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Masters Degrees (Consultation)

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Why Surrey?. The MSc in Supervision and Consultation. Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers. Read more

Why Surrey?

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation: Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to develop their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers.

Coaching and organisational consultation skills build from this, whilst research findings inform the development of practice.

Programme overview

The programme has been designed to be flexible and responsive to the specific needs of those training, ensuring it is relevant to their particular work circumstances.

The varied professional backgrounds of students facilitates lively discussion and in-depth consideration of the application of psychotherapeutic concepts to their supervision, consultation and coaching practice.

Teaching is provided both by academic staff and experienced practitioners, who use a variety of training methods, including experiential exercises, audio-visual recordings, formal lectures and seminars.

Different psychotherapeutic and psychological approaches to supervision, consultation and coaching are taught so that practitioners can better satisfy the needs of individuals, teams and organisations seeking their services.

Programme structure

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation is studied over two academic years and is part-time. All MSc students are initially registered for one academic year, and successful completion of all modules in the first year leads to progression into year two.

This is a specialised training course which leads to advanced knowledge and practice in the supervision and coaching of staff, and consultation to teams and organisations.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Facilities

The School of Psychology is a hub of energy, information and support. You will have access to the following facilities:

  • Two computing rooms, one dedicated to MSc students
  • Test library (300+ psychometric tests available, as well as five years of dissertations and theses from all programmes)
  • Video and audio editing (image and audio manipulation; interview and telephone recording; transcription equipment)
  • Seminar and classrooms (three fully equipped rooms for presentations and an observation suite (video and audio recording)

Supervision and consultation practice

It is essential that, during the training, you are in a position to provide ongoing supervision and consultation within your workplace. You will also need to be able to present that practice within different teaching contexts on the programme and receive advice and feedback on your practice from other trainees and staff.

Your practice during the Supervision and Consultation Practice module will be overseen via feedback forms, small group consultation, audio/video review and live observation.

Applicant profiles

There are three pathways to entry on the programme:

  • A professionally qualified psychologist registered with the Health & Care Professions Council
  • A qualified psychotherapist or counsellor (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural, systemic, integrative) eligible to be registered with the UKCP, BPC, BABCP or BACP
  • Qualification in a relevant profession with knowledge of psychology at an undergraduate/postgraduate level (teaching, medicine, nursing, human resources, social work, occupational therapy)

All candidates should have experience of providing supervision and consultation or, as part of their employment, are required to supervise and consult to others.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Develop advanced competencies to practice supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring within applied health, social care and educational settings
  • Conceptualise supervision/consultation/coaching/mentoring theory and practice clearly
  • Develop a range of specific and transferable supervisory, consultation, coaching and mentoring skills and competencies
  • Develop ethical awareness and relational/self-reflexivity
  • Supervise/consult/coach/mentor across a range of contexts and with a range of clients/supervisees/consultees
  • Practise supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring in a culturally attuned way

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Why Surrey?. The PG Cert Supervision and Consultation. Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to enhance their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers. Read more

Why Surrey?

The PG Cert Supervision and Consultation: Psychotherapeutic and Organisational Approaches programme provides experienced health and social care professionals, educators, and human resource personnel an opportunity to enhance their expertise as supervisors, consultants and trainers.

It satisfies the requirements for registration as a supervisor for some health related professions.

Programme overview

The programme has been designed to be flexible and responsive to the specific needs of those training, ensuring it is relevant to their particular work circumstances.

The varied professional backgrounds of students facilitates lively discussion and in-depth consideration of the application of psychotherapeutic concepts to their supervision and consultation practice.

Teaching is provided both by academic staff and experienced practitioners, who use a variety of training methods, including experiential exercises, audio-visual recordings, formal lectures and seminars.

Different psychotherapeutic and psychological approaches to supervision and consultation are taught so that practitioners can better satisfy the needs of individuals and teams seeking their services.

Programme structure

The MSc in Supervision and Consultation is studied over two academic years and is part-time. All MSc students are initially registered for one academic year, and successful completion of all modules in the first year leads to progression into year two.

This is a specialised training course which leads to advanced knowledge and practice in the supervision and coaching of staff, and consultation to teams and organisations.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Facilities

The School of Psychology is a hub of energy, information and support. You will have access to the following facilities:

  • Two computing rooms, one dedicated to MSc students
  • Test library (300+ psychometric tests available, as well as five years of dissertations and theses from all programmes)
  • Video and audio editing (image and audio manipulation; interview and telephone recording; transcription equipment)
  • Seminar and classrooms (three fully equipped rooms for presentations and an observation suite (video and audio recording)

Supervision and consultation practice

It is essential that, during the training, you are in a position to provide ongoing supervision and consultation within your workplace. You will also need to be able to present that practice within different teaching contexts on the programme and receive advice and feedback on your practice from other trainees and staff.

Your practice during the Supervision and Consultation Practice module will be overseen via feedback forms, small group consultation, audio/video review and live observation.

Applicant profiles

There are three pathways to entry on the programme:

  • A professionally qualified psychologist registered with the Health & Care Professions Council
  • A qualified psychotherapist or counsellor (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural, systemic, integrative) eligible to be registered with the UKCP, BPC, BABCP or BACP
  • Qualification in a relevant profession with knowledge of psychology at an undergraduate/postgraduate level (teaching, medicine, nursing, human resources, social work, occupational therapy)

All candidates should have experience of providing supervision and consultation or, as part of their employment, are required to supervise and consult to others.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Develop advanced competencies to practice supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring within applied health, social care and educational settings
  • Conceptualise supervision/consultation/coaching/mentoring theory and practice clearly
  • Develop a range of specific and transferable supervisory, consultation, coaching and mentoring skills and competencies
  • Develop ethical awareness and relational/self-reflexivity
  • Supervise/consult/coach/mentor across a range of contexts and with a range of clients/supervisees/consultees
  • Practise supervision, consultation, coaching and mentoring in a culturally attuned way

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Our one year, part-time Postgraduate Certificate in Enhanced Consultation skills will develop healthcare professionals consultation knowledge and skills and improve clinical competence. Read more

Our one year, part-time Postgraduate Certificate in Enhanced Consultation skills will develop healthcare professionals consultation knowledge and skills and improve clinical competence. This course offers an exciting opportunity to explore the expanding field of advanced practice.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/MP1ECS2-Y1A/

Is this course for me?

This course is suitable for registered healthcare professionals who wish to enhance their consultation skills, that of physical assessment and clinical decision making. This award facilitates the development of the key skills and competencies required for enhanced consultation, focusing on the practitioners' area of practice.

What will this course cover?

This course is designed to enrich personal and professional competence in regard to patient assessment, decision making and consultation skills. The course offers an exciting opportunity to explore this expanding field of advanced practice and is aimed at registered healthcare professionals working in areas of advanced practice within primary and secondary care settings.

The course team has a wide range of clinical experience and research interests; this includes advanced practice, non-medical prescribing, management of long term conditions and urgent care.

Course content

•            Physical Assessment of the Adult

•            Clinical Decision Making for Advanced Practice

Why choose this course?

The aim of the course is to enable you to develop sound knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

It aims to enhance your ability to assess the patient holistically using a range of different assessment methods through systematic clinical examination of the patients' health history and the buddy systems.

Through this, students will learn to manage complete episodes of care, working in partnership with others, delegation and referral as appropriate to optimise health outcomes and resources, as well as providing direct support to patients.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

The aim of the programme is to promote an enhanced level of scholarship, develop conceptual insight, skills of interpretation, critical reflection and effective synthesis of knowledge, to inform, develop and enhance patient consolation skills.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/



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A part time, modular postgraduate course for qualified pharmacists working in community, primary care or general practice who wish to develop excellent clinical knowledge and consultation skills. This programme of study can incorporate pharmacist independent prescribing. . Read more

A part time, modular postgraduate course for qualified pharmacists working in community, primary care or general practice who wish to develop excellent clinical knowledge and consultation skills. This programme of study can incorporate pharmacist independent prescribing. 

Key benefits

  • We are ranked seventh in the world for Pharmacy & Pharmacology (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017)
  • Clinical experts and experienced academic staff lead our teaching, and combine university-based study days with work-based learning.
  • Course content and assessments will reflect the most up-to-date practices which will support service development in your workplace.
  • There is an opportunity to gain a Practice Certificate in Independent Prescribing accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (NB additional competitive entry criteria apply).
  • We are part of King’s Heath Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre (AHSC), a pioneering collaboration between us, Guy’s, St Thomas’ and King’s College Hospitals and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trusts.
  • As an accredited Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) Foundation School, students who are RPS members have the opportunity to complete the RPS Foundation Training Programme.

Description

Pharmacists are increasingly recognised as core providers of services relating to medicines use, disease management and health promotion. Our part-time postgraduate Pharmacy Practice programme, designed specifically for qualified pharmacists working in community, primary care or general practice, will provide students with excellent clinical knowledge and consultation skills.

On completion of the course, students will be able to confidently deliver safe, efficient and effective patient care that meets the health needs of their local population. Students will also develop their knowledge and understanding of health beliefs and adherence, public health policy and strategic service development. They will be supported to engage effectively with commissioning groups, develop partnerships with GPs and implement successful pharmacy services that respond to the needs of patients and commissioners.

The course is modular, allowing students to undertake modules according to personal interests, CPD requirements or service development needs. In combination, completion of modules leads to the award of an academic qualification. Most students continue to work full time in addition to attending the course.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Taught classes are held on alternate Wednesdays at the Franklin Wilkins Building, Waterloo campus. Two modules are delivered each semester over five days. A further two days are allocated for face-to-face module assessments.

Modules are offered on a two-yearly cycle. The order in which the modules are undertaken therefore depends on the point of entry into the programme. Contact the course leader if you require specific information about a module.

 Modules are taught by expert academic staff and experienced clinical practitioners who are leaders in their field within both primary and secondary care. A variety of teaching methods are used including:

  • presentations
  • tutorials
  • workshops 
  • case studies

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Each 15 credit module represents 150 hours of student endeavour typically comprising of:

  • 15 contact hours
  • 15 hours of preparation for the group seminars
  • five hours of support and assessment
  • 75 hours of application within their clinical setting – including undertaking of clinically related tasks
  • 40 hours is to cover broader reading and engagement with clinical aspects of the work.

Assessment

Assessments are congruent with the roles of pharmacists in practice and are designed to evaluate the practitioner’s professional competencies relating to patient consultation, clinical decision making and pharmaceutical expertise. A variety of assessment methods are utilised:

  • consultation skills assessments
  • case based discussions
  • written tasks (e.g. therapeutic review, critique of public health policy )
  • portfolio reviews

A portfolio of evidence must be submitted at the end of each semester to demonstrate learning, reflection and the application of skills and knowledge in practice. 

  • Written reflective accounts of cases or patient interventions
  • Written critical reflection of a risk framework
  • Design of an adherence strategy
  • Oral presentation of a consultation framework or a case study
  • Written report of a business proposal
  • Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Extra information

Independent Prescribing

The 60 credit Independent Prescribing module (accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council) can be taken as part of the Diploma or MSc programmes. Additional entry criteria apply. Full details are available here.

Please note that you cannot take the Independent Prescribing module while you are undertaking other Pharmacy Practice modules.

Career prospects

On completion of this programme pharmacists will be equipped to deliver pharmacy services in the community to a high standard, in line with the demands of the changing NHS. Students may also be able to move into the provision of pharmaceutical and prescribing advice in primary care.



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Our three-year MSc (Clin) Endodontics course is ideal if you are a dentist looking to specialise in prevention of pathology and treatment of the dental pulp and surrounding tissues. Read more

Our three-year MSc (Clin) Endodontics course is ideal if you are a dentist looking to specialise in prevention of pathology and treatment of the dental pulp and surrounding tissues.

You will develop a knowledge and understanding of contemporary aspects of endodontics and learn how to use an interdisciplinary approach to comprehensive patient care, including advanced diagnostic and clinical skills.

The treatment of complex endodontics cases, which may be important to more comprehensive restorative treatment plans, will involve working with consultants/specialists in other disciplines.

This will improve your eligibility to sit the examinations to become a Member in Endodontics at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

In addition, a custom-designed communication course will introduce you to health services culture and governance.

You will also have the opportunity to interact with and be taught by national and international experts in their field, and attend recognised national courses.

Aims

The aims of the course are:

  • to equip you with skills in the design, execution and interpretation of clinical and clinically-related research (Research Methods unit);
  • provide you with skills in data collection, simple analysis and interpretation of clinical and clinically-related research (Biostatistics unit);
  • give you an understanding of the scientific basis of endodontics, with particular emphasis on current theories relevant to the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of adult patients (specialist clinical units);
  • train you in the identification, formulation and implementation of a specific research project and gain experience of working independently while taking an evidence-based approach to your project (the dissertation).

Special features

Expert teaching

Learn from consultants and specialists who will develop your abilities.

Member in Endodontics eligibility

You will become eligible to sit the Membership in Endodontics exam upon completion of this course.

Teaching and learning

You will be encouraged to attend specialist society meetings and to present your research findings and clinical work.

Teaching and learning methods are designed to encourage you to take responsibility for your own learning and to integrate work with formal educational activities.

The course usually consists of five clinical sessions a week with a mix of treatment and observation.

Coursework and assessment

  • Research Methods: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor-marked assignments and participation in specified online group activities.
  • Biostatistics: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor-marked assignments.
  • Clinical: The clinical unit is assessed by a written assignment, submission of clinical cases, a written examination and a structured oral examination.
  • Dissertation, Year 3 (10,000-15,000 words).

Course unit details

This course comprises four components:

Research Methods component (15 credits): Training in skills related to design, execution and interpretation of clinical and clinically-related research.

Biostatistics component (15 credits): Training in skills in data collection, simple analysis and interpretation of clinical and clinically-related research.

Specialist Clinical component : Gain an understanding of the scientific basis of endodontics, with particular emphasis on current theories relevant to the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of adult patients.

The Specialist Clinical Component encompasses the following:

  • Core lectures to include:
  • Medical emergency management
  • Cross infection control
  • Radiological protection
  • Clinical governance
  • Interactive seminars related to endodontics
  • Pre-clinical skills course
  • Clinical treatment sessions in state-of-the-art facilities
  • Attend consultation clinics
  • Case reviews
  • Participation in journal clubs

Research unit (dissertation, 30 credits): You will train in the identification, formulation and implementation of a specific research project and gain experience of working independently. Recent projects include studies related to bioactive materials, trauma and CBCT.

Course content for Year 1

  • Research methods
  • Biostatistics
  • Preclinical skills
  • Communications
  • Clinical treatment and consultation sessions
  • Visits to specialist practices (1)
  • Attendance at national endodontic meetings
  • Research project

Course content for Year 2

  • Clinical treatment and consultation sessions
  • Visits to specialist practices (2)
  • Attendance at national endodontic meetings
  • Personal development
  • Specialist courses (1)
  • Research project

Course content for Year 3

  • Clinical treatment and consultation sessions
  • Visits to specialist practices (3)
  • Attendance at national endodontics meetings
  • Health services
  • Specialist courses (2)
  • Research project

Facilities

You will have access to dedicated postgraduate suites at the University, as well as extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

We invite students on this course to participate in a number of conferences and courses. Some selected seminars will also provide CPD hours.

Career opportunities

Graduates can develop careers in a range of areas including clinical practice, teaching and research. The course also will also prepare you for working at specialist level.

Accrediting organisations

Teaching is aligned to the Membership in Endodontics collegiate specialty membership examination curriculum at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh , and you will be eligible to sit this examination upon completion of the course.



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The Education in Primary Care PGCert is for health professionals working and teaching in primary care in the UK. It will suit any primary care educator, including nurse practitioners, GPs, community pharmacists and practice nurses, intending GP trainers and training programme directors. Read more

The Education in Primary Care PGCert is for health professionals working and teaching in primary care in the UK. It will suit any primary care educator, including nurse practitioners, GPs, community pharmacists and practice nurses, intending GP trainers and training programme directors.

The programme offers a deep understanding of education in primary care and equips you to succeed in learning and teaching at a wide range of levels and primary care disciplines, as demonstrated by our alumni.

All facilitators on the programme are GP trainers, undergraduate tutors or training programme directors. You’ll benefit from links with current practitioners and expert researchers working at the Academic Unit of Primary Care at the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences. You’ll also have the opportunity for one-to-one support from a mentor throughout the programme.

Funding for is available from Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber for those on the Intending GP Training Pathway.

You can study this programme over one or two years, so you can fit your study time around the clinical environment and other commitments.

To study this programme over one year, see the Education in Primary Care PGCert – 12 months.

Course content

You’ll study four modules, all focused on primary care. Each module consists of two teaching days alongside online activities and discussions.

You’ll reflect on education in primary care, critically examine key aspects of your work and gain skills and ideas for your own development and the development of others. Students also have the opportunity to critically evaluate current research and contribute to the evidence base in education in primary healthcare.

The programme aims to develop the skills to implement and evaluate a curriculum, as well as critically evaluate consultation models and personal consultation skills. This is the only programme approved by Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber that offers teaching on consultation skills.

Learning and teaching

The programme is taught through a blended learning approach, combining face-to-face learning (at teaching days) with online activities.

Teaching is mostly in small groups with a facilitator, ensuring a personalised learning approach. You’ll learn through lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. We make extensive use of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and to enhance and extend on the material taught formally. Besides access to online materials, the Virtual Learning Environment offers continued peer and tutor support.

Assessment

Assessment for all four modules is through written assignments, submitted approximately six weeks after the end of the module.

Career opportunities

This programme is one of the steps in the process to become a GP trainer with Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber. Many successful local educators have completed this programme.

Graduates of this programme have become GP trainers, vocational training programme directors and gone on to work in Health Education Yorkshire and Humber, in roles such as Locality Lead for GP Education and GP School Lead for Trainer Quality Management.




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The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). Read more
The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). It is tailor-made to suit your interests in consultation with the areas of expertise offered by the School. It is designed also to suit the needs of those who are unable to attend time-tabled sessions at Bangor. It comprises two parts.)

Part 1:

Students will write two essays, each of 5000 words (30 credits each). The essay titles and content will be decided in consultation with your supervisor. However, they will follow any two topics listed below. Students will have full support from a supervisor (via e-mail, telephone, Skype, or any other means that is mutually convenient).

Topic List:

Eastern Philosophy and Religion (Hinduism, Sikhism, Shinto and Confucianism
Islamic Philosophy and ethics
Religious fundamentalism
Political Philosophy (including social theory such as Marx, Weber, Rawls etc.)
Globalization (including, multiculturalism)
The Enlightenment
Democratic theory
The Philosophy of Nietzsche
Psychoanalytic Studies
Jungian Theory
Old Testament
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Religious Experience
Part 2:

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of 40,000 words (120 credits). The subject of the dissertation will be decided by you in consultation with your supervisor. It is usually expected that the subject will relate to the broad range of topics listed above.

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This course is specifically designed for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals who wish to undertake part-time study to prepare them to become a non-medical prescriber. Read more
This course is specifically designed for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals who wish to undertake part-time study to prepare them to become a non-medical prescriber. Nurses and midwives will be awarded the NMC recorded qualification (V300 Independent and Supplementary Prescribing) and allied health professionals will be awarded an annotation with the HPC as a Supplementary Prescriber.
The leading principle within the Non-Medical Prescribing course is to prepare you to deliver high quality care by equipping you to:
- Prescribe safely and effectively
- Use resources to your optimum effect for service users
- Improve well-being and reduce inequalities
- Provide evidence-based effective care
- Engage in policy making and actively participate in the multidisciplinary prescribing team

You can expect to study four modules:

•Pharmacology and therapeutics for prescribers (30 credits) will prepare students to understand and apply the principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics directly related to prescribing practice. Practitioners will have the opportunity to critically analyse evidence based practice including risk assessment and management and to synthesise information relating to their own area of practice.
•Outline content includes: pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics; adverse drug reactions; numeracy; safe principles of prescribing; anatomy and physiology across the life span.
•Professional, legal and ethical issues for prescribers (15 credits) focuses on critically evaluating and synthesising ideas from the evidence in relation to the legal, ethical and professional issues implicit in non-medical prescribing decision making and consultations. Outline content includes: legislation and policies related to prescribing; accountability and responsibility for assessment, diagnosis and prescribing independently and within the multi-disciplinary team; patient safety in supervising, managing and evaluating prescribing decisions; prescribing effectively within a finite prescribing budget.
•Applied prescribing in the clinical context (15 credits) aims to critically evaluate the skills required for a comprehensive consultation for safe effective prescribing. In addition it is designed to promote synthesis of ideas influential in prescribing decision making. Outline content includes: appraisal of self and others regarding consultation skills in achieving medicines adherence; external pressures impacting on prescribing; different management options used to treat patients.
•Prescribing in practice for nurses and midwives / allied health professionals (0 credits) prepares students to prescribe from the British National Formulary as both independent and supplementary prescribers for nurses and midwives or as a supplementary prescriber for allied health professionals. Outline content includes: application of theory to practice; rationale for prescribing decisions; numeracy skills, writing prescriptions; prescribing in a range of scenarios. All practice experiences and practice outcomes for the whole course are based within this module.
Teaching and assessment
Our student-centred and enquiry-based approach to learning incorporates a wide variety of learning and teaching strategies, including; case studies, scenarios, small group work, action learning sets, workshops, pod casts, reflection, student presentations, supervised consultations with service users in practice and clinically focused tutorials. An essential part of the course will take place in practice settings under the guidance of a Designated Medical Practitioner, facilitated by your personal tutor. Students will also be supported by a designated qualified nurse prescriber, lead midwife for education, or supplementary prescriber for allied health, who will take up the role of preceptor at the end of the course.

Expertise
Our course team have a wide range of experience in non-medical prescribing provision. A key strength is that most are, or have been, independent and or supplementary prescribers from primary and secondary care in nursing, midwifery and pharmacy practice. The external examiner is also experienced in non-medical prescribing.

Graduate careers
A qualification in non-medical prescribing will be an essential aspect of your professional portfolio and will support your career progression through the advancement of your own practice in providing high quality patient care; thus enhancing your continued professional development needs.

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The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Research in this fascinating area has a long and distinguished history at the University of Manchester. We have a lively research culture, with talks, seminars and conferences that you will be able to attend in addition to your taught courses. You will also be able to draw on the expertise of scholars engaged in cutting-edge research at the John Rylands Research Institute, where the programme is based. The John Rylands Library houses exceptional medieval and early-modern treasures (which are currently being digitised) and offers many exciting research and study opportunities. Staff teaching on this MA represent the disciplines of History, Art History and Visual Studies, English, Religions and Theology, Classics, and European Languages. Two pathways are available for students who wish to extend their knowledge in a particular chronological direction: Medieval, and Early Modern.

Find out more about Medieval and early Modern Studies at Manchester: Why Manchester?

Associate Programme Director:  .

Coursework and assessment

Summative assessment is primarily via extended pieces of written work: the dissertation of around 15,000 words, long essays of around 4,000-6,000 words, and a variety of shorter pieces for palaeography or language classes. There is a pass mark of 50% for all assignments, marks over 60% are given as merit and over 70% as distinction. In addition, depending on the units selected, formative assessment may be based on oral presentation, class discussion, and feedback on written draft material. Assessment varies from course unit to course unit; full details of the assessment procedure for individual units can be obtained from the course director.

Those who only attain 120 credits (out of 180) will be awarded the PG Diploma in Medieval Studies.

Course unit details

The first component takes the form of the compulsory core courses and research training units. These are taken by students on all pathways.

These courses (details below in the course unit list) are designed to introduce you to the basics of interdisciplinary analysis, and to research training skills appropriate to the scope of the course. 'From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book' and 'Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology and Sources' are taught in the magnificent surroundings of the John Rylands Library, with the support of specialist library staff. You will get the opportunity to view and handle rare books and manuscripts from across the entire period. The aim is to consider all aspects of book production, from the roll to the codex and from script to print, as well as the uses (practical and symbolic) of texts in medieval culture. You will be introduced to a range of medieval sources, recent theoretical approaches to archival research, and learn methodological skills, such as palaeography and codicology.

'Perspectives in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Studies' aims to explore the methodological, historiographical and analytical choices that shape our study of the medieval and early modern periods. Highlighting the variety of disciplinary approaches that are in use in current scholarship, this module shall investigate a series of relevant themes within the field, and will be taught by specialists from across the School. Students will be encouraged to question issues of historical periodisation, the benefits of interdisciplinarity, and how an intellectual framework for the study of the medieval and early modern periods may be conceptualised.

The second component consists of 60-credits worth of optional modules. These options range widely over the history, literature, art and material culture of the medieval and early modern world. You may also take Latin or Old/Middle English (15-30 credits) - appropriate level taken to be discussed with the Programme Director, in consultation with the relevant department. Options to take other languages, such as Hebrew, Arabic, or Greek can be considered, in consultation with the programme director. A student can take no more than 30 language credits.

Medieval Pathway:

Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:

Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the early modern period.

Students may choose other relevant options from across the School, subject to approval by the relevant course directors. Details of new available options will appear here. Please check again in June, or contact the course director.

The third component consists of the dissertation, which allows you to research a topic of your choice (60 credits).

Students on all pathways must complete a dissertation.

Medieval Pathway:

The dissertation topic selected must lie within the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:

The dissertation topic selected must lie within the early modern period.

If you have any further academic queries, please email   .

Additional fee information

Self-funded international applicants for this course will be required to pay a deposit of £1000 towards their tuition fees before a confirmation of acceptance for studies (CAS) is issued. This deposit will only be refunded if immigration permission is refused. We will notify you about how and when to make this payment.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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MA Journalism (NCTJ-accredited) offers you one of the best ways to launch your journalism career – whatever the medium you hope to work in. Read more

About the course

MA Journalism (NCTJ-accredited) offers you one of the best ways to launch your journalism career – whatever the medium you hope to work in.

Our programme is accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists, ensuring you get a qualification that really counts when you apply for your first position. Unlike other single-medium Journalism MAs, you will be taught journalism from the basic building blocks of online reporting and writing through to substantial news and feature projects in video, audio and print and multi-platform.

You will be studying not only for your prestigious Brunel Master's degree but also the NCTJ Diploma, which examines you in Reporting, Public Affairs, Law, Video, Teeline shorthand and a Portfolio. We work in close consultation with senior journalists, ensuring our syllabus provides a rigorous foundation to a career in this dynamic, challenging and often controversial industry.

This programme is distinctive in allowing you to develop your own cutting-edge journalistic practice, whether it's exploring 3G news, or on-screen page make-up. At the same time you learn about the impact of technological change, cultural developments and political issues surrounding different forms of journalism.

Particular attention will be paid to factors such as ethics, professionalism, media ownership, the regulation of the media, and the role of journalism in the political process.

The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training. Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course. For more information, please visit http://www.journalismdiversityfund.com/

Aims

You will gain a systematic understanding of the field of contemporary journalism and a critical understanding of the current problems in the field.

You will acquire an understanding of the main theoretical approaches and techniques of journalism. You will be encouraged to use these critically, both in their studies of journalism and their own critical practice.

You will be provided with a critical understanding of the journalistic field that will enable you to use most effectively the skills which they acquire on the programme.

Course Content

MA Journalism consists of a common core of study in journalism, with an offer of specialist study in print or broadcast journalism in the second term, which will facilitate your entry into different aspects of the industry. This is particularly relevant in the context of a converging media industry requiring multi-skilling and the ability to adapt to new media environments.

The programme will consist of five modules - two that provide cutting-edge journalism skills essential for the new entrant to the industry, coupled with two that offer in-depth analysis of the recent history and political economy of the industry, critical evaluation of the cultural, political, ethical and legal frameworks within which journalism operates, and academic interrogation of current and emerging journalistic issues.

The fifth module, a major project, requires a synthesis of practice and theory. Through undertaking these modules, you will be enabled to identify and apply the most useful practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to help you to produce “good” journalism. In this way, you can enter journalism confident of your abilities, with highly-developed research skills, ethical judgement, the necessary contextual knowledge and an ability to navigate successfully an increasingly market-led industry.

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach:

Journalistic Practice 1
Journalistic Practice 2
Issues in Journalism
Major Research Project

Contact Hours

Full-time: Minimum four days attendance per week

Part-time: Three days in year 1 and 1-2 days in year two provided the 100wpm Teeline exam has been passed in year 1.

These are the attendance hours for terms 1 and 2. Terms 3/4 are more varied and flexible as this is when you will have assignments, exams and supervision.

Assessment

Assessments will take the form of practical projects and tasks, essays, exams, case studies, presentations, reflexive reports and dissertations.

Assessing students’ knowledge and understanding of theoretical debates, hermeneutic skills and understanding of the historical and institutional context of different international journalism practices will be undertaken via written essays.

The assessments covering these cognitive skills are practical exercises, written work and productions which test the acquisition of practical skills and strategies; essays which test theoretical and historical knowledge; and the final journalism project (and accompanying written analysis) which requires a summation of the critical, creative and practical skills learned during the programme.

The Major Project will test students’ theoretical knowledge and practical skills (with supporting reflexive practice) to a level commensurate with a Master's qualification. Dissertations are usually agreed in advance with the supervising tutor.

Special Features

We are industry accredited
This means you will study for the NCTJ Diploma as well as your Masters degree – two qualifications in one. The NCTJ Diploma doesn’t just prepare you for local media – BBC, Sky and The Guardian are on the Board.
You will become a multi-platform journalist by learning how to work in online, print, audio and video journalism in our fantastic, 24-hour, state-of-the-art digital newsroom and studios. You will develop the mindset to find lots of ways to report and present a story or feature to deadline using the very latest techniques.

You will be highly employable
Editors come to us when recruiting journalists. Brunel Journalists are now working as staff in top newsrooms across the globe, including the BBC, The Guardian, The Independent, news agencies, glossy consumer magazines, business-to-business journals, websites, local and regional press and broadcasting. Several are award winning journalists. Find out more about where our graduates are now working.

You will receive individual attention
All full-time lecturers are available at least four hours per week for personal consultation on academic issues. A structure of senior tutor and year tutors provides students with an easily accessible system for addressing queries about the programme. Each student has access to top journalists for career guidance.

We have top weekly guest speakers
We have an impressive range of high-profile industry guest speakers, giving you the chance to network with some of the leading journalists in the country. This year we have speakers from Cosmopolitan, the Guardian, BBC, Sky, Daily Express, C4 News and more.

Great work placements
Brunel journalists land all the best placements, gain enviable referees and see their bylines in leading publications. We have one of the best university Professional Development Centres in the UK who coach our students not only in CV and application writing but also help them develop the necessary skills to exceed at job interviews.

You are taught by top industry names
Our staff team and visiting lecturers comprise some of the biggest names in the business, such as leading investigative journalist Paul Lashmar (World in Action, The Observer, The Independent), Jacquie Hughes (Granada, BBC) and many more. You get the very best expertise preparing you for your career.

London-based campus environment
Brunel’s campus is a lively and attractive environment that buzzes with creativity and diversity. There is always something going on and a wide variety of amenities ranging from the bars and cafés to the computing clusters and the library. Our students also benefit from the fantastic links to London and its local, national and global media, not only through expert speakers but also via excellent work placements.

There’s great student media on site
Whether you fancy going on air, online or in print, you can do it here at Brunel. There’s student radio, a student newspaper and a host of online opportunities at your fingertips to enhance your CV and boost your employability. You will also have the opportunity to compete in national student media awards.

But it’s not all hard work..
There are days out, screenings, quizzes, networking events to build your contacts, confidence and just to have fun.

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This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics. Read more
This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics.

You will receive training in research methods and take a taught course unit in a relevant subject area. The research topic for your project is agreed with a supervisor in advance and can be in any area of the expertise in the department research groups. The project outline will be developed in consultation with your supervisor and project work is carried out in parallel with the taught courses, becoming full-time during the third term.

This Master’s by Research will provide you with a suitable background to work as a research assistant or as the grounding for further study towards a PhD.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscearthsciencesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This course is ideal for graduates in geology and related sciences who wish to carry out independent research over a shorter time period than is possible in a doctorate (PhD) programme. It allows you study at Master's level an aspect of the geological sciences which may not be catered for by specialist MSc programmes.

- You will be involved at every step of the research project - from planning and sample collection, laboratory work, result analysis, to writing your dissertation.

- It is ideal preparation if you are interested in studying for a PhD, but would like to have further preparation and training.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department of Earth Science’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

- The Department has up-to-date computer interpretation facilities, a full range of modern geochemical laboratories including XRF, quadrupole and multicollector ICP Mass Spectrometry, atmospheric chemistry and a new excimer laser ablation facility, excellent structural modelling laboratories, palaeontology and sedimentology laboratories.

Course content and structure

The course consists of the following three components:

A Research Study Skills Course Unit
- Personal research skills (e.g. safety, time and project management, teamwork)
- IT skills (e.g. literature retrieval, web authoring, databases, modelling)
- Data analysis skills (e.g. statistical methods, GIS systems, sampling techniques)
- Communication skills (e.g. posters, oral presentation, writing papers, web pages)
- Subject-specific skills and techniques. These amount to 55% of the research skills assessment, and for example may include parts of specialist taught courses (see below), a training course on the theory and practice of chemical and isotopic analysis, or other training arranged by the project supervisor. This will include training for research in the general field of the research project, not solely what is needed to carry out the project.

A Specialist Taught Course Unit
You will choose an advanced taught course unit relevant to the subject area of your research project. The following taught units are currently offered:
- Applied Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
- Pollution Sources and Pathways
- Oceans and Atmospheres
- Risk and Environmental Management
- Geographical Information Systems
- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
- Contaminants in the Environment
- Advanced Igneous Petrogenesis
- Seismic Processing and Interpretation
- Geodynamics and Plate Tectonics
- Interpretation of Structural Settings
- Coal Geology
- Petroleum Geology and Evaluation
- Terrestrial Palaeoecology
- Palaeoclimates

Research Project
The project may be on any topic which is within the broad research themes of the Department. You will be linked to a potential supervisor at the application stage and, in consultation with the supervisor, you will develop a detailed project outline during the first half of the first term. Project work is then carried out in parallel with taught courses during terms one and two, becoming the full-time activity after Easter. A bound dissertation is submitted for examination in early September.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and understanding of a variety of analytical, technical, numerical, modelling and interpretive techniques applicable to the specific field of earth sciences

- the articulation of knowledge and the understanding of published work, concepts and theories in the chosen field of earth sciences at an advanced level

- the acquisition of knowledge from published work in the chosen area of earth sciences to a level appropriate for a MSc degree.

Assessment

Research Study Skills: this is assessed by coursework and theory examination and will include short written assignments, a seminar, worksheets and practical tests. These assessments contribute 12.5% of the course marks.

Specialist Taught Course Units: these are mostly assessed by a written, theory examination and coursework. The unit assessment contributes 12.5% of the course marks.

Research Project: the project dissertation must be submitted in early September. It will be marked by both an internal and an external examiner, and will be defended at an oral examination with both examiners. The project assessment contributes 75% of the course marks.

Employability & career opportunities

Subject to agreement and suitable funding, MSc by Research students can transfer to the MPhil/PhD programme at Royal Holloway. They may use the research carried out for the MSc towards the PhD, and count the time spent towards MPhil/PhD registration requirements, provided that the MSc research forms a coherent part of the PhD, and that the transfer is approved prior to submission of the MSc research dissertation.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Research projects in this area will centre on adaptive decision-making in animals in a range of contexts, including (a) trade-offs between social and sexual… Read more
Research projects in this area will centre on adaptive decision-making in animals in a range of contexts, including (a) trade-offs between social and sexual behaviour, learning and other components of life history, such as immune function and disease resistance, (b) associative and higher order learning in invertebrates, (c) effects of genetic differences in social behaviour on population dynamics in nematodes, (d) the evolution of insect pollinator systems.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/apply/apply-online.aspx

Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Research projects in Ecology are offered in a range of animal, plant and microbial topics including (a) competition and coexistence in animal communities and the evolution of host-parasite interactions, (b) the evolution of insect pollinator systems, (c) life history strategies and trade-offs, (d) processes in plant communities e.g. Read more
Research projects in Ecology are offered in a range of animal, plant and microbial topics including (a) competition and coexistence in animal communities and the evolution of host-parasite interactions, (b) the evolution of insect pollinator systems, (c) life history strategies and trade-offs, (d) processes in plant communities e.g. nutrient cycling and herbivory, and (d) the ecology of the lichen symbiosis and lichen-dominated ecosystems, and lichen population biology.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

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This research area has grown enormously over the last decade and now embodies a number of disciplines. At Nottingham we adopt an integrated approach in which several strategies are developed to address particular problems in Cell Biology. Read more
This research area has grown enormously over the last decade and now embodies a number of disciplines. At Nottingham we adopt an integrated approach in which several strategies are developed to address particular problems in Cell Biology. Projects are available to study how the unlimited potential of primordial germ cells is governed at a molecular level during development in representative species such as amphibians and mice. Within the cell important processes are governed by the structures and dynamics of numerous macromolecules. Projects are offered to directly visualize macromolecular behaviour with a view to elucidating cellular function. These studies examine protein-protein, protein-membrane and receptor-mediated interactions within cells using state-of-the-art imaging systems.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/apply/apply-online.aspx
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Within the Developmental Biology research area a number of model systems are being used to study various aspects of vertebrate development with a major focus being on the development of stem cells. Read more
Within the Developmental Biology research area a number of model systems are being used to study various aspects of vertebrate development with a major focus being on the development of stem cells. Specific projects include: the development of blood stem cells and vasculature in zebrafish; the development of neural stem cells in zebrafish and in mice; the properties of mesenchymal stem cells; primordial germ cells and gene networks that govern the development of vertebrate embryos.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/apply/apply-online.aspx

Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

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