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Masters Degrees (Computer Linguistic)

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:

  • gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships
  • learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description
  • familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods
  • learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society
  • learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
  • gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics. 

General Linguistics gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech. 

Phonetics will introduce you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics. 

Language Technology combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa. 

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes. 



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This course offers advanced topics in Computer Science to existing graduates in Computing or a strongly-related discipline. Read more
This course offers advanced topics in Computer Science to existing graduates in Computing or a strongly-related discipline. It allows you to gain expertise in the design and implementation of sophisticated information systems that respond to the challenges faced by organisations in areas such as security, big data and cloud computing.

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/computing/study-options/part-time-learning/msc-computer-science

Course detail

This course will produce computing specialists who:
• Have a good understanding of current computing trends
• Are proficient in the use of modern applications and environments
• Are able to match tools and technologies to the needs of commerce and industry
• Are able to integrate these technologies to develop high-quality information systems

Modules

• Big Data Analytics and Visualisation
• Cloud Computing
• Systems Programming and Security
• Data Mining
• Database Security
• Object-Oriented Programming
• Web System Development
• Professional Development & Research Skills
• MSc Project

Format

Throughout the course, content is complemented by practical work, allowing you to support your theoretical development by providing real-life simulation. You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, tutorials, labs and external speakers. You will also be supported through our online virtual learning environment where you can access a wide variety of resources and other support materials.

The individual project provides an opportunity for applying specialist knowledge together with analytic, problem-solving, managerial and communication skills to a particular area of interest within Computer Science. Working with the full support and guidance of an allocated project supervisor, you will be given the opportunity to propose, plan, specify, develop, evaluate, and present a substantial project.

Placements

Students who perform particularly well during their first semester of studies will be invited to apply for a 45-week internship.

Careers

Opportunities exist in the analysis, design, implementation and management of software projects; the development of web applications and services; consultancy work in software architecture, Big Data Analysis and Cloud Computing. Previous graduates have gone on to work as IT consultants, software engineers, network managers/ administrators, database developers/ administrators, and web services developers.

Graduates have also gone on to pursue careers in research and academia.

How to apply

All students can apply online by visiting Apply Online at http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning. Read more

Course description

This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning.

If you would like to learn how to explore language using innovative techniques and computer tools, then our course will offer you cutting-edge, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by leading researchers in the fields of linguistics and computer science.

You will have options enabling you to study:
• How people use words to make meanings;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• The role of phraseology, metaphor, and idioms;
• Creative and poetic uses of language;
• New approaches to language teaching;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Creating dictionaries using new kinds of evidence;
• Using computer tools for teaching and translation.

For further information, please download our flyer here: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/MA-Practical-Corpus-Linguistics-for-ELT-Lexicography-and-Translation.pdf

Why choose Wolverhampton?

MA Practical Corpus Linguistics for ELT, Lexicography and Translation is an innovative, unique, and up-to-date course based on high-quality interdisciplinary research, with a selection of modules that is unparalleled both on a national and international level. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. As a result, the knowledge and practical skills developed on the course will allow you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the industry.

You will become proficient in the use of sophisticated corpus tools such as the Sketch Engine (https://www.sketchengine.co.uk), as well as state-of-the-art specialist software for professional translators and lexicographers. You will also be given an option to learn basic computer programming in Python, which is one of the most robust, popular, and widely used programming languages in the field. By the end of the course, you will have developed a unique set of transferrable skills that will make you highly competitive in the marketplace and allow you to find employment as a language professional in industry or in academia.

Figures speak louder than words: the University of Wolverhampton boasts an outstanding graduate employability rate – 98% of our postgraduate students are in work or further training six months after graduation!

What will I learn?

This course will introduce you to the use of corpora – large electronic collections of written and/or spoken text that serve as a reliable source of evidence in linguistic analysis. (‘Corpora’ is the plural of ‘corpus’.) You will learn how to design, analyse, and exploit corpora in language teaching, dictionary writing, and translation for English or any other language.

You will be given freedom and flexibility to tailor the course content to your needs and research interests as we offer a unique selection of general and specialized elective modules from which to choose. Our teaching staff will provide you with support and guidance in selecting the most suitable combination for your research topic.

Semester I will focus on developing general linguistic knowledge and research skills, which you will be able to apply to your chosen area of expertise in Semester II. You will learn about words, meanings, and linguistic creativity, broaden your knowledge of grammar, and acquire basic research and professional skills. You will also have an opportunity to learn the essentials of computer programming by attending our elective module in Python.

Semester II will introduce you to corpus linguistic methods and their application to three areas of research: language teaching, lexicography, and translation. You will start planning your dissertation and engage in one-on-one consultations with your supervisor.
For further information on modules and assessments, please visit our website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling

Opportunities

As a Master's student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specializing in linguistics and natural language processing.
• You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling/who-will-teach-you-on-this-course/; our teaching staff at RIILP are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results;
• We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
• The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry which you will be able to benefit from;
• You will also have an opportunity to travel the world – Malaga, Valencia, Besançon, Naples, Alicante, and Plovdiv are just a few of the many possible destinations covered by our institute’s Erasmus agreements.

Career path

Graduates will be able to pursue a career path in language teaching, translation, lexicography, editing, and human language technology, working either as freelancers or in a variety of industry locations, including publishing houses, translation agencies and IT companies that specialize in the development of language resources and tools (e.g. language learning applications, CAT tools). English language teachers will benefit greatly from the course, as they will develop knowledge and practical skills in using modern lexical resources, corpus data and tools in the preparation of teaching material and in the classroom, which will significantly improve their chances of securing a job in the ELT sector.

The course will also provide a sound intellectual platform for students to progress onto doctorate level study and a career in higher education. As the teaching on the course is based on research carried out within the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), graduates will be well-placed to continue their academic careers by applying for PhD positions within our institute or at other leading centres specializing in Corpus Linguistics, ELT/TESOL, Lexicography, Translation Studies, or Natural Language Processing.

Contact us

• Dr Sara Moze (course leader):
• April Harper (admin office):
• Research Group website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/
• Twitter: @RGCL_WLV


*Subject to approval

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The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge.

The course aims:

(a) to provide students with necessary background in linguistic theory and related topics at intermediate and advanced level using a range of approaches and methodologies;

(b) to give students the opportunity to acquire expertise in their specific research interests in part by offering the opportunity of specialisation through pathways in the linguistics of particular languages (e.g. English, Romance, Celtic etc.);

(c) to provide foundations for continuation to PhD research;

(d) to offer the opportunity to participate in research culture within and beyond the Faculty, by attending and contributing to graduate seminars and reading groups;

(e) to develop the research skills required to conduct independent study such as
- formulating a realistic research proposal, with suitably delineated aims, objectives, methods, scope and expected outcome;
- preparing written work based on the proposal;
- selecting and mastering suitable research methods;
- collecting relevant bibliography;
- using computer databases and corpora;
- using relevant software, including statistical packages where appropriate;
- presenting well-argued academic material to the wider research community.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmalmptal

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the MPhil in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics:
(a) will be aware of the nature of linguistic theories, and how theories relate to models, description, analysis, and explanation

(b) will have gained, in at least four areas of linguistics, a solid foundation, including:
- familiarity with one or more models in each area
- an appreciation of the fact that there can be alternative analyses of given data, and of how to evaluate the alternatives
- where relevant, an awareness of the relation between linguistic models and the mind
- where relevant, an understanding of the relation between linguistic models and their application

(c) will have become familiar with a variety of research skills relevant to research in linguistics

(d) will have developed the strategies needed to present linguistic data, arguments, interpretations, and conclusions both in writing and in oral presentation

(e) will have built up in-depth knowledge of at least one area of linguistics to the point where original research questions can be defined and pursued independently

(f) will have had experience in research sufficient to facilitate the transition to doctoral research

(g) will have acquired both the breadth and the depth of knowledge in linguistics that will prepare them for jobs in linguistics in the future.

Format

The MPhil programme is structured progressively to form a bridge between undergraduate study and possible further research. Its balance changes through the year so that in the first two months (Michaelmas Term - October to December) there is instruction through lectures, whilst by the last three months students are carrying out independent research full-time.

All students are required to follow a course in 'Research Methods' and a statistics course to acquire skills needed for research and 'transferable' skills. Beyond that, each student will follow his or her own 'Study Plan', which allows the individual interests, needs, and strengths of the student to be met. At the start of the course the student, with advice if needed from the Director of the MPhil and subject specialists, draws up a Study Plan for the Michaelmas and Lent Terms (October to March) which is approved by the Department. This will include the selection of a minimum of four introductory taught courses to be followed in Michaelmas, and participation in a minimum of two research seminars in Lent Term. Usually the Lent Term seminars chosen build on courses which have been followed in Michaelmas.

The course structure allows great flexibility in combining areas and approaches. It provides for tailored combinations of work in any of the areas of theoretical, applied, and descriptive linguistics, ranging for instance from formal semantics to experimental phonetics and phonology, from language acquisition to computational linguistics, and from Welsh syntax to the history of linguistics in France. A piece of work may have as its focus the development of an argument in linguistic theory, the description of some aspect of a language or its use, the psycholinguistic testing of alternative linguistic analyses, the application of linguistic theory to the history of a language or languages, the acoustic description of sound systems, and so on. The various pieces of work may relate to any language or combination of languages subject to adequate advice and facilities being available for the topic in question. Some students may wish to specialise and opt for a 'Pathway' relating to a particular language or language family.

The thesis demands independent study under the guidance of the supervisor and will involve a substantial piece of original research. A proposed title and summary for the 20,000 word thesis, formulated in discussion with the supervisor, must be submitted in mid-February, and this will be subject to approval by the Department of Linguistics, the supervisor, and the Faculty's Degree Committee. Because seminars finish at the end of Lent term, students can then devote themselves full time to research for the thesis during the Easter vacation and the Easter Term (April to June). The thesis is submitted on the seventh Friday of Easter Full Term, and about two to three weeks later there may be an oral examination on the thesis at the discretion of the examiners.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is normally a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism. Read more
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism.

You build a programme best-suited to your individual needs. This course is ideal if you need to study on a part-time basis and wish to fit your course choices in with your existing commitments, as you can also study on an accumulation basis over a period of up to five years.

The optional modules you choose come from a broad list including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Syntax

You also gain a basic familiarity with some common research methodologies and paradigms used in linguistics. You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. This takes place between April and September.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more

The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.

All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory): 

  • Grammatical Theory
  • Semantics and Pragmatics
  • Phonetics and Phonology

The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

If you wish to discover more about the academic staff in the department, please visit:http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/about/people/staff-directory/linguistics-english-language-staff/

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed at the end of the semester during which they are offered. All taught course units except Introduction to Grammatical Theory and Phonetics and Phonology are assessed by examined coursework only. All course units include formative assessments to ensure interim feedback during the semester.

Deadlines for assessments are stated in the MA in Linguistics and English Language 2016-2017 Programme Handbook .

Course unit details

The Linguistics MA consists of the following elements:

  • At least two of the following compulsory core course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory (15 credits), Phonetics and Phonology (15 credits), Semantics and Pragmatics (15 credits)
  • Research Methods I and II (2 x 15 credits)
  • Optional course units (60 credits altogether)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Alternatives to the compulsory course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory and/or Phonetics and Phonology may be chosen if students can provide evidence of having covered comparable material in their undergraduate degree; in borderline cases, students may be asked to take a proficiency test in Welcome Week.

The optional course units can be selected to follow specialised pathways, which include Sociolinguistics, Phonetics and Phonology, Syntax and Semantics, Typology, and Romani Linguistics. One or two course units may take the form of Directed Reading units, which are individual or small group seminars about set readings on a particular topic. These are available after consultation with an appropriated member of staff and the PGT Officer. One or two course units may also be taken from a list of MA course units available in other subject areas within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, or from a list of enhanced Level-3 undergraduate course units in Linguistics and English Language, which supplement the MA specific course units on offer.

For details of postgraduate course units currently on offer, please refer to the Programme Handbook.

Facilities

All postgraduate students on this programme can make use of the purpose-designed Centre for Graduate Studies within the Ellen Wilkinson Building. The Centre opened in 2014 and provides state-of-the-art facilities for postgraduate study. These include 30 computers, LaserJet printers, `hot-desk' facilities for around 50 students (including workstation facilities for students with disabilities), and 132 secure lockers. The Centre is a meeting place for postgraduate taught and postgraduate research students, and also has several areas to relax, socialise and network.

In addition to the Centre for Graduate Studies, the University has five major computer clusters, together with many smaller clusters. In total there are more than 10,000 PCs and workstations across the campus. All provide access to standard office software as well as specialist programs, and all are connected to the campus network and internet. Every student is registered for email, file storage and internet access. If more demanding computer access is required, our specialist computing division Manchester Computing can provide high-end and specialist computing services.

The University Library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're ranked in top 50% for 4* and 3* research with 90% of environment at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent).

French
Since 2001, the Department has housed three major AHRC-funded projects in French; it also continues to be one of the leading centres in French studies for innovation in the application of IT and new technology to text-based research and the creation of international research networks. A major new monograph series, Liverpool University Press’s ‘Contemporary French and Francophone Cultures’, is co-edited within Modern Languages and Cultures.

German
Research in German studies at Liverpool continues to develop its breadth and vitality, through new appointments, and through a strategy directed towards promoting cooperation among staff in different subject areas. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, and CAVA (The Centre for Architecture and the Visual Arts). These research centres provide a dynamic context for the development of staff and postgraduate research, and underpin and vitalise interdisciplinary research within the section and department as a whole.

Hispanic Studies
We continue to extend research activity over a broad range of areas in Iberian and Latin American Studies. The School is now at the forefront of high profile research in literary, historical, linguistic and cultural studies. Our research emphasises our understanding of ‘Hispanic studies’ in the broadest sense, as relating to the multiple geographical and linguistic contexts that make up the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds.

Latin American Studies and Italian Studies
The section has recently made new appointments including a new post extending our expertise to North America and the Caribbean. We have consolidated research clusters in American, Brazilian, Hispanic and Caribbean Studies, enhancing the research environment by providing institutional support to colleagues with related and overlapping interests. A University-wide research centre Research Institute of Latin American Studies (RILAS) fosters a robust research environment based in the Department.
Research in Italian studies is a recent addition to the School’s portfolio. The focus is on the contemporary and staff are involved in interdisciplinary research projects which feature, amongst others, the Linguistic Landscape, Italian political cinema and European cinema.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

Introduction to Modern Languages and Cultures

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languages and Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose. Read more

About the course

You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose.

There are four pathways to choose from: Literary Linguistics, Social and Historical Approaches, Structural and Theoretical Linguistics, and Modern Languages (co-run with the School of Modern Languages and Cultures). You can follow one exclusively or combine the four.

The Literary Linguistics pathway examines a range of approaches to literary linguistic study including cognitive poetics, corpus stylistics and narratology; Social and Historical Approaches investigates complex real-world language problems in different social and historical contexts; Structural and Theoretical Linguistics explores the foundational mental structures and processes underlying language; and Modern Languages offers students the opportunity to study similar aspects of Slavic, Germanic and/or Romance languages.

As your understanding of theory develops, you’ll learn how to analyse language and how to carry out research projects. If you choose a work placement, you might also develop skills in marketing, archiving, teaching or publishing.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.

Core module

Research Methods.

Examples of optional modules

Linguistics in Context; Linguistics in Practice; Research Practice; Literary Language: narrative and cognition; Literary Language: history and culture; Work Placement with Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The MA offers world-leading expertise in all areas of English language and linguistics, and is therefore capable of offering the best possible support for students’ interests on any topic. You’ll benefit from our expertise in many fields, from language variation and change, psycholinguistics and syntax to conversation analysis, dialectology and the language–literature interface. Our enthusiastic staff publish internationally. Within the School of English, we hold weekly research seminars which give you the chance to hear about the latest developments.

You’ll be taught through seminars and workshops. There are also work placement opportunities in schools, museums, libraries or local businesses. Assessment varies by module, but includes essays and presentations.

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The 2-year Master in Business and Technology, organized by the Solvay Business School of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, focuses on business aspects of modern-day technology. Read more

About the programme

The 2-year Master in Business and Technology, organized by the Solvay Business School of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, focuses on business aspects of modern-day technology. The programme contains advanced business courses, technology courses, as well as courses that combine both perspectives, such as the Entrepreneurship course.

This English variant of the Dutch-language Handelsingenieur ('Business Engineering') Master is not just a copy. On the contrary, the Solvay Master of Business & Technology focuses even more on IT and innovation and has a clear international flavour.

You will have the opportunity to take a number of elective courses in the second year, thus allowing you to personalise your curriculum and specialise more in either business, technology, or both.

Becoming a business engineer

Economics as its foundation, technology as added value and entrepreneurship as a guideline - this, in short, is the philosophy behind the Belgian academic qualification of 'Business Engineer' (Handelsingenieur / Ingénieur de Gestion, sometimes translated as 'Management Engineer' or 'Commercial Engineer').

Bridge the gap between the different worlds

The idea is to train professionals who are able to understand the jargon and business environment of all of their colleagues, whether they are engineers, economists, lawyers, computer scientists or they have other specialisations. Our graduates can bridge the gap between the different worlds of the many and varying professions in the workforce.

Solid foundation in economics

During the bachelor phase of our degree, which is only offered in Dutch, our students develop a solid foundation in economics and are immersed in business disciplines such as marketing, finance, management and human resource management. This is combined with a thorough grounding in mathematics, statistics and computer science, while a strong basis in science is provided by coursework in physics, chemistry, electronics and technology. Another unique aspect of the business engineer’s education is a strong focus on language skills.

This broad background is the cornerstone of our master’s programme, and all students admitted to the program are expected to have a similar knowledge base.

High-level business programme

Through this programme international undergraduate students have the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of the Solvay Business School without having to attend classes in Dutch. Participation in a high-level business programme in Brussels, the capital of Europe, is a great asset for any student who strives to be prepared for the challenge of management in a globalised world.

Approach

Interdisciplinary

The Master in Business and Technology is a unique interdisciplinary programme with a clear focus on all business aspects of cutting edge technology, offering advanced courses in business, technology and their intersection. The offered technology courses are taught by professors from both the Faculty of Exact Sciences and the Faculty of Engineering Science. Professors of the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences & Solvay Business School for their part will provide students with highly specialised knowledge in economics and business aspects.

Intercultural

Students in the Master in Business and Technology will meet with peers from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds while greatly improving their English language skills.

International

All of the courses in the Master in Business and Technology have a distinct international flavour. Due to its all-round and international character, the programme provides students with a multitude of career opportunities after graduation.

Curriculum

https://my.vub.ac.be/sites/default/files/faculteit/ES/Documenten/msc_in_bt.pdf

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Why study at Roehampton. The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom.
  • The University has a state-of-the-art language lab with cutting-edge translation software including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS.
  • You will have the option to study the localisation of computer games, equipping you to work in one of the UK’s fastest growing industries.
  • Roehampton’s location in London is ideal, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts.

The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Through working with dedicated software and high-tech industry standard equipment, you will learn the skills you need to enter the professional market and gain the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

There is a particular emphasis on learning translation tools (in particular SDL Trados) and on localisation, especially for video games. This programme is not limited to specific language pairs. You can work into and out of English and another language of your choice.

You will be taught by staff who are leaders in the field of translation and whose work has influenced organisations such as OFCOM. They work closely with industry and bring in key professionals in the field to teach and give talks, thus helping you to make vital industry contacts.

Roehampton boasts state-of-the-art language labs with cutting-edge translation software, including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS. The lab also features a training suite and an open access area where you can work independently.

In recent years our graduates have found work with a broad range of organisations including: media companies and broadcasters such as the BBC, France TV, and RTVE; subtitling companies such as IMS, Deluxe, ITFC; and translation and localisation providers including Pole To Win, London Translations and JF Traduções e Interpretações.

As a Specialised Translation student you will become a member of the Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, which promotes excellence in research into translation-related areas including language learning, audiovisual translation, accessibility to the media and other areas of translation.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of specialised translation. In the compulsory module ‘Technical and Scientific Translation’ you will practice your skills in translating highly specialised documents into your chosen language. During the course you will also address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation.

IT skills are central to a translator's work so the compulsory module ‘Translation Tools’ will familiarise you with some of the translation tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer-assisted translation systems. You will be taught how to carry out efficient documentation and make appropriate use of research tools in solving technical and scientific translation problems.

You could also study ‘The Localisation of Video Games’ where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. Other optional modules currently include ‘Subtitling: Concepts and Practice’, where you will explore the techniques of subtitle synchronisation using specialised software. MA students will also undertake a dissertation, which will provide you with the ideal opportunity to undertake an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic that is of interest to you.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S
  • Technical and Scientific Translation Module code: AST020L737A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Economic and Legal Translation Module code: AST020L738S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST020L749A
  • Think, Create, Translate: Transcreation in the Creative Industries Module code: AST020L724Y
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Specialised translator, subtitler, technical writer, editor, terminologist, project manager or localiser.

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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This programme will enable you to teach across the curriculum in two consecutive primary school age ranges, with either French, German or Spanish as a specialist subject. Read more

This programme will enable you to teach across the curriculum in two consecutive primary school age ranges, with either French, German or Spanish as a specialist subject. Our exciting and challenging course aims to develop both competence and confidence.

In this course you will follow an innovative structure combining three strands that will help you develop the knowledge, skills and understanding you need in teaching and learning modern foreign languages at primary level. You will be engaged in practical and theoretical enquiry, both in College and on a school placement, to enable you to reach your full potential as a qualified teacher.

You follow the same programme as other PGCE (Primary) students, but also take these modern languages elements as part of curriculum studies:

  • theories of second language learning and some aspects of bilingualism
  • pedagogical approaches to modern language learning
  • impact of parents, teachers and socio-cultural context on language learning
  • critical and analytical approach to teaching strategies and resources
  • curriculum design for primary modern language teaching (QCA guidelines for KS2, linguistic progression, differentiation, assessment)
  • planning of modern languages in conjunction with other curricular areas (cross-curricular links with literacy, numeracy, citizenship, ICT, etc)
  • planning the implementation of modern languages into primary school and the transition from primary to secondary education
  • a linguistic component to support the development of your own language skills
  • a cultural component (awareness and understanding)
  • school experience in England. As part of your school placement, you teach French, German or Spanish alongside all other curriculum areas

Additional costs

You will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements. We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules..

Structure

Two modules are offered at Masters (M) level. These are General Professional Studies – a classroom-based research project with a pedagogic focus – and Curriculum Studies, which has an integrated focus in which there are a number of options. School Experience is offered at higher (H) level.

For the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), you are also formally assessed on your competence in the classroom and your ability to meet Department for Education Professional Standards including computer-based tests in literacy and numeracy, which are now a condition of entry to the programme.



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This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice. Read more

This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice.

You’ll work with a range of text types, including journalistic, administrative, technical and literary texts. You’ll also deepen your knowledge of methods, approaches and concepts in translation studies.

You’ll also choose optional modules that suit your interests and career aspirations, on issues in translation and language more generally, such as Arabic/English stylistics, translation for international organisations, computer-assisted translation, applied linguistics and genre analysis.

Taught by expert researchers and contracted practitioners, this programme makes use of the expertise across the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies within the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies. It’s a great opportunity to learn valuable skills in a city full of cultural and linguistic diversity.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Throughout the programme you’ll develop your understanding of theories, approaches and methods in translation studies through a core module. You’ll then apply that knowledge in your specialised translation modules, when you’ll gain the intercultural skills to make sound translation decisions and build skills in computer-assisted translation.

You’ll complete the course with your choice from a range of optional modules to suit your interests and career plans. You could expand your knowledge of translation by studying translation for international organisations, comparative Arabic/English stylistics, or explore broader topics such as genre analysis in translation or different aspects of applied linguistics like language acquisition or syntax.

By the end of the course in September, you’ll submit work which showcases the skills you’ve acquired – this could be a long translation, long dissertation or shorter versions of both.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 1 15 credits
  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 2 15 credits
  • Long Annotated Translation 60 credits
  • Long Dissertation 60 credits
  • Short Annotated Translation 30 credits
  • Translation for International Organisations (English-Arabic)15 credits
  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Computers and the Translator 15 credits
  • Introduction to Screen Translation 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics for Translators 15 credits
  • English for Translators 15 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Introduction to Interpreting Skills 15 credits
  • Genres in Translation 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Literary Translation 15 credits
  • English in International Communication 30 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation A 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation B 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation B 15 credits
  • Dissertation: Translation Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies run a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as areessays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on yourindividual summer project, which can be either a long annotated translation, a long dissertation, or a combination of a short annotated translation and short dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with practical translation skills between two major world languages which are increasingly valuable to a wide range of employers across industries.

It’s excellent preparation for working in fields where Arabic is a working language, or where translation in and out of Arabic is needed. These include foreign diplomacy, the media, NGOs and international organisations, the travel and tourism sector, teaching and areas of the publishing, cultural and marketing industries.

Other graduates progress to PhD research, or work as specialised freelance translators.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Why study at Roehampton. A professionally-oriented course offering students a wide range of contacts in industry in the UK and abroad. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • A professionally-oriented course offering students a wide range of contacts in industry in the UK and abroad.
  • A flexible course that allows students the option to either develop a range of translation skills or focus particularly on those they wish to pursue.
  • The course is part of the European Masters in Translation network, recognised by the European Commission as a course of excellence and can lead to further opportunities in doctoral research.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

The MA in Audiovisual Translation is an internationally leading course in its field, recognised by the European Commission as a European Masters in Translation.

This international leading programme addresses the growing demand for translators with skills in translating audiovisual texts. It covers a range of areas, including subtitling, accessibility (subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, audio description and live subtitling), multimedia localisation, dubbing and voice-over for films. The programme is open to bilingual students wishing to work between different languages, but it also welcomes monolingual English-speaking students.

This programme places significant emphasis on accessibility in the media and offers a grounding in translation theory and research methods. Through your work with dedicated software and high-tech industry-standard equipment, you will equip yourself with the skills necessary to enter the professional market and the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

You will be taught by staff who are experts in their field and influence the policies of organisations such as OFCOM. They will bring their professional experience into the classroom, meaning you will always be benefiting from the most up-to -date research and practice.

Roehampton’s location in London means you are ideally situated, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world. Work placements opportunities are also available on the course; in addition to putting the skills you have learnt on the course into practice, you'll also learn valuable new ones, build a strong CV and make vital industry contacts.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of audiovisual translation. During the course you will address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation. You will also explore the broad range of approaches to translation, including, but not limited to: linguistic, socio-linguistic, cultural, cognitive, descriptive, gender and postcolonial. You will also gain the practical skills of translation you will require for a career fit for the 21st century. You will learn how to subtitle, to translate for dubbing and voiceover, and/or to provide captioning for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing.

IT skills are central to a translator's work, so we offer a module on ‘Translation Tools’ that will familiarise you with some of the tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer assisted translation systems.

Other optional modules currently include ‘The Localisation of Video Games’, where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. You will gain the practical experience of working with the various types of materials that make up the localisation process, including in-game, user interface, interactive subtitles, online help, voice-over, manuals, packaging, graphics files and official websites.

You will complete your MA with a dissertation, which allows you to apply your understanding, knowledge, analytical, conceptual and personal skills to an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST040L748A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S 
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S 
  • Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web Module code: FSC020L004S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Students go on to careers in a broad range of media companies and broadcasters, subtitling companies, translation and localisation providers, and production houses with in-house translation teams.

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This programme introduces students to the central concepts and the analytic techniques in speech science and language processing. Read more
This programme introduces students to the central concepts and the analytic techniques in speech science and language processing. It explores the inherent structure of language and how speech is produced and used in communication, addressing both the theoretical issues and the practical skills needed to analyse and model the processes involved. As the programme is situated at an intersection of disciplines, applicants are invited from a variety of disciplines, including engineering, computer science, linguistics, psychology, speech pathology and related areas. Students take six modules and undertake a research project leading to a 15,000 word dissertation. Four core modules are mandatory and two are elective options.

Core Modules:

Speech Processing 1: spectral analysis
Formal foundations of linguistic theories
Laboratory Phonetics and Phonology
Computational theories of grammar and meaning

The elective courses may include:

History and Globalisation of English
Corpus Linguistics
Technology, Language, and Communication
Speech Production, Hearing and Perception
Advanced Syntactic Theory
Speech Processing 2: acoustic modelling
Bilingualism and the Maintenance of Irish
Multilingualism

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