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Masters Degrees (Conservation And Restoration)

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Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. Read more

Want a programme with true pedigree? Try the Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, run by the RLICC (Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation), founded by Raymond Lemaire. The RLICC has more than 40 years of experience in training, research and consulting in the field of preservation of constructed heritage. Its advanced international and interdisciplinary study programme in the conservation and restoration of historic monuments and sites is a three-semester programme.

Structure 

The Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites, 90 credits, is a three-semester, research-based academic degree spread over two years. The first academic year consists of theoretical courses, seminars and project work. 

The first semester is chiefly dedicated to the establishing of a common theoretical framework, providing students from different backgrounds with a common basis, according to the interdisciplinary character of the programme. Optional courses offered by the other Advanced Master’s programmes of the Department of Architecture, and project-based education oriented towards building archaeology, documenting and surveying heritage, and larger-scale urban sites and landscapes, complete his semester.

In the second semester, the theoretical framework is dedicated to the technical and policy aspects of heritage. On the project level, its backbone consists of interdisciplinary project work integrating all aspects of conservation, based on a group work format, this is completed with a workshop abroad.

The third semester consists mainly of the Master’s thesis, i.e. individual research work in the field of conservation, supported by an ad hoc study programme. This semester concentrates on research training with seminars, including a thematic week (open to first and second year’s students), supporting the writing of the Master’s thesis. It is completed with a professional internship, which aims to introduce students to the world of heritage practice.

Objectives

The master after master programme offered by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation aims at educating young professionals in the conservation and restoration of immovable heritage (buildings, structures and sites), both into the tradition of the discipline and into the new scientific methods.

Graduates of the MCMS have acquired and developed skills that allow for the necessary interdisciplinary research, communication and collaboration between the various disciplines involved in the restoration of architectural heritage as for example : archaeology, history, urbanism, architecture, engineering, human sciences, conservation and restoration sciences, .... They have learned to use relevant source material, to approach a problem in a scientific way, to understand the approaches and possibilities of other disciplines than their own, and they have developed the necessary common terminology, methodology and skills to carry out research and to prepare jointly restoration studies, projects, and long-term programs. They have learned to reflect critically about ongoing concepts and debates on heritage preservation. Based on the above they have acquired the necessary common language and they master with a critical attitude the research methodologies and practices used in conservation of monuments and sites, as reflected in international guidelines, charters and literature. They have obtained knowledge and experience (through project works) that strengthens them to be part of interdisciplinary research and to communicate in a restoration team.

Career perspectives

Employment options for graduates from the RLICC are numerous and wide-spread. Alumni are currently working as independent professionals in conservation and restoration of architectural heritage all over the world. They display highly appreciated professional experience in private architecture and restoration offices as well as in leadership and policymaking positions in regional, national and international conservation institutions such as UNESCO, ICOMOS and the Council of Europe. All levels of the heritage administration, be they regional, national or international, count RLICC alumni among their ranks.



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Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage. Read more
Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage.

We’ll examine the process from the assessment of a building’s suitability for repair, through to the repair work itself, along with building maintenance, servicing, adaptation and strategic management.

We’ll cover the current legislative framework, decisions over longevity and regional styles and contexts, as well historic construction and repair techniques.

We’ll give you the preparation to embark on a career as a consultant, adviser or practitioner, while our connections with other institutions give you the opportunity to forge links with conservation schemes both at home and overseas.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/conservation-of-buildings

The aims of our course are to:
• develop your vision and understanding of what is required when undertaking the conservation of buildings;
• equip you with specialist conservation knowledge;
• provide study that will foster, inspire and enhance your technical, personal and inter-personal skills;
• develop your leadership skills, ability to evaluate challenging situations and produce solutions to problems.

You will absorb the academic, philosophical and technical aspects of building conservation, together with the underlying legislative and economic background, designed to produce competent consultants, advisors and practitioners.

Staff will have enhanced knowledge and skills of up-to-date building conservation practice, heritage management, academic awareness, and strength in networking.

On successful completion of our course you will be able to:
• understand how conservation is affected by historical, political, social, economic, legal and technical processes;
• be able to contribute to the formulation of conservation policies and their implementation, with an awareness of intended and unintended results of such policies and procedures;
• contribute to the effective running of an organisation concerned with conservation;
• apply local and general principles to the practical requirements of particular communities, their historical heritage and environment;
• compare conservation policies of various European countries with that of your own;
• forge links with conservation schemes at United Kingdom and overseas based Institutions.

Careers

We take pride in giving our graduates a great start as highly-qualified individuals whose knowledge and experience are well matched to the current needs of the industry. Career opportunities include specialist consultancy, local authority conservation and specialist statutory (building) control posts, and historic building and heritage asset management. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Built Environment PhD.

Core modules

The Science & Economics of Historic Buildings
Conservation and Legislation of Heritage Buildings
Facilities Management of Heritage Buildings
Research, Design and Methods
Surveying the Historic Building
Major Project/Dissertation

Assessment

We’ll assess you on your understanding and skill in applying the relevant technologies. These will include practical software projects and presentations, along with written assignments, and your final dissertation.

Special features

Our course is small and highly specialised. All students are taught together to enable new students to take advantage of the experience of more advanced students. We have strong links with conservationists in local authorities (including Essex County Council), conservation trusts and English Heritage, together with several EU universities.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. Read more

Overview

Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. The MA Garden Design aims to provide an integration of the creativity of art and design with the core knowledge of ecology, landscape and garden theory, history, technology, restoration and the understanding of the theoretical and applied levels of knowledge and practice in Garden Design.

MA Garden Design is a progression and a complement to the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design (LGD) course in the School of Design at Writtle University College. The Masters is intended to take the next steps in developing theory and practice of garden design by providing more advanced perspectives and applications to the undergraduate course. Garden Design focuses on the meaning of gardens, theory and history of gardens, conservation and restoration of gardens, and rural and urban social, economic and ecological contexts. The MA Garden Design is part of the School of Design and part of the overall postgraduate design programme that includes Landscape Architecture.

Professional Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the Landscape Institute and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

You can find out more about these here;
http://www.landscapeinstitute.org/
http://iflaeurope.eu/about/

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project, contextual to Garden Design), Research Methods in Landscape and Garden Design, Research Colloquium, Conservation and Restoration of Historic Gardens (option).

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Designing within a Historic Context, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Restoration and Management of Historic Gardens, Professional Practice, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Delivery and Assessment

The most successful teaching method across the UK for Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Garden Design, Art and Environmental Planning and Design has been this combination of design studio and classroom.

Work Experience

Internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory and private sector landscape and garden design consultancies within the UK and internationally.

All degrees at Writtle University College are awarded by the University of Essex.

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This master's degree has three main areas. research into human palaeoecology and prehistory, palaeoanthropology, geology and palaeoontology of the Quaternary; archaeological intervention; and the management, conservation and socialisation of archaeological heritage. Read more
This master's degree has three main areas: research into human palaeoecology and prehistory, palaeoanthropology, geology and palaeoontology of the Quaternary; archaeological intervention; and the management, conservation and socialisation of archaeological heritage. It shares objectives and educational activities with the degrees in History and Anthropology and Human Evolution through introductory subjects to a specialisation in archaeology.

It offers a specialised, career-oriented degree designed to prepare students for research in the field of Quaternary archaeology without neglecting the important demands of society and the labour market. It aims to train students to evaluate and draw up reports on archaeological interventions so that they can work as specialists in the field of archaeology or in the management of archaeological heritage.

Student Profile

The master's degree is designed for graduates with bachelor's degrees or pre-EHEA degrees in history, art history, humanities, social and cultural anthropology, geography, studies in conservation and restoration of cultural property, chemistry, physics, biology and geology.

Career opportunities

Research in Quaternary archaeology and human evolution, with specialisations in the disciplinary branches, including field and rescue archaeology, dissemination and museumisation of human evolution and Quaternary archeology, and conservation and restoration of archaeological material from the Pleistocene.

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This taught Masters degree is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in conservation management or ecological consultancy, professions which increasingly require postgraduate qualification for establishment and progression. Read more
This taught Masters degree is designed for those wishing to pursue a career in conservation management or ecological consultancy, professions which increasingly require postgraduate qualification for establishment and progression. The course puts a high emphasis on practical field experience for managing habitats, monitoring species and developing biological identification skills for plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. These activities are allied to a clear theoretical framework underpinning ecology and conservation practice. We welcome applications from recent graduates, experienced consultants, conservation workers or those seeking a career change.

What will I study?

This Conservation Management course combines the expertise of the field biologist with practical experience of managing habitats. A firm emphasis is placed on fieldwork, biological identification skills and experience of a broad range of management issues.

You will develop laboratory skills including microscopy for bryophyte and invertebrate identification and soil analysis techniques. Identification skills gained will range from plants to invertebrates, mammals, amphibians and birds.

You will learn to write in a concise scientific style, construct arguments, consider ethical issues of ecological work, analyse and interpret data and synthesise scientific literature. These skills are highly desirable in ecological consultancy and conservation research.

Ethics is also an important feature of conservation management, for instance in the collection of voucher specimens. Consideration of ethical issues is given in each module, where appropriate, alongside legal issues.

How will I study?

Fieldwork is an integral part of many modules and is used to provide a multitude of experiences across species, habitats and conservation issues. A variety of local sites are used including dunes, meadows and forests. The programme includes a residential field course. Field trip costs are included within course fees.

In small classes, lecture-style sessions and practical work are designed to develop subject-specific skills, clarify concepts, raise questions and collect data. Follow-up seminars may consider analysis, data presentation, qualitative observations, elucidation of trends, and integration with theoretical ideas.

How will I be assessed?

The course has a variety of assessment methods which are designed to develop the full range of skills and expertise relevant to the subject. These include a research thesis, scientific reports, voucher specimen collections, vegetation portfolios, field-based management plans and examinations.

Who will be teaching me?

The course is taught by a small friendly team who have considerable teaching and research experience in the area. All staff are research active which means that they keep up-to-date with current developments in their areas of interest and pass this knowledge onto their students. Staff expertise includes forest and grassland conservation, habitat restoration, sustainable management of ecosystems, remote sensing in ecology and conservation genetics.

What are my career prospects?

This MSc will equip you with the knowledge and skills required for a successful career in conservation or ecological consultancy. To date, graduates of the course have been employed by a range of non-governmental organisations (for example, Wildlife Trusts, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), and National Trust), governmental organisations (Natural England) and consultancies (including Atkins UK, Jacob’s Ecology, and Avian Ecology). Graduates have also progressed into conservation research, working for the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and at various universities.

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During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more. Read more

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation

During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more.

Programme summary

This programme focuses on policy, sustainable management and conservation of forest and nature; i.e. understanding and predicting the effect of phenomena such as global climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, ecotourism, timber production, hunting and animal reintroduction. Insights into all aspects of forest and nature conservation are required to address these issues with emphasis on both ecological and social aspects. The MSc Forest and Nature Conservation programme represents an integrated approach to natural resource management that can be applied at different scales, to diverse ecosystems and in varying political and social contexts. A tailor-made structure, an outstanding research environment and three comprehensive specialisations contribute to making the programme challenging for undergraduates from both the natural and social sciences.

Specialisations

Policy and society
The central study object is the dynamics between people, organisations and institutions within policymaking and policy innovation processes, referred to as `governance'; relative to forest and nature conservation issues, including spatio-temporal aspects. Issues in the field of economics, public administration, communication and strategic planning are addressed in order to conserve and manage forests and natural areas in a sustainable way. Examples are: recreation, communities and natural resources, deforestation, forest governance, sustainable forestry and certification schemes.

Management
This specialisation aims to design and assess realistic and feasible management options for forests and natural areas. The approach is based on specific knowledge and understanding of wildlife management, management of forests and other terrestrial vegetation. Special attention is given to the following questions: What is the best option for wildlife conservation? Do populations need to be managed or not? How does one determine an optimal population level? How should the effects of various management activities, at different spatial and temporal scales, be evaluated? How should the perceptions of different people be dealt with? What are the best options in forest management for a specific area? How to manage nature? How to deal with abiotic, biotic and social bottlenecks in restoration ecology? What is the role of N and P pollution? How to restore shallow lakes? How to restore tropical forests? It is also possible to focus on specific aspects of natural resource management.

Ecology
The emphasis is on understanding the ecological processes that form the basis for the structure, composition and functioning of forests and natural areas. You can specialise in tropical forestry, landscape ecology, animal ecology, forest resource management, plant ecology, biodiversity conservation or tropical nature conservation.

Your future career

The programme provides excellent preparation for Dutch as well as European and non-European jobs. Career possibilities include positions at research institutes and universities, government ministries and local authorities. Positions are also available at state and private forestry, nature conservation services, and environmental assessment agencies. Examples include the European Forest Institute, Birdlife International, and landscape and animal protection organisations such as RAVON or WWF. In the private sector, graduates find jobs at engineering and consultancy bodies, such as Royal Haskoning, the National Fund for Rural Areas or forestry companies. Graduates often begin their career by carrying out research, computer analysis and modelling of ecological systems, working in knowledge transfer or preparing policy documents. Eventually, their careers usually shift towards advisory work, consultancies, research coordination and project management.

Alumnus Wouter Wubben.
Wouter Wubben works for the municipality Westland and is responsible for matters concerning ecology, landscape and water quality. “When I just started working I could directly apply the ecological knowledge from my master, and I was able to pick up missing knowledge very quickly”. Wouter went to the USA to work on forestry for his internship. “During my internship I worked in the field with a lot of different teams, this experience now helps me to communicate with people involved with the implementation of municipality plans. I have a constantly changing job, I started with executive work but I am now responsible for the development of issues in ecology, landscape and water.”

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Biology
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Landscape Architecture and Planning
MSc Geoinformation Science
MSc International Development Studies.

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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This programme is for individuals already working in environmental conservation who seek to broaden or update their knowledge, and for graduates who wish to become professionally involved in conservation and environmental management. Read more
This programme is for individuals already working in environmental conservation who seek to broaden or update their knowledge, and for graduates who wish to become professionally involved in conservation and environmental management.

Professional and conservation organisations have advised on the content of this degree, ensuring strong links between the programme and the needs of the conservation industry and it has received two awards for 'Best Practice' from the CIEEM. The programme is structured around six compulsory courses that integrate theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary conservation and environmental management.

Students develop an interdisciplinary understanding of modern-day conservation and environmental management, and gain a practical understanding of ecological techniques and strategies. They also acquire the skills to critically apply environmental management techniques and methods to practical situations and to understand decision making processes and the underlying criteria and values. In addition, they gain specific knowledge and skills through their chosen optional courses.

During June to September students undertake a research project in a specialist area of their choice, often in collaboration with an external organisation. There is a high component of practical work including fieldtrips.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide a broad-based understanding of the current issues facing practitioners

- To equip graduates to develop a career in the environmental sector

- To enable students to develop a portfolio of skills and specialist knowledge of a particular area during the research project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/ees/envcons

Environmental Science

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary combination of social, natural and physical science. At its core is the idea of sustainable environmental management. This involves developing an understanding of the physical landscape and how society impacts on the environment. Solutions to environmental issues are investigated from a diversity of perspectives, including scientific, political, legal and philosophical positions.

What you'll study

Principles and Practice of Environmental Conservation (15 credits)
Environmental Law and Policy (15 credits)
Restoration Ecology (15 credits)
Research Methods for Postgraduates (15 credits)
Techniques in Applied Ecology (30 credits)
Introduction to GIS (15 credits)
Environmental Conservation Project (60 credits)
Options include: Environmental Impact Assessment; Ecology and Conservation of Estuaries and Coastal Zones and Managing Tourism in Protected Areas (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through assessments, coursework and examinations that are practically focused using real-world examples and case studies. Portfolios demonstrating competencies are an important component and provide a tangible record to show potential employers.

Professional recognition

This programme is accredited by and maintains strong links with the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM) (http://www.cieem.net/).

Career options

Graduates from this programme can pursue careers with conservation organisations in the UK and overseas, including central and local government, environmental consultancies, non-governmental organisations, business, the media and environmental education.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Summary. This programme is a unique collaboration, jointly delivered by Southampton and Marwell Wildlife. Marwell Wildlife is a conservation charity with a zoological park as part of its conservation profile. Read more

Summary

This programme is a unique collaboration, jointly delivered by Southampton and Marwell Wildlife. Marwell Wildlife is a conservation charity with a zoological park as part of its conservation profile. It undertakes a broad portfolio of conservation research including managing individuals and populations of threatened species and restoration of endangered wildlife and ecosystems. This MRes is the only wildlife conservation programme currently available in the UK to offer such a high degree of interaction between a university and a conservation organisation. Its ultimate aim is to produce individuals with the skills, experience and academic credentials required for employment as conservation biologists. To provide an immersive experience for students and to ensure we have the scope to cover all that the MRes encompasses, the course is based on a full calendar year, running from October until late September. The MRes is a full-time course, with no provision for a part-time option at this time. Tuition fees will depend on which research project is undertaken.

Modules

- Wildlife Conservation: Disciplines and Principles

- Fieldwork- Before, During and After (10 day field course to Marwell Wildlife's conservation and research site in Kenya)

- Techniques in monitoring and surveying

- Advanced Quantitative methods

- MRes Wildlife Conservation research project (independent research in the UK or Africa)

Visit our website for further information.



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The course, which is offered on both a part-time and a full-time basis, aims to be unique amongst schools in Britain in two ways. Read more
The course, which is offered on both a part-time and a full-time basis, aims to be unique amongst schools in Britain in two ways. Firstly, the teaching offers a design-based iterative element, thereby testing the formulation of informed decisions. Secondly, it places emphasis on the role of sustainability within the historic context at both technical and strategic levels. By using the Welsh School of Architecture’s established expertise as a research locus for sustainable design, it addresses these concerns which have been identified internationally by ICOMOS as the critical future direction of conservation education.

The course seeks to attract a broad range of students with varied levels of experience in professional practice who share an interest in the conservation of architecture, urbanism and the environment. Candidates may be graduates with a degree in architecture and/or RIBA part 2 exemption embarking on their professional careers or have been professionals in practice for some time seeking to refine or augment their career paths.

Distinctive features

The course is both RIBA approved and IHBC accredited. Completion of the RIBA approved course for RIBA and ARB registered Architects entitles them to apply to become 'Conservation Registrants' immediately. As an RIBA approved course, it reduces the number of years in practice required to be entitled to apply for registration as 'Specialist Conservation Architect' to 4 years (from 5) and 2 years (from 3) for 'Conservation Architect'. Completion of the IHBC accredited course enables suitably qualified candidates to achieve full IHBC accreditation in 2 as opposed to 5 years.

As a part of the fourth module, students are taken to Rome for a two day intensive visit during which we meet with tutors from the 2nd level International Masters in Architectural Restoration and Cultural Heritage at Roma TRE University. Travel to Rome, entrance fees and accommodation are covered in the course fee but travel to and from the UK airport is not.

Structure

The programme is offered on both a full-time and a part-time basis. The taught modules are all delivered over six two-day sessions per year thereby attracting part-time candidates who are employed in full-time practice. Part-time students will complete three modules (i.e. 60 credits) in the first year and two modules in the second year. They will be given until the following December to submit their dissertation module.

Core modules:

The Conservator's Role
Tools of Interpretation
Energy Use in Historic Buildings
Case Studies and Regional Work
Design Tools: Methods of Repair
Dissertation

Teaching

The taught material is largely delivered by a range of specially selected guest speakers, all prestigious within their particular field. The speaker’s presentation is followed by lively debate and discussion with the group, taking the opportunity to learn from a range of perspectives. We undertake several relevant site visits during the course of the programme, engaging with practitioners, clients and statutory authorities.

Assessment

Each piece of work or report is assessed at an outline stage and at completion stage, with feedback given to guide future submissions. There are no class tests or exams during the programme, however, students are required to submit written and project work on time and also on occasion to be able to present their work orally to the group.

The course briefs are designed to enable students from differing backgrounds to pursue paths relevant to their chosen or existing career progression.

Each 20-credit module is assessed via a combination of written assignments (4,000 words approx. each) and presentations.

Career Prospects

The course is both RIBA approved and IHBC accredited. Completion of the RIBA approved course for RIBA and ARB registered Architects entitles them to apply to become 'Conservation Registrants' immediately. As an RIBA approved course, it reduces the number of years in practice required to be entitled to apply for registration as 'Specialist Conservation Architect' to 4 years (from 5) and 2 years (from 3) for 'Conservation Architect'. Completion of the IHBC accredited course enables suitably qualified candidates to achieve full IHBC accreditation in 2 as opposed to 5 years.

Experienced professionals are provided with an opportunity to adjust their career path by gaining specialised expertise in an area of practice that increasingly demands proof of capability. Recent graduates are offered the chance to focus the skills and credentials they can offer to prospective employers or indeed to lay foundations in a specialised area in which they may choose to start up their own businesses.

Our students have gone on to be employed by the National Trust, the Planning Inspectorate, to be promoted within local authorities and to set up new divisions in their practices and businesses.

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The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. Read more
The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. They need a wide range of skills, including biodiversity, survey techniques, environmental management and monitoring systems, geographical information systems and an understanding of relevant ecological principles, legislation and regulatory frameworks, which demands a multidisciplinary approach.

This Masters programme in Wildlife and Conservation Management brings together the physical, chemical, biological, socioeconomic, administrative and legislative aspects of land planning, providing the skills you need for an exciting and rewarding career as an environmental conservation manager. It combines a broad understanding of the science and management of conservation, putting emphasis on integrating specialist knowledge and practical skills with IT and communication.

Our extensive and exciting fieldwork programme will train you in a wide range of environmental survey and assessment techniques.

This Masters degree is accredited by the Environment and Resources Professional Group of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/385-msc-wildlife-and-conservation-management

What You Will Study

Modules include:
- Applied Geospatial Analysis
- Restoration Ecology
- Environmental Management and Legislation
- Wildlife Surveying
- Terrestrial and Aquatic Conservation
- European Field Expedition*
- MSc Project

Optional modules:
- Tropical Ecology*
- Tropical Environmental Monitoring*
- Tools for Sustainable Development
- Work Based Learning Project
- Remote Sensing for Environmental Management

*Please visit our course page on the University of South Wales website for information regarding our Field Trips.

*Please note:* the course structure outlined above is indicative of what you will study and may change from year to year. Consequently there may be a difference between the information shown here and the course when it is delivered.

Learning and teaching methods

Full-time students spend two days at University, usually Wednesday and Thursday, and around 12 hours per week in lectures and practical sessions.

Part-time students attend one day per week. First year part-time students attend on Wednesdays and second years attend on Thursdays.

We teach using a combination of lectures, laboratory sessions, problem solving tutorials, video presentations and practicals. You will also undertake fieldwork excursions within the UK and overseas (additional costs apply). The number of hours of formal teaching will vary depending on your module choice. You will also be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning by completing guided reading and various interactive computer packages. Based on individual circumstances the MSc Project may be extended into your third year of study and will be agreed as part of a discussion with the course leader.

Please note: some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

- Work based learing project:
This optional module enables our students to gain 60 hours work experience under the supervision of an employer. You will also be assigned an academic supervisor who will advise you on a suitable employer based on your area of interest. Recent organisations who have hosted our students include Capita Symonds, Natural Resources Wales, Wales Heritage Coastal Path and Warwickshire Wildlife Trust.

- Employment prospects:
Graduates from our MSc Wildlife and Conservation Management have progressed to careers in the Environment Agency, utility companies, local, national and international conservation organisations, environmental consultancies, and regional and national government. Several others have progressed on to PhD study and into academic careers.

Assessment methods

You will be assessed through a range of methods depending on your module choice, these include: examinations, coursework such as writing reports of field excursions. You will also analyse case studies, undertake presentations, participate in workshops and analyse data.

Field trips

Fieldwork provides unforgettable educational and social experiences, bringing to life the theory and concepts of the lecture theatre. South Wales is a fantastic study location on the edge of rural and urban environments.

Cardiff, Wales’ capital city, the Brecon Beacons National Park and the Glamorgan Heritage Coast are all close to the University. They provide exceptional fieldwork locations that can be explored in a day. We make full use of these locations across our earth and environment courses to cover the practical aspects of our modules.

As part of this degree you will undertake residential fieldwork excursions, typically to Portugal and Mid Wales (additional fees apply). Some fieldwork trips will extend beyond the two days of study, but you will be notified in advance in order to plan appropriately.

If you choose to study the Tropical Ecology module, you will have the opportunity to complete a scientific scuba diving course, either locally or at a tropical location (for an additional fee which is approximately £2000). Previous locations have included Indonesia, Costa Rica, Honduras and Borneo.

The Tropical Environmental Monitoring module, will enable you to undertake studies in Southern Africa in locations such as Botswana for an additional fee which is approximately £2000.

The European Field Expedition module involves studying in Portugal. The fee is approximately £500-£600.

Please note: the exact locations of all overseas field trips may vary each year and is based on the area’s suitability for academic study and the overall cost of the trip. In addition some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Important Information

Please be aware of the physical demands of this course which has modules with significant fieldwork elements. If you therefore have a disability which is likely to be affected by these physical demands, please get in touch with the course leader Dr Gareth Powell as soon as possible. We will then investigate the reasonable adjustments that we can make to ensure your Health and Safety. Please note that if any Health & Safety aspects cannot be overcome, we may not be able to offer you a place on the course of your choice.

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This biodiversity conservation degree, taught by specialists in the field, will give you an in-depth knowledge of the science and practice of biodiversity conservation. Read more
This biodiversity conservation degree, taught by specialists in the field, will give you an in-depth knowledge of the science and practice of biodiversity conservation. It will equip you with the skills required for a career in biodiversity conservation.

Topics covered include biodiversity assessment and monitoring, site survey, management and restoration, GIS and data analysis, ecological principles and regulatory frameworks. You'll learn about the latest developments in conservation science and practice, and hone your ability to communicate effectively.

Field-based teaching features throughout to capitalise on the BU’s location within a biodiversity hotspot. Situated on the Dorset coast, BU is within easy reach of outstanding environments of global importance for conservation, including the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, Wessex Downs, Dorset heaths, Poole Harbour and New Forest.

Core units:
Conservation in Practice
Field Ecology Skills
Frontiers in Biodiversity
Quantitative & Spatial Analysis
Research Project

Option units (2 of the following):
Advanced Quantitative & Spatial Methods
Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services
Conservation Genetics
International Law of the Environment
Primate Behaviour & Ecology

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The issue of. Contemporary Art Conservation. is at the center of debates and disagreements. Read more

The issue of Contemporary Art Conservation is at the center of debates and disagreements. The diversity and originality of used materials, the ephemerality and perishability of some art works, the use of new media and, last but not least, the immateriality of some performances and happenings make this field a continuously and rapidly evolving ground where well prepared specialists ready to deal with this wide and inestimable patrimony are definitely missing.

Starting from here and from the individual peculiarities of each Campus, Accademia di Belle Arti Aldo Galli signed a partnership which proposes an ambitious Higher Education project.

Career opportunities - The Specialist in Contemporary Art Conservation can work either in conservation or in restoration, boasting a theoretical and practical knowledge specifically connected to the contemporary times. The employment sectors include galleries, public and private museums, public institutions for conservation and land-use planning, exhibition setup and art transportation businesses, studio and analysis labs, university departments of Art History, restoration and conservation companies.



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The Master’s degree Programme prepares experts (conservation scientists) in the diagnostic and conservation of cultural heritage, providing solid interdisciplinary scientific training that combines chemistry, physics, biology, computer science and geology with innovative technologies for storage of artifacts. Read more
The Master’s degree Programme prepares experts (conservation scientists) in the diagnostic and conservation of cultural heritage, providing solid interdisciplinary scientific training that combines chemistry, physics, biology, computer science and geology with innovative technologies for storage of artifacts. The training course is designed to prepare a professional figure able to interact with experts in other disciplines involved in the process of the protection and conservation of cultural assets, acting as a technical and scientific reference.

The graduate will be able to design and test new technologies for restoration work, to develop projects for prevention of damage and maintenance of cultural heritage and to run diagnostic tests for the characterization of artifacts.

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