• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"computer" AND "music"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Computer Music)

We have 163 Masters Degrees (Computer Music)

  • "computer" AND "music" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 163
Order by 
Overview. This programme focusses the creative, historical, critical, technical, and performative aspects of electronic and computer music, emphasising the many ways in which technology and musical practice influence each other. Read more

Overview

This programme focusses the creative, historical, critical, technical, and performative aspects of electronic and computer music, emphasising the many ways in which technology and musical practice influence each other.

You’ll engage with current thinking and practice in areas including experimental electronic music, sound synthesis, electrical and electronic musical instruments, signal processing, technologically-mediated approaches to composition, live electronic music, interfaces and interactivity, sound spatialisation, electronic music in the museum, and more. You’ll also learn to place these developments within the aesthetic, critical, cultural and historical context of electronic music and music technology.

A distinctive feature of this programme is the balance it strikes between creative practice, technical skills and theory, and critical/cultural/historic context in electronic and computer music.

Electronic and computer music is a broad and exciting field of research, and you’ll learn from an academic team with a strong presence in the international computer music, sonic arts, and electronic music research communities. It’s a great opportunity for musicians, creative professionals, educators, scientists, or artists who are interested in the integration of music and technology to collaborate across disciplines in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course Content

You’ll work on your own practice from the beginning of the programme. A core module will allow you to complete different electronic and computer music exercises using a range of frameworks, while another will introduce you to the development of electronic and computer music and the current state of the art form. You’ll consider the people, institutions, innovations, repertoires, and critical perspectives that continue to shape electronic and computer music.

Throughout the year your knowledge and skills will be underpinned by Professional Studies, a module which introduces you to research methods in music and allows you to build important skills. You’ll also put this into practice with your major project, where you’ll research, plan and document an independent project on a related topic of your choice.

Outside of the field of electronic and computer music, you’ll also choose an optional module from those offered across the School of Music. You could study psychology of music, aesthetic theory or editing, or if you have some experience of composing or performing you could even continue with these.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

COMPULSORY MODULES

You’ll study the three core modules below and then choose either the Electronic and Computer Music Portfolio (60 credits) or a Dissertation (60 credits).

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits

OPTIONAL MODULES

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Short Editorial Project 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Portfolio 60 credits

Career Opportunities

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge and a range of transferable skills in research, analysis, ICT and communication, as well as critical awareness. Beyond these, we also encourage an approach to skills development that is tailored to your individual needs.

You’ll focus on areas that interest you in your project work to gain the knowledge and skills you need to suit your career or research plans. After an audit of your existing skills, you’ll follow an individual development programme.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The future of the music industry lies with computer technology – and what we can do with that technology. It affects how we create, perform and distribute music. Read more
The future of the music industry lies with computer technology – and what we can do with that technology. It affects how we create, perform and distribute music. Whether you’re a practising musician, a sound engineer or a professional looking to combine your background and passion for music, we’ll help you explore key concepts at the heart of music, science and technology. Immersed in a thriving research centre, our future-facing course will give you a wealth of new career opportunities.

This programme is also available as a Research Masters (ResM). Further details are available on these pages.

Key features

-Work as part of a global research centre – the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR) – with staff, PhD students and post-doctoral researchers from all over the world. The latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 judged 100 per cent of our research to be internationally significant; 25 per cent of that was seen as world- leading, too.
-Projects can range from innovative approaches to composition and performance using computers, and the design of assistive music technology, to studying how music is processed in the brain.
-Take advantage of the ICCMR’s research collaborations with partners in Europe and USA, allowing you to visit renowned institutions such as IRCAM in Paris, NOTAM in Oslo and CalArts in the USA to develop your research project.
-Gain the skills necessary to progress to more advanced research at PhD level.
-Balance your work commitments and further education with the opportunity to study part-time for a masters-level qualification.
-Take part in the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival. Showcase your work in public, stay on top of new developments in the industry and get key insights into where music is headed in the future.
-Benefit from the multi-disciplinary nature of our programme. Whether you’re a practising musician, music graduate, musicologist, music educator, music technologist or just a graduate with proven knowledge of music or music technology, our programme provides many fascinating opportunities for collaboration.
-Focus on where you want to take your career, with the support you need to get there. An individual research project will enable you to explore what interests you most at the intersection of music, science and computing.

Course details

Over the course of our one-year programme, you’ll study three modules. In Advanced Topics in Computer Music Research you’ll be immersed in music programming techniques and software. Studying key contemporary composers working with technology in electronic and computer music, we’ll introduce you to current trends in computer music research, supplemented with course assignments and further reading. The Research in the Arts and Humanities module runs over five intensive days and focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to research into the arts, humanities and technology. You’ll also undertake a module that helps you manage your MRes project with your project supervisor. Your thesis can take the form of a written piece of theoretical work or a critical evaluation report, along with evidence of creative and/or professional practice.

Core modules
-MARE700 Research in the Arts and Humanities
-MARE701 Masters Thesis in the Humanities and/or Performing Arts
-MARE702 Advanced Topics in Computer Music

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

Read less
If you have a background in music or psychology, this programme will allow you to study existing research and theories in the psychology of music while continuing to follow your own musical interests. Read more

If you have a background in music or psychology, this programme will allow you to study existing research and theories in the psychology of music while continuing to follow your own musical interests.

You’ll develop your knowledge of qualitative and quantitative research methods, building your own research skills while learning to critically evaluate studies in the field of music psychology. Using real-world case studies you’ll explore areas such as music education, therapy, advertising, science and technology – but you’ll also be able to take optional modules in composition, performance, musicology, aesthetics, editing, electronic and computer music or other aspects of music.

Taught by experts in world-class facilities, you’ll gain an insight into the importance and role of research in music psychology to prepare you for further research or a wider range of careers.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Take a virtual tour of the School of Music.

Course content

Core modules that run throughout the year will develop your knowledge of music psychology, as well as your understanding of research methods. You’ll focus on case studies in different areas of the subject, gaining a sense of the key issues, debates and theories and becoming confident evaluating and using quantitative and qualitative techniques to collect data.

At the same time, you’ll select from optional modules that allow you to pursue your interests in different areas of music such as aesthetics, musicology, audience engagement, composition, performance, editing and archival studies, electronic and computer music or musicology. For some of these modules, we may need to see evidence of your ability before you begin – see ‘How to apply’ for more information.

By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve gained when you submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research, with an empirical component, on a topic of your choice within music psychology.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits
  • Research Techniques in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

Optional modules

You’ll then choose one from the optional modules below.

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • International Research Project 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Psychology of Music MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Psychology of Music MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. These will include seminars, tutorials and lectures in some modules, as well as instrumental or vocal lessons with our expert tutors if you select performance modules. However, independent study is crucial to this degree, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your interests at your own pace.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed using a range of methods, including presentations, bibliographic exercises, essays and group project work. Specialised music modules will also use relevant methods of assessment, such as compositions, recitals, critical editions and commentaries on musical sources.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to gain a range of transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication. All of these can be applied in musical as well as non-musical contexts.

Recent graduates have gone on to launch careers within the fields of music education, music advertising, business development, marketing and administration, and artist management. Others have also continued with their research at PhD level.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities. Read more

Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities.

Core modules will allow you to explore issues in musicology such as race, class, gender, sexuality, popular music and mass culture, as well as how music has been received and interpreted and how musical ‘canons’ are formed. You’ll also develop your understanding of research methods in musicology, and have the chance to gain knowledge of aesthetic theory or editing and archival studies, allowing you to balance critical and applied forms of musicology.

In addition, you’ll choose from optional modules from across the School of Music allowing you to focus on topics that interest you, from performance or electronic and computer music to composition and psychology of music.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. The Special Collections housed in our beautiful Brotherton Library contain significant collections of music manuscripts, rare printed music and letters from composers and critics to help inform your work.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

You’ll study core modules that develop your understanding of both critical and applied forms of musicology. One of these will allow you to explore issues and topics that have emerged in the past few decades – questions of race, gender, politics, deconstruction and more. You’ll also choose one or two from a cluster of optional modules, giving you an insight into editing and archival studies or introducing you to aesthetic theory.

In addition, you’ll have the chance to pursue another area of musical interest when you select from a range of optional modules. Whether you’re interested in computer music or psychology of music, or you want to continue to improve your performance or composition skills, you can pick one module allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in a field outside of musicology.

Throughout the year you’ll study a core module that develops your knowledge of research methods in music and musicology, laying the foundations for the rest of your studies. You’ll also be able to put the research skills you gain into practice if you choose to do a dissertation by the end of the programme – an independently researched project on a topic of your choice. Alternatively, you can complete a major editorial project, producing an extended edition of professional standard based on original musical sources.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Short Editorial Project 30 credits
  • Editorial Project 60 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including seminars and tutorials, as well as vocal/instrumental lessons with our expert tutors. We’re also making more and more use of online learning. However, private study is also integral to this programme, allowing you to pursue your interests more closely and develop research and critical skills.

Assessment

To help you build diverse skills, we also assess you using different methods depending on the modules you choose. These could include presentations, essays, literature reviews, recitals and performances or project work; however, optional modules may also use alternative methods such as recitals and composition portfolios.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you in-depth subject knowledge, as well as specialist knowledge and skills in a different aspect of music studies to broaden your understanding. It will also allow you to gain key research, critical and communication skills that are in demand in a wide range of industries and sectors.

Graduates from the programme move on to a variety of careers. Recent graduates have entered areas such as arts management, librarianship, recruitment, and freelance teaching and performance. Many graduates go on to further study at PhD level in the UK and USA.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Develop your creativity and technical fluency with this specialised programme, which allows you to specialise in composition while maintaining an interest in different aspects of music. Read more

Develop your creativity and technical fluency with this specialised programme, which allows you to specialise in composition while maintaining an interest in different aspects of music.

Core modules will allow you to create your own portfolio of original compositions – which can include electro-acoustic work – underpinned by your study of the principles of composition and aesthetic theory. You’ll look at orchestration, arrangement and remix. Then you’ll choose from optional modules allowing you to explore different aspects of music – you could choose electronic and computer music, musicology, performance, editing and source studies, psychology of music or more to inform your own creative work.

Guided by expert researchers and experienced composers and performers, you’ll have access to a wide range of facilities to explore your own ideas. You could even have some of your work performed by our ensemble, LS2, or benefit from the many opportunities you’ll find in the city’s vibrant live music scene.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

You’ll work on your own compositions throughout the year, developing a portfolio of original work supported and informed by a range of learning opportunities, from tutorials and lectures through to workshops with guest artists.

Throughout the year you’ll take a combination of core modules that allow you to develop your skills as a musician and composer. You’ll develop your academic skills, including research and presentation skills, as well as studying the principles of composition and different professional contexts.

You’ll develop an awareness of broader topics in the study of music to help inform your practice. Central to this is the core module in Semester Two that introduces you to aesthetic theory.

In addition, you’ll choose from the range of optional modules on offer across the School of Music depending on your individual interests and experience: options include performance, editing and archival studies, musicology, computer music, psychology of music and more.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Portfolio of Original Composition 60 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Experimental Composition MMus Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Experimental Composition MMus Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules will use seminars and tutorials, as well as lectures and instrumental or vocal lessons, depending on the modules you choose. However, independent study is the backbone of this programme, allowing you to build your skills and express your own creativity.

Assessment

Obviously, you’ll submit original compositions as an important part of your assessment. You will also write commentaries on your own work — drawing on musical/theoretical contexts — and more theoretical modules are likely to make use of written tasks such as essays and reports. Optional modules may also involve assessment through recitals, transcriptions or critical editions, presentations or other forms of assessment.

Career opportunities

Composition tutors have connections with performers, ensembles, and festivals in all corners of the globe. These relationships can be useful for your professional development, giving you an insight into issues such as funding, publicity and other aspects of working life for professional freelance composers.

Many of our graduates choose to continue and refine their research by applying for PhD level study. Several of our existing PhD students also completed their Masters programmes here at Leeds.

We have other resources to support you as you develop your career plans too – the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where you can be supported by past students as you plan your next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree. Read more

Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree.

Taught by the School of Music and Leeds University Business School, this programme will allow you to specialise in an aspect of music that suits your interests and talents while gaining an insight into the principles and strategies of management across the creative industries. You’ll also study modules designed specifically for this programme which bring music and management together, giving you the chance to connect with professionals in the music industry.

You could specialise in music management and promotion, performance, composition, music psychology, electronic and computer music or source studies while exploring strategic management, marketing and entrepreneurship. Whether you’re looking to launch a management career in the music industry or you want to enhance your skills and promotion prospects, you’ll learn from experts in both subjects to gain the diversity of skills to succeed.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Leeds University Business School is internationally recognised for the quality of its teaching and research. It’s among just 1% of institutions offering business degrees to be triple-accredited by the world’s best-known accreditation bodies.

Read more about Leeds University Business School

Course content

The focus of the degree will be a major project: working with a tutor, most of our students devise a music and management project to combine and reflect upon music management theory and practice. This could include, for example, organising an event, acting as a consultant during a work placement you organise, or managing a musical group. Alternatively, you can complete a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

A core module throughout the year will introduce you to research methods in music, equipping you with the skills to support the rest of your studies. You’ll also choose from optional modules to specialise in one of computer music, aesthetics, musicology, editing, psychology of music, performance, composition, artistic management or live music promotion.

In both semesters you’ll study core modules run by Leeds University Business School. These will introduce you to strategic management, marketing for managers and how businesses in the creative industries are actually run and managed, applying concepts and theories to understand the business models of media companies, as well as the impact of digital technologies and the rise of exciting new markets.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Creative Industries Management 15 credits
  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Music and Management Project 60 credits
  • Live Music Management and Promotion 30 credits

Optional modules

You will choose 15 credits from Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Creation, and Intellectual Property Management, and complete your enrolment by choosing one module from the list below.

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Music and Management MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Music and Management MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Because this programme is so diverse, you’ll come across a range of teaching and learning methods. These will include lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as group learning. You’ll also take instrumental or vocal lessons in some modules, depending on your choices. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to build a variety of skills and express your creativity

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed using a range of methods, including presentations, bibliographic exercises, essays and group project work. LUBS modules may include written exams. Specialised music modules will also use relevant methods of assessment, such as compositions, recitals, critical editions and commentaries on musical sources.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with in-depth knowledge of economic and management issues, both within and beyond the music industry. It will also equip you with transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation, communication, cultural and commercial awareness that are valuable to a wide range of employers.

All of this will put you in a great position to succeed in the music industry, as well as other related areas of arts and creative industries management .

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




Read less
The MA in Creative Music Technologies degree is a skills conversion programme. The programme is aimed at graduates, with musical abilities, who would like to explore musical applications of technology. Read more

Overview

The MA in Creative Music Technologies degree is a skills conversion programme. The programme is aimed at graduates, with musical abilities, who would like to explore musical applications of technology. The programme accepts graduates from any primary degree.

The programme is concerned with a range of areas relating to music technology, including composition, sound recording and engineering, computer music programming, and acoustics.

The MA offers full use of computer resources at the Music Technology Labs at Maynooth University; access to studio space, with the possibility of working towards recording and production projects; opportunities to have compositions performed; individual tutorial time with a designated advisor; expert advice on musical and technical issues from composers and researchers at the cutting edge of their fields.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-creative-music-technologies

Course Structure

The course is structured around a number of options covering all aspects of Computer Music, from acoustics to computer programming, including audio signal processing, synthesis and recording engineering. In addition, students will complete a research project, which can take the form a composition portfolio or a thesis in a computer music-related topic. Foreign language instruction is also available through the Maynooth University Language Centre.

Career Options

Recent graduates have been employed in the following areas:

- PhD study in electronic music composition

- PhD study in musical interface design

- Music software development

- Music Production

- Post-production

- Sound engineering

- Third level education

- Arts Administration

- Radio production

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHT50 Full-time


The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
The Master of Music (MMus) is designed for students who've already gained an Honours-level qualification in Music. It's an advanced, one-year programme of study. Read more

The Master of Music (MMus) is designed for students who've already gained an Honours-level qualification in Music. It's an advanced, one-year programme of study. You'll be guided by experts who will supervise you in individual sessions. You'll complete substantial-sized tasks focused on your chosen area of specialty. During this process, you'll develop your skills and expertise, and show an understanding of the content of your work. You'll also develop the attributes you need to work in this field.

Is your passion for performing music? During your MMus, you'll learn how to work towards a public musical recital, right up to the actual performance. This process involves planning and preparation, the integration of music research with performance, and you'll develop skills to be able to demonstrate each step leading up to your recital.

Are you more interested in composition? You'll be given the opportunity to create a significant body of original music.  You'll develop the skills to write music to a professional standard, suitable for being performed in public at a concert or similar event.

Links with Music Professionals and Associations

When you study for your MMus at Waikato, you'll have opportunities to network with professional groups working in the music industry. You'll be able to participate in your musical field and this will help you grow as a professional musician.

Are you interested in orchestral work? Waikato's MMus programme has links with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, Trust Waikato Symphony Orchestra, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and the Opus Orchestra. There are links with Chamber Music New Zealand and Opera New Zealand. In terms of local groups, Waikato has links with the Hamilton School of Instrumental Music, the Hamilton Community Centre of Music, the Waikato Museum Concert Series, Arts Waikato and the Hamilton Civic Choir.

As far as other music-related groups and associations go, Waikato has connections with Atoll Records, New Zealand Institute of Registered Music Teachers, Radio New Zealand Concert, the Composers Association of New Zealand and the New Zealand Music Examinations Board.

There are links with international organisations, including publishing companies: the Computer Music Journal (MIT Press, USA), Australasia Computer Music Association, Electronic Music Foundation (USA) and the Sonic Arts Network (UK). Also from overseas, there are links to Oxford Music on Line (Oxford Uni Press), Cambridge, UK, St Paul's Concert Series, Herne Hill, London, the Interlochen Arts Academy, USA and the Australian Centre for Interactive Design – Queensland Conservatorium of Music.

Career Opportunities

By the end of your MMus, you'll be working at a professional level in your chosen field. If your passion is performance, you may choose to pursue a career as a studio musician or solo performer, in a chamber group or orchestra, or do experimental or theatrical work. You may prefer to go on to work in broadcasting or in radio, television or recording production. Perhaps you'd like to work in film or video music production, or in multi-media creation. You could alternatively work as a musical director or producer.

You may use your MMus to work in a role as an arts administrator, communications coordinator or in community development (for tribal authorities). You may like to work in human-computer interface development or as an educator, in the primary, secondary or tertiary sectors. Perhaps you'd like to work as a journalist or as a librarian or information consultant and music technician.



Read less
This challenging programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer, while giving you the confidence to apply critical approaches to the study of music and its performance. Read more

This challenging programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer, while giving you the confidence to apply critical approaches to the study of music and its performance.

You’ll work with our experienced and talented specialist teachers to develop your repertoire. You’ll learn to interpret music sensitively, injecting your own personality without neglecting the historical style of each work. Not only will you perform regularly throughout the year, but you’ll work towards your own recitals and work on your own solo or ensemble project.

To put your performance into context, you’ll also have a choice of optional modules offered across the School of Music. You could study composition, musicology, aesthetics, psychology of music and more to explore how performance can shape and be shaped by other forms of musical research and practice.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

You could also choose to study for a Postgraduate Diploma qualification over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Course content

Core modules that run throughout the year will allow you to develop your performance skills in different contexts. Supported by instrumental or vocal lessons with a specialist teacher, you’ll take part in regular performance classes to develop your repertoire.

As well as focusing on a single concerto, song-cycle or extended work of 20-30 minutes, you’ll prepare for a final recital of 40-50 minutes that you’ll perform near the end of the programme. In addition, you’ll prepare for a solo or ensemble project and reflect on the process of preparing and then giving a performance.

You’ll also have the chance to expand your studies. The core Professional Studies module will build your understanding of research methods in music to equip you with a broader range of skills. Then you’ll choose from the optional modules offered across the School of Music, allowing you to explore musicology, composition, psychology of music, aesthetics and more.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

If you opt for the PGDip qualification, you’ll take fewer modules overall.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Performance MMus Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Performance MMus Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll take instrumental and vocal lessons with our specialist teachers. However, lessons can be organised with teachers from the surrounding area such as Opera North and the Royal Northern College of Music by individual arrangement.

Read about our instrumental and vocal teachers on our opportunities page.

You’ll also attend seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial, allowing you to hone your skills and explore your own creative approaches to performance.

Assessment

Your performance will largely be assessed through your recitals, and you’ll also submit programme notes for each recital you complete. Other modules may also assess you on project work, bibliographical exercises, essays and presentations. Optional modules may use specialist tasks such as compositions or critical editions.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to develop as a performer, improve your musical knowledge and gain critical, research and communication skills.

Graduates have pursued a range of careers in orchestral playing, solo performance, instrumental teaching, and arts administration. Several have also pursued further study at conservatoires in the UK and abroad, or research degrees at Leeds and other institutions.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The Graduate Diploma programme combines modules from different levels of undergraduate study into a single year. Read more

The Graduate Diploma programme combines modules from different levels of undergraduate study into a single year.

If your first degree isn’t in Music but you have a high level of expertise, or if you’re an international student who isn’t confident in the English language or UK education system, this programme allows you to expand your knowledge of music and focus on the aspects that suit your own interests. It can bridge the gap between an undergraduate and Masters degree, but the GradDip is a respected qualification in its own right.

You’ll study core modules that build your research skills and give you a good grounding in music studies. Then you’ll also choose from optional modules in areas such as performance, composition, music technology, aesthetics, psychology of music or musicology.

This is a flexible programme, so contact us to find out about the level of knowledge and qualifications you may need for different module choices.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. The Special Collections housed in our beautiful Brotherton Library contain significant collections of music manuscripts, rare printed music and letters from composers and critics to help inform your work.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll take a variety of modules that both lay the foundations of musical study and allow you to specialise in the topics that interest you.

You’ll start with a core module that develops your research skills in music, preparing you for the rest of your studies, and choose from introductory modules at Level 1 that give you a background in musical interpretation and the role music continues to play in society.

From this starting point, you’ll build your knowledge with your choice of Level 3 modules – you can take specialist modules where you’ll study different aspects of music in line with the research interests of our staff. Alternatively, you could focus on performance, composition, music technology, editing and source studies or the psychology of music. If there’s a musical topic that particularly interests you, the dissertation will give you the chance to undertake independent research to explore the subject in depth.

If you still need to take further credits to complete the programme after these choices, you’ll then be able to select from Level 2 modules offered across the School of Music.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Music Research Skills 10 credits

Optional modules

  • Understanding Music 20 credits
  • Music in History and Culture 30 credits
  • Composition 20 credits
  • Performance 20 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Sound, Technology, and Music 20 credits
  • Introduction to the Psychology of Music 20 credits
  • Interpreting Music 20 credits
  • Composition 20 credits
  • Performance 20 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Notation and Editing 20 credits
  • Aesthetics and Criticism 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • The Psychology of Listening and Performance 20 credits
  • Special Study in Musicology A 20 credits
  • Special Study in Musicology B 20 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Dissertation 40 credits
  • Composition 40 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Applied Project 20 credits
  • Performance 40 credits
  • Editing and Source Studies 40 credits
  • Contemporary Aesthetics 40 credits
  • Music Technology 40 credits
  • Music Psychology40 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Music GradDip in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Because this programme is so flexible, you’ll come across a range of teaching and learning methods depending on the modules you choose. These could include lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as vocal or instrumental lessons with our specialist teachers. Practical sessions and workshops may also be involved.

However, independent study is crucial to this degree, allowing you to build important skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed by diverse methods depending on your module choices. These may include essays, exams and presentations as well as compositions, performances, project work, critical editions and commentaries among others.

Career opportunities

This programme allows you to study undergraduate modules to develop your formal musical education. This means that it leaves you in a good position to progress to MA or MMus study in Music – and as a graduate of the University of Leeds, you will also be eligible for a 10% discount on postgraduate fees.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The MA in Creative Music Technologies degree is a skills conversion programme. The programme is aimed at graduates, with musical abilities, who would like to explore musical applications of technology. Read more

Overview

The MA in Creative Music Technologies degree is a skills conversion programme. The programme is aimed at graduates, with musical abilities, who would like to explore musical applications of technology. The programme accepts graduates from any primary degree.

The programme is concerned with a range of areas relating to music technology, including composition, sound recording and engineering, computer music programming, and acoustics.

The MA offers full use of computer resources at the Music Technology Labs at Maynooth University; access to studio space, with the possibility of working towards recording and production projects; opportunities to have compositions performed; individual tutorial time with a designated advisor; expert advice on musical and technical issues from composers and researchers at the cutting edge of their fields.

Course Structure

The course is structured around a number of options covering all aspects of Computer Music, from acoustics to computer programming, including audio signal processing, synthesis and recording engineering. In addition, students will complete a research project, which can take the form a composition potfolio or a thesis in a computer music-related topic. Foreign language instruction is also available through the Maynooth University Language Centre.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHT51

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:
Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
This flexible programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer; whilst you can focus entirely upon performance-based modules if you prefer, there are also options in other areas of musical study should you wish to explore those. Read more

This flexible programme will allow you to expand your repertoire and hone your skills as a performer; whilst you can focus entirely upon performance-based modules if you prefer, there are also options in other areas of musical study should you wish to explore those. This 120-credit programme is a smaller version of the 180-credit MMus Performance programme, and can be studied over 1 year full time, or 2 years part time.

You’ll work with our experienced and talented specialist teachers to develop your repertoire. You’ll learn to interpret music sensitively, injecting your own personality without neglecting the historical style of each work. Not only will you perform regularly throughout the year, but you’ll work towards your own recitals and work on your own solo or ensemble project.

To put your performance into context, you’ll also have a choice of optional modules offered across the School of Music to explore how performance can shape and be shaped by other forms of musical research and practice.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Alternatively, you could choose to study for an MMus Performance qualification over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Course content

The performance modules will allow you to develop your performance skills in different contexts. Supported by instrumental or vocal lessons with a specialist teacher, you’ll take part in regular performance classes to develop your repertoire.

As well as the potential to focus on a single concerto, song-cycle or extended work of 20-30 minutes, you can prepare for a final recital of 40-50 minutes that you will perform near the end of the programme. Applied Performance Studies will allow you to prepare and deliver a solo or ensemble project, and reflect upon the process in a written commentary.

You’ll also have the chance to expand your studies if you wish. The Professional Studies module builds your understanding of research methods in music, and you can also choose from optional modules offered across the School of Music, allowing you to explore musicology, composition, psychology of music, aesthetics and more.

If you choose to study part time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

If you opt for the MMus Performance qualification, you’ll take more modules overall.

Course structure

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 60 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Performance PGDip Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Performance PGDip Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll take instrumental and vocal lessons with our specialist teachers. However, lessons can be organised with teachers from the surrounding area such as Opera North and the Royal Northern College of Music by individual arrangement.

Read about our instrumental and vocal teachers on our opportunities page.

You’ll also attend seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial, allowing you to hone your skills and explore your own creative approaches to performance.

Assessment

Your performances will largely be assessed through your recitals, and you’ll also submit programme notes for each recital that you complete. Depending upon your module choices, other modules may also assess you on project work, bibliographical exercises, essays and presentations. Optional modules may also use specialist tasks such as compositions or critical editions.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to develop as a performer, improve your musical knowledge and gain critical, research and communication skills.

Graduates have pursued a range of careers in orchestral playing, solo performance, instrumental teaching, and arts administration. Several have also pursued further study at conservatoires in the UK and abroad, or research degrees at Leeds and other institutions.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK. Read more
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

If you’re an experienced musician and want to put your skills to use supporting children and adults with additional needs, our emphasis on clinical placements will prepare you for a rewarding career.

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, we’ll introduce you to the most recent, effective music therapy approaches. You’ll reflect on your own practice in our clinical supervision group discussions, supported by regular individual tutorials.

In the UK there are two central elements of music therapy: the use of improvised and pre-composed music; and the significance given to the relationship between client and therapist. These principles will underpin your training. Our experiential teaching includes: development of your improvisation skills; focused work on your first instrument; keyboard, single line instrument and voice; music therapy theory and links to practice; block clinical placements in at least two fields, including community settings, schools, hospitals and hospices; and experience in multidisciplinary teams.

Your training will take place in our new state-of-the-art Music Therapy Centre and Clinic, where you’ll often study with MA Dramatherapy students. All our students go on supervised clinical placements, preparing you for employment in many different settings.

Throughout the course you'll be supported by our team of qualified music therapists, who have a strong reputation for research. In 2013 we appointed Jörg Fachner as Professor of Music, Mind and the Brain, to further develop our research activities. One of our course tutors, Professor Amelia Oldfield, was recently awarded the first ever Clinical Impact Award by the World Federation of Music Therapists. And in 2014, our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research was acknowledged as 'world-leading' in the UK Government's Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two days a week plus two days on a clinical placement (Year 1). One day a week on campus plus a placement of least one day a week (Year 2).

Careers

As a qualified music therapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas including the NHS, hospices, social services, the education sector and the voluntary sector. The NHS Agenda for Change has led to improved career paths for music therapists at levels similar to, or higher than, those of other allied health professions.

You may also choose to work privately, or on a freelance basis, with a client base including adults and children with learning difficulties, mental health problems, and other special needs.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council, a legal requirement for music therapists in the UK. Your qualification should also be recognised around the world.

You’ll benefit from our links with the British Association for Music Therapy and other allied health professions; Professor Helen Odell-Miller, for example, advises at government level for the profession. You’ll also be able to forge links with practitioners such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Year one:
• Music Therapy Practical and Clinical Skills
• Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multi-Disciplinary Theoretical Studies
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (1)

Year two
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (2)
• MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as clinical improvisation and composition. You’ll also undertake some self-analysis and reflection with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress and process towards becoming a music therapist will be assessed by an examiner. Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project, which involves clinical evaluation. Meanwhile, in your final oral assessment you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules touches on dramatherapy and covers content from our MA Dramatherapy, as well as the Music Therapy course. Where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you’ll be taught separately but on more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you’ll benefit from working together.

Specialist facilities

You'll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. We have a large range of musical instruments, specifically chosen for clinical work, and high-quality recording and videoing equipment in the therapy rooms.

You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms.

Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our music therapy staff members are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our research is recognised as world-leading. We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

***This course has now reached full capacity for September 2016 but we are now accepting applications for September 2017***

Read less
Research profile. The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. Read more

Research profile

The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. We engage with a broad range of genres and traditions, including classical and popular music, Western and non-Western music, professional and amateur music making and music for screen. Our research is highly interdisciplinary, with centres and groups spanning other Colleges and Departments within the University of Edinburgh, from Physics and Neuroscience to Informatics, the Humanities, Divinity and the Social Sciences.

We have a large community of postgraduate students undertaking independent research in music.

If you are interested in undertaking a small independent research project in music, the 12-month MSc by Research is ideal. This programme is offered in any area served by the expertise of our music staff. In consultation with your supervisor you will develop an individual programme of coursework and research training over two semesters. You will submit a dissertation, or portfolio of projects equivalent to 30,000 words.

Candidates for larger-scale, doctoral research are normally admitted as probationary students for the first year of study, and on satisfactory completion of this first year are approved for registration for either MPhil (normally two years full-time, dissertation of 60,000 words) or PhD (maximum four years full-time, dissertation of 80,000–100,000 words).

All our research degrees may be studied part-time (for example, MSc by Research may be studied part-time over two years).

Staff have a wide range of research interests, engaging in research clustered around four main themes:

  • Music, Sound and Technology, including musical acoustics and organology
  • Musical Practice, including composition (electroacoustic, algorithmic, computer music and music for screen), and historical and contemporary performance research
  • Music and the Human Sciences, including music psychology and cognition, and music in the community
  • Music and Social Institutions, including 19th and 20th century musicology, popular music, and music sociology

Some of our current hubs of research activity include:

  • Acoustics and Audio Group
  • ECA Digitals
  • Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments
  • Institute for Music in Human and Social Development
  • Live Music Exchange

Please consult our staff profile pages to see our interests and availability; you may propose projects in any area for consideration.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.



Read less
Get professional training in dramatherapy. our emphasis on clinical placements and a range of dramatherapy approaches will prepare you for work in the arts therapies. Read more
Get professional training in dramatherapy: our emphasis on clinical placements and a range of dramatherapy approaches will prepare you for work in the arts therapies. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a dramatherapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, our course will introduce you to a range of approaches to dramatherapy. You’ll reflect on your own practice in group discussions, and be supported by an extensive programme of tutorials and supervisions.

Your studies will focus on intercultural practice, attachment/mother-infant observation and the understanding of how past relationships manifest in current client difficulties – and how they can be worked with through the dramatherapeutic relationship. You’ll also work with music therapists in lectures and performance work, such as Playback Theatre.

Our experiential teaching will focus on your own dramatic autobiographical process, dramatherapy theory, links between theory and practice, and bi-weekly experiential dramatherapy groups. In these, you’ll reflect upon your clinical experiences and the process of becoming a dramatherapist.

You’ll take part in clinical placements in two to three fields, under the supervision of qualified dramatherapists. Your placements could be in community settings, schools, hospitals or hospices, giving you valuable experience of working in a multidisciplinary team and great preparation for employment.

Supported by our team of practising and research-active music therapists, you’ll have access to the latest and most effective dramatherapy approaches with both adults and children, as well as to the best advice for your future career.

Careers

As a qualified dramatherapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas, such as the NHS, social services, education, or community projects. You may also choose to work privately or on a freelance basis, with a client base from prisoners to children with learning difficulties.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council – a legal requirement for practising dramatherapists in the UK.

You’ll also benefit from our links with the British Association of Dramatherapists and other allied health professions and practitioners, such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Core modules:
Year one:
Clinical Placements and Experiential Development 1
Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multidisciplinary Theoretical Studies
Dramatherapy Practice and Clinical Skills

Year two:
Clinical Placements and Experiential Development 2
MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as improvisation and performance. You’ll also be asked to undertake some self-analysis and reflection in discussion with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress will be assessed by an examiner.

Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project which involves clinical evaluation. In the final oral assessment, you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules includes music therapy, and covers content from our Music Therapy MA course as well as this Dramatherapy MA. On more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you'll work with our music therapy students; where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you'll be taught separately.

Placements

You’ll spend much of your time on clinical placements in a range of settings.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms and a full range of specialised dramatherapy props and equipment.

You’ll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms and a full range of specialised dramatherapy props and equipment. Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our dramatherapy staff are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research is recognised as ‘world-leading’ (Research Excellence Framework, 2014). We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X