key aspects of their work and to develop academic and leadership skills in education, research and service delivery.

On completion of the course you will:
• have gained a deep understanding of education in primary care
• be equipped to succeed in learning and teaching at all levels and in all primary care disciplines
• have improved your teaching skills
• have benefited from the experience of practitioners
• be able to critically evaluate consultation models and personal consultation skills and have developed ways to improve performance in future consultations
• have gained skills and ideas for your own development and the development of others
• have developed a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical approaches to research in education in primary care
• have gained the skills to critically evaluate current research and contribute to the evidence base in education in primary healthcare

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The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). Read more
The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). It is tailor-made to suit your interests in consultation with the areas of expertise offered by the School. It is designed also to suit the needs of those who are unable to attend time-tabled sessions at Bangor. It comprises two parts.)

Part 1:

Students will write two essays, each of 5000 words (30 credits each). The essay titles and content will be decided in consultation with your supervisor. However, they will follow any two topics listed below. Students will have full support from a supervisor (via e-mail, telephone, Skype, or any other means that is mutually convenient).

Topic List:

Eastern Philosophy and Religion (Hinduism, Sikhism, Shinto and Confucianism
Islamic Philosophy and ethics
Religious fundamentalism
Political Philosophy (including social theory such as Marx, Weber, Rawls etc.)
Globalization (including, multiculturalism)
The Enlightenment
Democratic theory
The Philosophy of Nietzsche
Psychoanalytic Studies
Jungian Theory
Old Testament
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Religious Experience
Part 2:

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of 40,000 words (120 credits). The subject of the dissertation will be decided by you in consultation with your supervisor. It is usually expected that the subject will relate to the broad range of topics listed above.

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This course is specifically designed for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals who wish to undertake part-time study to prepare them to become a non-medical prescriber. Read more
This course is specifically designed for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals who wish to undertake part-time study to prepare them to become a non-medical prescriber. Nurses and midwives will be awarded the NMC recorded qualification (V300 Independent and Supplementary Prescribing) and allied health professionals will be awarded an annotation with the HPC as a Supplementary Prescriber.
The leading principle within the Non-Medical Prescribing course is to prepare you to deliver high quality care by equipping you to:
- Prescribe safely and effectively
- Use resources to your optimum effect for service users
- Improve well-being and reduce inequalities
- Provide evidence-based effective care
- Engage in policy making and actively participate in the multidisciplinary prescribing team

You can expect to study four modules:

•Pharmacology and therapeutics for prescribers (30 credits) will prepare students to understand and apply the principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics directly related to prescribing practice. Practitioners will have the opportunity to critically analyse evidence based practice including risk assessment and management and to synthesise information relating to their own area of practice.
•Outline content includes: pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics; adverse drug reactions; numeracy; safe principles of prescribing; anatomy and physiology across the life span.
•Professional, legal and ethical issues for prescribers (15 credits) focuses on critically evaluating and synthesising ideas from the evidence in relation to the legal, ethical and professional issues implicit in non-medical prescribing decision making and consultations. Outline content includes: legislation and policies related to prescribing; accountability and responsibility for assessment, diagnosis and prescribing independently and within the multi-disciplinary team; patient safety in supervising, managing and evaluating prescribing decisions; prescribing effectively within a finite prescribing budget.
•Applied prescribing in the clinical context (15 credits) aims to critically evaluate the skills required for a comprehensive consultation for safe effective prescribing. In addition it is designed to promote synthesis of ideas influential in prescribing decision making. Outline content includes: appraisal of self and others regarding consultation skills in achieving medicines adherence; external pressures impacting on prescribing; different management options used to treat patients.
•Prescribing in practice for nurses and midwives / allied health professionals (0 credits) prepares students to prescribe from the British National Formulary as both independent and supplementary prescribers for nurses and midwives or as a supplementary prescriber for allied health professionals. Outline content includes: application of theory to practice; rationale for prescribing decisions; numeracy skills, writing prescriptions; prescribing in a range of scenarios. All practice experiences and practice outcomes for the whole course are based within this module.
Teaching and assessment
Our student-centred and enquiry-based approach to learning incorporates a wide variety of learning and teaching strategies, including; case studies, scenarios, small group work, action learning sets, workshops, pod casts, reflection, student presentations, supervised consultations with service users in practice and clinically focused tutorials. An essential part of the course will take place in practice settings under the guidance of a Designated Medical Practitioner, facilitated by your personal tutor. Students will also be supported by a designated qualified nurse prescriber, lead midwife for education, or supplementary prescriber for allied health, who will take up the role of preceptor at the end of the course.

Expertise
Our course team have a wide range of experience in non-medical prescribing provision. A key strength is that most are, or have been, independent and or supplementary prescribers from primary and secondary care in nursing, midwifery and pharmacy practice. The external examiner is also experienced in non-medical prescribing.

Graduate careers
A qualification in non-medical prescribing will be an essential aspect of your professional portfolio and will support your career progression through the advancement of your own practice in providing high quality patient care; thus enhancing your continued professional development needs.

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This programme's emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars who are leaders in their field. Research may be in any area of social, urban, environmental, development, political, economic, historical or cultural geography that is supported by the Human Geography Research Group. Read more

Research profile

This programme's emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars who are leaders in their field.

Research may be in any area of social, urban, environmental, development, political, economic, historical or cultural geography that is supported by the Human Geography Research Group. It is co-delivered with the University’s Graduate School of Social Science.

The programme can stand alone as a masters degree, or form the first year of a ‘1+3’ ESRC-backed PhD programme.

Students who successfully complete this programme will:

acquire transferable skills relevant to advanced researchers
develop skills in data acquisition and analysis
understand wider methodological and epistemological debates relevant to their research

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

We offer a balance between general and specialist research training. The programme combines lectures, practical work, workshops, essays, seminars and one-to-one supervision of independent research leading to delivery of a dissertation.

Compulsory courses typically include*:

Research Design in Human Geography
Methodological Debates in Human Geography
Core Quantitative Data Analysis 1 and 2
Research Skills in the Social Sciences: Data Collection
Dissertation in Human Geography

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:

Conducting Research Interviews
Contemporary Social Theory
The Documents of Life
Explanation and Understanding in Social and Political Research
Intermediate Inferential Statistics: Testing and Modelling
Listening to Children: Research and Consultation
Political Ecology
Qualitative Methods and Ethnographic Fieldwork
Survey Methods and Data
Values and the Environment
Independent research

*Courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change
The emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars at the cutting edge in order to advance your own research passions. A highlight of the programme is the postgraduate conference where you present your research to colleagues.

The University of Edinburgh has an unbroken record of teaching and research in the earth sciences going back to 1770, when Robert Ramsay became the first Professor of Natural History.

James Hutton and Arthur Holmes were prominent among those who set an academic tradition in Edinburgh that continues today with the University achieving top ratings in earth sciences teaching and research.

Our interactive and interdisciplinary research environment allows us to tackle difficult research questions, from causes of past glaciations to interactions of earth, climate and society. The ambition and quality of our research was reflected in the latest Research Assessment Exercise: 66 per cent of our research was rated within the top two categories – world-leading and internationally excellent.

Our location at the King’s Buildings campus – home to most of the University’s science and engineering research – benefits our work too. Our King’s Buildings neighbours include external institutes such as the British Geological Survey; our proximity to them strengthens these research links.

Training and support

As a research student, you will be affiliated to one of our research institutes, benefiting from an excellent peer-supported network.

As groupings of researchers with related interests, the institutes provide a forum for development of ideas, collaboration, and dissemination of results, and an environment for training, development and mentoring of research students and early career researchers.

Backed by industry

The School receives strong backing from industry, particularly in areas such as hydrocarbons and carbon capture and storage. We receive support from the EU and from major UK research councils, including the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council.

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Designed in consultation with industry, the MSc Applied Instrumentation and Control gives you a structured approach to the implementation of recent developments whilst embedding the knowledge we have acquired through many years of experience. Read more
Designed in consultation with industry, the MSc Applied Instrumentation and Control gives you a structured approach to the implementation of recent developments whilst embedding the knowledge we have acquired through many years of experience.

Using case studies throughout, you build up knowledge that is instantly applicable to industry, ensuring an efficient and relevant knowledge transfer into the work place.

Accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control.

This course has several available start dates and modes of study - please view the relevant web-page for more information:
JANUARY 2017 (Distance Learning) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00725-1DLAB-1617/Applied_Instrumentation_&_Control_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00927-1FTAB-1718/Applied_Instrumentation_and_Control?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

SEPTEMBER 2017 (Distance Learning) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00725-1DLA-1718/Applied_Instrumentation_and_Control_(Distance_Learning)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Distance Learning) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00725-1DLAB-1718/Applied_Instrumentation_and_Control_(Distance_Learning)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Programme Description

Accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control, the MSc Applied Instrumentation and Control provides a solid foundation in measurement science and control theory, practical experience of data acquisition and instrument networking, analysis of systems for condition monitoring, fault detection and control system design.

Designed in consultation with industry, the programme provides a structured approach to the implementation of recent developments whilst maintaining a secure underpinning identified through many years of experience.

Using case studies throughout, the programme provides you with knowledge that is instantly applicable to industry, thus ensuring efficient and relevant knowledge transfer. The programme will include a project which may be industrially based.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC) as meeting the Engineering Council’s further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Career Opportunities

The programme caters for an extremely wide range of industries and services for which the measurement of process variables and environmental factors are vital to their business performance. It will also be of interest to companies that manufacture and supply such measurement systems.

The range of sectors includes: petrochemicals, agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, optics and optoelectronics, medical instrumentation, power generation and the food, environmental and water industries. The employment areas within these sectors include: computer controlled instrumentation systems; process instrumentation; technical management and sales; process control and automation; sensor development and manufacture; instrument networking; instrument development; and test and measurement systems.

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The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Read more
The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Research in this fascinating area has a long and distinguished history at the University of Manchester. We have a lively research culture, with talks, seminars and conferences that you will be able to attend in addition to your taught courses. You will also be able to draw on the expertise of scholars engaged in cutting-edge research at the John Rylands Research Institute, where the programme is based. The John Rylands Library houses exceptional medieval and early-modern treasures (which are currently being digitised) and offers many exciting research and study opportunities. Staff teaching on this MA represent the disciplines of History, Art History and Visual Studies, English, Religions and Theology, Classics, and European Languages. Two pathways are available for students who wish to extend their knowledge in a particular chronological direction: Medieval, and Early Modern.

Coursework and assessment:
Summative assessment is primarily via extended pieces of written work: the dissertation of around 15,000 words, long essays of around 4,000-6,000 words, and a variety of shorter pieces for palaeography or language classes. There is a pass mark of 50% for all assignments, marks over 60% are given as merit and over 70% as distinction. In addition, depending on the units selected, formative assessment may be based on oral presentation, class discussion, and feedback on written draft material. Assessment varies from course unit to course unit; full details of the assessment procedure for individual units can be obtained from the course director.
Those who only attain 120 credits (out of 180) will be awarded the PG Diploma in Medieval Studies.

Course unit details:
The first component takes the form of the compulsory core courses and research training units. These are taken by students on all pathways:

Semester 1:
- Perspectives on Medieval and Early Modern Studies (30 credits)
- From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book (15 credits)

Semester 2:
- Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology, and Sources (15 credits)

These courses are designed to introduce you to the basics of interdisciplinary analysis, and to research training skills appropriate to the scope of the course. 'From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book' and 'Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology and Sources' are taught in the magnificent surroundings of the John Rylands Library, with the support of specialist library staff. You will get the opportunity to view and handle rare books and manuscripts from across the entire period. The aim is to consider all aspects of book production, from the roll to the codex and from script to print, as well as the uses (practical and symbolic) of texts in medieval culture. You will be introduced to a range of medieval sources, recent theoretical approaches to archival research, and learn methodological skills, such as palaeography and codicology.

'Perspectives in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Studies' aims to explore the methodological, historiographical and analytical choices that shape our study of the medieval and early modern periods. Highlighting the variety of disciplinary approaches that are in use in current scholarship, this module shall investigate a series of relevant themes within the field, and will be taught by specialists from across the School. Students will be encouraged to question issues of historical periodisation, the benefits of interdisciplinarity, and how an intellectual framework for the study of the medieval and early modern periods may be conceptualised.

The second component consists of 60-credits worth of optional modules. These options range widely over the history, literature, art and material culture of the medieval and early modern world. You may also take a language.

The modules on offer vary from year to year. Current offerings (2015-6) include:
Saints and Society: Art & the Sacred in Italy 1200-1500 (AHVS60262, 30 credits)
Prometheus Unbound: Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance (AHVS60321, 30 credits)
Renaissance Print Cultures (AHVS60362, 30 credits)
Northern Renaissance (AHVS 60341, 60 credits)
Broken Flesh: Pain, Wounds and Belief, 1300-1650 (AHVS61012, 30 credits)
Troy Stories (ENGL60752, 30 credits)
Wonders, Miracles & Supernatural Landscapes in Medieval & Early Modern Europe (HIST63192, 15 credits)
Club Med? How Mediterranean Empires Went Global (HIST64192, 15 credits)
The Secret Life of Objects (HIST65172, 15 credits)
Jews among Christians and Muslims: Introduction and Methodology in Jewish Studies (RELT70561, 30 credits)
Language: Latin or Old/Middle English (15-30 credits) - appropriate level taken to be discussed with the Programme Director, in consultation with the relevant department. Options to take other languages, such as Hebrew, Arabic, or Greek can be considered, in consultation with the programme director. A student can take no more than 30 language credits.

Medieval Pathway:
Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:
Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the early modern period.

Students may choose other relevant options from across the School, subject to approval by the relevant course directors. Details of new available options will appear in the course listing at http://www.jrri.manchester.ac.uk/study/taught-masters/ma-medieval-and-early-modern-studies/

The third component consists of the dissertation, which allows you to research a topic of your choice (60 credits).

Students on all pathways must complete a dissertation.

Medieval Pathway:
The dissertation topic selected must lie within the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:
The dissertation topic selected must lie within the early modern period.

Career opportunities:
The programme is designed to equip students with the critical skills and tools necessary for research in the history, literatures, and art of the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Many of these theoretical and methodological skills are highly transferrable, making our graduates popular with a wide range of employers.

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This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics. Read more
This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics.

You will receive training in research methods and take a taught course unit in a relevant subject area. The research topic for your project is agreed with a supervisor in advance and can be in any area of the expertise in the department research groups. The project outline will be developed in consultation with your supervisor and project work is carried out in parallel with the taught courses, becoming full-time during the third term.

This Master’s by Research will provide you with a suitable background to work as a research assistant or as the grounding for further study towards a PhD.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscearthsciencesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This course is ideal for graduates in geology and related sciences who wish to carry out independent research over a shorter time period than is possible in a doctorate (PhD) programme. It allows you study at Master's level an aspect of the geological sciences which may not be catered for by specialist MSc programmes.

- You will be involved at every step of the research project - from planning and sample collection, laboratory work, result analysis, to writing your dissertation.

- It is ideal preparation if you are interested in studying for a PhD, but would like to have further preparation and training.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department of Earth Science’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

- The Department has up-to-date computer interpretation facilities, a full range of modern geochemical laboratories including XRF, quadrupole and multicollector ICP Mass Spectrometry, atmospheric chemistry and a new excimer laser ablation facility, excellent structural modelling laboratories, palaeontology and sedimentology laboratories.

Course content and structure

The course consists of the following three components:

A Research Study Skills Course Unit
- Personal research skills (e.g. safety, time and project management, teamwork)
- IT skills (e.g. literature retrieval, web authoring, databases, modelling)
- Data analysis skills (e.g. statistical methods, GIS systems, sampling techniques)
- Communication skills (e.g. posters, oral presentation, writing papers, web pages)
- Subject-specific skills and techniques. These amount to 55% of the research skills assessment, and for example may include parts of specialist taught courses (see below), a training course on the theory and practice of chemical and isotopic analysis, or other training arranged by the project supervisor. This will include training for research in the general field of the research project, not solely what is needed to carry out the project.

A Specialist Taught Course Unit
You will choose an advanced taught course unit relevant to the subject area of your research project. The following taught units are currently offered:
- Applied Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
- Pollution Sources and Pathways
- Oceans and Atmospheres
- Risk and Environmental Management
- Geographical Information Systems
- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
- Contaminants in the Environment
- Advanced Igneous Petrogenesis
- Seismic Processing and Interpretation
- Geodynamics and Plate Tectonics
- Interpretation of Structural Settings
- Coal Geology
- Petroleum Geology and Evaluation
- Terrestrial Palaeoecology
- Palaeoclimates

Research Project
The project may be on any topic which is within the broad research themes of the Department. You will be linked to a potential supervisor at the application stage and, in consultation with the supervisor, you will develop a detailed project outline during the first half of the first term. Project work is then carried out in parallel with taught courses during terms one and two, becoming the full-time activity after Easter. A bound dissertation is submitted for examination in early September.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and understanding of a variety of analytical, technical, numerical, modelling and interpretive techniques applicable to the specific field of earth sciences

- the articulation of knowledge and the understanding of published work, concepts and theories in the chosen field of earth sciences at an advanced level

- the acquisition of knowledge from published work in the chosen area of earth sciences to a level appropriate for a MSc degree.

Assessment

Research Study Skills: this is assessed by coursework and theory examination and will include short written assignments, a seminar, worksheets and practical tests. These assessments contribute 12.5% of the course marks.

Specialist Taught Course Units: these are mostly assessed by a written, theory examination and coursework. The unit assessment contributes 12.5% of the course marks.

Research Project: the project dissertation must be submitted in early September. It will be marked by both an internal and an external examiner, and will be defended at an oral examination with both examiners. The project assessment contributes 75% of the course marks.

Employability & career opportunities

Subject to agreement and suitable funding, MSc by Research students can transfer to the MPhil/PhD programme at Royal Holloway. They may use the research carried out for the MSc towards the PhD, and count the time spent towards MPhil/PhD registration requirements, provided that the MSc research forms a coherent part of the PhD, and that the transfer is approved prior to submission of the MSc research dissertation.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Research projects in this area will centre on adaptive decision-making in animals in a range of contexts, including (a) trade-offs between social and sexual… Read more
Research projects in this area will centre on adaptive decision-making in animals in a range of contexts, including (a) trade-offs between social and sexual behaviour, learning and other components of life history, such as immune function and disease resistance, (b) associative and higher order learning in invertebrates, (c) effects of genetic differences in social behaviour on population dynamics in nematodes, (d) the evolution of insect pollinator systems.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/apply/apply-online.aspx

Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Research projects in Ecology are offered in a range of animal, plant and microbial topics including (a) competition and coexistence in animal communities and the evolution of host-parasite interactions, (b) the evolution of insect pollinator systems, (c) life history strategies and trade-offs, (d) processes in plant communities e.g. Read more
Research projects in Ecology are offered in a range of animal, plant and microbial topics including (a) competition and coexistence in animal communities and the evolution of host-parasite interactions, (b) the evolution of insect pollinator systems, (c) life history strategies and trade-offs, (d) processes in plant communities e.g. nutrient cycling and herbivory, and (d) the ecology of the lichen symbiosis and lichen-dominated ecosystems, and lichen population biology.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

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