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Masters Degrees (Conservation Genetics)

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The MSc in Conservation Genetics addresses the essential theoretical background and develops applied skills in this new and rapidly expanding field. Read more
The MSc in Conservation Genetics addresses the essential theoretical background and develops applied skills in this new and rapidly expanding field. You will be trained in the use of molecular tools for aspects of taxonomy and classification, species conservation and in the application of the principles of genetics to the conservation management of small populations. You will develop problem-solving approaches to different evolutionary and population genetics scenarios. A range of option units are available and there is a compulsory residential fieldtrip to either Poland or Tanzania which will provide you with practical experience of the essential techniques in the field of conservation genetics.

The MSc is completed by a research-based project which can be completed in the UK or overseas, often in collaboration with an external organisation. There are also opportunities to work within Manchester Met research projects in Tanzania, Kenya, the Philippines, Mauritius and Madeira.

Non means-tested loans of up to a maximum of £10,000 will be available to postgraduate master’s students.

Features and benefits of the course

-There is a residential fieldtrip to either Poland or Tanzania which will provide you with practical experience of the essential techniques in the field of conservation genetics
-The research-based project can be carried out in the UK or overseas, often in collaboration with an external organisation
-The course provides flexibility for students who have to work in order to fund their course.

Placement options

Your research-based project can be carried out in the UK or overseas, often in collaboration with an external organisation. There are also opportunities to work within Manchester Met research projects in Tanzania, Kenya, the Philippines, Mauritius and Madeira.

About the Course

You will be trained in the use of molecular tools for aspects of taxonomy and classification, species conservation and in the application of the principles of genetics to the conservation management of small populations. A range of option units are available and there is a residential fieldtrip to either Poland or Tanzania which will provide you with practical experience of the essential techniques in the field of conservation genetics.

Course delivery is flexible and most lectures take place in the evening. Lectures, other course material and assessment information is available via our online learning platform, Moodle. Teaching for this course begin in September 2016 and January 2017. Please note that January starters sit their examinations in January the following year, making the course duration 12 months.

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This course, which uniquely combines forensic genetic and conservation genetic elements within one of the largest forensic science academic departments in the world, runs in conjunction with other well established and popular MSc courses. Read more
This course, which uniquely combines forensic genetic and conservation genetic elements within one of the largest forensic science academic departments in the world, runs in conjunction with other well established and popular MSc courses. Students will learn the fundamentals of molecular genetics, population genetics and phylogenetics that underpin the disciplines of forensic and conservation genetics and develop both theoretical knowledge and practical application.

Small cohort sizes will allow the use of a diverse range of assessments and the provision of considerable student support. Teaching will be carried out using a combination of lectures, tutorials, practicals, computer workshops and self-directed study. In addition to six taught modules, students will undertake a three-module research project which will develop laboratory and research skills. Depending on availability, students may also have an opportunity to visit and gain field experience at the Maasai Centre for Field Studies in Kenya.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The forensic genetics group has dedicated pre and post-PCR laboratories housing an ABI3500, two ABI310 machines, an ABI7500 real-time PCR machine, a number of ABI2700 PCR machines, gel imaging systems, and several PCR cabinets. MSc students will carry out laboratory-based dissertation research projects within these well equipped modern laboratories. Research topics within the group are diverse, ranging from forensic genetics and human genetics, to wildlife forensics and forensic entomology. This will ensure that a wide choice of dissertation topics is available to our students. We also have a number of full-time and part-time MRes/MPhil/PhD students and an interest in research is actively encouraged and maintained throughout the year via seminars/ discussions.

The course will be delivered through lectures, tutorials, computer workshops, and practical classes, working independently or as part of a group. At least an equal amount of time should be spent in private study reading around the subject. Guided teaching and formal assessments on this course will enhance the development of a number of transferable skills such as the production of written case reports, formal presentations, active participation in discussions, ability to work to deadlines, computing skills, scientific analysis, adherence and development of laboratory protocols, and research methods.

Assessment is predominantly through coursework except for one module which is assessed by both examination and coursework. Coursework will include written essays, laboratory reports, case reports, presentations and in Part 3, a dissertation.

OPPORTUNITIES

Students graduating from this course will be well placed to undertake further research at the doctoral level or take up jobs in forensic/genetics/veterinary/diagnostic/wildlife protection laboratories.

Two of our graduates have taken on jobs as DNA analysts while a others have gone on to undertake further degrees or research towards a MPhil/PhD.

Depending on availability, students may have an opportunity to visit and gain field experience at the Maasai Centre for Field Studies in Kenya.

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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Explore contemporary wildlife conservation on this Masters. The course is delivered by world-leading experts in wildlife conservation and UAV (aka drone) technology. Read more
Explore contemporary wildlife conservation on this Masters. The course is delivered by world-leading experts in wildlife conservation and UAV (aka drone) technology. You will be able to learn fieldskills during an overseas field trip and will have the opportunity to conduct your own conservation research project.

•Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
•Delivered by world-leading experts in the field of wildlife conservation and drone technology
•LJMU is the only UK university to offer a Masters degree in cutting edge drone technology applications for wildlife conservation
•Opportunity to complete an overseas field trip to practice and develop an international conservation project
•World-class teaching and laboratory facilities (including drone, genetics and GIS facilities)
•Opportunity to design and complete a wildlife conservation study abroad using the latest software packages, such as ArcGIS, R, and Distance

This unique Masters course covers contemporary issues in wildlife conservation with a strong focus on providing you with a thorough understanding of the theoretical and practical skills you will need to become a professional in this exciting field.

You will develop an hypotheses-driven study based on the latest wildlife conservation literature.

Converting your idea for a study into a practical plan will involve:
•learning how to write a grant proposal (from funding experts)
•making a budget
•thinking through the logistical issues of conducting research in challenging environments

You will learn how to operate drones for wildlife conservation research and how to analyse the data obtained using these systems; providing you with a unique skillset.

The academic staff leading this course conduct research in this area. Your programme leaders uphold a wide range of international and national connections that can provide exciting opportunities for you during and after the course. You will have the opportunity to conduct fieldwork at international sites and make career-long connections.

We will also encourage you to become members of the learned societies, such as Society of Wildlife Conservation.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Survey, Mapping and Field Skills
Teaches the understanding and application of theoretical, practical and analytical skills in primatological or other wildlife fieldwork.
Drone Technology
Provides a comprehensive overview of drone technology at a conceptual and practical level. Special emphasis is placed on being able to specify, select, install and deploy sub-systems to fulfil the requirements of an application.
Wildlife Conservation
Covers both theoretical and practical skills in wildlife conservation.
Research Methods
Provides extensive training in generic research knowledge and statistical techniques for the Natural Sciences as part of the preparation for the MSc dissertation.
Dissertation
Requires you to conduct independent scientific research and make a major contribution in a chosen subject area through a supervised programme of individual study. The findings will be presented in the form of a written report.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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A unique combination of studies in ecology, population genetics and molecular ecology with emphasis in northern issues. The study programme is a combination of field work in the arctic and subarctic and in old-growth boreal forests and mires as well as molecular lab work. Read more
• A unique combination of studies in ecology, population genetics and molecular ecology with emphasis in northern issues
• The study programme is a combination of field work in the arctic and subarctic and in old-growth boreal forests and mires as well as molecular lab work
• Prepares the students for future leadership positions in conservation biology and environmental ecology

International master’s degree programme in Ecology and Population Genetics (ECOGEN) is a two-year programme concentrating on conservation issues and population genetics of endangered animals and plants. The programme will give you relevant skills and core knowledge of the latest methods and tools in:
• Molecular ecology
• Microbial ecology
• Metagenomics and microbiomes of organisms
• Conservation genomics of large mammals
• Distribution history of plants and their phylogeography
• Bioinformatics

The two-year programme has two specialisation options:
• Ecology
• Genetics

Optional courses make it possible to widen your expertise into:
• Aquatic ecology
• Microbial ecology
• Conservation ecology
• Restoration ecology
• Plant evolutionary genomics

The master’s programme is based on high quality and productive research in the fields of evolutionary ecology and genetics. Field research stations in natural reserves as well as Biodiversity Unit offer great opportunities for courses and research. Study environment is multicultural. ECOGEN provides positions as a trainee or a master’s thesis student, and an excellent background for PhD studies.

The skills gained in the master’s programme offer you a solid academic training and essential knowledge on wildlife conservation ecology and genetics, as well as their management. After graduation you are capable of evaluating risks, conducting management on small populations of endangered species, and doing research in the field and in lab. You are able to use molecular and bioinformatic tools.

Possible titles include:
• Project manager
• Researcher
• Planning coordinator of conservation issues
• Conservation biologist

Students applying for the programme must have a B.Sc. degree in biology or in closely related fields.

For all enquiries, please refer to our enquiry form: http://www.oulu.fi/university/admissions-contact

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Liverpool John Moores University offers the opportunity to study the UK's only Masters degree focusing on cutting edge developments in the use of UAVs (aka drones) for primate behaviour and conservation research. Read more
Liverpool John Moores University offers the opportunity to study the UK's only Masters degree focusing on cutting edge developments in the use of UAVs (aka drones) for primate behaviour and conservation research. You will be taught by world-leading experts and have access to excellent facilities in the UK and research sites overseas.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Delivered by world experts in the field of primate behaviour, welfare and conservation
-Overseas field trip to practice and develop advanced skills in behavioural observation, non-invasive sampling of health and welfare indicators and conservation monitoring
-State-of-the-art teaching and laboratory facilities (including genetics, drone and GIS facilities)
-Opportunity to design and complete a primate field study abroad using the latest software packages, such as ArcGIS, R, Distance

This exciting new MSc course covers contemporary issues in primate behaviour, welfare and conservation and will equip you with the latest knowledge and skills required to succeed as a professional researcher.
You will learn about the latest primatology research from active researchers including:

Primate behaviour and social systems in the wild
Primate conservation issues and main threats to wildlife in-situ
Ex-situ conservation efforts in sanctuaries and zoos
Job opportunities for primatologists in the UK and abroad
You will also complete a hypotheses-driven research project in the second half of the programme, based on your knowledge of primate behaviour, welfare and conservation developed during the first half of the course.

Studying cutting-edge developments in the use of drones for primate conservation research, you will gain the skills to:

maintain and operate drones
obtain and analyse data
interpret results to identify primate distribution and density, threats to their habitat, and inform conservation priorities

You will learn how to convert an idea for a research study into a practical plan, including how to:

identify field sites and funding sources
write a grant proposal (from funding experts)
make a budget
think through the logistical issues of conducting research in challenging environments

Your lectures and seminars will be delivered by world experts in the field of primate behaviour and conservation. The quality of research and teaching during the course mean that you will graduate with cutting edge knowledge and access to a host of international professional networks.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Primate Behaviour and Conservation
Field Skills (overseas field trip)
Drone Technology
Research methods
Dissertation
In the 2016-17 academic year, field trip travel, accommodation and site costs are covered by LJMU. You will be required to meet other potential costs, such as field clothing, visas and potential immunisations if required. In 2015-2016 the field trip was in Tanzania.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Are you passionate about animal welfare and keen to shape the management of the zoos of the future? Students from over 20 nationalities have chosen our unique programme, the first of its kind in the world. Read more
Are you passionate about animal welfare and keen to shape the management of the zoos of the future? Students from over 20 nationalities have chosen our unique programme, the first of its kind in the world. Study factors affecting animal behaviour, conservation, welfare and their interactions, as well as international zoo management and collaboration. Our partnership with Paignton Zoo gives you regular access to their connections, research and expertise – so you’re primed to make a difference.

Key features

-Delivered in conjunction with the staff at Paignton Zoo and its parent body, the Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust which also owns Newquay Zoo and Living Coasts.
-Develop your scientific knowledge, professional and technical skills as a conservation biologist. Learn how to manage animal collections for the purpose of education, conservation and wildlife research.
-Study aspects of animal behaviour and ecology, as well as how welfare, housing, nutrition and health all have a part to play in species management.
-Learn to troubleshoot problems at the level of a social group within a particular zoological collection, right up to the level of a species globally. Explore how breeding programmes for endangered species are international in scope.
-Benefit from the knowledge and guidance of Plymouth University’s expert staff with specialisms including the behaviour of captive animals, animal nutrition, the welfare of captive birds and the application of population genetics to captive and natural fish populations.
-Find out how the science of zoos is used to inform government policy. Two of our teaching team are the only academic representatives on the government’s Zoos Expert Committee.
-Get behind-the-scenes insight with a day of study each week with our partners at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park. Deepen your understanding of the business and conservation work of zoos, and how networks and collaborations work between them.
-Access the latest research and information from the Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust, including information on their co-ordinated breeding programmes for endangered species.
-Be inspired by opportunities to visit a range of zoos in the region – including Dartmoor, Bristol and Newquay – and to travel abroad for research projects. A recent student travelled to Louisiana Zoo for her research project on golden tamarin monkeys.
-Graduates work in zoos as educators, researchers, managers and keepers. Many go on to PhD study or work in further education. Other employers include the European Association for Zoos and Aquaria; the Natural History Unit (BBC); national and international conservation organisations.

Course details

As a full-time student, you’ll study seven modules taking in everything from genetics to environmental enrichment, preventative health to budgeting. We update modules to reflect current thinking and you can specialise within them. If you’re interested in working with tigers, for example, this can be reflected across your work. You’ll be assessed through coursework with practical tasks focused on your future career. Core modules include introduction to zoo organisation, animal conservation, applied animal behaviour and management, animal metabolism and nutrition, animal health and welfare and business management. You’ll then do a final three-month research project of your choice. Previous investigations have included everything from female mate choice in white faced saki monkeys to how peripheral and/or invasive activity affects the behaviour and enclosure use of captive sand tiger sharks.

Core modules
-BIO505 Research Project
-ANIM5006 Contemporary Zoo Management
-BIO5131 Postgraduate Research Skills & Methods
-ANIM5005 Zoo Animal Behaviour and Welfare
-ANIM5007 Small Population Conservation
-ANIM5008 Conservation Ecology and Society
-ANIM5009 Zoo Animal Health, Nutrition and Management

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. Read more
Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. This new research-led programme is run in collaboration with the Institute of Zoology and the Natural History Museum, providing a rigorous training and unparalleled opportunities across the full breadth of pure and applied research in evolutionary, ecological, and conservation science.

Degree information

Taught modules will focus on cutting-edge quantitative tools in ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics, systematics, palaeobiology, conservation, biogeography and environmental biology. Seminars, journal clubs and the two research projects will provide students with diverse opportunities for experience at UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are no optional modules for this programme. The programme consists of three core taught modules (60 credits) and two 16-week research projects (120 credits).

Core modules
-Research Skills (15 credits)
-Current Topics in Biodiversity, Evolution & Conservation Research (15 credits)
-Analytical Tools in Biodiversity, Evolutionary and Conservation Research (30 credits)

Dissertation/report
All students undertake two 16-week research projects, which each culminate in a written dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, presentations, assigned papers, as well as data analysis and interpretation. The seminar series includes mandatory seminars at UCL, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology (Zoological Society of London). Assessment is through essays, project reports, presentations and practicals. The two research projects are assessed by dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Careers

This programme offers students a strong foundation with which to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Intern, ZSL Institute of Zoology
-PhD in Evolutionary Biology, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL)
-PhD Researcher (Evolutionary Biology), University of Edinburgh a

Employability
This programme provides students with a strong foundation to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is an innovative collaboration between three globally renowned organisations: UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

By consolidating research expertise across these three organisations, students will gain a unique and exceptionally broad understanding of ties among different fields of research relating to the generation and conservation of biodiversity.

The MRes offers diverse research opportunities; these include the possibility of engaging actively in fundamental and applied research and participating in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (based at the Natural History Museum) or the EDGE of Existence programme (based at the Zoological Society of London).

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Human impacts on the environment have never been greater. As we approach the 6th mass extinction of species and face the prospect of global climate change, we are just beginning to realize how much we depend on ecosystems to provide us with services such as food, water, clean air, waste disposal and fibre. Read more
Human impacts on the environment have never been greater. As we approach the 6th mass extinction of species and face the prospect of global climate change, we are just beginning to realize how much we depend on ecosystems to provide us with services such as food, water, clean air, waste disposal and fibre. There has never been a more exciting time to study conservation biology and resource management. Our one-year programmes train students to an advanced level in conservation science and resource management, enabling them to become conservation professionals in research or the government, non-governmental organization, and consultancy sectors.

This is inevitably an inter-disciplinary subject. Our programmes benefit from the wide experience of teachers in the Schools of Environmental and Biological Sciences, with backgrounds in disciplines including conservation biology, ecology (including marine and population ecology), genetics, environmental planning, ocean science, management, law, and geography. Our programmes provide ample scope for individual research projects supervised by staff with research interests including socio-economic issues, historical impacts, climate change, conservation of rare species, and habitat management.

Why Ecology?

£7 million investment

The University's recent £7 million investment in marine ecology and the creation of the new School of Environmental Sciences have resulted in excellent research and teaching facilities.

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Ecology and evolutionary biology offer a perspective on biology from the level of genes to communities of species. In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas. Read more
Ecology and evolutionary biology offer a perspective on biology from the level of genes to communities of species.

In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas: ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. You can choose studies from any of these areas, as well as from other master's degree programmes. The programme is diverse and multidisciplinary: teaching is done with lectures, laboratory and computer training courses, interactive seminars, study tours and field courses. The field courses range from the northern subarctic region to tropical rainforests.

Our wide expertise extends from molecular ecology to population and community biology. The Centres of Excellence of Metapopulation Biology and Biological Interactions are located in our department.

Our programme offers you a wide range of options: evolutionary biology or genetics for those interested in ecological genetics and genomics, as well as the ability to take advantage of the high-quality molecular ecology and systematics laboratory; conservation biology for those interested in regional or global environmental problems; and ecological modelling skills for those interested in computational biology. Our training also offers Behavioural Ecology.

Ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology are not only fascinating topics for basic research, they also have a key role in addressing global environmental challenges.

Upon graduating from the Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology programme, you will:
-Have mastered the main theories and methods in ecology and evolutionary biology and be able to apply them to practical problems.
-Be able to plan and carry out a scientific research project.
-Have read the relevant scientific literature and be able to utilise your expertise in different types of work.
-Be able to work as an expert in your field.
-Be able to to write good scientific English.
-Be able to work in research projects and groups.
-Be able to continue on to doctoral studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The Master's degree program includes studies of ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. The studies are organised in modules. You can affect the content of the studies by planning your personal curriculum. You can study the following themes:
-Ecology studies the abundance and distribution of species (animals, plants, microbes) and the interactions among them and with the environment. The perspective ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem level. In ecology, a central question is: Why are some species able to invade new habitats and displace native species? Which species are able to adapt to environmental change or migrate with the changing climate, and which species will become extinct?
-Evolutionary biology examines the processes which support biodiversity on its various levels (genes – individuals – populations – species – ecosystems). You will learn about the theory of evolution and how to use population genetics and genomics methods in researching evolutionary issues.
-Conservation Biology studies the depletion of biodiversity, its causes and consequences. You will learn to apply ecological theory to the problems of environmental conservation, to assess the effectiveness of methods of conservation, as well as to resolve the problems relating to conservation e.g. by modelling and computational methods. The training emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary education in the area of conservation.

Programme Structure

You undertake modules producing a total of 120 credits (ECTS) according to your personal study plan. The degree consists of:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including a research project (Master’s thesis, 30 credits)
-60 credits of other studies chosen from the Programme or from other Programmes

Career planning or extracurricular activities can be included in your personal study plan. If you are studying to qualify as a biology teacher, you will need 60 credits of pedagogical studies in your degree. This applies only to Finnish or Swedish speaking students.

Career Prospects

Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology gives an access to the capability of University teaching and research tasks, for a wide range of expert and administrative tasks of the various research centres, companies, in the field of public administration (e.g., The UNITED NATIONS, the European Union, the State and the provincial administration, cities, municipalities), international and national organizations and the media. The degree also provides the scientific validity for doctoral education in different areas of biology.

The Master’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is a well-liked option among students studying towards biology teacher qualification (Finnish and Swedish speaking students).

Internationalization

You will have the opportunity to study at foreign universities and research institutions within the framework of an international student exchange. You can also gain valuable experience by working as a tutor of international students or participating in the international activities of the Student Union or other student organisations.

The teachers and researchers in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology are internationally known and respected. Their research groups host numerous international researchers as visitors and workers. They also employ many foreign graduate students, which creates an international atmosphere in the programme.

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The MSc Conservation Biology programme aims to provide students with an advanced understanding of the science which underpins conservation. Read more
The MSc Conservation Biology programme aims to provide students with an advanced understanding of the science which underpins conservation. Students can gain experience of essential techniques and fieldwork. The programme has a strong numerical and research-orientated approach. You can also gain experience in the increasingly important field of conservation genetics.

The course has an international outlook and provides opportunities for students to gain conservation experience overseas. There is a compulsory residential field course which can be in either Poland or Tanzania. Our facilities have recently been updated and you will engage with a large community of research active staff. There are exciting opportunities to complete your MSc research project abroad, for example you may join a project investigating the problems of conserving large mammals outside protected areas in Kenya. We also have links to research projects in many other countries.

Non means-tested loans of up to a maximum of £10,000 will be available to postgraduate master’s students.

Features and benefits of the course

-Optional two week field course in Northern Tanzania with visits to Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti National Park. Many of our MSc students collect data for their research projects abroad.
-You will have access to recently refurbished laboratories, project facilities and resource rooms with state-of-the-art audio visual equipment.
-The course is taught by a vibrant community of research active staff. Tutors are currently involved in research in Tanzania, Kenya, Mauritius, Ethiopia, the Philippines, Indonesia as well as the UK and every year many of our MSc students work within this project.
-Flexible course delivery. Most lectures, even for full-time students, take place in the evenings and some units are available in blocks, by self-study or by distance learning. The online virtual learning environment (using Moodle) gives you access to lectures, other course materials and assessment information.

Placement options

There are optional three month placements for those taking MSc Zoo Conservation Biology and these can take place at many different zoos in the UK.

About the Course

The course has an international outlook and provides opportunities for students to gain conservation experience overseas. There is a residential field course which can be in either Poland or Tanzania.

Course delivery is flexible and most lectures take place in the evening. Lectures, other course materials and assessment information is available via our online learning platform, Moodle. You will be assessed mostly through coursework, although some units have a formal examination.

Assessment details

You will be assessed mostly through coursework, although some units have a formal examination. Formal teaching begins in September and finishes with the field courses in mid-May or mid-July. Student research projects are usually completed by the end of September.

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This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines. Read more
This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines.

Why this programme

-This Ecology and Evnvironmental Biology degree programme draws on the research expertise of a large number of University staff and allows you the chance to obtain experience in a wide range of modern research techniques.
-There is considerable expertise in this area of biology available at Glasgow, especially in ornithology, fish biology, aquatic ecosystems, and theoretical, physiological, molecular and evolutionary ecology.
-Excellent research and teaching facilities are available at the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment (SCENE) and Cochno Farm and Research Centre
-You will be encouraged to tailor the MSc Ecology and Environmental Biology programme to your own specific requirements and interests, within the limitations of the courses and projects offered.

Programme structure

The programme consists of a taught component, and two research projects in individual laboratories and/or field based.

The taught component consists of core research skills and specialist option in analytical and sampling techniques.

The main part of the degree, however, is devoted to experience of research techniques. You will carry out two 20-week research projects with individual placements chosen to reflect your interests and the skills you wish to acquire. After each project, you will write a scientific report.

Core and optional courses

Core Courses
-Key Research Skills
-Research Project (x 2)

Optional Courses
-Programming in R (prerequisite for all modelling and epidemiology)
-Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease
-Single-species Models
-Conservation Genetics & Phylodynamics
-Freshwater Sampling Techniques
-Invertebrate Identification
-Molecular Analyses for DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Measurement
-Phyloinformatics
-Vertebrate Identification

Career prospects

The programme will provide an excellent training for those who want to undertake a PhD programme and enter ecological management or conservation businesses. It should also serve as an excellent introduction to research in the UK for overseas students intending to proceed to a PhD in this country.

Some of the Institutions/Organisations our M.Res students went on to:
-Bremen Institute for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT)
-Clyde River Foundation
-Dakshin Foundation, India
-Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand)
-University of Glasgow
-Warwick University

Some of the more exotic locations for MRes projects in recent years have included southern Brazil, Trinidad, Tobago, Kuwait, Egypt, Svalbard (Norway), Canada, the Azores (Portugal), Oman, Cayman Islands, and The Philippines.

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This taught Masters degree is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in conservation management or ecological consultancy, professions which increasingly require postgraduate qualification for establishment and progression. Read more
This taught Masters degree is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in conservation management or ecological consultancy, professions which increasingly require postgraduate qualification for establishment and progression. The course puts a high emphasis on practical field experience for managing habitats, monitoring species and developing biological identification skills for plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. These activities are allied to a clear theoretical framework underpinning ecology and conservation practice. We welcome applications from recent graduates, experienced consultants, conservation workers or those seeking a career change.

What will I study?

This Conservation Management course combines the expertise of the field biologist with practical experience of managing habitats. A firm emphasis is placed on fieldwork, biological identification skills and experience of a broad range of management issues.

You will develop laboratory skills including microscopy for bryophyte and invertebrate identification and soil analysis techniques. Identification skills gained will range from plants to invertebrates, mammals, amphibians and birds.

You will learn to write in a concise scientific style, construct arguments, consider ethical issues of ecological work, analyse and interpret data and synthesise scientific literature. These skills are highly desirable in ecological consultancy and conservation research.

Ethics is also an important feature of conservation management, for instance in the collection of voucher specimens. Consideration of ethical issues is given in each module, where appropriate, alongside legal issues.

How will I study?

Fieldwork is an integral part of many modules and is used to provide a multitude of experiences across species, habitats and conservation issues. A variety of local sites are used including dunes, meadows and forests. The programme includes a residential field course. Field trip costs are included within course fees.

In small classes, lecture-style sessions and practical work are designed to develop subject-specific skills, clarify concepts, raise questions and collect data. Follow-up seminars may consider analysis, data presentation, qualitative observations, elucidation of trends, and integration with theoretical ideas.

How will I be assessed?

The course has a variety of assessment methods which are designed to develop the full range of skills and expertise relevant to the subject. These include a research thesis, scientific reports, voucher specimen collections, vegetation portfolios, field-based management plans and examinations.

Who will be teaching me?

The course is taught by a small friendly team who have considerable teaching and research experience in the area. All staff are research active which means that they keep up-to-date with current developments in their areas of interest and pass this knowledge onto their students. Staff expertise includes forest and grassland conservation, habitat restoration, sustainable management of ecosystems, remote sensing in ecology and conservation genetics.

What are my career prospects?

This MSc will equip you with the knowledge and skills required for a successful career in conservation or ecological consultancy. To date, graduates of the course have been employed by a range of non-governmental organisations (for example, Wildlife Trusts, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), and National Trust), governmental organisations (Natural England) and consultancies (including Atkins UK, Jacob’s Ecology, and Avian Ecology). Graduates have also progressed into conservation research, working for the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and at various universities.

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At Nottingham, we exploit our expertise in population genetics, animal behaviour / ecology, and evolutionary biology to explore a wide range of key research questions in conservation biology. Read more
At Nottingham, we exploit our expertise in population genetics, animal behaviour / ecology, and evolutionary biology to explore a wide range of key research questions in conservation biology. Research projects in this area are likely to either involve intensive field work, laboratory experiments, or data analysis / mathematical modelling. Recent work within the School has been concerned the conservation genetics of several endangered European carnivores, including critically endangered European mink. Other members of staff are applying genetic methods to study populations of the endangered fen raft spider, in order to inform the management of this species, the biodiversity of lichen-forming fungi in Antarctica, and the distribution and abundance of harvest mice.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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About the course. -Prepare for employment in the competitive wildlife conservation sector. -Emphasis is placed on CV development. Read more
About the course:
-Prepare for employment in the competitive wildlife conservation sector
-Emphasis is placed on CV development
-Relevant extracurricular activities help you to hone the skills and qualities desired by employers
-Less than 50% of the contact hours are spent in a lecture room

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Species and habitat conservation
-Mammal conservation
-Management of vertebrates for conservation
-Conservation genetics
-Field trips

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

All our master’s programmes emphasise the practical skills that employers need, whether that is the ability to identify plants, carry out environmental assessments or use the latest cutting-edge molecular techniques. As a University of Reading MSc graduate, you will be well equipped to work in the field or the lab, and in the private or public sector. Many of our graduates go on to study for a PhD and pursue a career in research either in industry or in universities.

Typical roles of graduates from our ecology and wildlife-based MSc programmes include conservation officers, project managers, field ecologists and environmental consultants. Graduates from our biomedical MSc programme typically go on to pursue PhD studies or work in the pharmaceutical industry.

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