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Masters Degrees (Condensed Matter Physics)

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The Physics Department at Binghamton University offers a two-year master's (MS) degree and a PhD in physics. The MS program is for students seeking careers in applied physics or in research and development in industrial laboratories. Read more
The Physics Department at Binghamton University offers a two-year master's (MS) degree and a PhD in physics. The MS program is for students seeking careers in applied physics or in research and development in industrial laboratories. It is also intended for technical personnel in industry who wish to attain a higher level of understanding of the physical principles on which modern technology is based.

Upon completion of the PhD program, graduates will be able to lead efforts in acedeme and industry in the areas of condensed matter physics, applied physics and materials science. Graduates receive their degree having made significant contributions to advance knowledge in their particular area of research. Courses and seminars provide necessary background in the basic principles, methods and theories of physics.

As as young and vibrant program, faculty are currently engaged in various collaborative research projects, such as Physics of Metal Oxides through Piper Laboratory, Levy Studies of DNA, and Nanoelectronic Physics and Materials Science for Energy Generation and Information Processing. Research activities emphasize energy sciences, biophysics, and information sciences, with the intent to leverage significant research infrastructure investment under the Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center at Binghamton University.

The Physics Department also has a major focus on materials physics and condensed matter physics with strong interactions with Materials Engineering and industry. The Nanofabrication Laboratory at Binghamton University provides state-of-the-art resources pivotal to conducting cutting-edge nano-scale research.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended. Undergraduate degree in physics or related field desirable for admission.
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE general test scores
- Official GRE subject test in physics scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores
----Physics applicant minimum TOEFL scores:
*80 on the Internet-based exam
*550 on the paper exam
----Physics applicant minimum IELTS score:
*6.5, with no band below 5.0
----Physics applicant minimum PTE Academic score:
*53

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Program highlights. The recent progress in several fields of theoretical physics (such as high energy physics, astrophysics, quantum and nonlinear optics or condensed matter physics) required numerous very sophisticated mathematical tools. Read more

Program highlights

The recent progress in several fields of theoretical physics (such as high energy physics, astrophysics, quantum and nonlinear optics or condensed matter physics) required numerous very sophisticated mathematical tools. In these frontline research fields, it became clear that a new understanding of physical systems going from cold atom gases to black holes is impossible without a new insight into underlying mathematical structures. This kind of problems requires a new interdisciplinary approach and specialists with double competence: in Physics and in different fields of modern Mathematics.

The main aim of the Master Program In Mathematical Physics (Math4Phys) is to provide advanced lectures on the mathematical methods of modern theoretical physics in the framework of a mathematical curriculum. Such an offer exists in France only in Dijon as the Mathematical Physics group of the IMB (Burgundy Mathematical Institute) provides a unique environment for a program requiring a double competence in Mathematics and Physics. The Mathematical Physics group of the IMB laboratory in Dijon is a unique research team in France with a capacity to provide advanced lectures in mathematical problems of modern physics. It permits to create a scientific environment for a master program focused on the most important problems of modern Physics from the mathematical perspective.

We offer lecture courses for the students with background in mathematics or mathematical physics giving an introduction to the mathematical methods used for such branches of theoretical physics as quantum field theory, statistical mechanics, general relativity, gauge theories, string theory, etc. The coursework covers different fields of mathematics (algebra, geometry, analysis) and highlights their applications to the problems of modern theoretical physics. The students are integrated from the very beginning into the mathematical physics group of the IMB and have to prepare by the end of each year a master dissertation.

The first year (M1) of the program is designed to provide the necessary background courses (mostly in mathematics but also in physics) to comply with the coursework of the more advanced second year. In particular, the M1 program includes the following subjects:

1.  Differential geometry

2.  Fourier analysis

3.  Functional analysis

4.  Groups and representations

5.  Mathematical methods of classical mechanics

6.  Partial differential equations

7.  Quantum physics

8.  Numerical methods

The second year lecture coursework includes the following lecture courses:

1.  Mathematical methods of quantum physics

2.  Riemann geometry and integrable systems

3.  Lie groups and Lie algebras

4.  Cohomological field theories

5.  Quantum groups

6.  Geometry and physics of blackhole spacetimes

We will also provide several mini courses by the research visitors of IMB. More detailed program of the second year courses can be found on the program webpage

Graduate destinations

The main aim of the master program is to provide sufficient training to start a PhD preparation.

Application

Maximum enrolment 20 in M1 and 15 in M2

To apply for the Master program in Mathematical Physics students should send a CV, a short description of their previous coursework (in Mathematics and Physics) and eventually a motivation letter to the program coordinator:

For M1: Giuseppe Dito ()

For M2: Nikolai Kitanine ()

Accepted students should proceed with the formal application procedure available here.

Requirements

The students applying for the M1 have to complete their undergraduate studies with major in Mathematics or Physics. The students can apply directly for the second year (M2) if they have completed at least one year of graduate courses in Mathematics or Mathematical Physics.

To follow the program the students should have a sufficient proficiency in English (we don’t require TOEFFL or an equivalent certificate but we can suggest an online interview to candidates). 

Grants

Several fellowship grants (600 € per month, during up to 9 months) will be awarded each year to high quality foreign students,



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Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or… Read more
Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or astronomy? Develop valuable new knowledge and skills? Prepare for a research career, or embark on a completely new path? Whatever your motivation, a postgraduate degree from the School of Physics and Astronomy can help you achieve your ambitions.

The MSc Physics is available in three different pathways: Particle Physic, Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics. The School of Physics and Astronomy also offers an MSc in Astrophysics and a PGCert in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Programme outcomes

The aim of the programme is to deepen your understanding of contemporary theoretical physics, covering advanced concepts and techniques, leaving you well prepared for further doctoral level study and research. The programme will also enable you to develop skills transferable to a wide range of other careers.

This programme will:

Teach you the fundamental laws and physical principles, along with their applications, in your chosen area of physics.
Introduce you to research methodology, and how to manage your own research, making use of journal articles and other primary sources.
Allow you to communicate complex scientific ideas, concisely, accurately and informatively.
Instruct you how to use mathematical analysis to model physical behaviour and interpret the mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena.

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who wish to specialise in philosophy of physics at a higher level, and for individuals with a background in physics or mathematics who wish to make a transition to philosophy and foundations of physics. The course consists of five taught units in philosophy, two taught master's units in physics, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components in philosophy and physics, as well as a dissertation.

Core units
- Philosophical Writing and Research Methods (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
- A mandatory, two-hour weekly seminar developing ideas, bibliographical and writing skills necessary for philosophical research. The unit is assessed by seminar contributions and presentations.
- Scientific Methodology and Epistemology (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit concerns core topics in scientific epistemology and metaphysics. The unit is examined on the basis of an essay of 5,000-6,000 words. As with all assessed essays, you may meet with a supervisor to discuss your work and to receive feedback on a draft essay.
- Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit covers philosophical issues related to basic physical theories, focusing on conceptual issues in the foundations of quantum theory and special relativity. We will cover topics such as the relativity of simultaneity; geometry and the causal structure of relativity physics; the conceptual structure of quantum mechanics, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument; the measurement problem and Schrödinger’s cat paradox of; locality and action-at-a-distance.
- Advanced Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit will examine a selection of conceptual issues in the foundations of physical theory with particular focus on the physics of the mid-to-late 20th century. We cover topics such as: the arrow of time in thermal physics; the interpretation of quantum field theory; emergence and universality in condensed matter physics; fine tuning problems and inflationary cosmology; spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism; and time in quantum gravity.
- Foundations of Modern Physics (Physics, 10-credit unit)
Emphasis is placed on students developing an appreciation of the foundations of different areas of physics, and the unit assessment involves students writing an essay whose detailed subject is partly decided by the student. The lectures are divided into Classical, Spacetime and Quantum Physics.
- Relativistic Field Theory (Physics, 10-credit unit)
This course will give an account of the modern approach to special relativity and Lagrangian field theory, and their role in the covariant description of the classical electromagnetic field, and the relativistic quantum Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. Formative assessment is through problem sheets discussed in problems classes. Summative assessment is through a 2 hour written examination

Optional units (all Philosophy 20-credit units)
- History of Science
- Logic
- Philosophy and History of Mathematics
- Philosophy and History of Medicine
- Philosophy of Biology
- Philosophy of Psychology
- An individual, supervised research project

Please be aware that optional units may vary from year to year.

Careers

The MA in Philosophy of Physics is an ideal platform for further studies in Philosophy or Foundations of Physics. This course will also provide students with Maths and Physics backgrounds with an opportunity to develop verbal, written and argumentative skills that are highly valued by employers.

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The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. Read more
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. It is designed to act as a top-up course for students who already hold a 3-year undergraduate degree in physics (or an equivalent subject with similar physics content) and who are likely to wish to subsequently pursue research in physics, either within the department or elsewhere.

The course aims to bring students close to the boundaries of current research, and is thus somewhat linked to the expertise from within the specific research groups in the Department of Physics. Candidates make a series of choices as the year proceeds which allow them to select a bias towards particular broad areas of physics such as condensed matter physics, particle physics, astrophysics, biophysics, or semiconductor physics. The emphasis can range over the spectrum from strongly experimental to highly theoretical physics, and a range of specialist options may be chosen.

All students also undertake a substantial research project, which is expected to take up one third of their time for the year. Details of the current Part III physics course can be found at http://www.phy.cam.ac.uk/students/teaching/current-courses/III_overview . Please note that the courses available to students do change from year to year (especially the Minor Topic courses taken in the Lent Term) and so this year's course listing should only be used as a guide to what courses might be available in future.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphasphy

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- reinforced their broad understanding of physics across the core areas studied in the Cambridge bachelors physics programme.
- developed their knowledge in specialised areas of physics bringing them close to the boundaries of current research.
- developed an understanding of the techniques and literature associated with the project area they have focussed on.
- demonstrated the application of knowledge in a research context and become familiar with the methods of research and enquiry used the further that knowledge.
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of knowledge.
- demonstrated some level of self-direction and originality in tackling and solving research problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and execution of research.

Format

The course begins with taught courses offered in seven core areas: these "Major Topics" are lectured in the Michaelmas Term and cover substantial areas of physics. Students may choose to attend three or more of these for examination in the Lent term. In the Lent term, students take three or more shorter more specialised "Minor Topic" courses (from about twelve) for examination in the Easter Term. Substitutes for Major and Minor Topic courses are available from a small subset of courses taught by or shared with other departments. Throughout the year students also work on a research project that contributes to roughly a third of their mark and at the end of the year sit a three hour unseen paper on General Physics.

Depending on the lecturer for each course, students may be expected to submit work (i.e. problem sets) in advance of the small group sessions for scrutiny and/or present their work to those attending the sessions.

Assessment

The research project will be assessed on the basis of scrutiny of the student's project laboratory notebook and project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with the project supervisor and another member of staff.

It is not usual for submitted work to be returned with detailed annotations. Rather, feedback will be predominantly oral, but lecturers are expected to submit a short written supervision report at the end of each term for each of their students.

Feedback on the research project will be be primarily oral, during the student/supervisor sessions, though a short written supervision report at the end of the Lent term will be provided by each supervisor

Candidates will normally take:

- A two hour unseen examination on three or more of the Major Topic courses. These will be taken at the start of the Lent Term.
- A one and a half hour unseen examination on three or more of the Minor Topic courses. These will normally be taken at the start of the Easter term.
- One three hour unseen General Physics Paper, taken towards the end of the Easter term.
- A number of additional unseen examination papers, if the candidate has chosen to take any of the interdisciplinary courses, Part III Mathematics courses, or other shared courses in lieu of any of the Major or Minor Topic papers.

Candidates who have chosen to substitute a Minor Topic paper with an additional External Project, will be assessed on that work via scrutiny of the student's project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with two members of staff.

Candidates who have taken the Entrepreneurship course, in lieu of a Minor Topic, will be assessed on the basis of the course assignments set by the course co-ordinator.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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What is the Master of Physics all about?. The programme aims to train physicists capable of working in research institutes or corporate environments. Read more

What is the Master of Physics all about?

The programme aims to train physicists capable of working in research institutes or corporate environments. Upon successful completion of the programme, students will have acquired:

  • thorough knowledge of physics in general as well as more in-depth knowledge of at least one specialized area;
  • the ability to make sound judgments informed by current research;
  • the ability to gain new insights and results and to develop new methods;
  • the ability to solve physical problems using the most appropriate experimental and/or theoretical methods and to report on research findings;
  • the ability to structure and analyse specific problems in different situations;
  • strong teamwork skills;
  • the ability to communicate findings and insights;
  • a critical understanding of the role that physics plays in society.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

After a semester with advanced courses in different disciplines of physics, you choose a major research specialization consisting of advanced and specialized courses and a master’s thesis of 30 ECTS.

The remaining 30 ECTS allow you to follow one of two options: Research or Physics in Society.

  • The Research option prepares you for a research career in academia or industry. You broaden your research skills by choosing a minor research domain, including at least 12 ECTS courses from that domain and complemented by a research internship or with other courses.
  • The Physics and Society option offers you the opportunity to prepare for a career as a physicist outside academia, through courses preparing you for entrepreneurship or via an internship in a company.

Department

The mission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is exploring, understanding and modelling physical realities using mathematical, computational, experimental and observational techniques. Fifteen teams perform research at an international level. Publication of research results in leading journals and attracting top-level scientists are priorities for the department.

New physics and innovation in the development of new techniques are important aspects of our mission. The interaction with industry (consulting, patents...) and society (science popularisation) are additional points of interest. Furthermore, the department is responsible for teaching basic physics courses in several study programmes.

Objectives

The master students will grow into independent and critical scientists. Masters of physics will have developed sufficient knowledge and skills to participate in competitive national or international PhD programmes. Moreover the acquired research methodology will prepare the student for employment as a scientist in any chosen profession.

The curriculum is constructed in a way that the student can specialize in an area of choice by joining one of the research groups of the department. This specialization can be in the field of nuclear physics, condensed matter physics ortheoretical physics. A major part of the curriculum consists of research resulting in a master thesis. The subject of the thesis is chosen by the student during the course of the second semester of the 1st Master year and students join a research team from the 3th semester onwards.

The students can choose an option to prepare themselves better for a future in research or in industry or society related fields.

In the option "research" the student can take courses from another research specialization than its major one, which can be accompanied by an internship in one of the research teams of this minor discipline. As such our students have the possibility to broaden their knowledge in at least two scientific disciplines (in physics or a related field), which is invaluable when a further research career in or out of academia is considered.

In the option "Physics for society" students can choose for an internship of a full semester in a company or they can take courses from the LCIE Entrepreneurship Academy who wants to prepare academics for entrepreneurschip.

The Erasmus programme of the European Union offers an excellent opportunity for Belgian students who would like to combine their study with experience outside the KU Leuven. All research groups of the department have a network of European collaborators and we advise interested students to integrate this exchange with their thesis research during their second Master year. Choices concerning the Erasmus programme need to be made in December of the 1st Master year. Address the Erasmus coordinator to obtain specific information on this European programme.

Career perspectives

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at KU Leuven generates substantial research funding. Consequently, many research positions are available, and more than half the students obtaining a master’s degree in physics eventually start a PhD programme in one of the department’s research groups.

A number of graduates prefer to pursue a second master’s degree, with medical radiation physics, environmental sciences, and statistics as the most popular subjects. There are also excellent career opportunities in industry (ICT, material research, electronics), consulting, government, banking (statistics), and higher education. Unemployment is nonexistent among newly graduated physicists.



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The course is run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. Read more

The course is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. It covers the following main areas:

  • quantum field theory, particle physics and string theory
  • theoretical condensed matter physics,
  • theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and physics of continuous media
  • mathematical foundations of theoretical physics

The course concentrates on the main areas of modern mathematical and theoretical physics: elementary-particle theory, including string theory, condensed matter theory (both quantum and soft matter), theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and the physics of continuous media (including fluid dynamics and related areas usually associated with courses in applied mathematics in the UK system). If you are a physics student with a strong interest in theoretical physics or a mathematics student keen to apply high-level mathematics to physical systems, this is a course for you.

The course offers considerable flexibility and choice; you will be able to choose a path reflecting your intellectual tastes or career choices. This arrangement caters to you if you prefer a broad theoretical education across subject areas or if you have already firmly set your sights on one of the subject areas, although you are encouraged to explore across sub-field boundaries.

You will have to attend at least ten units' worth of courses, with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course or equivalent. You can opt to offer a dissertation as part of your ten units. Your performance will be assessed by one or several of the following means: 

  • invigilated written exams
  • course work marked on a pass/fail basis
  • take-home exams
  • mini-projects due shortly after the end of the lecture course.

The modes of assessment for a given course are decided by the course lecturer and will be published at the beginning of each academic year. As a general rule, foundational courses will be offered with an invigilated exam while some of the more advanced courses will typically be relying on the other assessment methods mentioned above. In addition, you will be required to give an oral presentation towards the end of the academic year which will cover a more specialised and advanced topic related to one of the subject areas of the course. At least four of the ten units must be assessed by an invigilated exam and, therefore, have to be taken from lecture courses which provide this type of assessment. A further three units must be assessed by invigilated written exam, take-home exam or mini-project. Apart from these restrictions, you are free to choose from the available programme of lecture courses.

The course offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of an optional dissertation (worth at least one unit). The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a member of staff and will typically involve investigating and write in a particular area of theoretical physics or mathematics, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results.



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This two-year MSc is offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more

This two-year MSc is offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise linked with world-leading research.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing. 

The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

With access to some of the leading physics departments in the world, there is a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

  • The course offers an incomparably wide range of options.
  • Royal Holloway's Physics Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including Rutherford Appleton and National Physical Laboratory, Oxford Instruments, CERN, ISIS and Diamond. 
  • We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Course structure

Year 1

All modules are optional

Year 2

  • Major Project

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

Year 1

You will take six from the following:

  • Lie Groups and Lie Algebras
  • Quantum Theory
  • Statistical Mechanics
  • Phase Transitions
  • Advanced Quantum Theory
  • Advanced Topics in Statistical Mechanics
  • Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields
  • Advanced Quantum Field Theory
  • Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory
  • Advanced Topics in Classical Field Theory
  • Formation and Evolution of Stellar Clusters
  • Advanced Physical Cosmology
  • Atom and Photon Physics
  • Advanced Photonics
  • Quantum Computation and Communication
  • Quantum Electronics of Nanostructures
  • Molecular Physics
  • Particle Physics
  • Particle Accelerator Physics
  • Modelling Quantum Many-Body Systems
  • Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
  • Theoretical Treatments of Nano-Systems
  • Physics at the Nanoscale
  • Electronic Structure Methods
  • Computer Simulation in Condensed Matter
  • Superfluids, Condensates and Superconductors
  • Advanced Condensed Matter
  • Standard Model Physics and Beyond
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
  • Statistical Data Analysis
  • String Theory and Branes
  • Supersymmetry
  • Stellar Structure and Evolution
  • Cosmology
  • Relativity and Gravitation
  • Astroparticle Cosmology
  • Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics
  • Planetary Atmospheres
  • Solar Physics
  • Solar System
  • The Galaxy
  • Astrophysical Plasmas
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs
  • Environmental Remote Sensing
  • Molecular Biophysics
  • Cellular Biophysics
  • Theory of Complex Networks
  • Equilibrium Analysis of Complex Systems
  • Dynamical Analysis of Complex Systems
  • Mathematical Biology
  • Elements of Statistical Learning

Year 2

Only core modules are taken.

Teaching & assessment

This high quality European Masters programme follows the European method of study and involves a year of research working on pioneering projects.

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Your future career

This course equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD. 

On completion of the course graduates will have a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Laser Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Laser Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics

Condensed Matter and Material Physics

Analytical Laser Spectroscopy

Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence

Lattice gauge theories, QCD

Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory

Field Theory in curved spacetime

Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts.

The MSc programme is a core part of the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, which has been created to mark the start of a new era in theoretical physics research, following the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. You will take part in the centre’s activities, including weekly seminars, colloquia and workshops involving physicists from around the world, and you will be involved in research-level projects as part of your dissertation.

The partnership between mathematics and physics is an essential one. In theoretical physics we attempt to build abstract constructs that rationalise, explain and predict physical phenomena. To do this we need mathematics: the language of physics. The underlying structure of the physical world can be understood in great detail using mathematics; this is a never-ending source of fascination to theoretical physicists.

Programme structure

Taught courses

You will take two compulsory courses plus a selection of courses that will bring you to an advanced level in subjects such as general relativity, cosmology, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, quantum field theory and the standard model of particle physics. You may also take courses drawn from a wider pool including specialist courses in mathematics, computing and climate science. For the MSc in Mathematical Physics, mathematics courses can account for almost half of the taught course element.

Dissertation

Following the taught component of the programme, you will undertake a three-month research project, which leads to a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By engaging with and completing the MSc in Mathematical Physics, graduates will acquire core knowledge of theoretical physics subjects and the research methodologies of modern theoretical and mathematical physics.

The programme aims to develop research skills and problem solving skills, especially in mathematics. It also aims to develop an attitude of mind conductive to critical questioning and creative thinking and the capacity to formulate ideas mathematically.

Career opportunities

These degrees are designed to prepare you for a research career by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable to a wide range of research areas and sectors including academia, industry, education and finance.

Scholarships and funding

Find out more about scholarships and funding opportunities:



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The Department of Physics and Astronomy is a broad-based department with a wide range of research interests covering many key topics in contemporary physics, astronomy, and applied physics. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Physics and Astronomy is a broad-based department with a wide range of research interests covering many key topics in contemporary physics, astronomy, and applied physics. See elsewhere in the Calendar for graduate program descriptions of Astronomy and Engineering Physics. In addition, an accredited Master of Science program is offered with a sub-specialization in Medical Physics. Departmental research activities are supported by several computing and experimental facilities, and excellent electronics and machine shops. Much of the Department's research is enhanced by local facilities such as the TRIUMF National Laboratory, the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL), and the BC Cancer Agency, UBC, and associated teaching hospitals, in addition to many specialized research laboratories housed within the Department. There is a great deal of collaboration and overlap of interests among the various groups, and incoming graduate students are currently attracted to research opportunities in many subfields of physics:
- Applied Physics
- Medical Physics
- Biophysics
- Nuclear and Particle Physics
- Astronomy and Astrophysics
- Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
- Condensed Matter Physics
- Theoretical Physics

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Physics
- Subject: Science
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

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This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts.

The MSc programme is a core part of the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, which has been created to mark the start of a new era in theoretical physics research, following the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. You will take part in the centre’s activities, including weekly seminars, colloquia and workshops involving physicists from around the world, and you will be involved in research-level projects as part of your dissertation.

The partnership between mathematics and physics is an essential one. In theoretical physics we attempt to build abstract constructs that rationalise, explain and predict physical phenomena. To do this we need mathematics: the language of physics. The underlying structure of the physical world can be understood in great detail using mathematics; this is a never-ending source of fascination to theoretical physicists.

Programme structure

Taught courses

You will take two compulsory courses plus a selection of courses that will bring you to an advanced level in subjects such as general relativity, cosmology, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, quantum field theory and the standard model of particle physics. You may also take courses drawn from a wider pool including specialist courses in mathematics, computing and climate science.

Dissertation

Following the taught component of the programme, you will undertake a three-month research project, which leads to a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By engaging with and completing the MSc in Theoretical Physics, graduates will acquire core knowledge of theoretical physics subjects and the research methodologies of modern theoretical and mathematical physics. The programme aims to develop research skills and problem solving skills, especially in mathematics. It also aims to develop an attitude of mind conductive to critical questioning and creative thinking and the capacity to formulate ideas mathematically.

Career opportunities

These degrees are designed to prepare you for a research career by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable to a wide range of research areas and sectors including academia, industry, education and finance.

Scholarships and funding

Find out more about scholarships and funding opportunities:



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The program deepens the knowledge of basic elements of modern physics (atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics) and of theoretical physics (analytical mechanics, quantum mechanics, mathematical and numerical methods). Read more

The program deepens the knowledge of basic elements of modern physics (atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics) and of theoretical physics (analytical mechanics, quantum mechanics, mathematical and numerical methods). It is possible to strengthen the knowledge of specific fields like biophysics, nanoscience, physics of matter, nuclear and particle physics, physics of the fundamental interactions, astrophysics. Finally, the program provides direct experience of the laboratory techniques and computer calculation techniques and data analysis.

The graduate in Physics will know and understand the most relevant phenomena of the physical world at different scales, starting from the macroscopic world down to the atomic physics, the physics of condensed matter, nuclear and subnuclear physics up to the physics of the universe. The understanding of the physical world will be based on experimental evidence and a proper use of the theoretical modelling and its mathematical instruments, including numerical techniques.

Course structure

The second-cycle degree in Physics is divided in three curricula to be chosen by the student: Physics of the fundamental interactions, Physics of matter and Physics of the universe. For further information please check: http://en.didattica.unipd.it

Career opportunities

The graduate in Physics can have jobs opportunities in Italy and abroad in industries involving new technologies regardless of the final products, in service companies aiming to innovation and, more generally, in all activities requiring understanding and modelling of processes and ability in analysis and testing. These include startups and high tech industries, software and consulting companies, research centers and public administration. They can also teach physics and mathematics in schools of different levels.

Scholarships and Fee Waivers

The University of Padova, the Veneto Region and other organisations offer various scholarship schemes to support students. Below is a list of the funding opportunities that are most often used by international students in Padova.

You can find more information below and on our website here: http://www.unipd.it/en/studying-padova/funding-and-fees/scholarships

You can find more information on fee waivers here: http://www.unipd.it/en/fee-waivers



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Why a Physics MSc?. Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. Read more

Why a Physics MSc?

Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. On the other hand, design of advanced technology materials, fabrication of semiconductor devices, the development of optical communication systems have all evolved as applications of physics.

Our department has both theoretical and experimental research activites. Quantum information theory, gravitation and condensed matter physics are among our theoretical research interests.

On the experimental research side, we have three advanced laboratories where we focus on solid state lasers, optoelectronic and nano-photonic materials and devices.

Our M. Sc. Program aims at teaching fundamental physics at a high level and coupling this knowledge with a research experience in either theoretical or applied physics depending on the interests of the student.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Photonic and Laser Materials

• Microphotonics

• Nanophotonics

• Gravitation, Cosmology, and Numerical Relativity

• Mathematical Physics

• Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Information Theory

• Theoretical High Energy Physics

• Quantum Optics, atomic, molecular and optical physics

• Statistical mechanics of biophysical systems

Laboratories



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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/212/physics

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The University has good facilities for modern research in physical sciences. Among the major instrumentation and techniques available on the campus are NMR spectrometers (including solutions at 600 MHz), several infrared and uvvisible spectrometers, a Raman spectrometer, two powder X-ray diffractometers, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption in flame and graphite furnace mode, gel-permeation chromatography, gaschromatography, analytical and preparative highperformance liquid chromatography (including GC-MS and HPLC-MS), mass spectrometry (electrospray and MALDI), scanning electron microscopy and EDX, various microscopes (including hot-stage), differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis, dionex analysis of anions and automated CHN analysis. For planetary science impact studies, there is a two-stage light gas gun.

- Interdisciplinary approach

Much of the School’s work is interdisciplinary and we have successful collaborative projects with members of the Schools of Biosciences, Computing and Engineering and Digital Arts at Kent, as well as an extensive network of international collaborations.

- National and international links

The School is a leading partner in the South East Physics Network (SEPnet), a consortium of seven universities in the south-east, acting together to promote physics in the region through national and international channels. The School benefits through the £12.5 million of funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), creating new facilities and resources to enable us to expand our research portfolio.

The School’s research is well supported by contracts and grants and we have numerous collaborations with groups in universities around the world. We have particularly strong links with universities in Germany, France, Italy and the USA. UK links include King’s College, London and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. Our industrial partners include British Aerospace, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Ophthalmic Technology Inc, Canada. The universe is explored through collaborations with NASA, ESO and ESA scientists.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Nature; Science; Astrophysical Journal; Journal of Polymer Science; Journal of Materials Chemistry; and Applied Optics.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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