• Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of Bradford Featured Masters Courses
Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
"computer" AND "science" …×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Computer Science Course)

  • "computer" AND "science" AND "course" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 1,514
Order by 
Leiden University offers five different specialisations in the MSc programme in Computer Science. - Bioinformatics. - Computer Science and Advanced Data Analytics. Read more
Leiden University offers five different specialisations in the MSc programme in Computer Science:

- Bioinformatics
- Computer Science and Advanced Data Analytics
- Computer Science and Science Communication and Society
- Computer Science and Science-Based Business
- Data Science: Computer Science

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/computer-science/en/introduction

Course detail

Leiden University offers five different specialisations in the MSc programme in Computer Science.

Three specialisations are dedicated to the research areas of the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science:

- Computer Science and Advanced Data Analytics
- Bioinformatics
- Data Science for Computer Science

The other two specialisations are more broadly oriented, and combine at least one year of the computer science curriculum with training in which specific career opportunities in science-related professions can be explored:

- Computer Science and Science-Based Business.
- Computer Science and Science Communication and Society

Reasons to Choose Computer Science in Leiden:

- The programme offers stimulating, significant and innovative research in the field of Computer Science, including recent advances in Data Analytics and Natural Computing.

- Research at the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS) has an excellent international reputation.

- The strength of the programmes is the individual approach: an individually tailored programme will be designed for each student.

- The researchers and assistants are easily accessible. Students and staff work closely together in a research-oriented environment.

- Students with an MSc in Computer Science are admissible to a PhD programme.

- It provides students with a thorough computer science background that will allow them to pursue careers in research or industrial environments.

Careers

Masters of Science in Computer Science are not only professionally trained, they also have an analytical mind and problem-solving attitude. These qualities ensure a wide variety of career opportunities.

Master of Science students in Leiden work in a multinational environment and are being prepared to operate in international settings.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Science. Informatique at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Science: Informatique at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in Computer Science: Informatique is a Dual Degree scheme between Swansea University and Université Grenoble Alpes for computer science.

The MSc in Computer Science: Informatique Grenoble dual degree scheme is a two year programme that provides students with an opportunity to study in both Swansea, UK and Grenoble, France. One year of the Computer Science: Informatique programme students study at Swansea University and the second year of the programme students study at Université Grenoble Alpes. Upon successful completion of the programme, students will receive an M.Sc. in Advanced Computer Science from Swansea University and a Master from Université Grenoble Alpes.

Key Features of Computer Science: Informatique MSc

- We are top in the UK for career prospects [Guardian University Guide 2018]
- 5th in the UK overall [Guardian University Guide 2018]7th in the UK for student satisfaction with 98% [National Student Survey 2016]
- We are in the UK Top 10 for teaching quality [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]
- 12th in the UK overall and Top in Wales [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]
- 92% in graduate employment or further study six months after leaving University [HESA data 2014/15]
- UK TOP 20 for Research Excellence [Research Excellence Framework 2014]
- Our Project Fair allows students to present their work to local industry
- Strong links with industry
- £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)
- Top University in Wales [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]

Modules of Computer Science: Informatique MSc

Modules on the MSc in Computer Science: Informatique may include:

Critical Systems; IT-Security: Theory and Practice; Visual Analytics; Data Science Research Methods and Seminars; Big Data and Data Mining; Data Visualization; Human Computer Interaction; Big Data and Machine Learning; Web Application Development; High Performance Computing in C/C++; Software Testing; Graphics Processor Programming; Embedded System Design; Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists; Logic in Computer Science; Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition; High-Performance Computing in C/C++; Hardware and Devices; Modelling and Verification Techniques; Operating Systems and Architectures.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of our expansion, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer and mathematical sciences. This development is exciting news for Swansea Mathematics who are part of the vibrant and growing community of world-class research leaders drawn from computer and mathematical sciences.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Computer Science Graduates were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15].

Some example job titles include:

Software Engineer: Motorola Solutions
Change Coordinator: Logica
Software Developer/Engineer: NS Technology
Workflow Developer: Irwin Mitchell
IT Developer: Crimsan Consultants
Consultant: Crimsan Consultants
Programmer: Evil Twin Artworks
Web Developer & Web Support: VSI Thinking
Software Developer: Wireless Innovations
Associate Business Application Analyst: CDC Software
Software Developer: OpenBet Technologies
Technical Support Consultant: Alterian
Programming: Rock It
Software Developer: BMJ Group

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Swansea Computer Science ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

Read less
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry. Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Read more
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry

Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Graduates will have developed scientific and analytical skills which are highly valued in the computing, engineering, IT and business industries.

The course offers a mix of compulsory and elective courses, and a research dissertation, so you can focus your skill base and your potential career direction.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, whether it is within IT industry or as a function of other sectors, scientific computing and technical skills are in great demand and therefore highly valued. There are opportunities for placements and enterprise development.

Curriculum

The MSc Computer Science combines academic and practical course, consisting of eight taught courses (four compulsory and four elective) and a dissertation (final research project).

The Compulsory courses are:

· Computational Modelling and Simulation

· Algorithms

· Innovations in Computer Science

· Research Methods for Computer Science

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science

Elective courses include:

· Embedded Systems and Robotics

· Cloud Computing and Web Services

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

· Human Computer Interaction

· E-Business

Course Descriptions

· Computational Modelling and Simulation (compulsory – 15 credits): This course develops understanding and knowledge of the principles, techniques and design of computational modelling and their applications.

· Algorithms (compulsory - 15 credits): This course gives a firm grounding in the philosophy and evolution of algorithmic design and analysis for computer science, engineering and information systems.

· Innovations in Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): You will examine the particular research interests of Computer Science Department.

· Research Methods for Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): The course will expose you to the established techniques of research and enquiry that are used to extend, create and interpret knowledge in computer science

· Embedded Systems and Robotics (elective - 15 credits): This course will examine the Robotics Operating System and robotic programming languages, such as Urbi.

· Cloud Computing and Web Services (elective - 15 credits): You will study the concepts behind the idea of cloud computing and web services and gain practical knowledge of Azure, the .Net framework and C#.

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing (elective - 15 credits): You will examine mobile phone OSs (Android) and Windows Phone 7. You will learn how to develop software for these devices using JavaFX and C#/Silverlight.

· Human Computer Interaction (elective - 15 credits): Human computer interaction (HCI) is the study of interaction between people and computers and is the most multi-disciplinary module available in the MSc Computer Science.

·
* E-Business (elective - 15 credits): E-business encompasses, and is more than, e-commerce. You will examine e-commerce technology, such as the internet and web-based technologies.

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science (compulsory - 60 credits): This module will allow the students to develop a Masters level research project with the support of an academic supervisor.

Read less
The PGCE Information Technology and Computer Science enables ICT & computing professionals and graduates to become effective teachers of computing (curriculum previously called ICT and now including a strong Computer Science element) in secondary schools. Read more
The PGCE Information Technology and Computer Science enables ICT & computing professionals and graduates to become effective teachers of computing (curriculum previously called ICT and now including a strong Computer Science element) in secondary schools. The programme emphasises learning through critical reflection on theory and practice and discussion with colleagues.

The programme combines the theory and practice of education which is why students spend 60 days in College and 120 days in schools. The course is research-led and you will develop your knowledge of how pupils learn; how assessment can improve learning and teaching; how to plan lessons, and how to make appropriate use of computers and the Internet to teach effectively. The programme emphasises learning through critical reflection on theory and practice and discussion with colleagues.

Key Benefits

- Our Programme, judged 'Outstanding' by Ofsted, is taught by one of the strongest team of computer science education tutors in the country.

- The programme at King's is challenging and students are encouraged to take a critical view of policies and practice.

- It is a sociable course where you will be expected to work with others, discussing issues and problems about teaching.

- You have the opportunity to work with tutors who are actively engaged in research and development in computer science education.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/pgce-information-technology-and-computer-science.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme combines the theory and practice of education. We work in close partnership with schools in designing, delivering and assessing our course.

University based: You will work with other trainees and tutors in your subject area to consider the principles and practice of teaching your subject including curriculum design, the development of materials, classroom management and lesson planning. You will also work with trainees from other subjects in a programme of lectures and seminar groups to examine broad generic issues. During both secondary school placements there are occasional days in college for tutorials to support and monitor progress towards the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). There are cross-curricular research tasks and assignments.

School based: For 24 of the 36 weeks the training takes place in schools, mainly in two complementary secondary schools but with two short primary school experiences. This introduces you to recognising key constituents of good teaching, helps develop your own teaching skills and gain an understanding of how schools work and how children learn.

- Computer Science Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) courses -

Our Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses are intensive and flexible programmes for graduates in IT/computing who want to teach computer science but whose degree is not a direct match or whose specialist subject knowledge needs deepening prior to training for qualified teacher status (QTS). King's College London in conjunction with Queen Mary College, University of London, has designed a 12-unit SKE programme for computer science funded by the National College for Teaching and Leadership.

In order to be eligible for SKE (for which you may also obtain a bursary) you need an offer of a place on one of the King's PGCE programmes: either computer science or information technology and computer science. At the PGCE interview we will assess your SKE needs and determine which units you should take. Our SKE courses are also open to candidates who have PGCE offers, conditional on SKE, from other institutions. The programme runs between April and September. Please note that it is not intended for graduates in non-IT disciplines who wish to retrain in computer science: for that we recommend a conversion MSc programme (eg http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduates/programme/view/21).

- Course purpose -

Our programme is for computing/ICT specialists wishing to train to be teachers of pupils aged 11-18 in computing (previously called ICT) to GCSE level and information technology to A-level. A parallel programme, PGCE Computer Science, enables computer science specialists to train to be teach computer science to A-level. The programme will lead to the Department for Education's (HM Government) Standards for QTS which are assessed through teaching practice observation, portfolios and written assignments.

- Course format and assessment -

The 45-credit honours-level module will be assessed by a combination of a written portfolio (equivalent to 8,000 words) and assessment of your teaching practice against the teaching standards as set out by the government’s Department for Education. Progress in meeting the teaching standards will be monitored through three progress reports that will be completed by staff at the placement school.

The 30-credit master’s-level modules will each be assessed by an 8,000-word written assignment.

The 15-credit honours-level module will be assessed by a 4,000-word written assignment.

Career prospects

The majority of trainees go into teaching or other areas of education: many become heads of departments or members of senior management teams; some take up careers in educational administration in the advisory or inspection services.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Read less
The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. Read more
The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. The program provides students with an understanding of the theory and practice of automating the representation, storage and processing of information, while emphasizing experimental research to design and engineer a wide variety of computer and information systems.

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. If you have bachelor's degree in computer science or a related field, you're invited to apply for admission to our MSCS program.

The doctoral program leads to a PhD in Computer Science. Students admitted into the program typically have a master's degree in computer science or a closely related discipline. Students with a bachelor's degree and a strong academic record may also be directly admitted.

Recent doctoral graduates have gone on to careers in as software engineering at Intel, eBay, Cisco Systems, positions at Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Twitter, Bloomberg, the Air Force Research Lab, and the U.S. Census. Academic placements include assistant professorships at California State University at Fullerton, Valdosta State University, and Harran University, Turkey.

The Master's program leads to a Master of Science in Computer Science. It is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. Holders of the baccalaureate degree in computer science or a related field are invited to apply for admission to the MSCS program. Students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science may be required to complete some preparatory work in addition to fulfilling the requirements listed below.
Program requirements include four core courses taken over the first two semesters of study. These courses are Computer Organization and Architecture, Operating Systems, Programming Languages and Design & Analysis of Computer Algorithms. Three graduating options are offered: a thesis option, a project option and a comprehensive exam. Beyond the 4 core courses, these options require students to complete 4, 5 and 6 elective courses, respectively, chosen from a broad set of courses offered by the Department.

Applicant Qualifications

- Undergraduate major in computer science or related field desirable for admission
- Applicants are additionally expected to have completed coursework in the following areas:
*Algorithms and data structures
*Computer organization and architecture
*Operating systems
*Programming languages
*Discrete mathematics

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation (three letters of recommendation for PhD applicants)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Read less
One of a range of degrees from the taught Masters Programme at the School of Computer Science our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science. Read more
One of a range of degrees from the taught Masters Programme at the School of Computer Science our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science. It is mostly taught separately from the other courses. It intensively covers a broad range of the key principles and techniques of computer science.

About the course

There is an emphasis on software development, in particular when applied to solving problems in other disciplines. Depending on the modules chosen, it can lead to a career in areas such as systems development, IT management, or the deployment of advanced applications in specific disciplines.

Why choose this course?

-This MSc is available with an optional one year industry placement. The 'with placement' programmes give you additional industrial experience by applying the skills you have learned throughout your studies
-A flexible course, part of our postgraduate master's programme in Computer Science, with two different routes
-Our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science
-Taught by a highly-regarded and long-established computer science department with strong links to business
-Half the research outputs in Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire have been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

Careers

Our masters programme is designed to give Computer Science graduates the specialist, up-to-date skills and knowledge sought after by employers, whether in business, industry, government or research. This particular course will prepare you for a career such as a software engineer, developer or project manager.

Teaching methods

Classes consist of lectures, small group seminars, and practical work in our well-equipped laboratories. We use modern, industry-standard software wherever possible. There are specialist facilities for networking and multimedia and a project laboratory especially for masters students. In addition to scheduled classes, you will be expected a significant amount of time in self-study, taking advantage of the extensive and up-to-date facilities. These include the Learning Resource Centres, open 24x7, with 1,500 computer workstations and wifi access, Studynet our versatile online study environment usable on and off campus, and open access to our labs.

Work Placement

This MSc is available with an optional one year industry placement. The 'with placement' programmes give you additional industrial experience by applying the skills you have learned throughout your studies.

This offers you the opportunity to work for one year in a highly professional and stimulating environment. You will be a full time employee in a company earning a salary and will learn new skills that can't be taught at University. During the placement, you will be able to gain further insight into industrial practice that you can take forward into your individual project.

We will provide excellent academic and personal support during both your academic and placement periods together with comprehensive careers guidance from our very experienced dedicated Careers and Placements Service.

Although the responsibility for finding a placement is with you, our Careers and Placements Service maintains a wide variety of employers who offer placement opportunities and organise special training sessions to help you secure a placement, from job application to the interview. Optional one-to-one consultations are also available.

In order to qualify for the placement period you must maintain an overall average pass mark of not less than 60% across all modules studied in semester ‘A’.

Structure

Year 1
Core Modules
-Computer Architectures
-Computer Science Masters Project
-Operating Systems and Networks
-Preparation for Placement
-Professional Issues
-Professional Work Placement for MSc Computer Science
-Programming and Program Design
-Software Development Exercise
-Systems Modelling

Year 2
Core Modules
-Computer Science Masters Project

Read less
The MSc in Computer Science is for graduates from a different discipline interested in a career in computer science. Computing underpins much of our professional and personal lives. Read more
The MSc in Computer Science is for graduates from a different discipline interested in a career in computer science.

Why study computer science with us?

Computing underpins much of our professional and personal lives. There is a growing need for individuals trained in one discipline who are also skilled in computer science.

If you are a graduate with a non-computing first degree then our MSc will:

- provide you with a sound foundation in practical and theoretical aspects of computer science
- help you change career, with skills desirable to a huge number of industries
- enhance your employability with transferable skills
- prepare you for PhD study

No prior background in computer science is necessary.

What will I learn?

Semester one offers a broad overview of computer science through a series of core units.

Semester two focusses on advanced and emerging areas of computer science. You will have the opportunity to specialise in one or more areas of the discipline.

The final semester is for your dissertation. You will:

- demonstrate the knowledge, skills and reflective insights you have have gained
- apply them to the investigation and/or development of new software systems.

Visit the Department of Computer Science (http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/) for further information on the department.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/msc-computer-science/index.html

Programme structure

The programme covers three semesters.

In the first semester we immerse students in the practical and theoretical foundations of the discipline.

In the second semester we build upon these foundations allowing students to specialise in one or more areas of the discipline.

The third semester is dedicated to a dissertation. Students combine their acquired knowledge to produce a novel software element or conduct novel research and critique their achievements. Please visit our research pages for a an overview of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/research/).

Career opportunities

Opportunities are extensive and we expect our graduates to move into computing careers in the leading:
- computer companies
- IT consultancy firms
- banks
- companies
- agencies
- educational establishments

About the department

The new Department of Computer Science began life in August 2001, emerging from the Computing Group of the Department of Mathematical Sciences. It is a research-led department with a strong record in interdisciplinary research and postgraduate teaching.

MSc
Our Masters programmes are designed to give you a wide range of knowledge so that you can build a career in the fast-moving industry of computing. The programmes are taught by recognised experts in each field, offering you, the student, a cutting-edge experience and a qualification which is both academic and commercially relevant. You will be exposed to the latest science and technology in your chosen specialist area, to complement previously-gained knowledge and skills from your undergraduate degree.

MPhil/PhD
The Department supports a strategic range of computer science research at PhD level and beyond. Our main research interests include Human Computer Interaction, Visual Computing, Mathematical Foundations, and Intelligent Systems. Research is pursued both in fundamental theoretical development and a range of application areas.

EngD in Digital Media
The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) in Digital Media is an alternative to the traditional PhD for students who want a career in industry. A four-year programme combines PhD-level research projects with taught courses, and students spend about 75% of their time working directly with a company.

Facilities and equipment
LAN and WAN, state-of-the-art HCI laboratory, audio laboratory.

International and industrial links
The Department has active collaborations with academics in leading universities in Europe, Australasia, the USA and Japan. Strong links with industry, e.g. HP labs, Airbus, Qinetiq, Westland, Toshiba and Vodafone.

Careers information
High employment records for undergraduate and postgraduate students. Good links with employers

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

Read less
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Read less
With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. Read more

About the Program

With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or a minor in computer science. Our programme even is free of tuition. The medium of instruction is English.

More information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws

Employment Outlook

Graduates from the institute WeST have found interesting positions at successful companies, started their own businesses or continued towards a Ph.D. Institute WeST has a limited number of places available each year for pursueing a Ph.D. If you excel earning a master's degree in Web Science you will be in pole position for continuing with doctoral studies.

Studying in Koblenz

Koblenz is one of the oldest and most attractive cities in Germany with its surroundings honoured as UNESCO World Cultural Heritage. The university of Koblenz-Landau has close contacts to leading companies, offering possibilities for internships, collaboration and project experiences.

Program Structure

Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

The curriculum is organized in seven module groups:

Foundations of Web Science (two modules) establishes the main idea of Web Science. It provides an interdisciplinary primary view of the web and of more abstract web structures.

The Computer Science track (three modules) teaches the essential technical aspects, namely web engineering, semantic web and web retrieval.

Web and Society (two out of four modules) considers interaction of the web and different user groups: citizens, customers, entrepreneurs, and interest groups.

The module group Elective Courses in Computer Science provides a wide range of technical topics. Modules may be choosen freely from all Master courses in computer science with relevance to the web given at the University of Koblenz-Landau (three modules or more, mininum 18 ECTS).

Elective Interdisciplinary Courses contain web-related modules offered by our university from other disciplines (such as economy, social sciences, linguistics, anthropology, communication theory etc.). Students have to freely elect at least two modules (12 ECTS).

Topics for seminars and research lab can be freely chosen from Web Science subjects. Furthermore, this module group contains a social skills and leadership training..

The topic of the master's thesis can also be freely chosen from any Web Science subjects.

More information about the curriculum can also be found under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/curriculum

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification -

It is a legal requirement in Germany that students own a Higher education entrance qualification („Hochschulzugangsberechtigung“) respectively a Master entrance qualification („Masterzugangsberechtigung“), proven by school leaving certificates or studies completed at secondary education level.

Entrance qualification is not checked by us, but uni-assist (see application process), therefore please refrain from asking us if your diploma will be accepted. Uni-assist provides some further information on higher education entrance qualification.

Academic Background in Computer Science -

You need some academic background in computer science, such as a

bachelor's degree in computer science, business informatics, Computervisualistik (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau), Information management (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau until 2012 if 60 ECTS in computer science were acquired) or similar.

Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) can apply, too. Here we have to make a decision on a by-case-basis. To get an educated guess please contact the course guidance.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. If you are unshure if your academic background fulfils our requirements, do not hesitate to contact us: . Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not qualify you for our programme.

Sufficient Grades in Previous Studies -

The German grading system ranges from 1 ("very good") to 6 ("insufficient"). Lower numbers mean better grades. To be eligible for our programme, the grades from your previous studies must be between 1 and 2.5. Grade conversion into the German system is done by uni-assist (cf. application procedure), so we cannot tell you if your GPA fis sufficient. For a first, non-binding estimation on your eligibility you might want to check the calculator provided by the University of Paderborn.

English Language Proficiency -

The medium of instruction for all required courses is English, some additional electives can be taken in German. Thus, we require a certain level of English proficiency such that studies can be undertaken successfully. Thus, a standardised language certificate is required – proof that your previous studies were held in English are not sufficient and not negiotiable. We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

a TOEFL result of at least 79 (internet based), 550 (paper based) or 213 (computer based)

IELTS test with 6.5 points mininum

Cambridge certificate at level B2 or higher (find an exam center)

Proficiency of German language is not a requirement for application. However, additional elective courses are available in German, and we recommend to learn some basic German for daily life. Some hints on learning German can be found at Deutsche Welle.

Motivational Letter -

Applicants need to supply a motivational letter. Please do not send lenghty standard letters describing your general interest in computer science and your appreciation of the German education system. Instead, refer only to our specific programme and follow these guidelines:

Length should be between 150 and 300 words.

The letter must be written in English.

Specify what you learnt and found particularly interesting in your previous studies or practical experiences. Tell us how you want to deepen these previous experience in our master's programme. You can also describe what you expect to learn here for your future job. You should always refer to our curriculum, especially the module groups Foundations of Web Science, Major Subject Computer Science und Major Subject Web and Society. Make clear that you know our curriculum and point out why you have chosen our programme above others.

Further information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/requirements

Read less
Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains. Read more
Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains.

We offer a two-year Master of Science in Computer Science centered on this emerging field. The backbone of the program is constituted by three core units on advanced data management, machine learning, and high performance computing. Leveraging on the expertise of our faculty, the rest of the program is organised in four tracks, Business Intelligence, Health & Life Sciences, Pervasive Computing, and Visual Computing, each providing a solid grounding in data science and engineering as well as a firm grasp of the domain of interest.

By blending standard classes with recitations and lab sessions our program ensures that each student masters the theoretical foundations and acquires hands-on experience in each subject. In most units credit is obtained by working on a final project. Additional credit is also gained through short-term internship in the industry or in a research lab. The master thesis is worth 25% of the total credit.

TRACKS

• Business Intelligence. This track builds on first hand knowledge of business management and fundamentals of data warehousing, and focuses on data mining, graph analytics, information visualisation, and issues related to data protection and privacy.
• Health & Life Sciences. Starting from core knowledge of signal and image processing, bioinformatics and computational biology, this track covers methods for biomedical image reconstruction, computational neuroengineering, well-being technologies and data protection and privacy.
• Pervasive Computing. Security and ubiquitous computing set the scene for this track which deals with data semantics, large scale software engineering, graph analytics and data protection and privacy.
• Visual Computing. This track lays the basics of signal & image processing and of computer graphics & augmented reality, and covers human computer interaction, computational vision, data visualisation, and computer games.

PROSPECTIVE CAREER

Senior expert in Data Science and Engineering. You will be at the forefront of the high-tech job market since all big companies are investing on data driven approaches for decision making and planning. The Business Intelligence area is highly regarded by consulting companies and large enterprises, while the Health and Life Sciences track is mainly oriented toward biomedical industry and research institutes. Both the Pervasive and the Visual Computing tracks are close to the interests of software companies. For all tracks a job in a start-up company or a career on your own are always in order.

Senior computer scientist.. By personalizing your plan of study you can keep open all the highly qualified job options in software companies.

Further graduate studies.. In all cases, you will be fully qualified to pursue your graduate studies toward a PhD in Computer Science.

Read less
The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation. Read more
The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation.

The purpose of the programs is to provide the intellectual and practical tools that professionals will need either to pursue or further careers as computer scientists in industry or to pursue a doctorate degree in computer science.

Curriculum

The Master's curriculum is designed with these goals in mind:

• The core modules provide a solid foundation in the fundamental principles of computer science.
• The 500-level electives give exposure to a variety of Computer Science subject areas.
• The 600-level advanced courses give exposure to research topics of current interest and provide in-depth knowledge.

Core: All four modules (12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC520 — Foundations of Computer Science
CSC530 — Data Structures
CSC540 — Programming Languages
CSC560 — Analysis of Algorithms

Electives: At least four 500-level electives (at least 12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC525 — Operating Systems
CSC535 — Networks and Data Communications
CSC545 — Database System Concepts
CSC555 — Software Engineering
CSC565 — Compiler Design
CSC570 — Computer Architecture
CSC573 — Graphics and User Interfaces
CSC575 — Artificial Intelligence
CSC581 — Topics in Computer Science
CSC582 — Topics in Information Systems
CSC583 — Topics in Computer Security
CSC584 — Topics in Web Technology
CSC585 — User Interfaces in Java
CSC586 — System Administration and Security
CSC587 — Web Services
CSC588 — Wireless Programming and Security
CSC589 — UML and Pattern Design

Advanced: At least two 600-level (at least 6 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC600 — Advanced Seminar
CSC603 — Advanced Seminar in Computer Security
CSC604 — Advanced Seminar in Web Technology
CSC605 — Internship
CSC610 — Independent Research
CSC620 — Master's Thesis

To find out more information about the curriculum please visit the website:

http://www.cs.wcupa.edu/grad/masters.html

Internships

West Chester University students may register for a Computer Science Internship and work part time or full time in Summer II or during regular semesters. Students who are not Computer Science majors should use CSC300 (3 credits). Computer Science majors should use CSC400 (6 credits); of the 6 credits, 3 credits can be used to satisfy the major requirements, and the other 3 credits satisfy general electives. Computer Science graduate students should use the course number CSC605 (3 credits).

For more information please visit the website:

https://www.wcupa.edu/internships/

Read less
The Higher Diploma in Science (Computer Science) is a postgraduate course intended for graduates whose primary degree included 3-year’s study of Computing. Read more

Overview

The Higher Diploma in Science (Computer Science) is a postgraduate course intended for graduates whose primary degree included 3-year’s study of Computing. On completion of the course participants would be expected to reach a level of competence equivalent to that of a four year BSc graduate in Computer Science.

Course Structure

Students choose, subject to module prerequisites, 9 modules; modules chosen must not have been covered at this level in a previous qualification. In addition a project is required.

Career Options

The course brings graduates to a level equivalent to a 4-year degree in computer science and to apply for jobs intended for such graduates. Graduates will be eligible to apply for further postgraduate study including taught MSc in Computer Science and MSc/PhD by research.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/computer-science/our-courses/higher-diploma-science-computer-science#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
The University of Sunderland is the longest established provider of IT and Computer Science Education. The PGCE Computer Science equips you to share your interest in computer science with young people and inspire them to realise their potential. Read more
The University of Sunderland is the longest established provider of IT and Computer Science Education.

Course overview

The PGCE Computer Science equips you to share your interest in computer science with young people and inspire them to realise their potential. A growing number of pupils are choosing to take computer science at GCSE and A Level, which means there is a rising demand for great computer science teachers.

Sunderland has a heritage of teacher training which dates back to 1908. The course prepares you for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which is an essential qualification for teaching in state-maintained schools.

This programme is also offered as part of our School Direct route.

Given the current shortage of computer science teachers, the Government is offering extra incentives to attract more graduates into teaching the subject. Financial incentives are available for those who train in 2016/17, go to The Department for Education website for more information.

The course has two strands. The first strand is based at the University and provides a solid grounding in theory and practical issues. The second strand is based in partner schools where you will undertake practical teaching experience.

In addition to Government bursaries, students on this course are also eligible for many of the University of Sunderland scholarships. Full details of the Sunderland scholarships available to you can be found on the Entry requirements tab of this course.

Course content

This course blends academic studies at the University with hands-on experience at our partner schools.

PGCE Course content
September – January
-Full-time teaching practice placement (school or college)
-Master's Module 1: Development of Learning: A Case Study – you will identify an educational intervention and explore its use, impact and influence upon the learning of one or more pupils
-Subject Studies related module

January – June
-Full-time teaching practice placement (school or college)
-Master's Module 2: Negotiated Individual Study in Education – you will undertake a piece of action research into an educational issue
-Subject Studies related module

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities on-campus and strong links with schools and colleges in the area.

Course location
This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Secondary partnership
The University of Sunderland forms part of a secondary partnership that includes more than 230 schools and colleges. This means that there are wide opportunities for placements during the professional year.

Sunderland’s outstanding IT facilities include the David Goldman Informatics Centre, which has hundreds of computers so it’s easy to find a free workstation with the software you need. In addition, the Remote Global Desktop Service allows access to our software whether you're using the WiFi in our halls of residence or you're at home.

We host high-performance computing platforms, including a Beowulf cluster and a grid distributed system, for concurrent processing of complex computational tasks. We also have the equipment and licenses for our own public mobile cellular network.
-We are the longest established provider of IT and Computer Science Education both at Undergraduate level and Postgraduate level in the North East
-Although we offer both PGCE and School Direct courses, we offer the only non-School Direct PGCE within the North East
-If you need to undertake a Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses we offer one which provides seamless transition onto our Programmes (we are the only North East provider)
-We have good links to Sunderland Software City which helps to inform our Trainee Teachers about the Employment opportunities available in Computing for the pupils they will teach

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on education and computing topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals. Resources include the EBSCO Professional Development Collection, which is a specialised collection of over 500 education journals.

Employment & careers

Everyone who wants to teach in a state-maintained school in England and Wales needs Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). This course leads to QTS and, on successful completion, you will become a Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT). The starting salary of an NQT is over £22,000, with extra if you work in London. Teachers see their salaries rise by an average of 30 per cent after their first four years in the job.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X