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Masters Degrees (Conservation Law)

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation gives you the opportunity to study environmental law in depth, within its policy context, exploring law at national, EU and global levels and comparing legal regimes.

The programme equips you with a broad expertise which will benefit you in careers in government departments and agencies, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, private practice, policymaking or in an advisory capacity. The degree also provides an excellent foundation for further research.

The specialisation is for graduates with a first degree in law and students with other relevant academic and professional backgrounds.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/115/environmental-law-and-policy

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW839 Environmental Quality Law

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW837 Conservation and Natural Resources Law

LW838 Land Development Law

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels.

International wildlife trade is big business and ranges from high volume timber and fishery products to the more traditional wildlife products from endangered species used in horticultural, pet, leather and medicinal trades. International trade and over-use are implicated in the decline of around one third of threatened species.

Equally, many of the world’s poorest people depend on the use or sale of wildlife products for their livelihood. Meeting the twin goals of reducing poverty and stemming the rate of species loss requires improved management of trade in natural resources.

The programme examines the dynamics of international wildlife trade from all angles: the practical mechanisms set up to regulate wildlife trade, the ecological assumptions, social, cultural and economic drivers of trade, along with the challenges, pressures and the political environment that underlines relevant international law and policy.

This pathway is designed for people from areas such as government management and scientific authorities, NGOs, international agencies and donors who are working to improve sustainability of wildlife trade. It examines a number of mechanisms for delivering sustainable wildlife trade, especially the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), with whom DICE has developed a Memorandum of Understanding to offer this pathway.

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Benefit from DICE members' expertise and in-depth knowledge of CITES and wildlife trade

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Heathrow Animal Reception Centre and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey. Previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with leading organisations involved in the monitoring of wildlife trade and enforcement of regulations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests:

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage. Read more
Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage.

Heritage is broad discipline, encompassing the wide spectrum of cultural inheritance from all civilisations and time periods. Heritage is also a major geopolitical issue in the world today, contributing to our sense of selves and communities, with law and development arguably the two most central issues in the field of heritage studies today. The MA engages you with both intellectual and practical approaches to key issues in heritage (including archaeology), with a particular focus on the protection of international heritage as well as development.

The programme is offered through a partnership between the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies and the Kent Law School. Over the autumn and spring terms you take a core module on heritage, and choose optional modules that cover archaeology, heritage, human rights, international law, and law and development, before undertaking an extended dissertation over the summer.

This MA is of particular interest to those who wish to study cultural heritage as an academic subject, those who wish to pursue a career in international heritage and development, lawyers who want to specialise in cultural heritage issues or heritage specialists who want to acquire a better understanding of legal issues.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/759/international-heritage-law

Course structure

This MA programme is currently in development. The proposed list of modules includes International Heritage, Archaeology and Development; alongside Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues; Artefacts in Archaeology; Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity; Transmanche Archaeologies (themes in the Archaeology of the Transmanche Region through time); Cultural Heritage Law; International Protection of Human Rights; Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems; and Law and Development.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Core Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL830 - International Heritage, Archaeology and Development (30 credits)
CL897 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity (30 credits)
CL897 - Roman Archaeology: Northern Provinces of the Empire from their Iron Age Origins (30 credits)
LW813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property (20 credits)
LW843 - International Human Rights Law (20 credits)
LW925 - Cultural Heritage Law (20 credits)
LW927 - Law and The Humanities1: Ethos and Scholarship (20 credits)
LW928 - Law and Humanities2: Current Issues (20 credits)

Study support

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies
Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) operates as a department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html), and there are corresponding opportunities for a high level of interdisciplinary interaction (five modern languages, philosophy, theology and religious studies and comparative literature), in addition to the informal links with staff in the rest of the University researching medieval history, the history of science, and social anthropology. We have good partnerships with high-profile universities and organisations such as the Universities of Ghent and Lille 3, the Flemish Heritage Institute, UCLA, the Free University of Amsterdam and the Vrije Universitat Brussel (VUB).

We offer bursaries to enable students to participate in departmental fieldwork projects for three weeks at a time, covering travel, food and accommodation. Typically, around 30 students each year have been placed on research and training excavations in Britain, Italy (including Ostia, port of Rome) and Greece, relating to sites of Bronze Age Greek (Minoan), Iron Age, Roman, Late Antique and Anglo-Saxon date.

About Kent Law School
Kent Law School (KLS) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop and focus their careers in law, heritage and development.

The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), the largest non-governmental organisation dealing with heritage protection (with more than 11,000 members), has highlighted the need for trained experts both in the legal aspects of heritage protection and in issues of heritage and international development.

The programme is ideal for careers in archaeology, museums and curation, preservation, conservation and the legal industries, as well as government bodies concerned with the preservation of architecture or the environment. It is also ideal for those wishing to develop a research career in heritage and law.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course is designed to develop the professional and field skills, including identification and survey techniques, required for effective conservation. Read more
This course is designed to develop the professional and field skills, including identification and survey techniques, required for effective conservation. It will familiarise you with the key ecological concepts underlying evidence-based conservation. You will produce professional reports and assessments and undertake monitoring of species and communities. You will also gain additional skills essential for conservation practitioners, for example:
- knowledge of international and national wildlife legislation, planning law and environmental policy

- IT competencies, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

- an understanding of the ecological requirements of different species and the implications of environmental change

- an ability to statistically interpret field data.

The course has two pathways: one is focused on conservation within the UK/EU and the other focuses on conservation at the International level.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/conservation-ecology/

Why choose this course?

- Our lecturers conduct first-class research in conservation ecology.

- We have strong links with many conservation organisations and research institutions, such as the NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, RSPB, Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International, providing excellent project opportunities and enhancing career prospects.

- Focusing on the practical application of theory means graduates can adapt quickly to the demands of the conservation professions. We develop your field skills including identification techniques, required when undertaking biodiversity surveys.

- Research-informed teaching keeps our students up to date with the latest thinking. Equipping you with current conservation legislation and practice is essential in the context of rapidly-changing demands on land use.

- We develop your transferable skills, particularly communication, organisation and research planning, which will assist you when carrying out your project and prepare you for a career in conservation ecology.

- On successful completion of the MSc, you will be able to apply for graduate membership of the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management.

Professional accreditation

CIEEM accreditation indicates that a key professional body recognises that we offer our students the opportunity to develop the key skills needed for employment in conservation ecology. Additionally our students have access to vital information about current developments in ecology and consultancy and can benefit from all that CIEEM offers.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics associated with conservation ecology, and include field visits and exercises, lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, practical exercises, laboratory sessions and project work. A key component of the course is developing field skills, including species identification. Techniques for identification are taught in the field and in laboratory sessions, using expertise from the Department of Biological and Medical Sciences and, where appropriate, from the University of Oxford Museum of Natural History.

As needed, you will be taught by guest speakers who are conservation practitioners or who work in conservation research organisations. Some parts of the course share modules with master’s provision in Environmental Assessment and Management and also in Primate Conservation. This cross-disciplinary nature for certain aspects of the course is a key strength.

Field trips

We use the varied landscape of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire as our natural laboratory, and the course has a large practical component, developing survey and assessment methods as well as identification skills. This landscape is used to illustrate major conservation issues as well. Most of this field work is conducted as part of the modules during semesters but we also have a field skills based period at the end of the taught component of the course and offer opportunities to work towards gaining specialist licences, which are invaluable for consultancy work.

There are no extra costs associated with the fieldwork components of this MSc.

Work placement and professional recognition

We encourage you to conduct your research project with conservation organisations or with one of our research groups. We have good links with a range of national and local conservation organisations and ecological consultancies. On successful completion of this MSc, you will be eligible to apply for graduate membership of the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management. With an additional two years' work experience, you will be eligible to apply for associate membership.

How this course helps you develop

We help you to develop links with potential employers, often through project work, and we encourage contact with practitioners throughout the course. The course is underpinned by theory but there is an emphasis on developing practical skills, including industry standard survey techniques and species identification skills. We also provide opportunities to develop techniques for data handling and analysis along with a focus on professional communication skills. We encourage all our students to learn from their peers as well, helping to develop essential teamworking skills.

Careers

Graduates of this course gain employment primarily with environmental consultancies or agencies, conservation organisations or charities, or continue academic research as a PhD student. Some of our past students are currently working for environmental consultants, the RSPB, the Environment Agency, DEFRA and Natural England.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 95% of our research in Biological Sciences was rated as internationally recognised, with 58% being world leading or internationally excellent. That makes us the top post’ 92 University for its Biological Sciences submission.

In addition to this research which underpins our teaching, our Centre for Ecology, Environment and Conservation is developing the use of mobile applications for data collection and processing in the field. Our Phase One Toolkit, which was developed by staff who deliver our MSc Conservation Ecology, with student input, is widely used by consultancies, demonstrating that our students have access to innovative data collection tools.

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The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Read more
The Brookes MSc offers a comprehensive grounding in the conservation of historic buildings and sites. Focusing on the UK, but also drawing on other national and international paradigms, it introduces you to a range of theoretical and practical disciplines, including the relevant aspects of architectural history, historical geography, spatial planning, urban design, construction, surveying, economics and finance, and research methodology.

This course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, and covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice. Our programme draws students from a wide range of backgrounds, and provides an ideal training for those wishing to pursue a career in this fascinating but competitive field. For information on recent field trips, please visit our Planning and Urban Design blog.

Why choose this course?

Established in 1990, the Brookes Historic Conservation MSc is one of the longest-running and most highly-regarded courses of its type, and our graduates have gone on to work in senior roles across the sector, both in the UK and internationally. Our programme draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the UK government Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input, bringing real-world experience to the course.

The Department of Planning - now part of the School of the Built Environment - is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014, 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent. Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its architecture, presenting valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

This course in detail

This course is offered at three levels: a Master of Science (MSc) degree, a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The MSc and PGDip can be studied on either a full-time (1-year) or a part-time (2-year) basis. The introductory PGCert is a 9-month part-time course.

With the exception of certain field trips, all core teaching is on Mondays and Tuesdays, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments. Part-time students take the Monday modules in their first year and the Tuesday modules in their second.

The course comprises a series of modules, each addressing a different set of questions in the theory and/or practice of historic conservation. (As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the modules you take may vary from those shown here.)

The following modules are compulsory for the MSc and PGDip:
-Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice
-Historical Studies I and II
-Design for Conservation
-Building Construction and Repair
-Historic Building Analysis and Recording
-Conservation Economics and Finance

The MSc also requires you undertake the following:
-Research Methods in Design
-MSc Dissertation

The PGCert comprises Conservation and Regeneration: Theory, Law and Practice; Building Construction and Repair; and Historic Building Analysis and Recording (details as above).

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work. Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide you with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Careers and professional development

The course provides an excellent grounding for those wishing to pursue a career in the conservation sector. Our tutors have wide experience in the field, and the broad variety of visiting speakers from national and local government, private practice, the voluntary sector, the law and academia add greatly to this range. We have excellent links with heritage organisations across the country, giving you opportunities for placements and other work experience. Graduates have gone on to work in many different roles across the sector, including:
-Central government bodies, eg English Heritage and Historic England.
-Local government roles, eg conservation and design officer.
-Charitable organisations, eg the National Trust and the Landmark Trust.
-Campaign groups, eg Victorian Society and SAVE Britain's Heritage.
-Private consultancies, eg CgMs and Alan Baxter & Associates.

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The Aberystwyth LLM in International Commercial Law and the Environment will give you a firm academic understanding of the ever-changing realities of the current global economy and its conflicted engagement with the environment and related legal protections. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM in International Commercial Law and the Environment will give you a firm academic understanding of the ever-changing realities of the current global economy and its conflicted engagement with the environment and related legal protections. During the LLM in International Commercial Law and the Environment, you will study subjects such as the law relating to transnational commerce, regulatory competence, pollution control, competition, nature conservation and business cartels. You will gain a masterful understanding of the law-making process, preparing for legislative action and anticipating the realities of environmental and business law in application.

You will benefit from the knowledge and experience of members of Aberystwyth University's Law and Criminology Department. You will also benefit from having your course materials augmented by lawyers from other academic institutions and private practice in the United Kingdom. By undertaking this course, you will strengthen your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in argument formation and your capacity for independent thought.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/international-commercial-law-environment-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you would enjoy studying the interaction between two significant branches of law
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to environmental and business issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures

Course detail

The LLM in International Commercial Law and the Environment will challenge you to master these two fascinating and complex subjects at local, national and international levels. You will get to grips with balancing the competing demands of environmental protection and business interest whilst studying some of the emerging law and policy in this area. You will complete an advanced and in-depth study of subjects including competition law to control monopoly and aggressive business practices and the relevant legal incentives and sanctions in environmental regulation.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within the specialism of your choice. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, transnational corporations, corporate and environmental lobby groups, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest developments in lawmaking for the turbulent global economy and our shared environment. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal argument. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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This MSc is an outstanding learning experience that will give you advanced knowledge and skills in conservation biology. You’ll gain an advanced, global outlook on conservation and will be ready to help solve the challenges of change in the modern world. Read more
This MSc is an outstanding learning experience that will give you advanced knowledge and skills in conservation biology.

You’ll gain an advanced, global outlook on conservation and will be ready to help solve the challenges of change in the modern world.

You’ll learn about the positive approaches that conservation biologists use to address conservation challenges and have the chance to participate in unique research in the field.

How will I study?
Core modules, which give you fundamental skills in conservation skills and biology, are supplemented by a choice of options on:
-Climate change
-Law
-Governance
-Engagement
-Unique field modules in tropical rainforest and Mediterranean regions

In the spring and summer terms, you will work on an independent research project.

Modules are assessed through:
-Essays
-Reports
-Presentations

The project is assessed with a dissertation.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

Geoff Lockwood Scholarship (2017)
-1 scholarship for Postgraduate (taught) of £3,000 fee waive
-Application deadline: 24 July 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty
Research in conservation biology at Sussex is primarily carried out in the School of Life Sciences, also drawing on expertise within the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme.

Our research interests include:
-Rewilding
-Ecosystem services and ecological assessment
-Ecology and conservation of bees and other pollinators
-Ecology and impact of diseases on animals
-Apex predator conservation biology
-Ecology and conservation of biodiversity hotspots
-Assessing the impacts of global change
-Development of policy-relevant strategies to manage human impacts

Careers
This course teaches concrete conservation and biology skills within a vigorous research environment, giving you a diverse skillset and a global perspective which will place you in a strong position to secure a career in conservation.

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This programme is for individuals already working in environmental conservation who seek to broaden or update their knowledge, and for graduates who wish to become professionally involved in conservation and environmental management. Read more
This programme is for individuals already working in environmental conservation who seek to broaden or update their knowledge, and for graduates who wish to become professionally involved in conservation and environmental management.

Professional and conservation organisations have advised on the content of this degree, ensuring strong links between the programme and the needs of the conservation industry and it has received two awards for 'Best Practice' from the CIEEM. The programme is structured around six compulsory courses that integrate theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary conservation and environmental management.

Students develop an interdisciplinary understanding of modern-day conservation and environmental management, and gain a practical understanding of ecological techniques and strategies. They also acquire the skills to critically apply environmental management techniques and methods to practical situations and to understand decision making processes and the underlying criteria and values. In addition, they gain specific knowledge and skills through their chosen optional courses.

During June to September students undertake a research project in a specialist area of their choice, often in collaboration with an external organisation. There is a high component of practical work including fieldtrips.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide a broad-based understanding of the current issues facing practitioners

- To equip graduates to develop a career in the environmental sector

- To enable students to develop a portfolio of skills and specialist knowledge of a particular area during the research project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/ees/envcons

Environmental Science

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary combination of social, natural and physical science. At its core is the idea of sustainable environmental management. This involves developing an understanding of the physical landscape and how society impacts on the environment. Solutions to environmental issues are investigated from a diversity of perspectives, including scientific, political, legal and philosophical positions.

What you'll study

Principles and Practice of Environmental Conservation (15 credits)
Environmental Law and Policy (15 credits)
Restoration Ecology (15 credits)
Research Methods for Postgraduates (15 credits)
Techniques in Applied Ecology (30 credits)
Introduction to GIS (15 credits)
Environmental Conservation Project (60 credits)
Options include: Environmental Impact Assessment; Ecology and Conservation of Estuaries and Coastal Zones and Managing Tourism in Protected Areas (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through assessments, coursework and examinations that are practically focused using real-world examples and case studies. Portfolios demonstrating competencies are an important component and provide a tangible record to show potential employers.

Professional recognition

This programme is accredited by and maintains strong links with the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM) (http://www.cieem.net/).

Career options

Graduates from this programme can pursue careers with conservation organisations in the UK and overseas, including central and local government, environmental consultancies, non-governmental organisations, business, the media and environmental education.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This interdisciplinary programme is designed to provide an opportunity to explore the interplay between scientific knowledge and law. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is designed to provide an opportunity to explore the interplay between scientific knowledge and law. You may take courses that address the international legal response to the growing number of pressures on the global environment, and complement these by studying a variety of courses designed to give an introduction to physical and/or biological sciences.

Climate change, acid rain, biodiversity conservation, species extinction, contaminated land - these are but a few of the environmental issues that constitute headline news today. Modules offered by the School of Law are designed to give a wider understanding of EC and international law perspectives on environmental problems that frequently can only be addressed through regional or international regulation. How has international environmental law evolved historically? Who are the main actors in the field? What key principles underpin regulation? What do we mean by the pursuit of “sustainable development”? How is the law in this area enforced?

Treaty regimes explored include those relating to acid deposition, climate change, ozone layer depletion, nuclear contamination and freshwater pollution. In addition, an insight will be given to the various treaty regimes that seek to address the continuing pressures on the world’s biodiversity. For example, how is commercial whaling now regulated? What system is in place to regulate trade in endangered species? What of the protection of wetlands, Antarctica, world heritage and of migratory species?

The scientific element of the programme is designed to provide a background in biological and/or physical sciences, and also an understanding of relevant mathematical and computer science to facilitate a quantitative understanding of environmental issues.

Addressing these issues to ensure a clean and healthy environment for the enjoyment of future generations is one of the greatest challenges for environmental science and law.

Key facts

The School of Law is rated as ‘internationally outstanding’ (Grade 5A on a scale of 1-5) for its research and as ‘Excellent’ for its teaching quality.
The School enjoys important professional relationships with international institutions; leading firms in the City of London and the provinces; private industry and consultancies; and non-governmental organisations.
The School of Biosciences is one of the largest and strongest Schools of its kind in the UK.
It has consistently achieved high ratings in independent UK assessments of both research and teaching quality, receiving an RAE grade of 5A and 23/24 in the latest Teaching Quality Assessment.
The Sutton Bonington Campus is a self-contained, 16-hectare site in the beautiful countryside of South Nottinghamshire and it offers a number of dedicated facilities applicable to this course.

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Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK. Read more

Programme description

Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK.

Whether you’re approaching the field from an architectural, historical, geological or other viewpoint, this programme will guide you through the foundations and challenges of this important means of nurturing cultural and national identity.

You will benefit from learning on our historic campus (located in Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site), along with the exhibitions and events associated with a vibrant art college.

You’ll be part of the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies (SCCS), a specialist teaching and research unit that provides the depth of expertise and resources that makes this programme one of the few of its kind in the UK to be recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation. Placements are also available through our partnerships with relevant organisations, allowing you to flex your skills in a practical setting.

Programme structure

The programme is assessed through individual written papers, group projects, presentations, and report writing. An intensive field trip to Germany (optional) will give you the chance to explore conservation issues in another setting. Following the taught courses, you will research and write a dissertation of 14,000–15,000 words on an aspect of architectural conservation.

Learning outcomes

To complete your studies, you must demonstrate your familiarity with the historical and theoretical foundations and challenges of historic preservation; the techniques of recording and research and the technologies of building repair; the influences of planning law, contemporary architecture and building economics on the historic built environment; and the special conservation challenges of Modern Movement architecture and urban planning.

You will also develop more general practical and intellectual skills, in areas such as project organisation, historical research, or graphic and oral communication.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to provide students with the broad base of knowledge and skills necessary to embark on a career in one of the many professional sub-disciplines of historic preservation, ranging from heritage management to conservation architecture.

Crucially, your qualification will be extremely well regarded thanks to its recognition by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation, the UK’s official organisation of architectural preservation professionals.

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This biodiversity conservation degree, taught by specialists in the field, will give you an in-depth knowledge of the science and practice of biodiversity conservation. Read more
This biodiversity conservation degree, taught by specialists in the field, will give you an in-depth knowledge of the science and practice of biodiversity conservation. It will equip you with the skills required for a career in biodiversity conservation.

Topics covered include biodiversity assessment and monitoring, site survey, management and restoration, GIS and data analysis, ecological principles and regulatory frameworks. You'll learn about the latest developments in conservation science and practice, and hone your ability to communicate effectively.

Field-based teaching features throughout to capitalise on the BU’s location within a biodiversity hotspot. Situated on the Dorset coast, BU is within easy reach of outstanding environments of global importance for conservation, including the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, Wessex Downs, Dorset heaths, Poole Harbour and New Forest.

Core units:
Conservation in Practice
Field Ecology Skills
Frontiers in Biodiversity
Quantitative & Spatial Analysis
Research Project

Option units (2 of the following):
Advanced Quantitative & Spatial Methods
Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services
Conservation Genetics
International Law of the Environment
Primate Behaviour & Ecology

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International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects States but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Read more
International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects States but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Given contemporary and future global problems – for example, protecting human rights and security and the conservation of resources – the significance of international law is growing in a multipolar world.

This programme will enhance your understanding and challenge preconceptions of the complex legal and political nature of international law-making and governance and explore the often competing concepts that infuse the subject of international law.

You’ll investigate and apply the theories, principles and rules of international law to novel problems, real-world and hypothetical scenarios, and examine the rules, legal and political bodies such as the Security Council and the International Court of Justice and underlying policies governing international law.

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Human impacts on the environment have never been greater. As we approach the 6th mass extinction of species and face the prospect of global climate change, we are just beginning to realize how much we depend on ecosystems to provide us with services such as food, water, clean air, waste disposal and fibre. Read more
Human impacts on the environment have never been greater. As we approach the 6th mass extinction of species and face the prospect of global climate change, we are just beginning to realize how much we depend on ecosystems to provide us with services such as food, water, clean air, waste disposal and fibre. There has never been a more exciting time to study conservation biology and resource management. Our one-year programmes train students to an advanced level in conservation science and resource management, enabling them to become conservation professionals in research or the government, non-governmental organization, and consultancy sectors.

This is inevitably an inter-disciplinary subject. Our programmes benefit from the wide experience of teachers in the Schools of Environmental and Biological Sciences, with backgrounds in disciplines including conservation biology, ecology (including marine and population ecology), genetics, environmental planning, ocean science, management, law, and geography. Our programmes provide ample scope for individual research projects supervised by staff with research interests including socio-economic issues, historical impacts, climate change, conservation of rare species, and habitat management.

Why Ecology?

£7 million investment

The University's recent £7 million investment in marine ecology and the creation of the new School of Environmental Sciences have resulted in excellent research and teaching facilities.

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Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Urban Conservation is designed to equip graduates for professional management roles concerned with the critical interplay of transport and spatial planning.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning is a practice based approach to learning processes, processes of plan-making and the management of development.

Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces you to various planning theories and their relevance to practice.

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. You'll select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

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