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Masters Degrees (Conflict Development)

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The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Read more
The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Yet to prevent conflict or to build a secure and inclusive state and society after conflict involves a complex set of skills straddling conflict analysis, conflict mediation and negotiation, peace processes, state stabilisation, post-conflict reconstruction, peace building and early warning.

This inter-disciplinary, custom-designed MSc offers the opportunity to develop operational and vocational skills for conflict prevention and peacebuilding within the context of the latest theories on conflict and conflict prevention. Students will acquire the analytical skills to map conflict dynamics, design conflict sensitive projects and develop early warning mechanisms, enabling them to better predict, and so avoid, the outbreak of violent conflicts. They will also gain the skills necessary to assess and evaluate the impact and outcomes of interventions.

The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their existing skills, as well as graduates with a career in conflict prevention, conflict mediation, or post-conflict reconstruction in mind. It is particularly aimed at those seeking to work or already working in the (I)NGO sector, governmental departments or inter-governmental organisations.

While rooted in peace and conflict studies, the MSc draws on strategic and security studies as well as development studies, enabling much needed cross-fertilisation between these traditionally divergent perspectives. It draws on real-life case studies as well as interactive role plays, and exposes students to both cutting-edge academic developments and the latest practitioner experience, with a particular focus on bottom-up approaches.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional, term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. fieldtrips have been organised to Nepal, Kenya, Lebanon, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

"What I really like about DGSi programs is that they are able to match a great theoretical understanding of the issues I am interested in with a clear focus on the practical skills that are required for working in the field." Lianne Vostermans, 2013/14

“Having co-sponsorship from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK and Durham University, I was able to accomplish my Chevening scholarship doing MSc Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding (CPP) at Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi). Although it was found to be quite intensive and intellectually challenging, I have no doubt that this master programme will equip junior diplomats like me with necessary knowledge and skills, especially in security and peacebuilding domains, so that we can contribute our best capacities in the making of the world a more peaceful home to the whole mankind.” Chan Aye, 2015/16

“I chose the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Master because of its interdisciplinary character, topics and the combination between theory and practice. During the course I have had the opportunity to meet very many interesting scholars, practitioners and very intelligent and diverse fellow students, from different cultural and academic backgrounds. The course gave me insight in things I had only read about in books before by confronting us with people who have actually been in the field, and by taking us there ourselves through the study trip and fieldwork opportunities for our dissertations. I have learned to look at conflict situations from new perspectives, something I hope to use in future employment in order to help create a more peaceful world.” Marit Jansen, 2014/15

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
-Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)

Dissertation.
Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities
-Conflict Analysis

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Read more
The Division of Peace Studies and the Bradford Centre for International Development each have a strong set of Master’s programmes; alongside undergraduate, postgraduate research, and Research and Knowledge Transfer programmes. Both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions in providing a structured, innovative and challenging taught MA programme on the important interrelationships between peace, conflict and development. It offers a comprehensive introduction and analysis of the interrelationships between development, conflict and security in developing and transitional societies.

It covers: development theory, policy and programming debates; interrelationships between insecurity, poverty and development; peace and peacebuilding (including conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction); human security issues; natural resource conflict, co-operation and management; environment and security in developing and fragile political contexts; and conflict-sensitive development principles and practices. It also equips its students with practical skills in order to design and manage projects and programmes in the field.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/peace-conflict-and-development-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies aims to combine the strengths of these two Divisions: Peace Studies and Development (known as Bradford Centre for International Development). They are both long established within the University of Bradford and both have high international reputations in their respective areas, in terms of teaching, research and policy and programme engagement.

Modules

Core modules
-Issues in Development Theory
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-Dissertation

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Introduction to African Politics
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Cities in Conflict
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Issues in Development Policy
-Public Policy Analysis and Management
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Work experience

Students are able to opt for a ‘Professional Practice’ module that encourages students to undertake a voluntary placement with a view to gaining experience of working in a team and managing change.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Students will benefit from practical skills-based training as well as academic education, in relation to engagement with key contemporary policy and programme debates of the key international and national organisations involved in peace, conflict and development. They will benefit from the strong international engagement of the relevant teaching staff in these debates, and the networks that these bring.

The MA in Peace, Conflict and Development Studies combines theoretical and academic debates on these interrelationships with examinations of the relevant policy and programming issues, so it is relevant for decision-makers and stakeholders within developing, fragile or conflict-affected countries and for those concerned with international aid and assistance.

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Civil Society and International Development

• Approaches to International Relations

• War, Identity and Society

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• War in Space

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security

• Development Studies

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA



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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on key contemporary debates about Africa's politics, culture, society and sustainable development. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on key contemporary debates about Africa's politics, culture, society and sustainable development.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Africa MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Africa MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face-to-face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.



Read less
This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore debates and controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Optional modules will also allow you to specialise in aspects of development that suit your interests.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, and the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face to face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it. Careers support.



Read less
This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on education in development. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on education in development.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

In addition, you’ll explore controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Education MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Education MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face to face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Civil Society and International Development

• Approaches to International Relations

• War, Identity and Society

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• War in Space

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security

• Development Studies

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA



Read less
This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face to face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Distinguish yourself with a dual Master and develop the advanced business acumen, leadership and diplomacy skills demanded of professionals in the twenty-first century. Read more
Distinguish yourself with a dual Master and develop the advanced business acumen, leadership and diplomacy skills demanded of professionals in the twenty-first century.

The Master of Business Administration - Master of Conflict Management and Resolution program is designed for students who intend to broaden their knowledge in business administration and management while becoming qualified in the areas of conflict management and resolution.
This course allows graduates to distinguish themselves to future employers with a dual Masters degree and is popular among progressive senior managers, middle managers and legal professionals who want to fast track their way towards more than one qualification.

Practical skills

The Master of Conflict Management and Resolution course is academically grounded and practice oriented. Our students develop the knowledge and skills to analyse, manage and resolve conflict in a wide variety of contexts. Graduates are prepared to work in professions that deal directly with conflict as well as in other professions that require conflict management skills.
The Master of Business Administration uses core knowledge from the academic disciplines of business, law, psychology, technology, social science and humanities to explore key areas confronting modern managers and organisations.

What you will study

The Master of Business Administration content includes financial skills, management practices, technology, innovation, career development, corporate governance, sustainability, risk, value creation, entrepreneurship, legislation, strategy and leadership. Students learn how to analyse, plan and implement strategic business decisions.
In the Master of conflict Management and Resolution, you will learn how to:
*Synthesise complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution.
*Critically analyse complex conflicts and conflict management systems.
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict.
*Effectively and ethically communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict.
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Course l earning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On completion of the Master of Business Administration component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Critically analyse complex knowledge, systems or practice issues from both historical and recent perspectives
*Evaluate complex contexts within which theories, standards or methods should be integrated and applied for sustainable professional practice
*Evaluate sustainable economic, social and environmental practices and value systems from different disciplinary perspectives
*Research and apply established concepts to solve business and professional practice problems
*Critically analyse complex issues using appropriate models and provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups or organisations based on multidisciplinary synthesis of theory and evidence
*Apply creative and innovative thinking effectively to business, conflict and related theory and practice and standards for professional practice.

*Present complex information appropriately to differing audiences using:
*Effective oral presentation skills
*Clear and fluent written communication

*Work effectively in achieving common goals, demonstrating both:
*Collaboration
*Leadership

*Adapt sustainable business constructs and skills to novel theoretical or practical situations
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in solving differing business problems creatively
*Demonstrate a capacity for independent critical personal reflection and self-development, making use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development

On completion of the Master of Conflict Management and Resolution component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Evaluate complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict
*Effectively communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in conflict management and resolution practice and research
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-MASTER OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND RESOLUTION (MBA-MConflMgtResol)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Why study with us?

*Benefit from flexible study options.
*Broaden your existing knowledge and skills.
*Expand your career options.
*Become a better manager.
*Put your learning into practice right away.
*Get two degrees at once.
*Be professionally accredited as a Mediator, Conflict Coach or Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner.
*Gain practical experience through our clinical program, the Student Conflict Support Service or an internship with a local or international organisation.

For more information about the Conflict Management and Resolution Program

Visit our program website: http://www.jcu.edu.au/conflictresolution
Contact the Program Director:
Dr Samantha Hardy
Associate Professor
Director of the Conflict Management and Resolution Programs
Email:
Phone: (07) 4781 6775

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a specialist focus on how globalisation, international economic interdependence and the internationalisation of political structures and processes are changing politics globally. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a specialist focus on how globalisation, international economic interdependence and the internationalisation of political structures and processes are changing politics globally.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues. You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore debates and controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime – with an additional compulsory module focusing on your specialism.

You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and International Political Economy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and International Political Economy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face-to-face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Distinguish yourself with a dual Master and develop the advanced business acumen, leadership and diplomacy skills demanded of professionals in the twenty-first century. Read more
Distinguish yourself with a dual Master and develop the advanced business acumen, leadership and diplomacy skills demanded of professionals in the twenty-first century.
The Master of Business Administration - Master of Conflict Management and Resolution program is designed for students who intend to broaden their knowledge in business administration and management while becoming qualified in the areas of conflict management and resolution.
This course allows graduates to distinguish themselves to future employers with a dual Masters degree and is popular among progressive senior managers, middle managers and legal professionals who want to fast track their way towards more than one qualification.

Practical skills

The Master of Conflict Management and Resolution course is academically grounded and practice oriented. Our students develop the knowledge and skills to analyse, manage and resolve conflict in a wide variety of contexts. Graduates are prepared to work in professions that deal directly with conflict as well as in other professions that require conflict management skills.
The Master of Business Administration uses core knowledge from the academic disciplines of business, law, psychology, technology, social science and humanities to explore key areas confronting modern managers and organisations.

What you will study

The Master of Business Administration content includes financial skills, management practices, technology, innovation, career development, corporate governance, sustainability, risk, value creation, entrepreneurship, legislation, strategy and leadership. Students learn how to analyse, plan and implement strategic business decisions.
In the Master of conflict Management and Resolution, you will learn how to:
*Synthesise complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution.
*Critically analyse complex conflicts and conflict management systems.
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict.
*Effectively and ethically communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict.
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Why study with us?

*Benefit from flexible study options.
*Broaden your existing knowledge and skills.
*Expand your career options.
*Become a better manager.
*Put your learning into practice right away.
*Get two degrees at once.
*Be professionally accredited as a Mediator, Conflict Coach or Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner.
*Gain practical experience through our clinical program, the Student Conflict Support Service or an internship with a local or international organisation.

For more information about the Conflict Management and Resolution Program

Visit our program website: http://www.jcu.edu.au/conflictresolution
Contact the Program Director:
Dr Samantha Hardy
Associate Professor
Director of the Conflict Management and Resolution Programs
Email:
Phone: (07) 4781 6775

Course learning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On completion of the Master of Business Administration component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Critically analyse complex knowledge, systems or practice issues from both historical and recent perspectives
*Evaluate complex contexts within which theories, standards or methods should be integrated and applied for sustainable professional practice
*Evaluate sustainable economic, social and environmental practices and value systems from different disciplinary perspectives
*Research and apply established concepts to solve business and professional practice problems
*Critically analyse complex issues using appropriate models and provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups or organisations based on multidisciplinary synthesis of theory and evidence
*Apply creative and innovative thinking effectively to business, conflict and related theory and practice and standards for professional practice.
*Present complex information appropriately to differing audiences using:
*Effective oral presentation skills
*Clear and fluent written communication
*Work effectively in achieving common goals, demonstrating both:
*Collaboration
*Leadership
*Adapt sustainable business constructs and skills to novel theoretical or practical situations
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in solving differing business problems creatively
*Demonstrate a capacity for independent critical personal reflection and self-development, making use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development

On completion of the Master of Conflict Management and Resolution component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Evaluate complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict
*Effectively communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in conflict management and resolution practice and research
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-MASTER OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND RESOLUTION (MBA-MConflMgtResol)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
The Master of Business Administration - Master of Conflict Management and Resolution program is designed for students who intend to broaden their knowledge in business administration and management while becoming qualified in the areas of conflict management and resolution. Read more
The Master of Business Administration - Master of Conflict Management and Resolution program is designed for students who intend to broaden their knowledge in business administration and management while becoming qualified in the areas of conflict management and resolution.
This course allows graduates to distinguish themselves to future employers with a dual Masters degree and is popular among progressive senior managers, middle managers and legal professionals who want to fast track their way towards more than one qualification.

Practical skills

The Master of Conflict Management and Resolution course is academically grounded and practice oriented. Our students develop the knowledge and skills to analyse, manage and resolve conflict in a wide variety of contexts. Graduates are prepared to work in professions that deal directly with conflict as well as in other professions that require conflict management skills.
The Master of Business Administration uses core knowledge from the academic disciplines of business, law, psychology, technology, social science and humanities to explore key areas confronting modern managers and organisations.

What you will study

The Master of Business Administration content includes financial skills, management practices, technology, innovation, career development, corporate governance, sustainability, risk, value creation, entrepreneurship, legislation, strategy and leadership. Students learn how to analyse, plan and implement strategic business decisions.
In the Master of conflict Management and Resolution, you will learn how to:
*Synthesise complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution.
*Critically analyse complex conflicts and conflict management systems.
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict.
*Effectively and ethically communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict.
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Why study with us?

*Benefit from flexible study options.
*Broaden your existing knowledge and skills.
*Expand your career options.
*Become a better manager.
*Put your learning into practice right away.
*Get two degrees at once.
*Be professionally accredited as a Mediator, Conflict Coach or Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner.
*Gain practical experience through our clinical program, the Student Conflict Support Service or an internship with a local or international organisation.

For more information about the Conflict Management and Resolution Program

Visit our program website: http://www.jcu.edu.au/conflictresolution
Contact the Program Director:
Dr Samantha Hardy
Associate Professor
Director of the Conflict Management and Resolution Programs
Email:
Phone: (07) 4781 6775

Course learning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On completion of the Master of Business Administration component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Critically analyse complex knowledge, systems or practice issues from both historical and recent perspectives
*Evaluate complex contexts within which theories, standards or methods should be integrated and applied for sustainable professional practice
*Evaluate sustainable economic, social and environmental practices and value systems from different disciplinary perspectives
*Research and apply established concepts to solve business and professional practice problems
*Critically analyse complex issues using appropriate models and provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups or organisations based on multidisciplinary synthesis of theory and evidence
*Apply creative and innovative thinking effectively to business, conflict and related theory and practice and standards for professional practice.

*Present complex information appropriately to differing audiences using:
*Effective oral presentation skills
*Clear and fluent written communication

*Work effectively in achieving common goals, demonstrating both:
*Collaboration
*Leadership

*Adapt sustainable business constructs and skills to novel theoretical or practical situations
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in solving differing business problems creatively
*Demonstrate a capacity for independent critical personal reflection and self-development, making use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development

On completion of the Master of Conflict Management and Resolution component of this degree, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Evaluate complex conflict and related theories and standards for professional practice in conflict management and resolution
*Provide specialised advice to assist individuals, groups and organisations to constructively manage conflict
*Effectively communicate with, facilitate and support people in personal, group, organisational and cross-cultural conflict
*Exercise independent ethical judgment and initiative in conflict management and resolution practice and research
*Independently and critically reflect on and assess their own capabilities and performance, and make use of feedback as appropriate, to support personal and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-MASTER OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND RESOLUTION (MBA-MConflMgtResol)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century. Read more
Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century.

This course attracts students from all over the world, and the optional modules reflect the key expertise of the faculty. You will acquire subject-specific knowledge and understanding of:
-The theories and concepts of peace and conflict and their application to global, regional and local contexts
-The emergence, nature and significance of conflict analysis/ conflict resolution as a distinct field of academic enquiry
-The nature of conflict and the variety of mechanisms and processes available for its management and resolution

You will also acquire a strong ability to evaluate different explanations of conflict analysis/conflict resolution and to articulate such evaluations at recognised postgraduate level.

Conflict Resolution is concerned with understanding the causes, dynamics and consequences of conflict, and employing that knowledge in practical efforts to mitigate or resolve conflict, and to respond to some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. This MA balances formal academic study and vocationally-relevant learning, opening up options for careers ranging from local mediation to work with international peacebuilding or humanitarian organisations.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/conflict-resolution-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

This is a flagship course for both teaching and research in this area and has gained a global reputation for its pioneering work. The MA is located in Peace Studies, a Rotary International recognised centre of expertise for teaching and research on peace and conflict issues.

Modules

Core modules
-Conflict Resolution Theory (20 Credits)
-Introduction to Peace Studies (20 Credits)
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills (20 Credits)
-Dissertation project in a topic of your choice (related to Conflict Resolution) (60 Credits)

Option modules
-Arms Trade and Arms Control (20 Credits)
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus (20 Credits)
-International Politics and Security Studies (20 Credits)
-Introduction to African Politics (20 Credits)
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (20 Credits)
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking in a Post-secular World (20 Credits)
-Africa Study Visit (20 Credits)
-Cities in Conflict (20 Credits)
-Gender, Conflict and Development (20 Credits)
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation (20 Credits)
-Social Movements, Globalisation and Political Change (20 Credits)
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy (20 Credits)

You have the opportunity to define your own engagement with the discipline by choosing from the full range of modules offered by Peace Studies. It is therefore up to you to decide what specific dimensions of peace you wish to focus on, with possible options ranging from modules on: the environment, human rights, Islam, Christianity and politics, African politics, nationalism, international political economy, international politics and security studies, conflict resolution, East Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

A graduate of this degree will be able to:
-Explain the emergence and development of conflict resolution, with an understanding of key events or trends in the 20th and 21st centuries which have shaped the field
-Critically analyse key theories of conflict, using theory to develop effective conflict case-studies
-Identify and evaluate the main approaches to ‘peacemaking, peacekeeping and peacebuilding’ that are practised and theorised within Conflict Resolution, demonstrating a critical understanding of their applications and limitations
-Demonstrate increased competence in a range of skills relevant to professional practice in conflict resolution

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