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A full-time, one-year (or for specialist registrars (StRs), a part-time, two-year) Master's programme that provides advanced knowledge in various areas of conservative dentistry. Read more
A full-time, one-year (or for specialist registrars (StRs), a part-time, two-year) Master's programme that provides advanced knowledge in various areas of conservative dentistry.

Degree information

The programme provides theoretical and practical experience in the conservative restoration of cases ranging from a single missing tooth to full mouth rehabilitation, utilising either tooth or implant-supported restorations.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of seven core modules (120 credits) and a dissertation module (60 credits). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Clinical Science and Research Methods
-Interdisciplinary Aspects of Restorative Treatment
-Principles of Treatment Core Course (Conservative Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, Prosthodontics)
-Fundamentals of Fixed and Implant Prosthodontics
-Prosthodontic Treatment Planning and Functional Occlusion
-Prosthodontic Operative Dentistry and Endodontics
-Clinical and Laboratory Treatment (Conservative Dentistry)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small group teaching, journal clubs, and one-to-one teaching in the clinical and laboratory situation. Assessment is through written papers (MCQ, MSA, and essays), mock written, oral and patient examination, supervised clinical work, internal graduate appraisal, logbooks, and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme is recommended for dental professionals wanting to upgrade and extend their knowledge and level of clinical practice of conservative dentistry in order to prepare for a career in private or mixed practice, the hospital or community services, industrial dental practice, or an academic career in the field.
-Ministry of Defence: Dental Officer
-NHS: Specialist Registrar (Restorative Dentistry)
-Private practice
-NHS: Specialist Doctor
-University appointments: Clinical Teaching Fellow
-Further academic career as PhD student

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Trust Specialty Doctor in Restorative Dentistry, NHS Croydon University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-Registrar Dentist, Eastman Dental Hospital (NHS)
-Clinical Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL)
-Dentist, Smile Point Dentistry
-Dental Surgeon, Government of Montserrat

Employability
The programme enjoys an excellent reputation for producing graduates possessing sound clinical skills based on a solid theoretical knowledge background.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MS Conservative Dentistry at the UCL Eastman Dental Institute is an intensive programme which maintains a good balance between theoretical knowledge and practical application, in addition to a research component.

Students gain theoretical and practical clinical and laboratory experience in the conservative restoration of cases ranging from a single missing tooth to full mouth rehabilitation, utilising either tooth or implant-supported restorations. This is accomplished through exposure to advanced diagnosis and treatment planning procedures, clinical practice, as well as undertaking the laboratory work for their patients as keys to successful clinical treatment.

The programme has been running for many years and enjoys great world-wide reputation.

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A one-year, London-based MA programme of ten evening seminars and individual research led by Professor Roger Scruton. Read more

Course information

A one-year, London-based MA programme of ten evening seminars and individual research led by Professor Roger Scruton. Offering examples of contemporary thinking and including lectures by internationally acclaimed philosophers, the purpose of this programme to give an overall survey of Philosophy and topics that are central to the interaction of philosophy and life.

Each seminar takes place in central London and is followed by a dinner during which participants can engage in discussion with the speaker. The topics to be considered include consciousness, emotion, justice, art, God, love and the environment.

Examination will be by a research dissertation on an approved philosophical topic chosen by the student, of around 20,000 words. Guidance and personal supervision will be provided.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

The Course Director

The course is led by the renowned philosopher, Professor Roger Scruton, FBA, FRSL.

Professor Scruton is a Fellow of the Humanities Research Institute and Course Director of the MA in Philosophy. He is a writer, philosopher and public commentator, specialising in aesthetics with particular attention to music and architecture.

He engages in contemporary political and cultural debates from the standpoint of a conservative thinker and is well known as a powerful polemicist. He has written widely in the press on political and cultural issues. His involvement in the establishment of underground universities and academic networks in Soviet-controlled Central Europe during the Cold War, has seen him win a number of awards.

He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a fellow of the British Academy.

Professor Scruton is the author of over thirty books, including The Soul of the World (2014), Notes from Underground (2014), How to Be a Conservative (2014), Our Church (2012), How to Think Seriously about the Planet: The Case for an Environmental Conservatism (2012), Beauty (2009),The Aesthetics of Music (1997), The Philosopher on Dover Beach (1990), Sexual Desire (1986), The Meaning of Conservatism (1980) and Art and Imagination (1974).

Associate Students

Others wishing to attend the seminars, but not intending to take the MA degree, may join the course as Associate Students at a reduced fee.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/philosophy.

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This course focuses on the conservation of heritage buildings and sites and the proactive management of change in the historic built environment. Read more
This course focuses on the conservation of heritage buildings and sites and the proactive management of change in the historic built environment. It is designed to help forge and develop the career prospects of individuals wishing to work in this fascinating and rewarding field of industry. The course examines the re-use of existing buildings and heritage assets and explores the role historic buildings play in the sustainable revitalisation of our towns and cities. Techniques of conservative repair, adaptation, retro-fitting and extension are scrutinised, and the legislative context of heritage planning is analysed in depth. The professional standards and quality of the course have been recognised through its accreditation with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IBHC).

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE

Modules
-History of Buildings & Towns
-Building Conservation
-Adaptive Re-Use
-Building Recording & Analysis
-Conservative Repair
-Urban Regeneration
-Dissertation (triple module)

INDUSTRY LINKS

The course has numerous industry links who help provide case study material, workshop visits and occasional student work experience. These include:
-English Heritage
-The Heritage Lottery Fund
-The Methodist Church in Britain
-The Dovenest Group
-Preston City Council
-Chorley Borough Council
-Blackpool Borough Council
-Wyre Borough Council
-Rossendale Borough Council
-DWA Architects Ltd
-Frank Whittle Partnership
-Clitheroe Civic Society
-Jubb & Jubb Ltd

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). The course is also formally ‘recognised’ by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).

FURTHER INFORMATION

This course has a two decade track-record of facilitating graduates with the skills and attributes necessary to forge successful careers working within the heritage sector and the historic built environment. Our alumni include conservation officers, planning consultants, architects and technologists, surveyors, project managers, heritage officers and other multidisciplinary professionals. Their feedback has ensured that the course provides students with the perfect blend of theory and practise, supplemented by by-weekly on-site workshop sessions. Our industry connections also guarantee that all students wishing to obtain relevant work experience can do so through liaison with the course team.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Modules area assessed in various ways, including written assignment work, group presentations and examinations.

Modules are class taught and supplemented by regular workshops which include site visits and on campus guest lectures.

The course team comprises practitioners and academics with extensive experience working within the heritage and construction sectors.

OPPORTUNITIES

Through liaison with the course team, students are offered the opportunity to secure voluntary work experience with one of industry partners. This commonly involves working within the conservation department of local planning authorities. These working arrangements are made between the student and the industry partner: UCLan acts only as a facilitator.

Regular workshops and site visits offer the students opportunities to network with industry professionals. These commonly include former students of the course.

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The programme is suitable for physiotherapists, osteopaths and doctors. This internationally renowned programme is open to doctors and physiotherapists. Read more
The programme is suitable for physiotherapists, osteopaths and doctors.

This internationally renowned programme is open to doctors and physiotherapists. As the longest-established Sports and Exercise Medicine MSc in the country, we have a prestigious history. The programme is based on the philosophy of total care for the athlete and the promotion of physical activity in the general population. Working in sport is a largely practical discipline and the programme's emphasis lies firmly on regular clinical experience. You will benefit from regular contact with members of the Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine as well as visiting clinicians and lecturers who are experienced sport medicine specialists.

The Centre is ideally situated on the same campus as the sports injury, physiotherapy, podiatry and the interdisciplinary combined sports clinics. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to attend recognised external clinics around London, as well as the chance to attend sporting events and visits to national centres of excellence where possible.

Successful alumni have gone on to hold pivotal positions in sports medicine across the UK and internationally, including the Chief Medical Officer to the British Olympic Association and London 2012 and the Medical Director to the English Institute of Sport.

The Centre is renowned in the UK for its academic strength and excellence. Lectures are delivered by national experts; from cutting edge scientists to physiotherapists, doctors, and other health professionals working with world-class athletes.

An insightful video for prospective students interested in the Sports and Exercise Medicine programmes.

This programme will:

-Offer you mastery of foundation concepts and skills in Sports and Exercise Medicine.
-Give you the knowledge and skills to assess sports injuries and to understand their treatment options, as well as understanding the physiological and psychological benefits of exercise and its use as a health tool.
-Allow you regular clinical contact with athletes and sportspeople.
-Introduce you to visiting lecturers, who are experts in the field of Sports Medicine.

Why study your MSc in Sport and Exercise Medicine at Queen Mary?
The Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine is based at the William Harvey Research Institute at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry is comprised of two world renowned teaching hospitals, St Bartholomew’s and The Royal London, which have made, and continue to make, an outstanding contribution to modern medicine. We were one of the top five in the UK for medicine in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

It is unique in the UK for the delivery of integrated academic and practical tuition. Lectures are delivered by national experts.
Core clinician-scientists on staff consult to elite athletes, we have an international research profile in Sports and Exercise Medicine.
Our staff will work closely with you to nurture your research interests and to develop your clinical ability in Sports and Exercise Medicine.

Many students also go on to publish in peer-reviewed journals, a reflection of the quality of our student research output.
Facilities

You will have access to Queen Mary’s comprehensive libraries, including the Postgraduate Reading Room, and The British Library can also be accessed as a research resource. We subscribe to many journals in sport and exercise medicine. You can access electronic journals online.

The Human Performance Laboratory (HPL) at QMUL combines the expertise of sports medicine clinicians, surgeons, engineers and sports scientists with state-of-the-art physiological testing and motion analysis equipment. This collaborative venture offers clinical, educational, research and athlete support service applications in the laboratory or field based settings.

The capabilities of the HPL can be broadly divided into two areas: musculoskeletal biomechanics and physiological testing.

Musculoskeletal biomechanics
The HPL carries 4 Codamotion Cx1 infra-red scanning units that are used extensively for 3-dimensional motion analysis. This system is fully integrated with 2 ground embedded Kistler force plates and a 16 channel wireless EMG system. The integration of these systems allows for full analysis of movement, forces associated with movement and measuring muscular effort during movement. In addition, the HPL also boasts a 64 channel EMG system for multichannel work and an isokinetic dynamometer, which can be used for both research and rehabilitation.

Physiological testing
Detailed analysis of pulmonary gas exchange can be made using an online gas analysis system, in addition to cardiac monitoring using a 12-lead ECG system, during exercise on a treadmill or the electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer. Measures can also be made out in the field, from simple tests of flexibility, strength, speed, power and cardiorespiratory fitness, to comprehensive measurement of expired air using the portable on-line gas analysis system.

Papers of interest

-In Vivo Biological Response to Extracorpereal Shockwave Therapy in Human Tendinopathy (paper is called ESWT)
-The role of interventions directed at the foot for managing patellofemoral pain (paper is called InTouch Article)
-The biomechanics of running in athletes with previous hamstring injury: A case-control study (Hamstrings paper)
-The ‘Best Practice Guide to Conservative Management of Patellofemoral Pain’: incorporating level 1 evidence with expert clinical reasoning (PFP paper)
-Eccentric and Concentric Exercise of the Triceps Surae: An In Vivo Study of Dynamic Muscle and Tendon Biomechanical Parameters (JAB EL CL paper)

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Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. Read more
Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. UCLan's MA Social Policy postgraduate degree will be of benefit to professionals working in the world of social welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline, and to the interested citizen. There are core modules in poverty and social inequality; comparative social policy and social change; social theory and social policy; the making of social policy; introduction to social research. Newly-introduced modules include a work placement module: social policy in practice, with an alternative choice of a reflecting on policy and practice module for those students already in work who may wish to focus analysis on their current professional role.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students will be taught in a combination of lecture, seminar and workshop settings. The research module makes extensive use of eLearn. Full-time students will normally have six hours per week class contact time (3 taught modules per semester), whilst part-time students will normally have between two to four hours per week class contact time (One-two modules per semester, depending on the student's chosen programme of study). Students also receive additional tutorial support in negotiation with their personal tutor.

The course employs a variety of assessment methods including essays, seminar presentations, data analysis and a 15000 word dissertation that is the biggest single component (worth three modules) of the MA target award. There are no examinations. All forms of assessment have been designed to test the extent to which learning outcomes have been achieved.

There is also a dissertation (triple module) on a topic of the student’s choice. The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and supervised self-directed study. It is assessed through coursework and a dissertation. There are no examinations.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to that range of life enhancing and life sustaining experiences, whose distribution lies at the heart of welfare states. These include education, health care, housing, and income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings and the care associated with the experience of contingencies which lead to a loss of independence and autonomy. There can be little doubt that social policy issues are now at the centre of political debate in Britain and much of the rest of the industrialised world.

The New Labour government of 1997-2010 made the ‘modernisation’ of these services and the improvement in the quality of users' experiences the test by which it wishes to be judged: in what directions has the new Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition taken social policy since the defeat of New Labour?

The MA Social Policy is a modular course that offers the opportunity to engage in a discussion of some of the most important issues of a world characterised by profound cultural, demographic, economic, political and technological change. It will be of relevance and benefit to professionals who work in one or other sector of the mixed economy of welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline such as Economics, Health Studies, History, Philosophy, Politics and Sociology, and to the interested citizen.

The course aims to:
-Provide an intellectually challenging range of modules that focus on a number of the most important theoretical perspectives at the "cutting edge" of the subject
-Apply an advanced critical perspective to social policy issues relevant to your professional and/or academic situation
-Encourage you to develop a framework of knowledge, critical understanding and analytical skills that can be used as a basis for both professional and personal development

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Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat periodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases. Read more

About the course

Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat periodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases.

You’ll use various complementary learning modalities, interacting with colleagues and allied specialties in restorative dentistry to jointly manage patient care. Over the three years, you’ll learn sophisticated research methods and apply them in a scientific research investigation, with specific outcomes for each year of study.

The programme has been approved by RCS Edinburgh as recognised speciality training for eligibility to sit their MRD examinations in the three sub-specialisms of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics.

Your career

We offer clinical and non-clinical courses that will further your career and develop your interests. Many of our clinical graduates go on to specialist dental practice, hospital practice or academic posts.

World-leading dental school

Our internationally recognised oral and dental research is organised into two overarching themes: ‘clinical and person centred’ and ‘basic and applied’. These themes are supported by three interdisciplinary research groups: Bioengineering and Health Technologies, Integrated Bioscience, and Person Centred and Population Oral Health.

We believe that dental science should not be constrained by the traditional boundaries created by specific clinical disciplines and that progress derives from a multidisciplinary approach. Our research supports our teaching enabling a blended approach to learning.

Your course will make the most of virtual learning environments and advanced practical sessions, as well as traditional lectures and seminars.

Facilities

You’ll develop your clinical skills in one of our two clinical skills labs or in our new virtual reality Simulation Suite where you can use haptic technology to undertake a range of clinical techniques.

You’ll complete your clinical training in Sheffield’s Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, part of the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. There are 150 dental units with modern facilities for treatment under sedation, a well-equipped dental radiography department, oral pathology laboratories and a hospital dental production laboratory.

We have new modern research facilities and laboratories for tissue culture, molecular biology, materials science and histology- microscopy. All laboratories have dedicated technical support and academic expertise to guide you.

Health clearance

If you’re starting a course that involves exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissues, you must conform to the national guidelines for the protection of patients, health care workers and students. Before admission to a clinical course we’ll need to check that you’re not an infectious carrier of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV and that you do not have tuberculosis. A positive test doesn’t necessarily exclude you from dental training.

Our immunisation requirements are constantly being reviewed to ensure we meet current Department of Health guidance. You need to comply with these if you are offered a place. You’ll get more information when you apply, but if you have any questions on health clearance issues, please get in touch.

Disclosure and Barring Service

If you apply for one of our clinical courses you’ll need a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosure. If you do have any criminal convictions or cautions (including verbal cautions) and bind-over orders, please tell us about them on your application form. If you have not lived in the UK in the preceding five years before you commence our programme, you’ll need to provide us with a Certificate of Good Standing from the police authority in your home country. You’ll get more information on the DBS and the Certificate of Good Standing when you apply.

Local NHS policies and procedures

Clinical training in Charles Clifford Dental Hospital requires you to comply with their policies and procedures, which include the Department of Health policy on being ‘bare below the elbow’. For clarification on these policies and procedures before you apply, please see our website.

Core modules

Year 1: Principles of Periodontal Treatment; Principles of Endodontic Treatment; Principles of Conservative Dentistry; Management of the Partially Dentate Patient I; Research Project: Literature Review; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient I.

Year 2: Research Methods in Clinical Dentistry; Principles of Clinical Management; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient II; Research Project: Experimental Work Data Collection; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Year 3: Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient 3; Research Project: Completion and and Write Up; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Teaching

Lectures, tutorials, seminars, demonstrations, clinical skills laboratory sessions, case-based discussion, extensive practical clinical experience.

Assessment

Competency-based continuous clinical assessments, formal examinations, oral presentations, written assignments, research project.

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This full-time, three-year Master's programme is designed for students from outside the European Union. It matches the institute's Specialty Training programme and is designed to enable students to meet training requirements in their home country. Read more
This full-time, three-year Master's programme is designed for students from outside the European Union. It matches the institute's Specialty Training programme and is designed to enable students to meet training requirements in their home country.

Degree information

The programme offers practical experience in advanced conservation, fixed (conventionally prepared and resin-retained designs) and removable prosthodontics, and implant-supported prostheses for single missing teeth or partially edentulous cases, alongside an introduction to occlusal registration techniques and the range of diagnostic procedures required to ensure effective planning and design of oral reconstructions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits. All modules are compulsory.

In year one, students complete core modules to the value of (165 credits). In year two, students complete core modules to the value of (105 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits). In year three students complete clinical study (not credit bearing).

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Aspects of Restorative Treatment
-Principles of Treatment Core Module (Conservative Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, Prosthodontics)
-Fundamentals of Fixed and Implant Prosthodontics
-Fundamentals of Removable Prosthodontics
-Prosthodontic Treatment Planning and Functional Occlusion
-Prosthodontic Clinical and Laboratory Care 1
-Advanced Restorative Seminars - Clinical Log Book 1 and Case Reports 1
-Prosthodontic Operative Dentistry and Endodontics
-Advanced Fixed, Removable, Implant and Maxillofacial Prosthodontics
-Prosthodontic Clinical and Laboratory Care 2
-Prosthodontic Clinical Log Book and Case Reports 2
-Clinical Science and Research Methods

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in year two which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 13,000–15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through one-to-one clinical and laboratory instruction, seminar teaching, lectures, journal club, individual work including a research project, self-directed learning and problem based learning.

Careers

This programme offers dental professionals the opportunity to extend their knowledge of fixed and removable prosthodontics in order to prepare them for a career in specialist practice, the hospital or community services, industrial dental practice or an academic career in the field.

Employability
The majority of graduates completing the programme progress onto specialist lists in prosthodontics in the UK. Overseas graduates can apply to sit examinations to join relevant specialist lists in prosthodontics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme is intensive with a strong practical emphasis. Students benefit from first-class facilities which provide unique, seamless training in specialist dentistry, including practical classes in the operative technique laboratory.

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This is a full-time two year, or part-time three-year Master's programme comprising theoretical instruction, practical work and personal research. Read more
This is a full-time two year, or part-time three-year Master's programme comprising theoretical instruction, practical work and personal research.

Degree information

The programme offers practical experience in advanced conservation, fixed (conventionally prepared and resin-retained designs) and removable prosthodontics, and implant-supported prostheses for single missing teeth, partial or completely edentulous cases, alongside an introduction to occlusal registration techniques and the range of diagnostic procedures required to ensure effective planning and design of oral reconstructions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits. All modules are compulsory.

Year One consists of core modules (165 credits). Year Two consists of core modules (105 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits). Year Three (Speciality/Advanced Training only) is not credit-bearing. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Aspects of Restorative Treatment
-Principles of Treatment Core Module (Conservative Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, Prosthodontics)
-Fundamentals of Fixed and Implant Prosthodontics
-Fundamentals of Removable Prosthodontics
-Prosthodontic Treatment Planning and Functional Occlusion
-Prosthodontic Clinical and Laboratory Care I
-Advanced Restorative Seminars - Clinical Log Book I and Case Reports I
-Prosthodontic Operative Dentistry and Endodontics
-Advanced Fixed, Removable, Implant and Maxillofacial Prosthodontics
-Prosthodontic Clinical and Laboratory Care 2
-Prosthodontic Clinical Log Book and Case Reports 2
-Clinical Science and Research Methods

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in year two which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 13,000–15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through one-to-one clinical and laboratory instruction, seminar teaching, lectures, journal club, individual work including a research project, self-directed learning and problem-based learning.

Careers

The majority of graduates continue their progression to specialist training in prosthodontics to gain entry to the prosthodontic specialist list.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme offers an intensive programme with a strong practical emphasis. Students benefit from first-class facilities which provide unique, seamless training in specialist dentistry, including practical classes in the operative technique laboratory. Approximately two-thirds of the programme is allocated to clinical and laboratory work for patients.

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Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies. Read more
Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies.

The International Studies (Environment) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies. In particular it applies these to contemporary debates on global environmental issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-environment/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as global environmental governance, the rise of environmental social movements and whether we can achieve development whilst still maintaining the quality of our natural environment. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- You will have the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library, as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A high level of student support during your time with us. Each student is allocated an academic adviser and student support co-ordinators are also available to help you with any issues you might encounter.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
- Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

Professional advice

Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. The International Studies (Global Political Economy) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to the globalisation of economic relations, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2016/international-studies--global-political-economy-/international-studies-global-political-economy/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers. .

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as the globalisation of economic relations and the potential challenges it poses for states and the governance of the international system. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables you to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional Advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by n international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Read more
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations.

The International Studies (International Relations) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced International Studies, including the application of these to real world cases and issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-international-relations/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers the central foundations of the contemporary study of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip provides you with first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat endodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases. Read more

About the course

Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat endodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases.

You’ll use various complementary learning modalities, interacting with colleagues and allied specialties in restorative dentistry to jointly manage patient care. Over the three years, you’ll learn sophisticated research methods and apply them in a scientific research investigation, with specific outcomes for each year of study.

The programme has been approved by RCS Edinburgh as recognised speciality training for eligibility to sit their MRD examinations in the three sub-specialisms of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics.

Your career

We offer clinical and non-clinical courses that will further your career and develop your interests. Many of our clinical graduates go on to specialist dental practice, hospital practice or academic posts.

World-leading dental school

Our internationally recognised oral and dental research is organised into two overarching themes: ‘clinical and person centred’ and ‘basic and applied’. These themes are supported by three interdisciplinary research groups: Bioengineering and Health Technologies, Integrated Bioscience, and Person Centred and Population Oral Health.

We believe that dental science should not be constrained by the traditional boundaries created by specific clinical disciplines and that progress derives from a multidisciplinary approach. Our research supports our teaching enabling a blended approach to learning.
Your course will make the most of virtual learning environments and advanced practical sessions, as well as traditional lectures and seminars.

Facilities

You’ll develop your clinical skills in one of our two clinical skills labs or in our new virtual reality Simulation Suite where you can use haptic technology to undertake a range of clinical techniques.

You’ll complete your clinical training in Sheffield’s Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, part of the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. There are 150 dental units with modern facilities for treatment under sedation, a well-equipped dental radiography department, oral pathology laboratories and a hospital dental production laboratory.

We have new modern research facilities and laboratories for tissue culture, molecular biology, materials science and histology- microscopy. All laboratories have dedicated technical support and academic expertise to guide you.

Health clearance

If you’re starting a course that involves exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissues, you must conform to the national guidelines for the protection of patients, health care workers and students. Before admission to a clinical course we’ll need to check that you’re not an infectious carrier of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV and that you do not have tuberculosis. A positive test doesn’t necessarily exclude you from dental training.

Our immunisation requirements are constantly being reviewed to ensure we meet current Department of Health guidance. You need to comply with these if you are offered a place. You’ll get more information when you apply, but if you have any questions on health clearance issues, please get in touch.

Disclosure and Barring Service

If you apply for one of our clinical courses you’ll need a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosure. If you do have any criminal convictions or cautions (including verbal cautions) and bind-over orders, please tell us about them on your application form. If you have not lived in the UK in the preceding five years before you commence our programme, you’ll need to provide us with a Certificate of Good Standing from the police authority in your home country. You’ll get more information on the DBS and the Certificate of Good Standing when you apply.

Local NHS policies and procedures

Clinical training in Charles Clifford Dental Hospital requires you to comply with their policies and procedures, which include the Department of Health policy on being ‘bare below the elbow’. For clarification on these policies and procedures before you apply, please see our website.

Core modules

Year 1: Principles of Periodontal Treatment; Principles of Endodontic Treatment; Principles of Conservative Dentistry; Management of the Partially Dentate Patient I; Research Project: Literature Review; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient I.

Year 2: Research Methods in Clinical Dentistry; Principles of Clinical Management; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient II; Research Project: Experimental Work Data Collection; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Year 3: Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient 3; Research Project: Completion and and Write Up; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Teaching

Lectures, tutorials, seminars, demonstrations, clinical skills laboratory sessions, case-based discussion, extensive practical clinical experience.

Assessment

Competency-based continuous clinical assessments, formal examinations, oral presentations, written assignments, research project.

Read less
Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat prosthodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases. Read more

About the course

Develop your skills and expertise to a specialist level. Conforming to the GDC’s Specialist Curricula, the course covers the theoretical basis and practical skills needed to manage and treat prosthodontics and general restorative interdisciplinary cases.

You’ll use various complementary learning modalities, interacting with colleagues and allied specialties in restorative dentistry to jointly manage patient care. Over the three years, you’ll learn sophisticated research methods and apply them in a scientific research investigation, with specific outcomes for each year of study.

The programme has been approved by RCS Edinburgh as recognised speciality training for eligibility to sit their MRD examinations in the three sub-specialisms of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics.

Your career

We offer clinical and non-clinical courses that will further your career and develop your interests. Many of our clinical graduates go on to specialist dental practice, hospital practice or academic posts.

World-leading dental school

Our internationally recognised oral and dental research is organised into two overarching themes: ‘clinical and person centred’ and ‘basic and applied’. These themes are supported by three interdisciplinary research groups: Bioengineering and Health Technologies, Integrated Bioscience, and Person Centred and Population Oral Health.

We believe that dental science should not be constrained by the traditional boundaries created by specific clinical disciplines and that progress derives from a multidisciplinary approach. Our research supports our teaching enabling a blended approach to learning.

Your course will make the most of virtual learning environments and advanced practical sessions, as well as traditional lectures and seminars.

Facilities

You’ll develop your clinical skills in one of our two clinical skills labs or in our new virtual reality Simulation Suite where you can use haptic technology to undertake a range of clinical techniques.

You’ll complete your clinical training in Sheffield’s Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, part of the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. There are 150 dental units with modern facilities for treatment under sedation, a well-equipped dental radiography department, oral pathology laboratories and a hospital dental production laboratory.

We have new modern research facilities and laboratories for tissue culture, molecular biology, materials science and histology- microscopy. All laboratories have dedicated technical support and academic expertise to guide you.

Health clearance

If you’re starting a course that involves exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissues, you must conform to the national guidelines for the protection of patients, health care workers and students. Before admission to a clinical course we’ll need to check that you’re not an infectious carrier of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV and that you do not have tuberculosis. A positive test doesn’t necessarily exclude you from dental training.

Our immunisation requirements are constantly being reviewed to ensure we meet current Department of Health guidance. You need to comply with these if you are offered a place. You’ll get more information when you apply, but if you have any questions on health clearance issues, please get in touch.

Disclosure and Barring Service

If you apply for one of our clinical courses you’ll need a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosure. If you do have any criminal convictions or cautions (including verbal cautions) and bind-over orders, please tell us about them on your application form. If you have not lived in the UK in the preceding five years before you commence our programme, you’ll need to provide us with a Certificate of Good Standing from the police authority in your home country. You’ll get more information on the DBS and the Certificate of Good Standing when you apply.

Local NHS policies and procedures

Clinical training in Charles Clifford Dental Hospital requires you to comply with their policies and procedures, which include the Department of Health policy on being ‘bare below the elbow’. For clarification on these policies and procedures before you apply, please see our website.

Core modules

Year 1: Principles of Periodontal Treatment; Principles of Endodontic Treatment; Principles of Conservative Dentistry; Management of the Partially Dentate Patient I; Research Project: Literature Review; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient I.

Year 2: Research Methods in Clinical Dentistry; Principles of Clinical Management; Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient II; Research Project: Experimental Work Data Collection; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Year 3: Clinical Practice Programme: New Patient 3; Research Project: Completion and and Write Up; Clinical Practice Programme: Treatment of Own Patients; Speciality Programme in Endodontics, Periodontics, or Prosthodontics.

Teaching

Lectures, tutorials, seminars, demonstrations, clinical skills laboratory sessions, case-based discussion, extensive practical clinical experience.

Assessment

Competency-based continuous clinical assessments, formal examinations, oral presentations, written assignments, research project.

Read less
This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject. Read more
This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject.

Course structure

Four option modules; dissertation.

Core Modules

-Graduate Diploma dissertation

Optional Modules

-Optional Modules in previous years have included (2 choices from):
-Landscapes of Worship in Contemporary South Asia
-Literature and Theology of the Old Testament
-New Testament Theology
-Topics in Christian Ethics
-Death, Ritual and Belief
-The Making of Modern Christianity: Medieval and Reformation Europe
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions I
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions II
-God, Freedom and the Soul
-Philosophy and the Christian Tradition
-One further 20 credit module offered by the Department of Theology & Religion at Levels 1 or 2

Plus 2 choices from:
-Aramaic
-Biblical Theology
-Advanced Greek Texts
-Religious Innovations
-New Testament Ethics
-Issues in Old Testament Studies
-The Cross in the Shadow of the Crescent
-The First Urban Churches
-Religion and Film
-Religious Violence in the Reformation Era
-Emotion and Identity in Religion
-The Sociology of Conservative Protestantism
-The Postmodern God
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (English)
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (with Greek)
-The Theology of Thomas Aquinas
-Marriage and Family in Christian Social Teaching
-War and Peace in the Orthodox Tradition
-Gospel, Mission and Empire
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (English)
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (Greek)
-The Historical Jesus
-Reading Greek Sources about the Historical Jesus
-Jesus Christ in the Twentieth Century
-Faith and the Experience of War in the Christian World
-Religions in Sub-Saharan Africa
-Religious Difference in the Reformation World
-The Doctrine of the Church from the Fathers to the Present

Learning and Teaching

As a student on the Graduate Diploma, you will receive on average 7.5 hours of timetabled contact per week. This will include a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Timetabled contact is only the beginning of your learning. It provides a starting point for your development as an independent learner. Typically, classroom teaching and learning will form nearly 25% of the time you will spend on your studies; you will be expected to spend the remaining 75% of your time on independent research.

The culmination of the process of your becoming an independent researcher is the Dissertation, a large research project that counts for one third of your marks. This gives you the opportunity to engage at an advanced level with creative cutting-edge research at the forefront of the discipline, working on a topic of your choice. For the dissertation you will have a supervisor who will guide and discuss your research with you. The dissertation represents the cumulative development of skills in analysis, synthesis, presentation and interpretation that the degree programme aims to foster.

In addition to all this the Department also has an extensive programme of research-related activities that you are warmly encouraged to attend. These include several research seminar series and public lectures from high-profile guest speakers and visiting scholars; the University also frequently hosts eminent and well-known visiting speakers.

Other admission requirements

It is also ideal if you have already studied theology and religion to first degree level in another country, and wish to become familiar with the critical approach to these subjects that is typical in British public universities. When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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Develop and deliver high quality dentistry with our Restorative Dentistry programme. Read more
Develop and deliver high quality dentistry with our Restorative Dentistry programme. Led by a team of consultants and complemented by respected visiting specialist clinicians and teachers, this programme is structured to allow you to continue your current working commitments while studying for this postgraduate degree at an appropriate pace. Each clinical module includes hands-on consultant time to ensure you’ll have the understanding and confidence to carry out taught restorative techniques.

Key features

-Choose your own learning journey – complete 60 credits and receive a PG Certificate in Restorative Dentistry. 120 credits will give you a PG Diploma and the maximum 180 credits will reward you with a full Masters in Restorative Dentistry. The cost of each module is £5000.
-Balance existing work commitments with flexible study opportunities. Each module consists of 300 total learning hours – 80 hours of direct contact and 220 hours in own practice preparing cases.
-Benefit from hands-on consultant time for each clinical module – put your knowledge into practice and gain experience and confidence.
-High quality teaching – learn from an experienced team of consultants in restorative dentistry and by respected visiting specialist clinicians and teachers.
-Grow in confidence and experience with the programme – learn and understand the foundations of restorative dentistry and restoring teeth and tissues in year one and develop your knowledge and skills with advanced restorative dentistry in year two.
-Boost your future career prospects and the quality of care you can offer to your patients and produce a dissertation to complete the masters - design, conduct, evaluate and write up a project on a topic relevant to restorative dentistry.

Course details

Year 1
In your first year, you’ll learn the foundations of restorative dentistry which includes diagnosis and treatment planning, occlusal management, non-surgical periodontology and current concepts in endodontics. You’ll also learn about restoring teeth and tissues and study fixed prosthodontics operative techniques, with hands on components in the Simulated Dental Learning Environment. You’ll also study the restoration of endodontically treated teeth, removable prosthodontics and complete dentures.

Core modules
-RSD711 Foundations of Restorative Dentistry
-RSD712 Restoring Teeth and Tissues

Year 2
Successfully complete the modules from your first year and go on to study advanced restorative dentistry in your second year. You’ll get the chance to focus on aesthetics and conservative aesthetic techniques and treatment planning for missing teeth including live implant surgical demonstration – moving up to advanced endodontics, adjunctive periodontal surgery, guided bone regeneration and soft tissue surgery, restorative practice and more.

Core modules
-RSD721 Advanced Restorative Dentistry 1
-RSD722 Advanced Restorative Dentistry 2

Final year
Successfully complete 120 credits and choose to produce a dissertation to complete the masters in your third and final year. The aim of the dissertation is to enable you to demonstrate your ability to design, conduct, evaluate and write up a project on a topic that is of relevance to restorative dentistry - in doing so you’ll demonstrate your self-direction, originality and ability to act independently in the planning and implementation of project skills at an advanced professional level.

Core modules
-DIS732 Dental Programmes Dissertation

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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