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Masters Degrees (Computing Biology)

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Research Project in Environmental Biology

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

MSc Project

+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Physics Project

+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Modelling Earth Systems

Satellite Remote Sensing

Climate Change – Past, Present and Future

Geographical Information Systems

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium

a number of CW and pulsed laser systems

scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

a Raman microscope

a 72 CPU parallel cluster

access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.



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The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. Read more
The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. It seeks to create, advance and apply computer/software-based solutions to solve formal and practical problems arising from the management and analysis of very large biological data sets. Applications include genome sequence analysis such as the human genome, the human microbiome, analysis of genetic variation within populations and analysis of gene expression patterns.

As part of the MSc course, you will carry out a three month research project in a research group in UCC or in an external university, research institute or industry. The programming and data handling skills that you will develop, along with your exposure to an interdisciplinary research environment, will be very attractive to employers. Graduates from the MSc will have a variety of career options including working in a research group in a university or research institute, industrial research, or pursuing a PhD.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr33/

Course Detail

This MSc course will provide theoretical education along with practical training to students who already have a BSc in a biological/life science, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering or a related degree.

The course has four different streams for biology, mathematics, statistics and computer science graduates. Graduates of related disciplines, such as engineering, physics, medicine, will be enrolled in the most appropriate stream. This allows graduates from different backgrounds to increase their knowledge and skills in areas in which they have not previously studied, with particular emphasis on hands-on expertise relevant to bioinformatics:

- Data analysis: basic statistical concepts, probability, multivariate analysis methods
- Programming/computing: hands-on Linux skills, basic computing skills and databases, computer system organisation, analysis of simple data structures and algorithms, programming concepts and practice, web applications programming
- Bioinformatics: homology searches, sequence alignment, motifs, phylogenetics, protein folding and structure prediction
- Systems biology: genome sequencing projects and genome analysis, functional genomics, metabolome modelling, regulatory networks, interactome, enzymes and pathways
- Mathematical modelling and simulation: use of discrete mathematics for bioinformatics such as graphs and trees, simulation of biosystems
- Research skills: individual research project, involving a placement within the university or in external research institutes, universities or industry.

Format

Full-time students must complete 12 taught modules and undertake a research project. Part-time students complete about six taught modules in each academic year and undertake the project in the second academic year. Each taught module consists of approximately 20 one-hour lectures (roughly two lectures per week over one academic term), as well as approximately 10 hours of practicals or tutorials (roughly one one-hour practical or tutorial per week over one academic term), although the exact amount of lectures, practicals and tutorials varies between individual modules.

Assessment

There are exams for most of the taught modules in May of each of the two academic years, while certain modules may also have a continuous assessment element. The research project starts in June and finishes towards the end of September. Part-time students will carry out their research project during the summer of their second academic year.

Careers

Graduates of this course offer a unique set of interdisciplinary skills making them highly attractive to employers at universities, research centres and in industry. Many research institutes have dedicated bioinformatics groups, while many 'wet biology' research groups employ bioinformaticians to help with data analyses and other bioinformatics problems. Industries employing bioinformaticians include the pharmaceutical industry, agricultural and biotechnology companies. For biology graduates returning to 'wet lab' biology after completing the MSc course, your newly acquired skills will be extremely useful. Non-biology graduates seeking non-biology positions will also find that having acquired interdisciplinary skills is of great benefit in getting a job.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. Read more

This course provides specialist skills in core systems biology with a focus on the development of computational and mathematical research skills. It specialises in computational design, providing essential computing and engineering skills that allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

This interdisciplinary course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The course is ideal for students aiming for careers in industry or academia. We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering.

Computational Systems Biology is focused on the study of organisms from a holistic perspective. Computational design of biological systems is essential for allowing the construction of complex and large biological systems.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience essential for understanding systems biology. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, and Cell and Molecular Biosciences. The course also has strong links with Newcastle's Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and Nutrition (CISBAN).

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply.

The course is part of a suite of related programmes that also include:

-Bioinformatics MSc

-Synthetic Biology MSc

-Computational Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics MSc

All four programmes share core modules, creating a tight-knit cohort. This encourages collaborations on projects undertaking interdisciplinary research.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you a real opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in depth in Systems Biology. You have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:

-With a research group at Newcastle University

-With an industrial sponsor

-With a research institute

-At your place of work

Placements

Students have a unique opportunity to complete a work placement with one of our industrial partners as part of their projects.

Previous students have found placements with organisations including:

-NHS Business Services Authority

-Waterstons

-Metropolitan Police

-Accenture

-IBM

-Network Rail

-Nissan

-GSK

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

Facilities

Facilities

You will have dedicated computing facilities in the School of Computing. You will have access to the latest tools for system analysis and development. For certain projects, special facilities for networking can be set up.

You will enjoy access to specialist IT facilities to support your studies, including:

  • a dedicated virtual Linux workstation
  • a dedicated virtual Windows workstation
  • high specification computers only for postgrduates
  • over 300 PC's running Windows, 120 just for postgraduates
  • over 300 Raspberry Pi devices 
  • high-performance supercomputers
  • the latest Windows operating system and development tools
  • 27" monitors with high resolution (2560X1440) display
  • high-capacity database servers
  • motion capture facilities
  • 3D printing facilities

You will have access to a Linux based website that you can customise with PHP hosting services.

We have moved to the new £58m purpose-built Urban Sciences Building. Our new building offers fantastic new facilities for our students and academic community. The building is part of Science Central, a £350 million project bringing together:

  • academia
  • the public sector
  • communities
  • business and industry.


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This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Read more
This course provides you with a balance of molecular biology, engineering, computing and modelling skills necessary for a career in synthetic biology. Computational design of biological systems is important as the field of synthetic biology grows. This allows the construction of complex and large biological systems.

While laboratory approaches to engineering biological systems are a major focus, the course specialises in computational design. This provides you with essential computing and engineering skills to allow you to develop software to program biological systems.

Our course is designed for students from both biological and computational backgrounds. Prior experience with computers or computer programming is not required. Students with mathematical, engineering or other scientific backgrounds are also welcome to apply. It is ideal if you are aiming for careers in industry or academia.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding synthetic biology. The programme draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Biology, as well as the Medical Faculty and the Institute of Human Genetics.

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to meet the demands of industry and academia effectively. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems synthetic biology journals.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in Synthetic Biology. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry led projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:
-With a research group at Newcastle University
-With an industrial sponsor
-With a research institute
-At your place of work

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. Read more

This course provides specialist expertise in core neuroinformatics (such as computing and biology) focusing on the development of research skills. It equips you with the skills to contribute to biologically realistic simulations of neural activity and developments. These are rapidly becoming the key focus of neuroinformatics research.

Newcastle is among the pioneers of neuroinformatics in the UK and hosted the £4m EPSRC-funded CARMEN project for managing and processing electrophysiology data. We are currently involved in a £10m EPSRC/Wellcome Trust-funded project. This is on implantable devices for epilepsy patients. We use computer simulations to inform about the stimulation location and protocol.

As the amount of data in the neurosciences increases, new tools for data storage and management are needed. These tools include cloud computing and workflows, as well as better descriptions of neuroscience data. Available data can inform computer simulations of neural dynamics and development. Parallel computing and new algorithms are needed in order to run large-scale simulations. There is high demand within academia as well as within industry involving healthcare informatics, brain-inspired computing, and brain-inspired hardware architectures.

The course is designed for students who have a good degree in the biological sciences (including medicine) or the physical sciences (computer science, mathematics, physics, engineering).

You will gain foundational skills in bioinformatics together with specialist skills such as computing programming, mathematics and molecular biology with a significant focus on the development of research skills.

We provide a unique, multidisciplinary experience that is essential for understanding neuroinformatics. The course draws together the highly-rated teaching and research expertise of our Schools of Computing Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Biology, Cell and Molecular Biosciences and The Institute of Neuroscience. We also have strong links with the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF).

Research is a large component of this course. The emphasis is on delivering the research training you will need in the future to effectively meet the demands of industry and academia. Newcastle's research in life sciences, computing and mathematics is internationally recognised.

The teaching staff are successful researchers in their field and publish regularly in highly-ranked systems neuroinformatics journals. Find out more about the neuroinformatics community at Newcastle University.

Graduates of this course may want to apply for PhD studies at the School of Computing Science. In the past, all graduates have continued their career as PhD students either at Newcastle University or elsewhere.

Our experienced and friendly staff are on hand to help you. You gain the experience of working in a team in an environment with the help, support and friendship of fellow students.

Project work

Your five month research project gives you real research experience in neuroinformatics. You will have the opportunity to work closely with a leading research team in the School and there are opportunities to work on industry lead projects. You will have one-to-one supervision from an experienced member of the faculty, supported with supervision from associated senior researchers and industry partners as required.

The project can be carried out:

-With a research group at Newcastle University

-With an industrial sponsor

-With a research institute

-At your place of work.

Delivery

The course is based in the School of Computing Science and taught jointly with the School of Mathematics and Statistics and the School of Biology, and the institutes of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Genetic Medicine and Neuroscience.

We cater for students with a range of backgrounds, including Life Sciences, Computing Science, Mathematics and Engineering. Half of the course is taught and the remainder is dedicated to a research project. Our course structure is highly flexible. You can tailor your degree to your own skills and interests.

Semester one contains modules to build the basic grounding in, and understanding of, neuroinformatics theory and applications, together with necessary computational and numeric understanding to undertake more specialist modules next semester. Training in mathematics and statistics is also provided. Some of these modules are examined in January at the end of semester one.

Semester two begins with two modules that focus heavily on introducing subject-specific research skills. These two modules run sequentially, in a short but intensive mode that allows you time to focus on a single topic in depth. In the first semester two module, you will focus on learning about modelling of biochemical systems - essential material for understanding neural systems at a molecular level. The second module is selected from a number of options. There are up to four modules to choose from, allowing you to tailor the research training component of your degree to your preferences.

Accreditation

We have a policy of seeking British Computer Society (BCS) accreditation for all of our degrees, so you can be assured that you will graduate with a degree that meets the standards set out by the IT industry. Studying a BCS-accredited degree provides the foundation for professional membership of the BCS on graduation and is the first step to becoming a chartered IT professional.

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

You will have dedicated computing facilities in the School of Computing. You will have access to the latest tools for system analysis and development. For certain projects, special facilities for networking can be set up.

You will enjoy access to specialist IT facilities to support your studies and access to a Linux based website that you can customise with PHP hosting services.



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Our MSc Bioinformatics and Systems Biology course looks at two concepts that complement each other and reflect the skills currently sought by employers in academia and industry. Read more

Our MSc Bioinformatics and Systems Biology course looks at two concepts that complement each other and reflect the skills currently sought by employers in academia and industry.

Bioinformatics is changing as high throughput biological data collection becomes more systems-oriented, with employers seeking people who can work across both disciplines.

Enormous success has been achieved in bioinformatics, such as in defining homologous families of sequences at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. However, our appreciation of function is changing rapidly as experimental analysis scales up to cellular and organismal viewpoints. 

At these levels, we are interested in the properties of a network of interacting components in a system, as well as the components themselves. 

Our MSc reflects these exciting developments, providing an integrated programme taught by researchers at the forefront of fields spanning bioinformatics, genomics and systems biology.

You will gain theoretical and practical knowledge of methods to analyse and interpret the data generated by modern biology. This involves the appreciation of biochemistry and molecular biology, together with IT and computer science techniques that will prepare you for multidisciplinary careers in research.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • provide a biological background to the data types of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics;
  • develop the computational and analytical understanding necessary as a platform for processing biological data;
  • demonstrate applications and worked examples in the fields of bioinformatics and system biology, integrating with student involvement through project work.

Special features

Expert teaching

Learn from researchers at the forefront of fields spanning bioinformatics, genomics and systems biology.

Research experience

Develop your research skills in preparation for a career in the biosciences industry or academic research.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods, including lectures, practicals, group discussions, problem classes and e-learning.

Research projects provide experience of carrying out a substantive research project, including the planning, execution and communication of original scientific research.

Find out more by visiting the postgraduate teaching and learning page.

Coursework and assessment

Research projects are assessed by written report. Taught units are assessed through both coursework and exams.

Course unit details

The taught part of the course runs from September to April and consists of 60 credits delivered from four 15-credit units:

  • Bioinformatics
  • Programming Skills
  • Computational Approaches to Biology
  • Experimental Design and Statistics.

You will undertake two research projects, each carrying 60 credits, in Semester 2 and the summer.

Additionally, tutorials and the Graduate Training Programme (skills development) will run through the whole course.

What our students say

"My final MSc project was conducted in collaboration with a cancer research group in Liverpool, aimed at facilitating targeted DNA sequencing of gene regions identified as being important for breast cancer.

This gave me an opportunity to work together with researchers outside of the university on a project that had real-world value."

Martin Gerner

Facilities

You will be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

Career opportunities

Our graduates acquire a wide range of subject-specific and transferable skills and extensive research experience.

The combination of systems biology and bioinformatics addressed in this course reflects the current skills sought in academic and industrial (eg pharmaceutical) settings.

Around half of each class find PhD positions straight after the MSc, while others build upon their training to enter careers in biology and IT.



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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The scheme is designed to introduce key, practice-based skills in statistics for Computational Biology. You will contribute knowledge to the design of Biological experiments to ensure that appropriate statistical analysis of experimental data is possible. Read more

About the course

The scheme is designed to introduce key, practice-based skills in statistics for Computational Biology. You will contribute knowledge to the design of Biological experiments to ensure that appropriate statistical analysis of experimental data is possible.

You will learn how to critically evaluate the application of specific statistical techniques to research problems in Computational Biology and then effectively interpret and report the results of analyses.

This master’s degree is all about computational biology and statistics and will be of interest to students that are looking for the minimum entry-level qualification for many excellent employment opportunities in pharmaceuticals, advanced agriculture and in public health.

The course is a collaboration between the departments of Computer Science, Maths and also the Institute of Biological Environmental and Rural Science. The study scheme will bring the departments together in research-led teaching in these areas and you will benefit from expertise and insight from these highly specialised departments. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014) it was found that 95% of the universities research was of an internationally recognised standard or higher.

Course structure and content

The duration of the course is twelve months full-time or 24 months part time. The academic year (September to September) is divided into three semesters: September to January; January to June; June to September. The course is available as a postgraduate certificate or diploma and can be taken part-time. Students must contact the department to discuss these options.

Core modules:

Frontiers in the Biosciences
Programming for Scientists
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists
Statistical Concepts, Methods and Tools
Machine Learning for Intelligent Systems
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists (1520)
Statistical Techniques for Computational Biology

Optional modules:

Dissertation

Contact Time

Approximately 10-14 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The programme comprises 180 credits. There are 120 credits of taught modules completed during Semester 1 and Semester 2. This is followed by a research dissertation (60 credits) in semester 3.

This degree will suit you:

- If you already have a background in one of biology, maths or computing and now want training in this exciting interdisciplinary area to enhance your current skills.

- If you have a high 2:2 degree or higher in a related discipline

- If you wish to gain academic expertise and practical experience in Computational Biology.

- If you wish to enter a career in Statistics for Computational Biology with opportunities to work in pharmaceuticals, advanced agriculture and public health.

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These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Read more

These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Medicine is currently involved in the largest and most ambitious IT project in the world - the capture and interpretation of electronic patient records. This information will make health care much more effective and can help spot new diseases early - whilst they can still be contained and controlled. At the heart of all these developments are data and knowledge - and a real need and demand for the skills and techniques that computer scientists can bring these problem areas. Biology and healthcare now provide some of the fastest growing and most challenging areas for computer scientists to apply their skills.

The Digital Biology pathway is centered around a central theme of Biohealth Informatics. The theme is specifically designed for computer scientists without any previous experience of medicine or biology and will help you to develop the core skills needed to work or research (as a computer scientist) in these rapidly evolving fields. This core theme is complemented by a range of other themes that allow students to develop additional skills which have important applications in healthcare and biology.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Digital Biology pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers with healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, and bio-health research institutes.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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This course will provide an in-depth understanding of the disease processes involved in malignancy and the opportunity to explore the scientific rationale for various therapeutic options. Read more
This course will provide an in-depth understanding of the disease processes involved in malignancy and the opportunity to explore the scientific rationale for various therapeutic options. It will allow you to link academic knowledge with the practical applications of cancer biology, with a focus on the latest advances in this field. This course is, therefore, excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers in hospital laboratories, commercial laboratories, cancer research, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions.

-You will be taught by active researchers and expert practitioners, and have the opportunity to work in industry with companies like GlaxoSmithKline, or at a research institute, such as the Institute of Cancer Research.
-Your research project can be carried out with one of our research groups or as part of an industrial placement (if you are a part-time student) at your place of work.
-Flexible study options (such as single modules) can be taken as part of a continuing professional development (CPD) programme.

What will you study?

You will be trained in science research methods and learn about the techniques used in molecular biology. You will study the biology of disease, tumour biology, immunology, molecular oncology, haematological malignancy, plus diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for cancer.

In addition to developing a comprehensive understanding of the principles and practice of core topics in current areas of medical science, you will gain an in-depth knowledge of oncology topics – and their relationship to other medical disciplines. You will also learn how to plan, carry out and report on a piece of independent scientific research.

Assessment

Coursework, written exam, research project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.
-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer
-Immunology and the Biology of Disease
-Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy
-Research Techniques and Scientific Communication
-Research Project

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.

Careers

Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. Read more
This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. The course provides advanced training in marine biology with a strong emphasis on practical training.

The course provides training addressing the following major themes:

Marine Ecology Skills
Habitat Ecology / Coastal Survey
Marine Fisheries
Marine Vertebrates
Marine Invertebrates
Research Design & Planning
Research Project / Dissertation
The programme is achieved through a series of compulsory modules encompassing theory, practical, private study and practical research.

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University has over 50 years experience of teaching at postgraduate level, and excellent teaching and research facilities for the study of the marine biology. Undergraduate teaching was graded excellent in the last Teaching Quality Assessment, and research was graded 4* in the Research Assessment Exercise. NERC has designated the School as a Centre of Excellence in Coastal Seas, Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography.

The MSc course in Marine Biology is one of a suite of 4 focused MSc courses in marine science run within the School. New students on this course are inducted to the University and School via an introductory course consisting of orientation through site tours, excursions and social events, and 5 weeks of quantifying biological variability, learning Information Technology, and practising presentation skills. Pre-sessional English language training courses are also available for overseas students.

The MSc course is managed by a course team comprising of the Course Director, Deputy Course Director and Postgraduate Course Administrator. The team report to the School Course Board, which in turn reports to the College of Natural Sciences. Each student has a personal tutor drawn from the teaching staff. The School has 30 academics teaching and researching across the marine science disciplines of Marine Biology (15), Biogeochemistry (2), Physical Oceanography (6) and Geological Oceanography (7) with a similar overall number of technical staff. Teaching on the MSc Marine Biology will be provided from 'in house' in the main, but additional teaching will be provided from the University's School of Biological Sciences and the National Museum of Wales.

The MSc course is housed in a fully serviced and dedicated postgraduate suite. The School is located on the shores of the Menai Strait which separates the Isle of Anglesey from the mainland. The Menai Strait is a proposed Statutory Marine Resource and EU Special Area of Conservation and there are unspoilt marine environments relatively close by.

The University's newly refurbished science library is located in nearby in Bangor. Specialist facilities in the School include temperate and tropical aquaria, satellite imaging processing and Geographical Information System computing, diving and field survey operations (including ROVs and sledges) and laboratories for benthic analysis, nutrition, microbiology, genetics, radiochemical analysis, stable isotopes, sediments and organic chemistry, scanning electron microscopy. An additional strength in our field teaching, is work at sea aboard the only ocean-going research vessel in the Higher Education sector (RV Prince Madog), which entered service in 2001.

MSc course students can benefit from the School's links with other institutions, especially for research project opportunities. Such links presently include the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, U.S.A., University of Mauritius, Catholic University Chile etc.

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Applications are invited for the MSc in Bioinformatics and Theoretical Systems. Biology. The programme will provide an interdisciplinary training and applications. Read more
Applications are invited for the MSc in Bioinformatics and Theoretical Systems
Biology. The programme will provide an interdisciplinary training and applications
are invited from students graduating from any biological, physical, computational
or mathematical first degree course. We are keen to encourage graduates from
numerical and physical sciences to join the course.

This programme will provide students with the necessary skills to produce effective
research in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology. The course, which is based at the
South Kensington campus, has been designed and is taught by staff from the Faculties
Natural Sciences, Engineering (Computing) and Medicine.

In the first term, students take the following courses:
• Bioinformatics and Systems Biology - Introduction to biology; advanced tools for the
analysis of biological data; and approaches for modelling biological systems
• Computing - Python, R, & Unix
• Mathematics & statistical inference - high level algorithms & analysis of large datasets

The remainder of the year is devoted to three full-time research projects,
undertaken under the supervision of researchers at Imperial College.

Wellcome Trust 4 year PhD Programme

Please note there is also a separate funded 4 year PhD programme, supported by the Wellcome Trust, which starts with this Master’s course and then progresses to a three year PhD. The closing date for application is Monday 5 December 2016 for admission in October 2017. Details, including how to apply, can be found at

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/wellcome-bioinformatics-phd/

Applicants must have or be expected to obtain at least an upper second honours
degree or an equivalent overseas qualification. Please be aware that we do not
do any 'wet lab' research as part of our courses, it is purely computer based. If you
are not an EU citizen, we do not have any finance for our MSc. For further details and the application procedure
see:

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This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Read more
This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Students will gain specialised skills in the molecular biology of infectious diseases, and will cover all aspects of major vector-borne diseases. The course also offers a thorough grounding in the systematics of medically important arthropods, processes regulating vector populations, and the biology of vector–parasite and vector–vertebrate interactions.

Graduates enter operational control programmes, applied basic research and academic fields. Students benefit from close interaction with staff who have extensive international expertise.

The James Busvine Memorial Medal and Prize, donated by Professor James Busvine in 1987, is awarded each year for outstanding performance.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/medic_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of the biology of vectors and intermediate hosts of human pathogens together with methods for their control

- describe the biology, pathogenesis and diagnosis of parasitic infections in humans and relate these to human health and disease control strategies

- demonstrate a range of specialised technical and analytical skills relevant to vectors and vector-borne diseases

- design and carry out a research project on biology or control of disease vectors, analyse and interpret the results and prepare a report including a critical literature review

- design, undertake and evaluate vector control interventions, and show written and verbal competence in communicating scientific information

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by three compulsory core modules:

- Parasitology & Entomology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies
- Critical Skills for Tropical Medicine

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Some modules can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Molecular Biology & Recombinant Techniques

- Slot 2:
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination (compulsory)

- Slot 4:
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Population Dynamics & Projections

- Slot 5:
Integrated Vector Management (compulsory)

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tbcd.html

Residential Field Trip

There is a compulsory one week field course, after the Term 3 examinations, on vector and parasite sampling and identification methods. The cost of £630 is included in the field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a field or laboratory research project on an appropriate entomological topic, for submission by early September.

Titles of some of the recent summer projects completed by students on this MSc

Due to our collaborative networking, students are given the opportunity to conduct research projects overseas. This unique experience provides students with skills that are highly desirable to potential employers. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html#sixth

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The Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation (IANC) is a world-leading institute dedicated to the theoretical and empirical study of adaptive processes in both artificial and biological systems. Read more

The Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation (IANC) is a world-leading institute dedicated to the theoretical and empirical study of adaptive processes in both artificial and biological systems. We are one of the UK’s largest and most prestigious academic teams in these fields.

We foster world-class interdisciplinary and collaborative research bringing together a range of disciplines.

Our research falls into three areas:

  • machine learning
  • computational neuroscience
  • computational biology

In machine learning we develop probabilistic methods that find patterns and structure in data, and apply them to scientific and technological problems. Applications include areas as diverse as astronomy, health sciences and computing.

In computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics we study how the brain processes information, and analyse and interpret data from neuroscientific experiments

The focus in the computational biology area is to develop computational strategies to store, analyse and model a variety of biological data (from protein measurements to insect behavioural data).

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up in 2008 to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

The research you will undertake at ANC is perfectly suited to a career in academia, where you’ll be able to use your knowledge to advance this important field. Some graduates take their skills into commercial research posts, and find success in creating systems that can be used in everyday applications.



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