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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more
Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Course description

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our student
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

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Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. Read more
Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. These on-line activities, many conducted beyond national boundaries, have opened up enormous opportunities for security attacks such as identity thefts, computer hackings, privacy breaches, technical sabotages, etc. Addressing security threats and attacks in this vast and complex distributed environment is an immensely challenging task.

The Computer Security pathway is centred round a core Security theme that introduces students to fundamental security topics that arise in the design, analysis, and implementation of networked and distributed systems. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they may apply their newly acquired skills. The pathway is designed for students who wish to specialize in the security aspect of the Information Technology field.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

Security plays a role in almost all areas where computers are being used, including, for example, finance, healthcare, consumer products, and public services. Thus students who have followed the Computer Security pathway will be ideally placed in any of these areas, especially in positions where they need to be aware of security issues and solutions.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. Read more
In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. The Web is, on the one hand, a network of interlinked computers, protocols, and software and, on the other hand, a socio-cultural phenomenon that influences law, the media, business, science, etc. To shape and work with the current and future forms of the Web, we need to understand its underlying design principles and concepts, relevant issues and techniques, and how these interact and influence each other. The fast changing nature of the Web means that such a deep understanding is essential to understand the latest developments and their potential.

The Advanced Web Technologies pathway is centred around a core theme of the same name, Advanced Web Technologies, and combines it with a choice of closely related yet complimentary themes, including Software Engineering 1 & 2, Making Sense of Complex Data, and Learning from Data. Students following this theme will gain an understanding and insight into the technologies that deliver the Web as we see it today. The topics covered include underlying languages and standards used to represent information on the web; techniques for understanding and managing data and information in a web context; and techniques and technology used to design and deliver web infrastructure.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Advanced Web Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Wed infrastructure, ranging from the obvious Web developers and system providers to basically all companies employing or developing Web technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?. This course is run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. Read more
Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?

This course is run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. As a Master's student, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP) (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/), an independent, research-driven University unit specialising in Linguistics and Natural Language Processing.

What will I learn?

Computational Linguistics (sometimes called Natural Language Processing) is the use of computers to study language. On the course, you will be able to study:
• How to use Python and the well-established NLTK library to process natural language texts;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• How to automatically translate text using computer programs;
• The use of computers to study features of language;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Computer techniques for automatically classifying natural language texts;
• Understand how Siri, Amazon Echo and Google Home etc. work;
• How to design an experiment that will thoroughly test your research questions.

You will be mentored through this programme by experienced and leading academics from the field. Join our research group today (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/) to become part of this team of leading researchers and academics and create your path to a career in computers and language!

What modules will I study?

When studied full-time, this course comprises of three semesters worth 60 credits each. Three modules will be studied in semesters one and two. During the third semester, students will undertake their research project and complete a 15,000 word dissertation on any aspect of Computational Linguistics.

The course covers all aspects of Computational Linguistics in line with current and leading work in research and industry, and is divided into the following taught modules:
1. Computer programming in Python
2. Corpus Linguistics in R
3. Machine translation and other natural language processing applications
4. Computational Linguistics
5. Translation tools for professional translators
6. Machine learning for language processing
7. Research methods and professional skills

Translation Tools for Professional Translators is an elective module that may be chosen in the Second Semester to replace another taught module for those students who are interested in pursuing careers in Translation.

Opportunities

- You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: our teaching staff at the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP) (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/) are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results.
- We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
- The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry from which you will be able to benefit;
- Find out about Dr. Vinita Nahar’s (past group member) innovative research into technology to detect Cyberbullying online http://www.itv.com/news/central/topic/cyber-bulling/.

How will I be assessed?

Assessments will include writing assignments on given topics, reports on practical work carried out in the class, portfolios, projects, oral presentations, and tests. The culmination of the study programme will be your 15,000-word dissertation, which will allow you to carry out an in-depth study of a chosen topic within the areas of corpus linguistics, language teaching, lexicography, or translation.

What skills will I gain?

The practical sessions include working with tools and software and developing programs based on the material taught in the lectures, allowing you to apply the technical skills you are learning. Some of the tasks are group based, feeding into the collaboration aspect of blended learning which enhances team-working skills, and some are done individually. Through portfolio building, you will be able to share your learning with other students. You will also be able to enhance your employability by sharing your online portfolio with prospective employers. Some assessments will require you to present your work to the rest of the class, enabling you to develop your presentation skills, which are useful in both academia and industry. Other transferable skills are the abilities to structure your thoughts, present your ideas clearly in writing and prepare texts for a wider audience. You will acquire these skills through assessed report and essay writing, and most of all through writing your dissertation.

Career path

Graduates of this course will be well-placed to continue their academic/research careers by applying for PhD positions within RIILP or at other leading centres for language and information processing. This degree will also enable graduates to access research and development positions within the language processing and human language technology industries, as well as in related areas such as translation, software development and information and communication technologies, depending on their specific module choices and dissertation topic. It should be noted that computer programming is a skill that is increasingly sought after by many companies from technological backgrounds and skills gained from this course will place graduates in a good position to take up such posts. Past graduates from this course have also gone on to successful careers specifically within the computer programming industry.

Student comments

"This course allowed me to see all the potential of Natural Language Processing - my favourite topic was Corpus Linguistics."

"I would recommend this course to people interested in linguistics or languages in general to show them that linguistics can also be paired with Computer Science and to those interested in Computer Science, for it could show them a new application to Computer Science."

"I would recommend this course to the individuals who seek to increase their knowledge of Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing. People who want to understand how, say, SIRI works, should join this course."

"Thanks to this course, I know what I want to do in the future; I want to be a Professor of Corpus Linguistics. I have several opportunities for a PhD in the US. I also learnt how to use a few programming languages, which is of great importance nowadays if one wants to find a job."

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This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. Read more
This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. It is suitable for those who wish to enhance their computing skills in order to improve their contribution to IT-related industry or to pursue R&D in academia or industry.

A student following the Advanced Computer Science course chooses two from about a dozen themes, each of which combines two related course units that build on top of each other. Certain combinations are integrated into specialised 'pathways' . A student who opts to follow the pathways will have the pathway specialism included in their degree certificate.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for worldwide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Our courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia. The MSc is also a route to further study at research level, or to careers in industrial or academic research.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering. Read more

Overview

Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering.
By its very nature, scientific computing is a fundamentally multidisciplinary subject. The various application areas give rise to mathematical models of the phenomena being studied.

Examples range in scale from the behaviour of cells in biology, to flow and combustion processes in a jet engine, to the formation and development of galaxies. Mathematics is used to formulate and analyse numerical methods for solving the equations that come from these applications.

Implementing the methods on modern, high performance computers requires good algorithm design to produce efficient and robust computer programs. Competence in scientific computing thus requires familiarity with a range of academic disciplines. The practitioner must, of course, be familiar with the application area of interest, but it is also necessary to understand something of the mathematics and computer science involved.

Whether you are interested in fundamental science, or a technical career in business or industry, it is clear that having expertise in scientific computing would be a valuable, if not essential asset. The question is: how does one acquire such expertise?

This course is one of a suite of MScs in Scientific Computation that are genuinely multidisciplinary in nature. These courses are taught by internationally leading experts in various application areas and in the core areas of mathematics and computing science, fully reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of the subject. The courses have been carefully designed to be accessible to anyone with a good first degree in science or engineering. They are excellent preparation either for research in an area where computational techniques play a significant role, or for a career in business or industry.

Key facts:
- This course is offered in collaboration with the School of Computer Science.
- It is one of a suite of courses focusing on scientific computation.
- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 50 full-time academic staff.
- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked 8th in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).

Modules

Advanced Techniques for Differential Equations

Computational Linear Algebra

Operations Research and Modelling

Programming for Scientific Computation

Scientific Computation Dissertation

Simulation for Computer Scientists

Stochastic Financial Modelling

Variational Methods

Vocational Mathematics

Data Mining Techniques and Applications

Mathematical Foundations of Programming

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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The MSc Law and Finance programme is offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (within the School of Law,) and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. Read more

Overview

The MSc Law and Finance programme is offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (within the School of Law,) and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. It will equip you with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of global economics and finance, and how this area is regulated by law. Such interdisciplinary skills are needed in order to manage the financial crisis and regulate the market effectively.

You can learn from and interact with some of the best academics and industry experts in their fields, many of whom advise and work with numerous leading institutions including the World Bank, national and international governments, the European Central bank, the IMF, the Bank of England, the European Union, the WTO, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Bloomberg, leading UK and International Banks, the FSA and leading International law and accountancy firms.

This programme will:

* Enhance your career options by allowing you to specialise in the highly sought after interdisciplinary areas of law, economics and finance.
* Allow you to tailor the programme to suit your interests by choosing one of four pathways: General; Banking and financial services; Law and financial regulation; or, Law and corporate finance.
* Provide you with the theory, knowledge, practical skills and latest developments required to work in both emerging and established economies in legal, banking, financial, governmental or research institutions.
* Provide professional module exemptions for the CISI (Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment) Masters in Wealth Management and the CBI Chartered Banker Diploma.

Why study your MSc in Law and Finance at Queen Mary?

The School of Law is firmly established as a centre of national and international excellence in legal studies and research, with leading academics in the field of banking, finance, regulation, insolvency, international commercial law and insurance law, including Professors Rosa Lastra, Philip Rawlings, George Walker, Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal and Dr Leon Vinokur.

High profile guest lecturers teaching on the courses have recently included Sean Hagan, General Counsel and Director of the Legal Department at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Graham Nicholson, Chief Legal Advisor, Bank of England, Mr Lee Buchheit, Partner, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, USA.

The School of Economics and Finance is one of the top economics schools in the country, with particular expertise in economic theory, econometrics and finance, and applied economics

You will have invaluable contributions from respected City practitioners and industry experts including banks, fund management businesses, who also teach students, bringing practical insights in to the classroom by applying the theory to real world scenarios.

You will have access to an unparalleled set of optional short courses designed to equip you with further practical training and key technical skills that are highly valued in the Financial Sector.

State-of-the-art facilities such as a virtual trading floor, which provides exclusive access to the latest technology and financial software used in the banking and finance industry, and access to specialised financial and economic databases and software used by economists in finance or in government for data analysis and simulation.

Facilities

You will have access to facilities and equipment at both Schools, including the Postgraduate School of Law Centre in Lincoln's Inn Fields, Holborn, based in the legal district of London, which comprises of workstations, wireless internet access, projectors and a common room.

As well as housing the Law Library and a European Documentation Centre, the Queen Mary Library at Mile End provides access to all the main British, European and international textbooks, law reports and periodicals and also offers one of the best commercial law collections in the country. Through the University of London College network, students have access to an unrivalled range of electronic law journals and databases.

In addition, Queen Mary provides free access to extensive online databases and collections including: Lexis, Nexis, Westlaw, Justis, Eur-lex, Hein-Online, Business Source Complete, Index to Legal Periodicals, International Court of Justice Reports, Kluwer Arbitration, Oxford Scholarship Online (Law), Reports of Patent, Design and Trademark Cases, UK Statute law database and United Nations Treaty Collection.

You will be able to access the well-stocked law library at the University of London’s Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS). The Institute, located at Russell Square, a few minutes’ walk from Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is one of the major law libraries worldwide. You will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House.

The School of Economics and Finance is able to offer excellent facilities and resources to its students.

IT Software
* Real Time Data/Trading Software: Queen Mary is one of the few UK universities offering training and access to both Reuters and Bloomberg trading terminals (in our designated trading room) as well as Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.
* Time Series Data Software: A full range of economic and financial data is available through DataStream, Macrobond and the WRDS platform (including Bankscope and CRSP).
* Statistical Analysis Software: A wide range of Econometric software including Eviews, Stata, Matlab, Gauss etc.

Computers Rooms
* 2 computers labs with 70 PC s and designated printers.

Trading Room
* Designated Trading Room offering training and access to Reuters, Bloomberg, Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.

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Explore techniques which will help you to become a creative, reflective designer and start your career as a chartered landscape architect. Read more
Explore techniques which will help you to become a creative, reflective designer and start your career as a chartered landscape architect.

We are experts in landscape architecture - our teaching experience spans more than 40 years. We also have a proven track record of helping graduates find rewarding careers.

We are dedicated to ensuring your course suits your needs, so you will be able to tailor your studies to your career aspirations. Through live projects and competitions, you will be tasked with responding to the numerous environmental challenges facing today's landscape architects.

You will benefit from our multimedia studios equipped with drawing boards, computers and model-making facilities, a state-of-the-art library, specialist workshops and a Landscape Resource Centre, which features experimental gardens.

This course is accredited by the Landscape Institute and will enable you to become a graduate member of the Institute.

We offer two routes for studying our course. Firstly, if you have an undergraduate degree in a related area to landscape architecture we will give you a thorough grounding in the subject, including design processes, urban and rural landscape design and landscape technology.

You will undertake a comprehensive landscape architecture project and join specialist design studios in ecological, community and urban design as well as studying contemporary landscape theory. At the end of the course you have the option to join an advanced landscape architecture studio which when complete provides you with a fully accredited MA and eligibility for graduate membership of the UK Landscape Institute. This can take a further six months for full-time and 12 months for part-time students.

The alternative route is if you already have an undergraduate qualification in Landscape Architecture. Our course is an opportunity to enrol for a fully accredited MALA or to top-up your qualification into an MA when you have completed a postgraduate diploma. You will have the opportunity to undertake a project of your choosing, and relevant to your interests, in order to achieve this.

Find out more about our course and the opportunities available to you as a landscape architect on the Be a Landscape Architect website (http://bealandscapearchitect.com/).

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University's results for the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit, which it entered for the first time, were impressive with 37% of its research being rated world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website - http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/landscapearchitecture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Our long-standing links with industry keep us up to date with job vacancies which has helped many of our graduates find careers in private design consultancies, local government agencies and environmental organisations in the UK and overseas.

- Landscape Architect
- Landscape Technician
- Urban Designer

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Your projects are supported through lectures, specialist workshops, small group seminars and one-to-one tutorials, together with UK and overseas study visits, including Amsterdam and Bordeaux. You will benefit from our multimedia studios equipped with drawing boards, computers and model-making facilities, a state-of-the-art library, specialist workshops and a Landscape Resource Centre including experimental gardens.

Our virtual studio (CAGD) provides a valuable learning environment particularly for part-time students and those studying at a distance. Our studio provides a forum for tutor support and feedback as well as opportunities for creative dialogue with colleagues. Many students choose to undertake 'live' or practice based projects working with local community organisations or for clients such as the Amsterdam planning department and you will become part of an extensive network of landscape practitioners and researchers.

Our course is fully accredited by the Landscape Institute which is the final university qualification that enables you to become a Graduate member of the Institute. A further examination is taken after working in professional practice before you become a Chartered Landscape Architect.

Core Modules

Landscape Architecture Studies
Gain the foundations to develop your knowledge, understanding and subject specific skills relating to the planning, design and stewardship of both the urban and rural outdoor environment.

Landscape & Urban Design Studios
Reflect on your recent work and learning needs selecting activities to help you enhance your professional development. Studio-based learning will be combined with lectures, seminars and fieldwork where necessary.

Contemporary Landscape Architecture Theory & Practice
Prepare for professional practice as you discover the trends and issues relevant to contemporary landscape architecture, including the scope of work, methods of approach and responsibilities of practising landscape architects.

Advanced Landscape Architecture Project
Apply key research and analysis techniques, theories, strategies and design processes to an urban or rural landscape design project of interest to you.

Personal Focus Portfolio
Compile a thorough portfolio that demonstrates your professional experience. Your portfolio will include a written reflection and your tutor will guide you as you determine its content.

Professor Mohammad Dastbaz

Dean, Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology

"We aim to provide innovation in curriculum, engagement with current industry practices and standards, and to give our students the experience of working with staff whose research has national and international reputation."

Mohammad is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology,having joined our University in June 2011 from the University of East London. A well published researcher, with over 50 refereed conference and Journal publications, his research profile includes many funded research programmes including JISC and EU FP7 projects. Mohammad’s first degree was in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He then went on to complete a PhD in the 'Design, Development and Evaluation of Multimedia Based Learning Systems' at Kingston University. In 1989 he set up one of the UK's first multimedia PC companies, 'Systems 2000'.

Facilities

- Landscape Resource Centre
This amazing outdoor learning space (an equivalent to which is not often found in other universities at present) houses both mature and freshly created gardens, as well as bio-diverse wildlife habitats.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This programme covers practical aspects of information systems development, modern management topics and professionalism in IT. If you already have experience of working in the IT industry, the programme aims to provide opportunities for broadening and deepening your knowledge and skills. Read more
This programme covers practical aspects of information systems development, modern management topics and professionalism in IT. If you already have experience of working in the IT industry, the programme aims to provide opportunities for broadening and deepening your knowledge and skills. If you do not have previous experience, the programme aims to provide a platform for a career in the IT industry.

You will gain an advanced level of understanding of computers, computing, software development, and how to design and implement software systems. The programme also covers the use of information systems in organisations, and the management of IT and information systems.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Provides graduates who have a first degree in a subject other than computing with knowledge of information systems, computing and management of IT.
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of problem analysis, evaluation of technology options, systems development, technology-driven organisational change and technology-based innovation.
Provides a foundation for continuing on to an MPhil/PhD programme in information systems or technology management.
You will have 24-hour access to several laboratories of networked PCs with a range of language compilers, database and other application software. We are connected, via the SuperJANET network, to the computers of other academic institutions in London, elsewhere in the UK and abroad.

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Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Read more
Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Aspects covered include questions such as how software can be designed to make use of new, ever more powerful (and often multicore) hardware, or how hardware can be designed to support certain software paradigms. The School of Computer Science is home to internationally renowned research groups working on these challenging tasks, and students following the Computer Systems Engineering pathway will have the opportunity to profit from their understanding of current technology and visions of how to exploit, for example, the formidable complexity of the billion transistor microchips that semiconductor technology will make commonplace over the next decade.

This pathway combines two themes, namely the Parallel Computing in the Mulit-core Era theme and the Mobile Computing theme. The former provides the student with techniques and tools to successfully develop concurrent multicore systems, while alleviating problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. The latter provides the student with an understanding of the current state of the art in computing to support mobility for telecommunications.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data. Read more
Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data: with the transition to the information age and the knowledge economy, data has become both increasingly central and critical to all activities. For example, imagine the huge amounts of genomic or patient data available electronically, and how the quality of their management can affect society.

The Data and Knowledge Management pathway allows students to take specialist themes concerned with methods and technologies for the adequate management of data and knowledge. The Managing Data theme focuses on the design, maintenance, and query processing of both structured and unstructured databases. The Learning from Data theme covers principles, algorithms, and technologies underlying machine learning, probabilistic modelling, and optimisation, while exposing students to relevant applications. The Advanced Web Technologies theme provides students with a deep understanding of the technologies that are being used to support the continuing evolution of the Web, including Semantic Web technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Data and Knowlege Management pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern data and knowledge management tools and technologies. This includes data and knowledge engineering positions in all areas where data is stored and managed electronically, i.e., in all areas, including the finance, retail, and healthcare sector.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Read more
These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Medicine is currently involved in the largest and most ambitious IT project in the world - the capture and interpretation of electronic patient records. This information will make health care much more effective and can help spot new diseases early - whilst they can still be contained and controlled. At the heart of all these developments are data and knowledge - and a real need and demand for the skills and techniques that computer scientists can bring these problem areas. Biology and healthcare now provide some of the fastest growing and most challenging areas for computer scientists to apply their skills.

The Digital Biology pathway is centered around a central theme of Biohealth Informatics. The theme is specifically designed for computer scientists without any previous experience of medicine or biology and will help you to develop the core skills needed to work or research (as a computer scientist) in these rapidly evolving fields. This core theme is complemented by a range of other themes that allow students to develop additional skills which have important applications in healthcare and biology.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Digital Biology pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.
In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers with healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, and bio-health research institutes.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. Read more
Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. The aim is to provide software and methodologies so that web resources, data in databases and raw data associated with programs can be processed and manipulated in a more intelligent way. This requires storing, understanding, manipulating and reasoning about the meaning of the data. Semantic technologies are increasingly being used in such varied applications as the semantic web, health care and biomedical domains, the life sciences, software/hardware industries and the automotive industry.

The Semantic Technologies pathway combines themes such as 'Data on the Web' with 'Ontology Engineering and Automated Reasoning'. These core offerings can be combined with any other theme. Good complementary themes are Data Engineering, Managing Data, Learning from Data, Security and Software Engineering.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Semantic Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in software companies or for healthcare providers who are using or developing Semantic Technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. Read more
Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. The consequences will be profound because parallel computational activities will need to be handled as the norm, rather than the exception; programmers of the future will need skills that are currently possessed by very few, due to the inherent complexities of parallel systems.

This pathway is centred round a core theme, Parallel Computing in the Multi-core Era , that introduces students to the aforementioned complexities, and provides techniques and tools that can alleviate the ensuing problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they might apply their newly learned skills.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Multi-Core Computing pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers in the software industry since they will acquire the necessary skills to design and develop software that makes the most out of state-of-the-art multi-core architectures. This includes the games industry, the financial sector, and all other areas in which high performance computing is key.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build… Read more
Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build software systems that are reliable, adaptable, usable, maintainable, etc, despite the fact that they are usually developed by large groups of people with different ideas, conceptualisations, or working styles, and against a tight schedule and possibly conflicting or unclear requirements. The understanding and mastering of these techniques is essential both for people who are part of this group and for those managing such a group or project.

The Software Engineering pathway combines two themes of the same name, Software Engineering 1 & 2. These themes covers both an overview of existing approaches to Software Engineering, and two particular approaches at the forefront of Software Engineering research and practice; Pattern-based and Component-based Software Development.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Software Engineering pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Software Engineering techniques and tools. This includes the obvious positions in the games industry, but also positions in finance, commerce, software project management, etc.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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