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Masters Degrees (Computing Biology)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems
Research Project in Environmental Biology
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Software Engineering
Data Visualization
MSc Project
+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems
Research Project
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Physics Project
+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering
Data Visualization
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Modelling Earth Systems
Satellite Remote Sensing
Climate Change – Past, Present and Future
Geographical Information Systems
Conservation of Aquatic Resources
Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium
a number of CW and pulsed laser systems
scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
a Raman microscope
a 72 CPU parallel cluster
access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.

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The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. Read more
The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. It seeks to create, advance and apply computer/software-based solutions to solve formal and practical problems arising from the management and analysis of very large biological data sets. Applications include genome sequence analysis such as the human genome, the human microbiome, analysis of genetic variation within populations and analysis of gene expression patterns.

As part of the MSc course, you will carry out a three month research project in a research group in UCC or in an external university, research institute or industry. The programming and data handling skills that you will develop, along with your exposure to an interdisciplinary research environment, will be very attractive to employers. Graduates from the MSc will have a variety of career options including working in a research group in a university or research institute, industrial research, or pursuing a PhD.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr33/

Course Detail

This MSc course will provide theoretical education along with practical training to students who already have a BSc in a biological/life science, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering or a related degree.

The course has four different streams for biology, mathematics, statistics and computer science graduates. Graduates of related disciplines, such as engineering, physics, medicine, will be enrolled in the most appropriate stream. This allows graduates from different backgrounds to increase their knowledge and skills in areas in which they have not previously studied, with particular emphasis on hands-on expertise relevant to bioinformatics:

- Data analysis: basic statistical concepts, probability, multivariate analysis methods
- Programming/computing: hands-on Linux skills, basic computing skills and databases, computer system organisation, analysis of simple data structures and algorithms, programming concepts and practice, web applications programming
- Bioinformatics: homology searches, sequence alignment, motifs, phylogenetics, protein folding and structure prediction
- Systems biology: genome sequencing projects and genome analysis, functional genomics, metabolome modelling, regulatory networks, interactome, enzymes and pathways
- Mathematical modelling and simulation: use of discrete mathematics for bioinformatics such as graphs and trees, simulation of biosystems
- Research skills: individual research project, involving a placement within the university or in external research institutes, universities or industry.

Format

Full-time students must complete 12 taught modules and undertake a research project. Part-time students complete about six taught modules in each academic year and undertake the project in the second academic year. Each taught module consists of approximately 20 one-hour lectures (roughly two lectures per week over one academic term), as well as approximately 10 hours of practicals or tutorials (roughly one one-hour practical or tutorial per week over one academic term), although the exact amount of lectures, practicals and tutorials varies between individual modules.

Assessment

There are exams for most of the taught modules in May of each of the two academic years, while certain modules may also have a continuous assessment element. The research project starts in June and finishes towards the end of September. Part-time students will carry out their research project during the summer of their second academic year.

Careers

Graduates of this course offer a unique set of interdisciplinary skills making them highly attractive to employers at universities, research centres and in industry. Many research institutes have dedicated bioinformatics groups, while many 'wet biology' research groups employ bioinformaticians to help with data analyses and other bioinformatics problems. Industries employing bioinformaticians include the pharmaceutical industry, agricultural and biotechnology companies. For biology graduates returning to 'wet lab' biology after completing the MSc course, your newly acquired skills will be extremely useful. Non-biology graduates seeking non-biology positions will also find that having acquired interdisciplinary skills is of great benefit in getting a job.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. Read more
This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. It specialises in computational design, providing essential computing and engineering skills that allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

This interdisciplinary course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The course is ideal for students aiming for careers in industry or academia. We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering.

Computational Systems Biology is focused on the study of organisms from a holistic perspective. Computational design of biological systems is essential for allowing the construction of complex and large biological systems.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience essential for understanding systems biology. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, and Cell and Molecular Biosciences. The course also has strong links with Newcastle's Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and Nutrition (CISBAN).

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply.

The course is part of a suite of related programmes that also include:
-Bioinformatics MSc
-Synthetic Biology MSc
-Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics MSc

All four programmes share core modules, creating a tight-knit cohort. This encourages collaborations on projects undertaking interdisciplinary research.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you a real opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth in Systems Biology. You have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Placements

Students have a unique opportunity to complete a work placement with one of our industrial partners as part of their projects.

Previous students have found placements with organisations including:
-NHS Business Services Authority
-Waterstons
-Metropolitan Police
-Accenture
-IBM
-Network Rail
-Nissan
-GSK

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Read more
This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Computational design of biological systems is important as the field of synthetic biology grows. This allows the construction of complex and large biological systems.

While laboratory approaches to engineering biological systems are a major focus, the course specialises in computational design. This provides you with essential computing and engineering skills to allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply. It is ideal if you are aiming for careers in industry or academia.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding synthetic biology. The programme draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Biology, as well as the Medical Faculty and the Institute of Human Genetics.

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to meet the demands of industry and academia effectively. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems synthetic biology journals.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in Synthetic Biology. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry led projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Read more
This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is a discipline at the interface between biology and computing and is used in organismal biology, molecular biology and biomedicine. This programme focuses on using computers to glean new insights from DNA, RNA and protein sequence data and related data at the molecular level through data storage, mining, analysis and display - all of which form a core part of modern biology.

Why this programme

◾Our programme emphasises understanding core principles in practical bioinformatics and functional genomics, and then implementing that understanding in a series of practical-based elective courses in Semester 2 and in a summer research project.
◾You will benefit from being taught by scientists at the cutting edge of their field and you will get intensive, hands-on experience in an active research lab during the summer research project.
◾Bioinformatics and the 'Omics' technologies have evolved to play a fundamental role in almost all areas of biology and biomedicine.
◾Advanced biocomputing skills are now deemed essential for many PhD studentships/projects in molecular bioscience and biomedicine, and are of increasing importance for many other such projects.
◾The Semester 2 elective courses are built around real research scenarios, enabling you not only to gain practical experience of working with large molecular datasets, but also to see why each scenario uses the particular approaches it does and how to go about organizing and implementing appropriate analysis pipelines.
◾You will be based in the College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, an ideal environment in which to train in bioinformatics; our College has carried out internationally-recognised research in functional genomics and systems biology.
◾The new programme reflects the development and activities of 'Glasgow Polyomics'. Glasgow Polyomics is a world-class facility set up in 2012 to provide research services using microarray, proteomics, metabolomics and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Its scientists have pioneered the 'polyomics' approach, in which new insights come from the integration of data across different omics levels.
◾In addition, we have several world-renowned research centres at the University, such as the Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology and the Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, whose scientists do ground-breaking research employing bioinformatic approaches in the study of disease.
◾You will learn computer programming in courses run by staff in the internationally reputed School of Computing Science, in conjunction with their MSc in Information Technology.

Programme structure

Bioinformatics helps biologists gain new insights about genomes (genomics) and genes, about RNA expression products of genes (transcriptomics) and about proteins (proteomics); rapid advances have also been made in the study of cellular metabolites (metabolomics) and in a newer area: systems biology.

‘Polyomics’ involves the integration of data from these ‘functional genomics’ areas - genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics - to derive new insights about how biological systems function.

The programme structure is designed to equip students with understanding and hands-on experience of both computing and biological research practices relating to bioinformatics and functional genomics, to show students how the computing approaches and biological questions they are being used to answer are connected, and to give students an insight into new approaches for integration of data and analysis across the 'omics' domains.

On this programme, you will develop a range of computing and programming skills, as well as skills in data handling, analysis (including statistics) and interpretation, and you will be brought up to date with recent advances in biological science that have been informed by bioinformatics approaches.

The programme has the following overall structure
◾Core material - 60 credits, Semester 1, made up of 10, 15 and 20 credit courses.
◾Elective material - 60 credits, Semester 2, students select 4 courses (two 10 credit courses and two 20 credit courses) from those available.
◾Project - 60 credits, 14 weeks embedded in a research group over the summer.

Core and optional courses

◾Programming (Java)
◾Database Theory and Application
◾Foundations of Bioinformatics
◾Omics and Systems Approaches in Biology
◾These 4 courses are obligatory for those taking the MSc degree and the PgDip; they are also obligatory for those with no prior programming experience taking the PgCert.
◾60-credit summer research project lasting 14 weeks - this is also obligatory for those taking the MSc programme; normally this will be with one of the research laboratories in Glasgow associated with the programme, but there is also the opportunity to study in suitable laboratories in other parts of the world.

Optional courses include:
◾RNA-seq and next generation transcriptomics
◾Metagenomics
◾Pathogen Polyomics
◾Using Chemical Structure Databases in Drug Discovery for Protein Targets
◾Identification of disease-causing genetic variants
◾A range of more general biology and computing biology courses are also available in semester 2.

Career prospects

Most of our graduates embark on a research career path here in the UK or abroad using the skills they've acquired on our programme - these skills are now of primary relevance in many areas of modern biology and biomedicine. Many are successful in getting a PhD studentship. Others are employed as a core bioinformatician (now a career path within academia in its own right) or as a research assistant in a research group in basic biological or medical science. A postgraduate degree in bioinformatics is also valued by many employers in the life sciences sector - e.g. computing biology jobs in biotechnology/biosciences/neuroinformatics/pharma industry. Some of our graduates have entered science-related careers in scientific publishing or education; others have gone into computing-related jobs in non-bioscience industry or the public sector.

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Bioinformatics is changing as high throughput biological data collection becomes more Systems oriented. This means that employers are looking for people able to work across the traditional disciplines. Read more
Bioinformatics is changing as high throughput biological data collection becomes more Systems oriented. This means that employers are looking for people able to work across the traditional disciplines.

The MSc in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology at Manchester reflects these exciting developments, providing an integrated programme taught by researchers at the forefront of fields spanning Bioinformatics, Genomics and Systems Biology.

Bioinformatics has been an identifiable discipline for more than a decade, driven by the computational demands of high volumes of biological data. It incorporates both the development and application of algorithms to decipher biological relationships.

Enormous success has been achieved, for example in defining homologous families of sequences at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. However, our appreciation of function is changing rapidly as experimental analysis scales up to cellular and organismal viewpoints.

At these levels, we are interested in the properties of a network of interacting components in a system, as well as the components themselves. The concepts or Systems Biology and Bioinformatics complement each other, and both are addressed in this course.
This combination reflects the current skills sought in academic and industrial (eg pharmaceutical) settings. An important feature is the extent to which computational biology is concerned with finding patterns in biological data, and generating hypotheses that feed back into experiments.

Teaching is delivered by more than ten academic staff working in the fields of Bioinformatics, Genomics and Systems Biology, representing the breadth and depth of these areas.

Aims

The Bioinformatics and Systems Biology course provides students with theoretical and practical knowledge of methods to analyse and interpret the data generated by modern biology. This involves the appreciation of biochemistry and molecular biology, together with the techniques of IT and computer science that will prepare students for multidisciplinary careers in research.

To achieve this there are three main objectives:
-Provide biological background to the data types of Genomics, Proteomics and Metabolomics.
-Develop the computational and analytical understanding necessary as a platform for processing biological data.
-Demonstrate applications and worked examples in the fields of Bioinformatics and System Biology, integrating with student involvement through project work.

Coursework and assessment

Research projects provide experience in carrying through a substantive research project including the planning, execution and communication of original scientific research. They are assessed by written report.

Taught units involve lectures, practicals and problem classes and are assessed through both coursework and exam.

Course unit details

The taught part of the course runs from September to April and consists of 60 credits delivered from four 15 credit units.
-Bioinformatics
-Programming Skills
-Computational Systems Biology
-Experimental Design and Statistics

You will undertake two research project, each of 60 credits, in Semester 2 and the summer. Additionally tutorials and the Graduate Training Programme (skills development) will run through the whole programme.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a wide range of subject specific and transferable skills and gain extensive research experience. Around half of each class find PhD positions straight after the MSc, whilst others build upon their training to enter careers in biology and IT. The combination of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics addressed in this course reflects the current skills sought in academic and industrial (e.g. pharmaceutical) settings.

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. Read more
This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. It equips you with the skills to contribute to biologically realistic simulations of neural activity and developments. These are rapidly becoming the key focus of neuroinformatics research.

Newcastle is among the pioneers of neuroinformatics in the UK and hosted the £4m EPSRC-funded CARMEN project for managing and processing electrophysiology data. We are currently involved in a £10m EPSRC/Wellcome Trust-funded project. This is on implantable devices for epilepsy patients. We use computer simulations to inform about the stimulation location and protocol.

As the amount of data in the neurosciences increases, new tools for data storage and management are needed. These tools include cloud computing and workflows, as well as better descriptions of neuroscience data. Available data can inform computer simulations of neural dynamics and development. Parallel computing and new algorithms are needed in order to run large-scale simulations. There is high demand within academia as well as within industry involving healthcare informatics, brain-inspired computing, and brain-inspired hardware architectures.

The course is designed for students who have a good degree in the biological sciences (including medicine) or the physical sciences (computer science, mathematics, physics, engineering).

You will gain foundational skills in bioinformatics together with specialist skills such as computing programming, mathematics and molecular biology with a significant focus on the development of research skills.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding neuroinformatics. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, Cell and Molecular Biosciences and The Institute of Neuroscience. We also have strong links with the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF).

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to effectively meet the demands of industry and academia. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems neuroinformatics journals. Find out more about the neuroinformatics community at Newcastle University.

Graduates of this course may want to apply for PhD studies at the School of Computing Science. In the past, all graduates have continued their career as PhD students either at Newcastle University or elsewhere.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in neuroinformatics. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Delivery

The course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the School of Mathematics and Statistics and the School of Biology, and the institutes of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Genetic Medicine and Neuroscience.

We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering. Half of the course is taught and the remainder is dedicated to a research project. Our course structure is highly flexible. You can tailor your degree to your own skills and interests.

Semester one contains modules to build the basic grounding in, and understanding of, neuroinformatics theory and applications, together with necessary computational and numeric understanding to undertake more specialist modules next semester. Training in mathematics and statistics is also provided. Some of these modules are examined in January at the end of semester one.

Semester two begins with two modules that focus heavily on introducing subject-specific research skills. These two modules run sequentially, in a short but intensive mode that allows you time to focus on a single topic in depth. In the first semester two module, you will focus on learning about modelling of biochemical systems - essential material for understanding neural systems at a molecular level. The second module is selected from a number of options. There are up to four modules to choose from, allowing you to tailor the research training component of your degree to your preferences.

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Read more

MSc Bioinformatics

The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Bioinformaticians apply information technology to store, retrieve and manipulate these data and employ statistical methods capable of analysing large amounts of biological data to predict gene functions and to demonstrate relationships between genes and proteins.

Programme summary

DNA contains information about life, but how is this information used? Biological data, such as DNA and RNA sequence information produced by next-generation sequencing techniques, is accumulating at an unprecedented rate. Life scientists increasingly use bioinformatics resources to address their specific research questions. Bioinformaticians bridge the gap between complex biological research questions and this complex data. Bioinformaticians use and develop computational tools to predict gene function(s) and to demonstrate and model relationships between genes, proteins and metabolites in biological systems. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field that applies computational and statistical techniques to the classification, interpretation and integration of large-scale biological data sets. If different data types are joined then complex interactions in biological systems can be studied. The use of systems biology methods to study complex biological interactions offers a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation and enables control of biological systems on different scales. Systems biology approaches are therefore quickly gaining importance in many disciplines of life sciences, such as in applied biotechnology where these methods are now used to develop strategies for improving production in fermentation. Other examples include bioconversion and enzymatic synthesis, and in the study of human metabolism and its alterations where systems biology methods are applied to understand a variety of complex human diseases, including metabolic syndromes and cancer. The Wageningen Master programme focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics and systems biology approaches in many areas of the Life Sciences. To ensure that students acquire a high level of understanding of modelling and computing principles, the students are trained in the fundamentals of database management, computer programming, structural and functional genomics, proteomics and systems biology methods. This training includes advanced elective courses in molecular biology and biostatistics.

Thesis tracks

Bioinformatics
The bioinformatics track focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics knowledge and skills in molecular life sciences. It aims at creating and using bioinformatics resources to address specific research questions. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines such as molecular & cell biology, biotechnology, (human) genetics, health & medicine and environmental & biobased technology.

Systems Biology
The systems biology track focuses on the study of the complex interactions in biological systems and on the emerging properties derived from these. Systems biology approaches to complex biological problems offer a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation. It enables control of biological systems on completely different scales, ranging from the molecular cellular level to marine, plant, or animal ecosystems to a desired state. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines including molecular & cell biology, applied biotechnology, genetics, medicine and vaccine development, environmental and biobased technology.

Your future career

Bioinformatics and Systems Biology are new fast growing biology based interdisciplinary fields of research poorly served by the traditional curricula of Life Sciences. As demand has outpaced the supply of bioinformaticians, the first job after graduation is often a PhD project at a research institute or university. It is expected that five years after graduation, about one third will stay employed as a scientist at a university or research centre, while the others choose for careers at research-oriented pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies.

Alumnus Tom van den Bergh.
"It is sometimes difficult for doctors to diagnose genetic diseases caused by missense mutations. A missense mutation does not necessarily mean that you have the gene-associated disease and will become ill since not all missense mutations lead to appreciable protein changes." Tom created a database for Fabry’s disease for his final thesis. He wrote a computer programme that reads publications and stores all information about Fabry mutations in its database. Genetic researchers can, in turn, quickly access this database to determine if the mutation they found in a patient has already been addressed in literature and what the effects were.

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Plant Biotechnology

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The scheme is designed to introduce key, practice-based skills in statistics for Computational Biology. You will contribute knowledge to the design of Biological experiments to ensure that appropriate statistical analysis of experimental data is possible. Read more

About the course

The scheme is designed to introduce key, practice-based skills in statistics for Computational Biology. You will contribute knowledge to the design of Biological experiments to ensure that appropriate statistical analysis of experimental data is possible.

You will learn how to critically evaluate the application of specific statistical techniques to research problems in Computational Biology and then effectively interpret and report the results of analyses.

This master’s degree is all about computational biology and statistics and will be of interest to students that are looking for the minimum entry-level qualification for many excellent employment opportunities in pharmaceuticals, advanced agriculture and in public health.

The course is a collaboration between the departments of Computer Science, Maths and also the Institute of Biological Environmental and Rural Science. The study scheme will bring the departments together in research-led teaching in these areas and you will benefit from expertise and insight from these highly specialised departments. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014) it was found that 95% of the universities research was of an internationally recognised standard or higher.

Course structure and content

The duration of the course is twelve months full-time or 24 months part time. The academic year (September to September) is divided into three semesters: September to January; January to June; June to September. The course is available as a postgraduate certificate or diploma and can be taken part-time. Students must contact the department to discuss these options.

Core modules:

Frontiers in the Biosciences
Programming for Scientists
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists
Statistical Concepts, Methods and Tools
Machine Learning for Intelligent Systems
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists (1520)
Statistical Techniques for Computational Biology

Optional modules:

Dissertation

Contact Time

Approximately 10-14 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The programme comprises 180 credits. There are 120 credits of taught modules completed during Semester 1 and Semester 2. This is followed by a research dissertation (60 credits) in semester 3.

This degree will suit you:

- If you already have a background in one of biology, maths or computing and now want training in this exciting interdisciplinary area to enhance your current skills.

- If you have a high 2:2 degree or higher in a related discipline

- If you wish to gain academic expertise and practical experience in Computational Biology.

- If you wish to enter a career in Statistics for Computational Biology with opportunities to work in pharmaceuticals, advanced agriculture and public health.

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These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Read more
These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Medicine is currently involved in the largest and most ambitious IT project in the world - the capture and interpretation of electronic patient records. This information will make health care much more effective and can help spot new diseases early - whilst they can still be contained and controlled. At the heart of all these developments are data and knowledge - and a real need and demand for the skills and techniques that computer scientists can bring these problem areas. Biology and healthcare now provide some of the fastest growing and most challenging areas for computer scientists to apply their skills.

The Digital Biology pathway is centered around a central theme of Biohealth Informatics. The theme is specifically designed for computer scientists without any previous experience of medicine or biology and will help you to develop the core skills needed to work or research (as a computer scientist) in these rapidly evolving fields. This core theme is complemented by a range of other themes that allow students to develop additional skills which have important applications in healthcare and biology.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Digital Biology pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.
In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers with healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, and bio-health research institutes.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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This course will provide an in-depth understanding of the disease processes involved in malignancy and the opportunity to explore the scientific rationale for various therapeutic options. Read more
This course will provide an in-depth understanding of the disease processes involved in malignancy and the opportunity to explore the scientific rationale for various therapeutic options. It will allow you to link academic knowledge with the practical applications of cancer biology, with a focus on the latest advances in this field. This course is, therefore, excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers in hospital laboratories, commercial laboratories, cancer research, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions.

-You will be taught by active researchers and expert practitioners, and have the opportunity to work in industry with companies like GlaxoSmithKline, or at a research institute, such as the Institute of Cancer Research.
-Your research project can be carried out with one of our research groups or as part of an industrial placement (if you are a part-time student) at your place of work.
-Flexible study options (such as single modules) can be taken as part of a continuing professional development (CPD) programme.

What will you study?

You will be trained in science research methods and learn about the techniques used in molecular biology. You will study the biology of disease, tumour biology, immunology, molecular oncology, haematological malignancy, plus diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for cancer.

In addition to developing a comprehensive understanding of the principles and practice of core topics in current areas of medical science, you will gain an in-depth knowledge of oncology topics – and their relationship to other medical disciplines. You will also learn how to plan, carry out and report on a piece of independent scientific research.

Assessment

Coursework, written exam, research project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.
-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer
-Immunology and the Biology of Disease
-Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy
-Research Techniques and Scientific Communication
-Research Project

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.

Careers

Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. Read more
This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. The course provides advanced training in marine biology with a strong emphasis on practical training.

The course provides training addressing the following major themes:

Marine Ecology Skills
Habitat Ecology / Coastal Survey
Marine Fisheries
Marine Vertebrates
Marine Invertebrates
Research Design & Planning
Research Project / Dissertation
The programme is achieved through a series of compulsory modules encompassing theory, practical, private study and practical research.

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University has over 50 years experience of teaching at postgraduate level, and excellent teaching and research facilities for the study of the marine biology. Undergraduate teaching was graded excellent in the last Teaching Quality Assessment, and research was graded 4* in the Research Assessment Exercise. NERC has designated the School as a Centre of Excellence in Coastal Seas, Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography.

The MSc course in Marine Biology is one of a suite of 4 focused MSc courses in marine science run within the School. New students on this course are inducted to the University and School via an introductory course consisting of orientation through site tours, excursions and social events, and 5 weeks of quantifying biological variability, learning Information Technology, and practising presentation skills. Pre-sessional English language training courses are also available for overseas students.

The MSc course is managed by a course team comprising of the Course Director, Deputy Course Director and Postgraduate Course Administrator. The team report to the School Course Board, which in turn reports to the College of Natural Sciences. Each student has a personal tutor drawn from the teaching staff. The School has 30 academics teaching and researching across the marine science disciplines of Marine Biology (15), Biogeochemistry (2), Physical Oceanography (6) and Geological Oceanography (7) with a similar overall number of technical staff. Teaching on the MSc Marine Biology will be provided from 'in house' in the main, but additional teaching will be provided from the University's School of Biological Sciences and the National Museum of Wales.

The MSc course is housed in a fully serviced and dedicated postgraduate suite. The School is located on the shores of the Menai Strait which separates the Isle of Anglesey from the mainland. The Menai Strait is a proposed Statutory Marine Resource and EU Special Area of Conservation and there are unspoilt marine environments relatively close by.

The University's newly refurbished science library is located in nearby in Bangor. Specialist facilities in the School include temperate and tropical aquaria, satellite imaging processing and Geographical Information System computing, diving and field survey operations (including ROVs and sledges) and laboratories for benthic analysis, nutrition, microbiology, genetics, radiochemical analysis, stable isotopes, sediments and organic chemistry, scanning electron microscopy. An additional strength in our field teaching, is work at sea aboard the only ocean-going research vessel in the Higher Education sector (RV Prince Madog), which entered service in 2001.

MSc course students can benefit from the School's links with other institutions, especially for research project opportunities. Such links presently include the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, U.S.A., University of Mauritius, Catholic University Chile etc.

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Applications are invited for the MSc in Bioinformatics and Theoretical Systems. Biology. The programme will provide an interdisciplinary training and applications. Read more
Applications are invited for the MSc in Bioinformatics and Theoretical Systems
Biology. The programme will provide an interdisciplinary training and applications
are invited from students graduating from any biological, physical, computational
or mathematical first degree course. We are keen to encourage graduates from
numerical and physical sciences to join the course.

This programme will provide students with the necessary skills to produce effective
research in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology. The course, which is based at the
South Kensington campus, has been designed and is taught by staff from the Faculties
Natural Sciences, Engineering (Computing) and Medicine.

In the first term, students take the following courses:
• Bioinformatics and Systems Biology - Introduction to biology; advanced tools for the
analysis of biological data; and approaches for modelling biological systems
• Computing - Python, R, & Unix
• Mathematics & statistical inference - high level algorithms & analysis of large datasets

The remainder of the year is devoted to three full-time research projects,
undertaken under the supervision of researchers at Imperial College.

Wellcome Trust 4 year PhD Programme

Please note there is also a separate funded 4 year PhD programme, supported by the Wellcome Trust, which starts with this Master’s course and then progresses to a three year PhD. The closing date for application is Monday 5 December 2016 for admission in October 2017. Details, including how to apply, can be found at

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/wellcome-bioinformatics-phd/

Applicants must have or be expected to obtain at least an upper second honours
degree or an equivalent overseas qualification. Please be aware that we do not
do any 'wet lab' research as part of our courses, it is purely computer based. If you
are not an EU citizen, we do not have any finance for our MSc. For further details and the application procedure
see:

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