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Masters Degrees (Computing Science)

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The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry. Read more
The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, computing at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Computing Science include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Masters team project

Optional courses
◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Functional programming
◾Human computer interaction
◾Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾IT architecture
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Safety critical systems.
◾Software project management
◾Theory of Computation
◾Web Science

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Accreditation

MSc Computing Science is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET)

Our specialist MSc graduates in Computing Science, Software Engineering and Information Security are recognised by the British Computer Society (BCS), The Chartered Institute for IT, for the purposes of fully meeting the further learning academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP Further Learning) and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Scientist (CSci). These programmes have also been awarded the Euro-Info Master Label.

[[Industry links and employability ]]

◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾Employers are interested in graduates who have a combination of good technical skills and well-developed personal skills, and in this respect graduates of the MSc in Computing Science from the University of Glasgow are particularly well placed.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

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This MSc programme will provide you with the skills required to understand the entrepreneurship and innovation required for the software industry. Read more
This MSc programme will provide you with the skills required to understand the entrepreneurship and innovation required for the software industry. Many national and multinational companies employ computer science graduates in areas such as software development and engineering, artificial intelligence, systems and networks, database and systems security as well as mobile multimedia, modelling, research and development. You will also get the chance to demonstrate the skills you have learned by completing a substantial research and development project.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr40/

Course Details

Students must attain 90 credits through a combination of:

- Core Modules (30 credits)
- Elective Modules (30 credits) (15 credits from Group 1 and 15 credits from Group 2 below)
- Research & Development Project (30 credits)

Core Modules

CS6403 Case Studies in Computing Entrepreneurship (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6406 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration 1 (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6407 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration 2 (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6408 Database Technology (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen
CS6409 Information Storage and Retrieval (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen
CS6410 Project Development Skills (5 credits) - Mr. Marc Van Dongen

Elective Modules Group I

CS6312 Mobile Devices and Systems (5 credits) - Dr. Dan Grigoras
CS6314 Mobile Applications Design (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6320 Formal Methods for Distributed Systems (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6321 Model-Based Software Development (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6322 Optimisation (5 credits) - Dr. Steve Prestwich

Elective Modules Group 2

CS6313 Services and Mobile Middleware (5 credits) - Dr. Dan Grigoras
CS6315 Mobile Systems Security (5 credits)
CS6316 Cellular Network Services (5 credits)
CS6317 Multimedia Technology in Mobile Networks (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6323 Analysis of Networks and Complex Systems (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6325 Network Security (5 credits) - Dr. Simon Foley
CS6405 Datamining (5 credits) - Dr. Marc Van Dongen

Research Phase (after period 2)

CS6400 Dissertation in Computing Science (30 credits)

Assessment

Full details and regulations governing Examinations for each programme will be contained in the Marks and Standards 2015 Book and for each module in the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/modules/

- Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science -

Students failing to achieve an aggregate of at least 60% across all modules but who achieve a pass in each of the taught modules at their first attempt graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science. Students may also opt to exit the programme and graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science provided they have achieved a pass in each module.

Careers

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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A solid, theoretical understanding of computer technology with plenty of attention for the wide range of ICT applications. The enormous and rapidly growing power of ICT is the main driving force shaping our modern society. Read more
A solid, theoretical understanding of computer technology with plenty of attention for the wide range of ICT applications.

The enormous and rapidly growing power of ICT is the main driving force shaping our modern society. This goes beyond the technical and economical aspects. ICT is also essential in research as all sciences benefit from the raw power of software in processing huge quantities of data. But how do we manage and control the complexity of modern software? How can we make the most of the opportunities? And, not to be forgotten, how can we secure the ICT infrastructures we so heavily rely on? The Master’s programme in Computing Science covers all these aspects.

We offer specialisations in each terrain: security, software, data and the mathematics at the base of it all. These are not, however, isolated disciplines. We also look at the interesting interplay between them. For example, by taking privacy into account when dealing with big data. And by doing a thorough analysis of newly designed software to prevent security breaches later. Thanks to a large number of optional courses, you can decide where you want your focus to be.

The job opportunities in computer science are excellent: many of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all have positions within six months after graduating. Many of our graduates find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers and a few continue as researchers.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/computingscience

Specialisations

- Cyber Security
You’ll learn to assess the security of existing ICT solutions, and how to develop more secure solutions for the future. This specialisation is offered in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology, meaning you get taught by many of the best cyber security experts in the country.

- Data Science
You’ll learn how to turn real-world data sets into tools and useful insights, with the help of software and algorithms. Radboud University and the iCIS research institute are leading in research on legal and privacy aspects of data science and on the societal and administrative impact of data science.

- Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science
You’ll come to understand the fundamental mathematical concepts of computation and information in order to stretch the boundaries of computer technology. We’re the only specialisation in the country – and one of the few in the world – to focus on the theoretical and abstract playing field linking mathematics and computer science.

- Software Science
You’ll learn how to design high-level software that guarantees safety while controlling its complexity. At Radboud University, we are specialised in model based development. In other words, writing and testing code before they are unleashed in the real world or built into an expensive prototype.

- Societal Master's specialisations
You can either follow one of the above-mentioned research Master's specialisations as a whole (2 years), or you can combine the first year of the research specialisation with an additional year of one of the societal Master’s specialisations, namely:
- Science in Society
- Science, Management and Innovation

Why study Computing Science at Radboud University?

- All of our specialisations are closely related to the research carried out within the Institute for Computing and Information Science (iCIS).
- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.
- There are plenty of high profile companies in the vicinity such as Philips and ASML, where you could do an internship or the research for your Master’s project.
- Exceptional students who choose the Data Science specialisation have the opportunity to do a double degree in Computing Science together with the specialisation in Web and Language Interaction (Artificial Intelligence). This will take three instead of two years.

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our research in this field

The Institute for Computing and Information Science (iCIS) is the research institute that is connected to Radboud University. Within this institute there are three research sections:
- Model Based System Development
- Digital Security
- Intelligent Systems

Within each research section there are different departments/groups that have their own research. On the websites of the research sections you will find more information about their research, publications, the departments/groups and contact information.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/computingscience

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How can we develop secure and robust software? How can we teach computers to see? How can we make our software easily adaptable to new tasks? How do we improve learning by computers?. Read more
How can we develop secure and robust software? How can we teach computers to see? How can we make our software easily adaptable to new tasks? How do we improve learning by computers?

If you find these questions fascinating, you should choose the Master's degree programme in Computing Science in Groningen. This programme deals with both the theoretical and the practical aspects of computing.

You will develop and increase your in-depth knowledge within the areas of Distributed Systems, Software Engineering, Intelligent Systems, Computational Science and Visualization. Most courses offer insightful lectures covering both theory and practice. Apart from acquiring core computer science skills, mathematics and research methodology are also important.

In student colloquia research and presentation skills are developed. For those aiming to go into business rather than academia, project management and related topics are also offered. All skills acquired are actively used in research projects, either within the university or during business and industrial internships.

Because computer science is pivotal in many areas of research, students can easily participate in one of many research collaborations with other fields, such as bioinformatics, medicine and astronomy. In addition, contacts with many businesses facilitate internships in a variety of fields, matching the interests of most students.

Why in Groningen?

- Excellent computing facilities: Virtual Reality Cube, 12000+ processor, STELLA Blue-Gene type supercomputer, world's biggest touch screen
- Also offers Computational Science and Visualisation, in particular 3-D medical imagining

Job perspectives

Having completed the Master's degree programme in Computing Science, you will be spoilt for choice regarding future employment. There are hardly any areas of business or research which do not require computer scientists, either software engineers and architects, or researchers. Usually our students are offered suitable jobs within one month of graduating (or even before graduating).

After graduating, most of our alumni move on to software companies (or found their own) or to academia, usually by entering into PhD programmes.

Those in industry are generally promoted to managerial roles after a few years and, for example, become project managers.In academia the usual path is from PhD via post-doctoral researcher to university staff member, though quite a few of our successful PhD students have moved on to industry as well. Many MSc and PhD students have gone into the field of medical imaging, either at various universities or in the research labs of large companies. More and more are moving into bioinformatics.

Job examples

- PhD research position
- Work for a software company
- Medical imaging
- Bioinformatics

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This Advanced Computing Science Masters allows you to deepen your knowledge of the subject, drawing on the expertise of our world-leading academics to investigate topics at the cutting edge of Computing research. Read more
This Advanced Computing Science Masters allows you to deepen your knowledge of the subject, drawing on the expertise of our world-leading academics to investigate topics at the cutting edge of Computing research.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a Computing Science background who wish to study new topics, begin to specialise in a particular field, and gain further qualifications. It’s ideal as preparation for a research post or for graduates looking to differentiate themselves in the job market.

The degree is more flexible than some our more specialised courses and gives you the choice of a wide range of topics, reflecting the research specialisms of our School – including Artificial Intelligence, Graphics, Audio and Visual Processing, Data Mining and Systems Engineering. You’ll become aligned with one of our major research areas and undertake an in-depth project that may involve a placement with one of our industry links.

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The Masters by Research (MRes) is a full-time or part-time Masters Degree by research allowing graduates from disciplines related to Computing and I.T. Read more
The Masters by Research (MRes) is a full-time or part-time Masters Degree by research allowing graduates from disciplines related to Computing and I.T. to develop their subject specific and personal skills through a programme of guided and structured research studies. Delivered in the distance learning (DL) mode means that you will be able to access learning materials and interact with staff at the University remotely, using the latest technology and online resources. It is an intensive programme of research under the guidance of a research supervisor who is a specialist in the chosen area of research. The general area of your study must fit in with the overall ‘flavour’ of the award, but within that general area you will be able to specialise in a topic negotiated between you and your supervisor according to a ‘Learning Contract’. The part-time route is very suitable for existing technologists, lecturers and teachers in academic institutions and may produce outcomes that are valuable to a current or potential employer. The distance learning mode of study is also suitable for learners whose situation allows them time to do online research but makes it more difficult to visit the University.

Course content

The MRes programme by distancce learning is demanding and requires the equivalent of a minimum of 48 weeks of study in the full-time mode. The distance learning MRes usually takes a minimum of two years to complete in the part-time mode and the maximum period of registration for both full- and part-time study is five years. The course structure is heavily negotiated throughout so that it fits what you are interested in. As with all research you will proceed at a pace that suits you, within the guidelines given above. You will need to be highly motivated and personally well-organised. The Programme begins with the Research Methods Module which provides the research training you will use on the remainder of the course. This runs in September each year, so the middle of September is the normal start time. You will draw up a Learning Contract with your supervisor after the Research Methods Module. The remaining modules are taken sequentially. In the full time mode you would normally complete two modules by the end of Semester 1 (January), two more by the end of Semester 2 (May) and the Masters Dissertation by the following September.

It is possible to finish the Programme with the award of Pg. Certificate after successfully completing the first two modules, a Pg. Diploma after two more modules and the Masters by Research after successful completion of the Masters Dissertation.

Find out more about the MRes Computing Science course



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Students will be provided with a strong foundation in the concepts, analysis techniques, and design methods underlying the development of modern information and software systems. Read more

Computing Science

Students will be provided with a strong foundation in the concepts, analysis techniques, and design methods underlying the development of modern information and software systems.

Tracks

Within the programme, you can select one of four tracks:
-Programming Technology
-Algorithm Design and Analysis
-Advanced Planning and Decision Making
-Algorithmic Data Analysis

Graduates qualify for PhD studies in the areas of the thematic focus areas and in a broad range of other subareas of computer science. Next to this our graduates are also in demand and find jobs in a great variety of industries and companies, such as:

KLM (Royal Dutch Airlines)
Google and
Philips.

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Our core Computing Science MSc is designed for graduates of non-computing subjects who might be interested in a new career direction or who simply want to learn about the subject. Read more
Our core Computing Science MSc is designed for graduates of non-computing subjects who might be interested in a new career direction or who simply want to learn about the subject. The course gives you a firm grounding in the fundamentals of computing, with plenty of options to steer learning in your chosen direction – you’ll also develop valuable skills in project management, research, communication and team work which are extremely attractive to potential employers.

The degree culminates in a Masters dissertation which gives you the chance to specialise in a specific topic and work closely with our world-leading academics. We’ve got strong research expertise in areas as diverse as Artificial Intelligence, Audio and Visual Processing and Data Mining.

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The Masters by Research (MRes) is a part-time distance learning Masters Degree by research allowing graduates from disciplines related to Computing and I.T. Read more
The Masters by Research (MRes) is a part-time distance learning Masters Degree by research allowing graduates from disciplines related to Computing and I.T. to develop their subject specific and personal skills through a programme of guided and structured research studies. Delivered in the distance learning (DL) mode means that you will be able to access learning materials and interact with staff at the University remotely, using the latest technology and online resources. It is an intensive programme of research under the guidance of a research supervisor who is a specialist in the chosen area of research. The general area of your study must fit in with the overall ‘flavour’ of the award, but within that general area you will be able to specialise in a topic negotiated between you and your supervisor according to a ‘Learning Contract’. The part-time route is very suitable for existing technologists, lecturers and teachers in academic institutions and may produce outcomes that are valuable to a current or potential employer. The distance learning mode of study is also suitable for learners whose situation allows them time to do online research but makes it more difficult to visit the University.

Course content

The MRes programme by distance learning is demanding and requires the equivalent of a minimum of 48 weeks of study in the full-time mode. The distance learning MRes usually takes a minimum of two years to complete in the part-time mode and the maximum period of registration for part-time study is five years. The course structure is heavily negotiated throughout so that it fits what you are interested in. As with all research you will proceed at a pace that suits you, within the guidelines given above. You will need to be highly motivated and personally well-organised. The Programme begins with the Research Methods Module which provides the research training you will use on the remainder of the course. This runs in September each year, so the middle of September is the normal start time. You will draw up a Learning Contract with your supervisor after the Research Methods Module. The remaining modules are taken sequentially.

It is possible to finish the Programme with the award of Pg. Certificate after successfully completing the first two modules, a Pg Diploma after two more modules and the Masters by Research after successful completion of the Masters Dissertation.

Graduate destinations

Currently the Faculty supports research in the following areas of Computing Science, although these are not exclusive: Enterprise, Knowledge and Information Systems, Cloud Computing, Computer Games Programming, Software Engineering and Mobile Systems, the Internet of Things, Networks, Cybercrime and Embedded Systems, Web, Multimedia and Interactive Systems. As an MRes graduate. you would be well suited to a career in any of these areas, or for Computing research in general. The completion of the award often leads to a student being enabled to undertake a further two years of research for the award of PhD. The MRes will gain you exemption from the research methods training course that PhD students usually have to take and will allow you to move directly to PhD study without going through the MPhil to PhD transfer, thereby reducing the time taken to complete the PhD by one year in most cases.

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This course provides a year of intensive training in computer science and is suitable for graduates of disciplines other than computing who are preparing for a career in the computer industry. Read more
This course provides a year of intensive training in computer science and is suitable for graduates of disciplines other than computing who are preparing for a career in the computer industry.

This course is also a suitable preparation for PhD studies.

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This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. Read more
This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. It equips you with the skills to contribute to biologically realistic simulations of neural activity and developments. These are rapidly becoming the key focus of neuroinformatics research.

Newcastle is among the pioneers of neuroinformatics in the UK and hosted the £4m EPSRC-funded CARMEN project for managing and processing electrophysiology data. We are currently involved in a £10m EPSRC/Wellcome Trust-funded project. This is on implantable devices for epilepsy patients. We use computer simulations to inform about the stimulation location and protocol.

As the amount of data in the neurosciences increases, new tools for data storage and management are needed. These tools include cloud computing and workflows, as well as better descriptions of neuroscience data. Available data can inform computer simulations of neural dynamics and development. Parallel computing and new algorithms are needed in order to run large-scale simulations. There is high demand within academia as well as within industry involving healthcare informatics, brain-inspired computing, and brain-inspired hardware architectures.

The course is designed for students who have a good degree in the biological sciences (including medicine) or the physical sciences (computer science, mathematics, physics, engineering).

You will gain foundational skills in bioinformatics together with specialist skills such as computing programming, mathematics and molecular biology with a significant focus on the development of research skills.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding neuroinformatics. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, Cell and Molecular Biosciences and The Institute of Neuroscience. We also have strong links with the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF).

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to effectively meet the demands of industry and academia. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems neuroinformatics journals. Find out more about the neuroinformatics community at Newcastle University.

Graduates of this course may want to apply for PhD studies at the School of Computing Science. In the past, all graduates have continued their career as PhD students either at Newcastle University or elsewhere.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in neuroinformatics. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Delivery

The course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the School of Mathematics and Statistics and the School of Biology, and the institutes of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Genetic Medicine and Neuroscience.

We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering. Half of the course is taught and the remainder is dedicated to a research project. Our course structure is highly flexible. You can tailor your degree to your own skills and interests.

Semester one contains modules to build the basic grounding in, and understanding of, neuroinformatics theory and applications, together with necessary computational and numeric understanding to undertake more specialist modules next semester. Training in mathematics and statistics is also provided. Some of these modules are examined in January at the end of semester one.

Semester two begins with two modules that focus heavily on introducing subject-specific research skills. These two modules run sequentially, in a short but intensive mode that allows you time to focus on a single topic in depth. In the first semester two module, you will focus on learning about modelling of biochemical systems - essential material for understanding neural systems at a molecular level. The second module is selected from a number of options. There are up to four modules to choose from, allowing you to tailor the research training component of your degree to your preferences.

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. Read more
This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. It specialises in computational design, providing essential computing and engineering skills that allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

This interdisciplinary course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The course is ideal for students aiming for careers in industry or academia. We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering.

Computational Systems Biology is focused on the study of organisms from a holistic perspective. Computational design of biological systems is essential for allowing the construction of complex and large biological systems.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience essential for understanding systems biology. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, and Cell and Molecular Biosciences. The course also has strong links with Newcastle's Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and Nutrition (CISBAN).

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply.

The course is part of a suite of related programmes that also include:
-Bioinformatics MSc
-Synthetic Biology MSc
-Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics MSc

All four programmes share core modules, creating a tight-knit cohort. This encourages collaborations on projects undertaking interdisciplinary research.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you a real opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth in Systems Biology. You have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Placements

Students have a unique opportunity to complete a work placement with one of our industrial partners as part of their projects.

Previous students have found placements with organisations including:
-NHS Business Services Authority
-Waterstons
-Metropolitan Police
-Accenture
-IBM
-Network Rail
-Nissan
-GSK

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The Masters in IT Cyber Security is an intensive, practically-oriented taught programme which equips you with advanced IT and Cyber Security skills. Read more
The Masters in IT Cyber Security is an intensive, practically-oriented taught programme which equips you with advanced IT and Cyber Security skills. This is a conversion degree programme intended for students without a computing science background. You will apply your knowledge and skills by conducting a development project.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in IT Cyber Security include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Database theory and applications
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Human-centred security
◾Programming
◾Safety critical systems
◾Software project management
◾Systems and networks
◾Group project

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake an information security focussed project worth 60 credits. This is a project chosen by you to design, implement, and test an information security based application system.
◾The project will integrate the subject knowledge and generic skills that you will acquire during the MSc programme.
◾We offer a wide range of projects, and each student is normally allocated a different project. We take your preferences into account when we allocate the projects.
◾You will also have the opportunity to propose your own project, subject to academic approval.

Furthermore for students hoping to continue into research, we have four major research sections:
◾human computer interaction (GIST)
◾formal analysis, theory and algorithms (FATA)
◾information, data and analysis (IDA)
◾computer systems (GLASS)

Most MSc students choose projects offered by these groups, giving them an opportunity to go on to PhD study. See details of our research.

Industry links and employability

◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾Employers are interested in graduates who have a combination of good technical skills and well-developed personal skills, and in this respect graduates of the MSc in Computing Science from the University of Glasgow are particularly well placed.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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Our Advanced Computer Science MSc provides you with a flexible training programme in a range of emerging computer science topics including. Read more
Our Advanced Computer Science MSc provides you with a flexible training programme in a range of emerging computer science topics including: cloud computing; security and trust; resilience; human computer interaction; and mobile and distributed systems. You will develop technical and professional skills that will underpin your future career in computing.

The course is intended for honours graduates within computing science, or a discipline with a significant computing component (eg engineering, systems engineering or mathematics). We also value relevant industrial computing experience and transferable skills.

We provide flexible study options so you can tailor your module choices to match your interests and skills. You can select from a wide range of taught modules in the first half of the course and then select your own focus for the final project. Comprehensive computer science research training will help to develop your skills in computer and information systems, providing a basis for PhD study. The course will also develop your technical and professional skills to underpin personal development and future career success.

The course is demanding and rewarding with close links to ongoing research in the School of Computing Science. We have leading international research groups and three research centres focusing on a wide range of computer science fields, including:
-Security and resilience
-Dependable systems
-Cybercrime
-Cloud computing

Our staff teaching you have international reputations for their contributions to the field and some have extensive experience as practitioners in industry.

As a student on this course, you will be encouraged to play a full part in the life of the School, participating in seminars delivered by distinguished external speakers. Our experienced and helpful staff will be happy to offer support with all aspects of your course from admissions to graduation and developing your career.

Delivery

You can study over one year full time, or two years part time, leading to the award of an MSc. It will provide you with the skills to be able to pursue a career as a software architect or project manager. You will also be able to undertake basic research or establish your own consulting or software development company.

The first two semesters consist of lectures totalling about 20 hours per week. You will then undertake written assessments. You will also complete a substantial amount of supervised and unsupervised practical work.

We teach the topics covered at an advanced level and they have close links to the research strengths of the School. We will introduce you to the latest developments in the fields covered. You will focus on both the theory and application of the associated techniques.

The topics covered include:
-Advanced programming
-Distributed algorithms
-Information management
-Safety and dependable systems
-Security and trust
-Formal modelling and system validation
-Internet programming
-Human factors engineering

A team project is also incorporated into the course to provide an opportunity for the development of team working skills.

Project work

During the course you will also complete an individual project. This five month project gives you an opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth, and to work in a research or development team. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of staff, supported with supervision from industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out in:
-One of the research groups at Newcastle
-An industry laboratory
-Your place of work

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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