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Masters Degrees (Conflicts)

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In recent years the world has seen many violent conflicts, ranging from the former Yugoslavia, Congo, Afghanistan to Iraq. Many of the violent conflicts are nowadays fought over issues as identity, territory or resources (e.g. Read more
In recent years the world has seen many violent conflicts, ranging from the former Yugoslavia, Congo, Afghanistan to Iraq. Many of the violent conflicts are nowadays fought over issues as identity, territory or resources (e.g. diamonds and oil). War between states has become rare; most of the violent conflicts take place within the borders of a state. In addition, ‘terrorist' organisations with goals that exceed national agendas have claimed more attention than before. The international community - governments, non-governmental organisations and international organisations like the UN - has a significant interest in the management and resolution of violent conflicts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cti

Entry Requirements (Additional)

The requirements for admission include:
- a bachelor degree in Human Geography received from Radboud University or another relevant bachelor degree with at least 24 EC in conflict studies and/or political geography
- Having successfully completed a course in social scientific research methods is highly recommended and will increase your chance of getting selected for this specialisation
- excellent proficiency in English
- a letter of motivation
- two letters of recommendation
- list of your grades obtained during previous training

Career Prospects

Graduates of the Master's in Human Geography will be qualified for many different job positions. These jobs all require excellent analytical skills at an academic level, a critical perspective, thorough knowledge of societal relations and a clear vision of how crucial societal problems can be solved. Human Geography graduates find jobs rather easily at (international) research institutes, international companies, or at consultancy firms. Top-ranking positions, in private industry as well as in governmental and non-governmental organisations can also be found.

Our approach to this field

If you choose the master specialisation Conflicts, Territories and Identities you will study (inter)national conflict, war and the physical and mental borders that come along with these. We will focus on the backgrounds, contexts and sources - imperialism, geopolitics, failing states, religions, (national) identities, discrimination, resources, borders - and the management and resolution - good governance, border management, humanitarian aid, development aid, diplomacy, peace operations. You will become familiar with the political and social construction of conflicts, territories and identities, as well as with the theory and practice of (inter)national conflict management.

Our research in this field

The Master's specialisation in Conflicts, Territories and Identities is a joint project of the Centre for International Conflict Analysis & Management (CICAM) and the Department of Human Geography of Radboud University. Together they offer the state-of-the-art knowledge and skills in the field of conflict analysis and management, that you will need in your future career as a scholar, a (inter)national policy or decision maker, a conflict manager, or as a journalist. You will be able to apply scholarly ideas and concepts to complex conflict situations in practice. The central question in this programme is: ‘how can violent conflicts be analysed, understood or explained and how can they be managed?'

You will be taught by professors who study these issues and publish their findings in international academic journals and contribute to the public debate in the Netherlands. You will study theories, methods and instruments, but above all you will develop a critical attitude. You will learn that there are always multiple approaches to any problem. The Master's programme in Conflicts, Territories and Identities includes a variety of cases, individual and group assignments, lectures and seminars, small national excursions and an international excursion to a (former) conflict zone. The programme gives you the opportunity to share experiences with other students and to link theory with practice. You can also specialise by selecting a specific elective course and by choosing a topic for your final Master's thesis. Furthermore there are good opportunities for interesting and challenging research-internships.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cti

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The MA in International Political Economy (IPE) concentrates on the critical comprehension, understanding, and analysis of developments in international political economy, in terms of its theories, issues and conflicts. Read more
The MA in International Political Economy (IPE) concentrates on the critical comprehension, understanding, and analysis of developments in international political economy, in terms of its theories, issues and conflicts. Students will be equipped with critical analytical insights into contemporary issues such as globalisation, trans-nationalisation, development, conflict and human rights. Competency will be developed in the critical theories of, and contemporary approaches to, international political economy.

On completing the programme students will have a deeper understanding of the historical evolution of different approaches to international political economy, and be able to apply these approaches to contemporary issues in international political economy. Students will apply the intellectual skills developed in the programme in the preparation and presentation of theoretical and/or applied analyses in the form of a dissertation.

Structure

Two Core Modules
-Critical Theories of International Political Economy
-Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy
-And then four Option Modules from a range of subjects

During the Summer Term students start work on a dissertation on a topic of their choice. The dissertation is due for submission at the end of the summer vacation.

The MA in International Political Economy may also be taken on a part-time basis over two years (24 months).

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This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. Read more
This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. The programme grows out of and addresses the needs and experiences of people in Northern Ireland. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts and the role of religion in such conflicts. It is designed to address the challenge of developing a fuller, more complex and more systematic understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to reconciliation. Thirty years of violence have taught people some costly wisdom about reconciliation, which needs both to be consolidated and further applied in Northern Ireland and to be offered to others who have experienced similar conflicts. Reciprocally, the Reconciliation Studies programme will also be probing conflicts around the world for lessons to be applied in Northern Ireland and more widely. The programme also includes a one-week Spring School in Dublin.

Students take at least five of the eight courses offered and are assessed on four of them. The courses include Dynamics of Reconciliation; Theology of Reconciliation; Conflict Transformation; Northern Ireland – Conflict and Reconciliation; Social Research Methods; Resources of Reconciliation in World Religions; When the Fighting Stops: Transitional Justice and Truth Commissions; and Conflict and Collective Identity: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Religion. Students also participate in a one-week Spring School in Dublin, which varies in content from year to year. In addition seminars will be organised in support of the programme.

Assessment: The assessment consists of four 5,000-6,000 word essays: students submit an essay on the first course ‘Dynamics of Reconciliation’, at least one from courses 2, 3 or 4, and two others – to be completed by 1st May, and an 18,000-20,000 word dissertation to be completed by 15th September.

All students are registered on a common Masters programme and follow the same assessment procedures for the four essays required. Subject to satisfactory performance in the four essays, students may proceed to submission of a dissertation for the M.Phil. degree. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment.

Admission Requirement:
Applicants should normally have an honors degree at second-class level or above. Students not meeting these criteria may exceptionally be considered at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

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The International Conflict and Security MA at the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is structured to introduce you to the key concepts and theories necessary to understand the features of contemporary international conflict and security issues. Read more
The International Conflict and Security MA at the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is structured to introduce you to the key concepts and theories necessary to understand the features of contemporary international conflict and security issues.

At the same time, it gives the opportunity, through practical and case study-driven modules, to learn about conflict prevention and early warning, as well as the appropriate ways of managing conflicts peacefully through negotiation and mediation.

The programme also provides you with training specific to working in the field of conflict analysis, such as preparing reports on specific conflicts or security issues, drafting recommendations for policymakers, or mediating between conflicting parties. The programme is constantly updated to introduce fresh insights from the theory of conflict and innovative policy strategies as developed in the field by practitioners and academics alike.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/54/international-conflict-and-security

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Conflict and Security allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Conflict and Security in the context of International Relations; Development; International Migration and and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Conflict and Security with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a programme that will attract, and meet the needs of both those seeking to prepare for careers in fields concerned with international conflicts and those with a general intellectual interest in contemporary security issues

- provide you with a research-active teaching environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of study of international conflict and war, co-operation, security and peace

- examine how state, non-state and supra-national actors behave and interact in conflict situations

- ensure that you acquire a solid knowledge of the theories of the causes and dynamics of different kinds of contemporary conflict and security threats and the means to manage them

- ensure that students who specialise in regional conflicts acquire an advanced understanding of the historical, cultural, social and institutional context of the area to be studied

- prepare students for various careers in jobs related to international conflict analysis security issues, as well as for career changes in the spirit of lifelong learning

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills) in particular through a substantial dissertation.

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its three core research groups: Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Comparative Politics; and Political and Social Thought. We also host four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Global Europe Centre (GEC), the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT), and the Centre for Federal Studies (CFS).

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World. Encounter and Conflict. Read more
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World: Encounter and Conflict

Why is Jerusalem still such a contested place? What are the reasons for the systematic destruction by the Islamic State (IS) of the cultural heritage of the past? Why do sacred texts produced centuries ago continue to shape the lives of people today? How are they used and abused? Why does the sword sometimes replace the word in religious matters? How did religious groups, ideas and artefacts travel from one continent to another and how did that migration transform them? In other words, how did religious conflicts and encounters shape the modern world and why do they still matter today?

These are some of the topics MF Norwegian School of Theology tackles in its new M.Phil programme in History of Religions, with a primary focus on Religion in the Pre-Modern World: Encounters and Conflicts.

The programme is focused on the issues of religious cross-pollination, coexistence and conflict in three target areas: Europe, South-East Asia and the Middle East. Addressed in a long historical perspective stretching from Late Antiquity to the European Renaissance, the programme seeks to illuminate the roots of present peaceful coexistence and interchange, as well as of today’s antagonisms and conflicts. The underlying idea of the programme is that, in order to fully grasp current religious conflicts and alliances, we need to understand how the perceptions of past and present are intertwined, reciprocally dependent and constantly reshaped.

Based on a multidisciplinary approach and applying various theoretical frameworks and interpretative methods, the core courses of the programme aim to reveal historical dynamics, privileging ‘how’ and tentatively ‘why’ over ‘who’ and ‘when’.

The programme is conceived at the intersection between political history and history of religions, but relies also on other disciplines, such as the history of ideas, art history and archaeology. These are meant to provide the depth of field expected in Big History by illustrating and clarifying the macro-historical perspectives.

Teaching and learning are driven by a hands-on and case-oriented attitude and core courses are complemented by lectures and seminars of theory and method.

The programme is open to all students with a BA in related disciplines (history, religious studies, theology, archaeology, art history, social sciences, etc.).

The programme coordinator is Victor Ghica, Professor of Antiquity and Early Christian Studies. The core courses of the programme will be taught by Kristin B. Aavitsland, Professor of Cultural History, Liv Ingeborg Lied, Professor of the

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Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Read more
Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Furthermore religion plays an important role in people's lives worldwide, and has become one of the major ways people connect with each other across the globe. However, the persistence and prominence of the role of religion in contemporary societies is still not sufficiently understood in academic research and in the work of policy-makers, NGO's and journalists.

This master's track addresses the pivotal place of religion in the dynamics of globalization and conflict that shape present-day societies. The programme is interdisciplinary, examining political, social, psychological and cultural dimensions. You will learn to:

• investigate the consequences of globalization for religious practices and individual, ethnic and national identities
• understand the relationship between religion, conflict and peace-building
• analyse national and international conflicts, and learn how they are interwoven with religious interests and opinions

You can specialize in either conflict and peacebuilding, migration or gender

Degree: MA in Theology & Religious Studies

Why in Groningen?

• The combination of anthropology, sociology and political science is unique in the world.
• Rated the best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands.
• Top 100 university
• Relates latest research and theories to current developments.
• Vibrant research tradition with international links.
• Internships at embassies, ministry of foreign affairs, international NGO's.
• Taught by leading experts with a world-class reputation.
• You can follow your own research interests.

Job perspectives

With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as, developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education. Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a place on the Research Master after your regular Master's programme. You can complete this two-year programme in one year.

Job examples

- Consulting & Policy
In a globalizing world, national and international conflicts are farreaching.There is a need for experts who can explain and help solve these conflicts. With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. More specifically, this could mean working for the think-tank of a political party, for the Netherlands Institute for Social Research or for the Netherlands Institute of International Relations Clingendael.

- Media & Journalism
Religion is in the news every day, often in a negative way, from terrorism to integration issues. With your expertise in the field of religion and conflict, you can intensify the debate in society and, where necessary, add some nuance to the picture. You can put your knowledge into practice as an editor at a publishing company, a broadcasting company, a newspaper or a current affairs magazine.

- Education
You will have enough knowledge of the subject to teach Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies in secondary education. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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The MA in War. History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years. Read more
The MA in War: History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years.

Looking at political, cultural and social history, this MA is for those who want to study war in all its multi-faceted complexity, from the everyday and the personal, to the national and the global. We offer expert teaching and supervision on British, European, American and Middle Eastern modern and contemporary history.

The main conflicts you will cover are: the First World War and the Second World War; the Balkan Wars of the 1910s and the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s; the wars of Decolonization and those of New Imperialism; the Cold War and its ‘side-wars’; the War on Terror and the current conflicts in the Middle East.

Why study with us?

Studying this degree you will acquire expertise on:

• War and conflict studies
• Modern international history
• Interdisciplinary learning and researching

You will be taught in a truly interdisciplinary manner, utilising a number of disciplines: cultural and social history, politics and international relations. You can build the degree structure that suits best your interests and future plans.

You can specialise in particular disciplines, or you can explore a wide range of new methods. You will also have the choice of three different types of elective work (e.g. extended essays or primary-source based seminars). Our students can also use the nearby world-famous Mass Observation archive. They also tend to be involved in the events and research projects run by the University of Brighton’s Understanding Conflict cluster, such as our latest initiative on ‘Contesting Britain at War’.

We offer flexible modes of study for those with personal or professional commitments. After finishing the MA you will be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

Areas of study

There are two Core Modules that you will have to take, one on the forms and one on the legacies of war. ‘Forms of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ examines the lead up to war and what is happening in wartime. It looks at: the political, ideological and wider structural causes of war; the human experience at the home-front and at the war-front; the politics and methods of warfare as they have evolved in time; the different modes of practical, political, and intellectual resistance against invasion and occupation. ‘Legacies of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ looks at the impact of war, at what is left after a conflict: the emotional and personal effects of war; how a conflict continues to exist on material and psychological landscapes; the multiple ways through which personal, collective and global memories of killing and sacrifice are constructed; the politics of what we decide to remember and what to forget; the activist, political and theoretical efforts to stop war from happening again.

Beyond the two Core Modules you can also pick a number of option courses that relate to you interests, for example: Public History and Heritage; Cultural Memory; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity; Globalisation and Global Politics; Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Genocide; International Relations theory; Aesthetics and Philosophy; Cultural Theory; Philosophy and Critical Theory. Alternatively you might want instead to research and write a stand-alone extended essay, or you may opt for a more practical-based unit on teaching and learning higher education, offering you the opportunity to learn more about undergraduate teaching.

You will also take a Research Methods module that will help you develop the academic skills necessary to engage in the 20,000-word Dissertation, for which you are guided by one of our faculty with subject expertise.

Careers and employability

Our graduates are particularly well-equipped to follow career paths in sectors that deal with violent conflicts, their consequences and resolution, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the Ministry of Defence, and international bodies (e.g. United Nations).

Much more broadly our degree opens the path to sectors that value critical research skills and a good knowledge of modern history and politics, such as media and journalism, politics and government, museums and archives, and publishing.

Working in schools and in academia are, of course, standard options. Alternatively, many of our students go on to study for Doctorates with one of the Research Centres in Brighton.

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Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. Read more
Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

The Security Dilemma.
Face-to-face diplomacy.
Peace building, alliances and institutions
Emotions in crises and conflicts
The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma.
The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War.
US-Iran nuclear relations.
The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China.

Our students explore cutting edge scholarship through three core modules: Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics, Global Cooperation in Practice, and our exclusive training programme on Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation. In addition, our new module Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation examines the psychological determinants of political choices and behaviours. Our programme allows for a truly interdisciplinary training in understanding and tackling the challenges of complex international tensions.

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: Trust; Political Settlements; International Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Who is the programme for?

Our MSc degree is designed for students interested in international relations, political psychology and security studies. Our students share a common goal: to advance their academic training, establish a policy-related career, work in government, international organizations and NGOs, or serve as mediators, negotiators and diplomats to address intractable conflicts at all levels of world politics.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management 
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building 
  • Climate Change Disasters 
  • Technologies and Weaponry
  • Research project 
  • Professional placement 

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as: 

  • Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
  • Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
  • Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
  • Preparing for Floods 

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from.)

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



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Your programme of study. If you are naturally curious about how specific regions and countries end up in conflict and how that conflict changes the political system in different countries globally towards peace and different approaches you may be interested in Global Conflict and Peace Processes. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are naturally curious about how specific regions and countries end up in conflict and how that conflict changes the political system in different countries globally towards peace and different approaches you may be interested in Global Conflict and Peace Processes. This degree opens your options to go into politics, the Civil Service, EU, UN, OSCE, public sector, NGOs and many other organisations globally and other careers.

You understand how different conflicts generated peace at internal level, intrastate level and regional level. From this you may build up a portfolio of understanding and experience to assist in countries, report on various issues, speak to specific groups of people like governments, advisors, diplomats and aid workers. You may become so knowledgeable that you are able to offer advice, opinion, outreach, security or economic development for specific regions or you may be able to promote peace upon what you experience at workshops, talks and briefings and at government agencies.

The programme allows you to engage with a range of conflicts and peace process in Northern Ireland, Lebanon and Cyprus to fully appreciate the types of conflicts in our recent past, their commonalities and methods of ensuring peace. This allows you to build up a knowledge and expertise to understand how future conflict may play out or be managed.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods

Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Optional

Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods

The Comparative Study of European Societies

Dimensions of Globalisation

Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building

Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Semester 3

Dissertation in Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/106/global-conflict-and-peace-processes/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You gain a solid set of skills in conflict management, the understanding of characteristics that ensure peace process and you are taught by critical researchers within disciplines involved
  • You gain from research conducted without the Institute of Conflict, Transition and Peace Research

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • September

 International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



Read less
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences. Read more
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences.

More about this course

Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. Theoretically, we are confronted with the issue of how to reconcile unconditional rights with consequentialist ethics of political responsibility and rival ideologies of social order. Practically, we are confronted with particular powers, interests and conflicts demanding judgement and action that is at once moral and pragmatic. The MA in Human Rights and International Conflict will explore such issues and attempt to cultivate such judgement. The course provides both a solid academic grounding in human rights and international relations and a wide choice of optional modules. Students are trained in research methodology, before completing a 12-15,000 word dissertation dealing in depth with a subject of their choice.

Taught by published experts in human rights, peace and conflict studies, international relations, politics, history, philosophy, women's studies and other subjects, this multidisciplinary course equips students with the kind of understanding necessary to work for peace, justice and human rights in the real world.

Assessment is largely by coursework. Core modules also involve two assessed presentations and two unseen examinations. One third of the assessment for the MA is by dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-History and Theory of Human Rights (core, 20 credits)
-Human Rights and International Conflict Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Human Rights and the International Order (core, 20 credits)
-International Conflict Resolution (core, 20 credits)
-Theory and Research Methods in International Relations (core, 20 credits)
-American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century (option, 20 credits)
-Citizenship and Social Justice (option, 20 credits)
-Human Security (option, 20 credits)
-International Relations and the Legal Regulation of Conflict (option, 20 credits)
-Religion and International Relations (option, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (option, 20 credits)
-The New Europe in the New International Order (option, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (option, 20 credits)
-Work Placement Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will be trained in the kind of research and analytical skills that will qualify them to take a wide range of opportunities for both further study and for employment in the private, public and third sectors. Most especially, an academic training in human rights and conflict management will qualify its recipients to take opportunities in a range of exciting, international non-governmental organizations. Graduates of our previous courses in human rights or international security have gone on to work in such organizations.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management 
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building 
  • Climate Change Disasters 
  • Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as: 

  • Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
  • Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism) 
  • Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
  • Preparing for Floods 

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from.)

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers.

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
  • Climate Change Disasters
  • Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers.

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

Please note that the Certificate of Credit option is only suitable for students who do not require a visa to study in the UK, and who live close enough to the University to attend each seminar in person. We regret, but no distance learning option is available.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Foundational Concepts, Principles, and Actors
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
  • Disaster Management
  • Morality and Governance
  • Conflict and Disaster Case Studies
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
  • Climate Change Disasters
  • Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.



Read less
Conflict resolution professionals work in a range of fields, including business, law, education, healthcare, and government. They act as arbitrators, mediators, facilitators, ombudsmen, and counselors. Read more
Conflict resolution professionals work in a range of fields, including business, law, education, healthcare, and government. They act as arbitrators, mediators, facilitators, ombudsmen, and counselors. They must understand the root causes and dynamics of conflict and how to resolve disputes through reasoned negotiation.

Columbia’s master’s program in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, which can be completed on a part-time or full-time basis, combines theory and applied training to prepare students to develop practical models for negotiating and resolving disputes among parties with differing objectives and desires. This graduate program is part of a rich history of conflict resolution at Columbia University.

The graduate program’s training philosophy is grounded in a commitment to interactive, dialogue-based methods of managing and resolving conflict. The focus is on building common ground, establishing dialogue, applying practical skills, ensuring representation and recognition, and forging relationships.

The program trains students to:

Adopt a mindset that is self-aware and sensitive to diverse populations of people in various settings
Consider alternative perspectives from differing worldviews
Apply sound conflict analysis models, tools and processes
Understand system dynamics and complexity of issues and actors
Develop a reflective practice of learning
Work toward reaching constructive outcomes through the use of collaborative processes
Use theory to inform their understanding, and apply pragmatic approaches to resolving conflicts

Curriculum

The curriculum emphasizes a pragmatic approach to resolving conflicts that arise in human resource management, community and labor organization, education and health administration, and law and business. Through examination of theory and practical methodology, the program focuses on constructive communication, ethical understanding, cultural awareness and sensitivity, counseling, and resolving conflicts in ways that are favorable for all parties.

The program includes four core courses that ground students in the field. Two additional courses are designed to provide students with a deeper engagement in research and practice. Four electives allow students to focus their work in an area of concentration, such as health care, the environment, or ombuds practice. At least two of these electives must be chosen from courses designed for the program; up to two may be chosen from course offerings in other schools of the University. Three Master's Capstone Thesis Seminars immerse students in the world of negotiation, mediation and conflict resolution through applied research and exposure to professional work in the field with grounding in theory, research and practice.

This is a rigorous and concentrated graduate degree program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. The Master of Science in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution can be taken on a full or part-time basis, and is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed full-time.

Students should be aware of the nontraditional schedule. Classes are mostly held in the evenings and on the weekends. Course meetings are either spread out over the 14-week term or scheduled as weekend, day-long intensives. Course schedules are posted in advance of the term so that students can plan accordingly. Classroom attendance is required. Students are also expected to devote significant time to completing reading and written assignments, and projects outside of class.

In order to receive the Master of Science in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, students must complete all requirements within three years (six terms, excluding summer) with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better.

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