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Masters Degrees (Conservation Policy)

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The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management. Read more
The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management.

Modern conservation science transcends the traditional boundaries of biology, ecology and environmental management. Today’s managers of biodiversity need to be versed in a broad range of specialist fields, from population ecology and human community development, through to international wildlife trade and the economics of conservation, as well as the latest techniques in endangered species recovery.

Our MSc in Conservation Biology is an interdisciplinary pathway that integrates all of these aspects of conservation biology. It is designed for wildlife managers with practical experience in international conservation work looking to acquire formal scientific training, as well as students with academic qualifications looking to develop a career in conservation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/273/conservation-biology

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF 2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The MSc in Conservation Studies is a one year interdisciplinary Masters degree that brings together students from a range of backgrounds but with a shared passion for conservation. Read more

The MSc in Conservation Studies is a one year interdisciplinary Masters degree that brings together students from a range of backgrounds but with a shared passion for conservation.

Highlights

  • The interdisciplinary approach means you can explore a range of methodological approaches to conservation – ecological, economic, historical, etc.
  • You will gain a scientific understanding of data collection and analysis and engage with issues in conservation policy at different scales.
  • An ideal opportunity to research ecological case studies and examples from a range of habitats in aquatic and terrestrial systems.
  • Students complete a practically orientated summer research project which can be undertaken in collaboration with an external organisation involved in conservation work.

The growing understanding of ecosystems, ecosystem services, and biodiversity suggests that conservation of the environment is crucial to humankind's survival. However, there are significant challenges to effective conservation.

Firstly, there is a need for further advances in scientific understanding and data collection. The MSc Conservation Studies provides advanced training in data collection and analysis and the design of ecological studies with the opportunity for you to develop field work, mathematical computing, and experimental skills.

Secondly, there is the need to inform and engage the public, managers, and decision makers. On the MSc Conservation Studies you will explore conflicts between different human agencies, engage with conservation policy and governance at different scales (local, national, and international), and consider the relationship between the public, science, and policy.

The MSc Conservation Studies is distinguished by its interdisciplinary character and involves academic staff from the following Schools:

  • Biology
  • Classics
  • Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • Geography and Sustainable Development
  • History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Philosophical, Anthropological, and Film Studies.

You will be encouraged to use ideas from different disciplines to illuminate present day conservation debates with a view to mediating what can appear to be irreconcilable differences of opinion.

Teaching format

The MSc degree requires two semesters of full-time coursework, normally equivalent to six modules.

The course involves both independent and group study. Modules have different methods of delivery, including:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • practical classes.

Assessments include:

  • written assignments
  • practical work
  • presentations
  • creating podcasts.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Tourism is the world's largest industry and nature and wildlife tourism is the fastest growing sector of the industry. Read more
Tourism is the world's largest industry and nature and wildlife tourism is the fastest growing sector of the industry. Therefore, there is a need to ensure that nature tourism follows the principles of sustainability, by minimising impacts on natural environments, contributing to protected area management and also benefiting local people.

The MSc in Conservation and Tourism offers you a critical engagement with the subject of conservation and tourism, not only by exploring the wide range of environmental, social and economic impacts, but also through considering difficult questions that we might ask ourselves about our role as conservationists. For instance, in relation to the underlying values we might introduce into different cultures around the world as part of our ‘mission’, and what the historical roots and repercussions of these might be.

This programme is relevant to the work of NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, tour operators, conservation managers, international agencies and donors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/272/conservation-and-tourism

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

DICE is Britain’s leading research and postgraduate training centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity, as well as the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people.

We focus on combining natural and social sciences to understand complex conservation issues and design effective interventions to conserve biodiversity. Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working in collaboration with conservation agencies around the world. This blend of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Our taught Master’s programmes cover topics in conservation management, policy, ecotourism and sustainable natural resource use. The research degree programmes (MSc by Research and PhD) encourage you to undertake original, high-quality research, which culminates in the submission of a thesis. Please visit our website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/) for new programmes that may be under development that further integrate conservation policy and practice.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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***This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry***. The management of species, habitats and ecosystems is increasingly drawing upon principles and practices from other disciplines, such as business, marketing and human resources. Read more
***This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry***

The management of species, habitats and ecosystems is increasingly drawing upon principles and practices from other disciplines, such as business, marketing and human resources.

The MSc in Conservation Project Management draws upon the extensive conservation project management experience of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and equips you with the skills and tools you need to manage conservation projects effectively. The pathway is particularly suitable for managers of conservation projects who wish to build on their existing skills, or conservation practitioners who wish to move into a project management role. You spend time at the International Training Centre at Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in Jersey.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/274/conservation-project-management

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which integrates natural and social sciences

- Lecturers are research active, world-leading academics with practical experience of conservation project management in locations across the world

- Tailored courses in leadership and facilitation skills delivered by staff experienced in project managment within conservation

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development.

The relationship between conservation and rural development can best be described as an uneasy alliance: on the one hand there is substantial common ground between them in terms of preventing environmental degradation, but on the other, they are often in direct conflict. This pathway explores the issues underlying the conservation/rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between the two.

The programme is relevant to the work of national management and scientific authorities, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies and donors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/271/conservation-and-rural-development

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which provides substantive natural and social sciences training in both conservation and rural development

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

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*****This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry.*******. At its core, the MSc in Primate Conservation and Behaviour provides a forum for understanding not only the behaviour of NHPs (non-human primates), but also the current issues and hot topics in NHPs conservation and management. Read more
*****This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry.*******

At its core, the MSc in Primate Conservation and Behaviour provides a forum for understanding not only the behaviour of NHPs (non-human primates), but also the current issues and hot topics in NHPs conservation and management.

Many of the world’s non-human primates (NHPs) face extinction due to habitat destruction, fragmentation, overexploitation, disease and/or increased competition over resources with their human relatives. In spite of the impressive behavioural flexibility and capacity for adaptation of numerous NHP species, global trends are alarming.

This pathway promotes a multidisciplinary approach and understanding of primate conservation issues. A combination of ecological, spatial, behavioural, and social methodologies and perspectives provides promising avenues to inform and achieve effective conservation management and to help combat these challenges. This pathway highlights the benefits of incorporating an understanding of local human communities’ experiences and a sound knowledge of primate behavioural and landscape ecology to foster successful conservation of non-human primates. It will familiarise you with a diverse set of practical and theoretical tools to pursue successfully a future role in primate conservation.

The MSc offers collaborations with NGOs around the world, from the neotropics to Africa and Southeast Asia, as well as zoological institutions across Europe (eg, Howletts and Port Lympne Animal Parks, Kent) and African primate sanctuaries.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/269/conservation-and-primate-behaviour

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching by research active experts drawing on extensive field research experience with primates and biodiversity conservation

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links and collaborations with international NGOs and zoological institutions around the world

- Wide suite of modules enabling you to design a learning syllabus to suit your individual interests

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildwood Discovery Park, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

Academic Excellence

You will be taught by leading experts who are pioneering innovative conservation solutions around the world. Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Taught by internationally recognised experts active at the science/policy interface, this interdisciplinary programme examines both scientific and policy-oriented aspects of conservation. Read more

Taught by internationally recognised experts active at the science/policy interface, this interdisciplinary programme examines both scientific and policy-oriented aspects of conservation. Teaching covers the breadth of this important field, examining how conservation goals may be achieved under climate change scenarios, in combination with food security requirements, while taking social justice issues into account. The breadth of the degree gives flexibility to pursue those areas most relevant to your professional development and contains a significant research component supported by leading researchers.

The degree is designed to offer you considerable scope to tailor your studies to focus on the topics you wish to pursue. Integral to the whole programme is extensive liaison with conservation practitioners from a wide range of collaborating governmental and non-governmental organisations (e.g., Butterfly Conservation, Marine Conservation Society, Natural England), as well as a broad suite of international organisations (e.g., Kenya Wildlife Service, Solio Ranch, Wildlife Direct. Key individuals from some of these organisations contribute to classes and field visits and a number of our project students will be placed with such organisations.

A special feature of the programme is the Kenya field course, which includes visits to some of East Africa’s most famous conservation areas, as well as in-depth discussions with a wide range of stakeholders about synergies and trade-offs between conservation and development. The trip provides you with opportunities to see first-hand how conservation science operates within particular policy contexts. Travel and subsistence costs for this part of the programme are included in the programme fee.

Perfect environment to study conservation science and policy

This Masters is based on the Penryn Campus in Cornwall—an exceptional place in which to study issues related to the environment and sustainability. The duchy is a living laboratory offering a diverse range of marine and terrestrial habitats, a wealth of natural resources, and creative and resilient communities.

The Penryn Campus is home to the University's Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI http://www.exeter.ac.uk/esi/) – a £30 million centre leading cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research into solutions to problems of environmental change and enhancing people’s lives by improving their relationship with the environment. As a student on the MSc Conservation Science and Policy you will benefit from the ESI’s interdisciplinary approach to conservation science and policy and will have the unique opportunity to work on real world scenarios and problem solving in this area. You will be able to take advantage of a wide range of opportunities to engage with local, national and international experts through ESI events, guest lectures and research projects.

Fieldwork

The census research projects will see you spending a considerable amount of time in the field collecting data at several key research sites in West Cornwall and interacting with local NGOs (Cornwall Wildlife Trust, South West Lakes Trust).

This programme includes a two week field course in Kenya and will include visits to some of Africa’s largest and most important game reserves, as well as an introduction to some of the day-to-day problems faced by conservation biologists in developing nations. You will study the behaviour of animals in a natural ecological setting with a focus on large mammals, birds and insects. Travel and subsistence costs for this part of the programme are included in the programme fee.

Find out more about our field course modules at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/fieldwork/. You can also keep up to date and share the experiences of our students in the field on our Field Course Fortnight website at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/fieldcourses/.

Learning and teaching

The taught component of this programme is delivered in the first five months, during which time you will be encouraged to develop your census research projects. The rest of the academic year is dedicated to these projects.

Programme structure

This Programme is modular and consists of four compulsory modules and 2-3 optional modules.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include;

  • Dissertation;
  • Understanding Environmental Change;
  • Environmental Sustainability in Practice;
  • Key Skills

Optional modules

Examples of the optional modules can include;

  • Terrestrial Biodiversity and Conservation; ;
  • Marine Biodiversity and Conservation;
  • Preparing for Ecological Consultancy;
  • Statistical Modelling;
  • Governing Sustainability
  • African Conservation Science and Policy Field Course

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.



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The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels.

International wildlife trade is big business and ranges from high volume timber and fishery products to the more traditional wildlife products from endangered species used in horticultural, pet, leather and medicinal trades. International trade and over-use are implicated in the decline of around one third of threatened species.

Equally, many of the world’s poorest people depend on the use or sale of wildlife products for their livelihood. Meeting the twin goals of reducing poverty and stemming the rate of species loss requires improved management of trade in natural resources.

The programme examines the dynamics of international wildlife trade from all angles: the practical mechanisms set up to regulate wildlife trade, the ecological assumptions, social, cultural and economic drivers of trade, along with the challenges, pressures and the political environment that underlines relevant international law and policy.

This pathway is designed for people from areas such as government management and scientific authorities, NGOs, international agencies and donors who are working to improve sustainability of wildlife trade. It examines a number of mechanisms for delivering sustainable wildlife trade, especially the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), with whom DICE has developed a Memorandum of Understanding to offer this pathway.

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Benefit from DICE members' expertise and in-depth knowledge of CITES and wildlife trade

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Heathrow Animal Reception Centre and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey. Previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with leading organisations involved in the monitoring of wildlife trade and enforcement of regulations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests:

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues. Read more

Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.

We're witnessing today a tectonic shift in global geopolitics. The emergence of China, Brazil and India as global players, the development of global governance, the financial crisis, climate change – are all symptoms.

On this Masters you’ll grasp concepts like race, diaspora, hybridity, difference, grassroots development, HDI, multitude, immanence, and human rights.

These concepts are used to analyse practical, policy and activist issues arising from globalisation: global civil society, the role of international organisations (the IMF, WTO, UN and World Bank and global NGOs), intellectual property rights, social capital, financialisation, global governance and deep democracy.

You'll deal with issues like terrorism, microfinance, indigenous people, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism and environmental justice.

The MA is ideal for anyone pursuing careers in policy research, NGOs, advocacy, charities, international organisations, cultural and political activism, global media, art and curating, as well as for further academic work leading to a PhD.

Practical placement

The Masters includes a supervised and assessed practical placement. This may be with NGOs in India or Africa, arts and conservation organisations in China, indigenous activists in Latin America, London-based global NGOs, diasporic communities, think-tanks, environmental organisations, publishers or financial/microfinance organisations.

Leading theorists and visiting lecturers

You'll be taught by leading theorists and visiting lecturers drawn from a wide circle of activists, artists, film-makers, lawyers, economists, journalists and policy-makers.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. Modules can be chosen from across Goldsmiths departments and centres. Option modules are subject to availability and approval by the module lecturer/convenor.

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Other option modules, by department

You may prefer to look through the full range of optional modules available across Goldsmiths departments.

Please note that not all the modules listed below may be open to you - your final selection will depend upon spaces available and timetable compatibility.

Assessment

Essays and/or practical projects; dissertation.

Skills

The programme provides advanced training for labour market-relevant skills in transnational analysis of sovereignty, democracy, governmentality, financialisation, intellectual property rights, and the role of non-governmental organisations.

Careers

Suitable careers and areas of work for graduates of the programme include:

  • the academic sphere
  • government and non-government sectors
  • arts and art administration
  • publishing
  • journalism
  • media
  • the culture industry in general

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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This course is designed to develop the professional and field skills, including identification and survey techniques, required for effective conservation. Read more
This course is designed to develop the professional and field skills, including identification and survey techniques, required for effective conservation. It will familiarise you with the key ecological concepts underlying evidence-based conservation. You will produce professional reports and assessments and undertake monitoring of species and communities. You will also gain additional skills essential for conservation practitioners, for example:
- knowledge of international and national wildlife legislation, planning law and environmental policy

- IT competencies, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

- an understanding of the ecological requirements of different species and the implications of environmental change

- an ability to statistically interpret field data.

The course has two pathways: one is focused on conservation within the UK/EU and the other focuses on conservation at the International level.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/conservation-ecology/

Why choose this course?

- Our lecturers conduct first-class research in conservation ecology.

- We have strong links with many conservation organisations and research institutions, such as the NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, RSPB, Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International, providing excellent project opportunities and enhancing career prospects.

- Focusing on the practical application of theory means graduates can adapt quickly to the demands of the conservation professions. We develop your field skills including identification techniques, required when undertaking biodiversity surveys.

- Research-informed teaching keeps our students up to date with the latest thinking. Equipping you with current conservation legislation and practice is essential in the context of rapidly-changing demands on land use.

- We develop your transferable skills, particularly communication, organisation and research planning, which will assist you when carrying out your project and prepare you for a career in conservation ecology.

- On successful completion of the MSc, you will be able to apply for graduate membership of the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management.

Professional accreditation

CIEEM accreditation indicates that a key professional body recognises that we offer our students the opportunity to develop the key skills needed for employment in conservation ecology. Additionally our students have access to vital information about current developments in ecology and consultancy and can benefit from all that CIEEM offers.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics associated with conservation ecology, and include field visits and exercises, lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, practical exercises, laboratory sessions and project work. A key component of the course is developing field skills, including species identification. Techniques for identification are taught in the field and in laboratory sessions, using expertise from the Department of Biological and Medical Sciences and, where appropriate, from the University of Oxford Museum of Natural History.

As needed, you will be taught by guest speakers who are conservation practitioners or who work in conservation research organisations. Some parts of the course share modules with master’s provision in Environmental Assessment and Management and also in Primate Conservation. This cross-disciplinary nature for certain aspects of the course is a key strength.

Field trips

We use the varied landscape of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire as our natural laboratory, and the course has a large practical component, developing survey and assessment methods as well as identification skills. This landscape is used to illustrate major conservation issues as well. Most of this field work is conducted as part of the modules during semesters but we also have a field skills based period at the end of the taught component of the course and offer opportunities to work towards gaining specialist licences, which are invaluable for consultancy work.

There are no extra costs associated with the fieldwork components of this MSc.

Work placement and professional recognition

We encourage you to conduct your research project with conservation organisations or with one of our research groups. We have good links with a range of national and local conservation organisations and ecological consultancies. On successful completion of this MSc, you will be eligible to apply for graduate membership of the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management. With an additional two years' work experience, you will be eligible to apply for associate membership.

How this course helps you develop

We help you to develop links with potential employers, often through project work, and we encourage contact with practitioners throughout the course. The course is underpinned by theory but there is an emphasis on developing practical skills, including industry standard survey techniques and species identification skills. We also provide opportunities to develop techniques for data handling and analysis along with a focus on professional communication skills. We encourage all our students to learn from their peers as well, helping to develop essential teamworking skills.

Careers

Graduates of this course gain employment primarily with environmental consultancies or agencies, conservation organisations or charities, or continue academic research as a PhD student. Some of our past students are currently working for environmental consultants, the RSPB, the Environment Agency, DEFRA and Natural England.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 95% of our research in Biological Sciences was rated as internationally recognised, with 58% being world leading or internationally excellent. That makes us the top post’ 92 University for its Biological Sciences submission.

In addition to this research which underpins our teaching, our Centre for Ecology, Environment and Conservation is developing the use of mobile applications for data collection and processing in the field. Our Phase One Toolkit, which was developed by staff who deliver our MSc Conservation Ecology, with student input, is widely used by consultancies, demonstrating that our students have access to innovative data collection tools.

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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Masters Mediterranean Ecology Field Course 15 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Leeds is one of the best locations geographically to study Biodiversity and Conservation. You’ll be within easy reach of three areas of great natural beauty and dramatic scenery; Yorkshire Dales, North Yorkshire Moors and the Peak District – providing you with a wide range of project and fieldwork opportunities.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area. Potential employers look for academic qualifications in combination with practical skills and experience, and a relevant MSc course can give you the edge in a highly competitive field.

Please visit the website for more details regarding career opportunities and support.



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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

You’ll also undertake the African field course is based at Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia, Kenya. You’ll gain a first-hand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community, both for the wildlife and the people who live in the area. As well as learning about the local environment, flora and fauna, s, you’ll spend most of the time designing and carrying out group research projects.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • African Field Ecology 20 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area.



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This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. Read more

This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. The course is taught not only by our experienced academic staff but with the assistance of world-leading experts and conservation practitioners both in class and also in the field.

Importantly throughout the course we stress a holistic appreciation of the link between field and laboratory-based work and the necessity of professional level communication with a range of audiences. Where possible teaching will be undertaken through workshops and seminars so providing a more immersive environment to help develop an understanding of the operation of professional-level applied conservation skills in communication and problem solving.

What happens on the course?

The focus throughout is on animals in their wild settings and as such there is a strong emphasis on fieldwork and applied wildlife research. Modules to be studied are:

  • 7AB012 Conservation Genetics - This module is focused on genetic applications to problems of conservation, reflecting the diversity of concerns relevant to conservation biology and covering the management of captive populations for conservation. Modern genetic techniques used by conservationists are also examined.
  • 7AB009 Advanced Survey and Monitoring Techniques –The desktop survey, design, collection, processing, analysis and output production of environmental data (physical, vegetation and organismal) will be explored in a problem-based setting. This will involve the integrated use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), geospatial imagery, telemetry, image acquisition, sound acquisition, ground-truthing and field survey techniques.
  • 7AB011 Primate Conservation and Behaviour - This module focuses on the evolution of primate societies and asks how environmental and demographic factors influence animals’ decisions about how to organise their social and reproductive strategies. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding key theoretical concepts and how these may be applied to empirical studies of non-human primates. This module explores also the science of scarcity and diversity of wild primate populations and the successful management of captive populations for conservation.
  • 7AB013 Research Methods for Wildlife Conservation - This module prepares you with the skills needed for wildlife conservation research. You will develop advanced skills in literature searching and critical analysis of published work. You will explore the development of a research question, research design, data handling and statistics. You will prepare a professional portfolio of your research methods covered in the module.
  • 7AB010 Field Course - The module will examine the whole process of research trip planning from funding and logistical planning through to the detail of content for individual session activities. The culmination of this process will be a residential field course in the UK or overseas.
  • 7AB014 Conservation of UK Protected Species – In-depth consideration of the conservation of UK protected species including their ecology, protection legislation, conservation measures, habitat management and habitat creation.
  • 7AB015 The Masters Project module - an opportunity to plan, undertake and deliver an extended, problem-focused, original independent investigation related to the chosen programme of study and is a requirement for the award of a Masters degree.

Whilst the majority of the material will be delivered by the core Departmental staff the course aims to bring-in external speakers from wildlife research, practice and policy to allow students access to the knowledge of professionals working in the sector.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course has evolved from the BSc Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Conservation and explores some of the areas that are more suited to higher-level study. It is expected that students will come from subject areas that have an animal conservation/behaviour background, or else current conservation professionals that are seeking to update their subject and skills knowledge.

The course is designed to provide many opportunities for students specifically:

  • Wolverhampton is developing a national reputation for the study of Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Conservation. Studying the MSc provides real opportunities to influence the direction of study and research of the staff and student body.
  • There are significant opportunities to undertake fieldwork in a range of local, national and international settings. This is an important driver for the department and provides a strong applied focus for Masters-level study across the range of modules studied.
  • A strong emphasis is placed on developing the link from strategic/logistical planning through field and laboratory work to the professional communication of the information generated.
  • The facilities of the new Science building at the university provide a significant opportunity to develop complementary wildlife-related laboratory skills which are often not explored at undergraduate level.
  • Innovative approaches to learning are used including student-led workshops, seminars and practical activities that mirror workplace scenarios. This gives students a strong role in directing their own development and links strongly to career development and aspiration.
  • There is a strong emphasis on the individual and the nurturing of individual study and career aspirations.

Career path

The course prepares you for a role as a conservation professional working with strong applied and field-based components. In particular it gives you key opportunities for employment in conservation-type roles in the UK and beyond where higher-level qualifications are essential for demonstrating topic knowledge and technical competency. Such roles are found in a host of statutory and non-governmental organisations across the wildlife sector.



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