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Masters Degrees (Computational Linguistic)

We have 13 Masters Degrees (Computational Linguistic)

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The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge.

The course aims:

(a) to provide students with necessary background in linguistic theory and related topics at intermediate and advanced level using a range of approaches and methodologies;

(b) to give students the opportunity to acquire expertise in their specific research interests in part by offering the opportunity of specialisation through pathways in the linguistics of particular languages (e.g. English, Romance, Celtic etc.);

(c) to provide foundations for continuation to PhD research;

(d) to offer the opportunity to participate in research culture within and beyond the Faculty, by attending and contributing to graduate seminars and reading groups;

(e) to develop the research skills required to conduct independent study such as
- formulating a realistic research proposal, with suitably delineated aims, objectives, methods, scope and expected outcome;
- preparing written work based on the proposal;
- selecting and mastering suitable research methods;
- collecting relevant bibliography;
- using computer databases and corpora;
- using relevant software, including statistical packages where appropriate;
- presenting well-argued academic material to the wider research community.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmalmptal

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the MPhil in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics:
(a) will be aware of the nature of linguistic theories, and how theories relate to models, description, analysis, and explanation

(b) will have gained, in at least four areas of linguistics, a solid foundation, including:
- familiarity with one or more models in each area
- an appreciation of the fact that there can be alternative analyses of given data, and of how to evaluate the alternatives
- where relevant, an awareness of the relation between linguistic models and the mind
- where relevant, an understanding of the relation between linguistic models and their application

(c) will have become familiar with a variety of research skills relevant to research in linguistics

(d) will have developed the strategies needed to present linguistic data, arguments, interpretations, and conclusions both in writing and in oral presentation

(e) will have built up in-depth knowledge of at least one area of linguistics to the point where original research questions can be defined and pursued independently

(f) will have had experience in research sufficient to facilitate the transition to doctoral research

(g) will have acquired both the breadth and the depth of knowledge in linguistics that will prepare them for jobs in linguistics in the future.

Format

The MPhil programme is structured progressively to form a bridge between undergraduate study and possible further research. Its balance changes through the year so that in the first two months (Michaelmas Term - October to December) there is instruction through lectures, whilst by the last three months students are carrying out independent research full-time.

All students are required to follow a course in 'Research Methods' and a statistics course to acquire skills needed for research and 'transferable' skills. Beyond that, each student will follow his or her own 'Study Plan', which allows the individual interests, needs, and strengths of the student to be met. At the start of the course the student, with advice if needed from the Director of the MPhil and subject specialists, draws up a Study Plan for the Michaelmas and Lent Terms (October to March) which is approved by the Department. This will include the selection of a minimum of four introductory taught courses to be followed in Michaelmas, and participation in a minimum of two research seminars in Lent Term. Usually the Lent Term seminars chosen build on courses which have been followed in Michaelmas.

The course structure allows great flexibility in combining areas and approaches. It provides for tailored combinations of work in any of the areas of theoretical, applied, and descriptive linguistics, ranging for instance from formal semantics to experimental phonetics and phonology, from language acquisition to computational linguistics, and from Welsh syntax to the history of linguistics in France. A piece of work may have as its focus the development of an argument in linguistic theory, the description of some aspect of a language or its use, the psycholinguistic testing of alternative linguistic analyses, the application of linguistic theory to the history of a language or languages, the acoustic description of sound systems, and so on. The various pieces of work may relate to any language or combination of languages subject to adequate advice and facilities being available for the topic in question. Some students may wish to specialise and opt for a 'Pathway' relating to a particular language or language family.

The thesis demands independent study under the guidance of the supervisor and will involve a substantial piece of original research. A proposed title and summary for the 20,000 word thesis, formulated in discussion with the supervisor, must be submitted in mid-February, and this will be subject to approval by the Department of Linguistics, the supervisor, and the Faculty's Degree Committee. Because seminars finish at the end of Lent term, students can then devote themselves full time to research for the thesis during the Easter vacation and the Easter Term (April to June). The thesis is submitted on the seventh Friday of Easter Full Term, and about two to three weeks later there may be an oral examination on the thesis at the discretion of the examiners.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is normally a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Linguistics at Kent offers an excellent opportunity to explore the broad spectrum of linguistics and its sub-disciplines. Read more
The MA in Linguistics at Kent offers an excellent opportunity to explore the broad spectrum of linguistics and its sub-disciplines.

The programme is designed for graduates with a background in language and related areas (for example, English, Modern or Classical Languages, Linguistics, Psychology, Anthropology), looking to explore the theory and methodology of linguistics in-depth, from the study of sound (phonetics and phonology) to the study of words (morphology), sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics and pragmatics). It draws upon the considerable expertise of staff in the Department of English Language & Linguistics.

Students choose four modules each in the Autumn and Spring terms, including core modules on Sounds, Structure, and Meaning, supplemented with options on, for example, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, language learning and teaching, sociolinguistics and stylistics, which allow students to develop areas of interest, and engage with aspects of their chosen discipline which are informed by the latest research and scholarship. They then complete a research dissertation of up to 15,000 words over the summer.

The programme is ideal for those with a keen interest in language in the broadest sense, and a willingness to explore theories of language critically. The programme also offers a smooth transition to doctoral work for those who wish to pursue their studies further.

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

We welcome applications from students interested in MA and PhD research. Please see our staff and research pages for more information on the topics staff are able to supervise.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, modern languages and linguistics was ranked 3rd for research quality, 3rd for research output and in the top 20 for research intensity, research impact and research power in the UK.

Our submission was the highest ranked nationally to include modern languages – a testament to our position as the UK’s European university. An impressive 100% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

The programme comprises eight 15-credit modules.

The four core modules, Sounds, Meaning, Structure and Research Skills, provide you with a solid grounding in linguistic theory and methodology, while a range of optional modules either develop themes covered in the core module, or explore the relationship between language and other disciplines, such as literature (stylistics), the mind (psycholinguistics), and society (sociolinguistics).

Teaching in the MA in Linguistics takes the form of lectures, tutor-led and student-led seminars and tutorials, as well as problem-based workshops allowing students to engage with linguistic data and theory. You also have the opportunity to attend subject-related conferences and talks by visiting speakers.

You can study the programme on a 12-month full-time or a 24-month part-time basis.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/ell/postgraduate/taught-linguistics.html

Assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of written coursework, practical/experimental work (where appropriate) and seminar presentations.

On successful completion of the taught modules, students write a 15,000-word research dissertation (included in their final grade) on a topic agreed with their supervisor.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- enable you to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and provide a smooth transition to doctoral work if you wish to pursue your studies further
- develop your critical awareness of research methodologies in linguistics
- offer a learning experience which is informed by the latest research and scholarship, and which requires you to engage with aspects of the discipline at the frontiers of knowledge
- provide further development of critical, analytical and other transferable skills acquired at first degree level.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

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The Linguistics MA allows you to study phonology and syntax alongside a pathway of your choice in English Language, Language Acquisition or European Languages. Read more
The Linguistics MA allows you to study phonology and syntax alongside a pathway of your choice in English Language, Language Acquisition or European Languages. The course, characterised by its flexibility, equips you with the research skills necessary to undertake independent study in linguistics.

The common subjects the course covers include theoretical and general linguistics, descriptive linguistics (whether focusing on English or on other languages), applied linguistics, and combinations of these specialisms. By choosing one of the pathways, you will be able to focus on your area of specific interest.

By the end of the course you will understand and engage with ideas at the forefront of linguistic research and address linguistic questions and problems currently being debated.

Delivery

During two 12-week semesters you will study six modules delivered through lectures, seminars, workshops and field work. These are supplemented by academic events and invited international specialists. You work closely with your supervisor on a 15,000 –18,000-word dissertation.

Pathway

The Linguistics MA has three specialist pathways leading to different awards:
-MA Linguistics: English Language
-MA Linguistics: Language Acquisition
-MA Linguistics: European Languages

The pathways allow you to focus on your area of particular interest, which could range from lexical innovation, sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, child language acquisition, psycholinguistics, or topics relating to French, German and Spanish. Whichever pathway you choose, you gain:
-Research skills necessary for independent study in linguistics and English language
-Critical engagement with current work in the subject area
-Confidence to address linguistic questions and participate in current theoretical debates
-Advanced knowledge of a range of issues in the subject area
-Mastery of the methods and skills required to obtain and interpret relevant research data

All pathways involve selecting modules covering the two central linguistic disciplines of phonology and syntax.

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This course explores 20th-century history of linguistics and the philosophy of linguistics. Tensions between different conceptions of language, the issues surrounding research methodology in linguistics, sociolinguistics and the sociology of language are examined. Read more
This course explores 20th-century history of linguistics and the philosophy of linguistics. Tensions between different conceptions of language, the issues surrounding research methodology in linguistics, sociolinguistics and the sociology of language are examined. This Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognised course is designed to prepare you for doctoral study.

The course combines a mixture of generic research training modules with more specialised modules covering research training and specific linguistic knowledge. You will gain a working knowledge of the methodology and skills in quantitative and qualitative research in language and linguistic studies. You will carry out a literature review, independent fieldwork, and undertake sociolinguistic analysis using a variety of mathematical and computational tools. We offer supervision in the following areas:

Linguistic theory

-Syntactic theory and comparative syntax
-Phonological theory
-Morphophonology and morphosyntax
-Philosophy of language
-Philosophy of linguistics
-Architecture of the language faculty

Language variation and change

-Historical/diachronic linguistics
-Variationist/comparative linguistics
-Sociolinguistics
-Grammaticalization
-Dialect syntax
-Corpus analysis
-Linguistic typology

Language evolution, acquisition, and development

-First language acquisition and development
-The acquisition of second language morphosyntax and phonology
-Evolutionary linguistics

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The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more
The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.
All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory):
Grammatical Theory
Semantics and Pragmatics
Phonetics and Phonology
The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

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As a student on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology, you will study the sounds and sound patterns of the languages of the world from cognitive and social angles, combining theory and data. Read more
As a student on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology, you will study the sounds and sound patterns of the languages of the world from cognitive and social angles, combining theory and data. You will be guided by academics who are recognized experts in their field, with specialisms in language change, acquisition, prosody, spoken interaction and sociophonetics.

Overview

Why do the sounds of languages change over time? How do we learn the phonologies of our first and second languages? Why do we have different accents? What information do fine details of everyday speech convey?

These are some of the many questions that you can pursue on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology. This MA programme is designed to familiarise you with a broad range of topics within phonetics and phonology and give you the necessary skills to develop your own research in these fields. You will learn how to collect and analyse phonetic and phonological data, and how to use it to answer theoretical questions.

You will be taught by a diverse group of researchers drawing on traditional and time-tested methods of analysis as well as cutting-edge technological advances. Our own research combines a focus on careful data analysis with a strong interest in theoretical questions. We hope to instill the same attention to theoretical and empirical detail in our students.

Aims
Our MA in Phonetics and Phonology will:
-Deepen your knowledge of phonetics and phonology
-Give you practical training in using auditory and instrumental techniques in phonetic analysis, as well as a range of computational methods
-Provide you with a strong background in quantitative and qualitative data analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Train you to carry out original research in phonetics and phonology

Teaching and assessment

Teaching methods
We aim to give you practical training in the skills that are essential for phoneticians and phonologists as well as a firm grounding in theory. Our teaching methods reflect these goals: you will attend a variety of lab sessions, ear training classes and discussion groups besides more conventional lectures and seminars. You will also work closely with a supervisor who will help you develop your own research programme.

We encourage our students to be an active part of the research community here at York. You will have the opportunity to interact with researchers from within and outside the department, and to attend departmental colloquia where you can broaden your view of phonetics, phonology and linguistics in general.

Assessment
This MA programme comprises an overall 180 credits. A large part of this is made up by the dissertation, which is worth 80 credits. As a result, the decisive factor in determining the outcome of the MA is the dissertation.

For the taught modules, assessment is typically by an exam, a dossier of exercises or a short essay for the Autumn Term Modules, and by a 5,000 word essay or equivalent for the Spring Term Modules.

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This programme introduces students to the central concepts and the analytic techniques in speech science and language processing. Read more
This programme introduces students to the central concepts and the analytic techniques in speech science and language processing. It explores the inherent structure of language and how speech is produced and used in communication, addressing both the theoretical issues and the practical skills needed to analyse and model the processes involved. As the programme is situated at an intersection of disciplines, applicants are invited from a variety of disciplines, including engineering, computer science, linguistics, psychology, speech pathology and related areas. Students take six modules and undertake a research project leading to a 15,000 word dissertation. Four core modules are mandatory and two are elective options.

Core Modules:

Speech Processing 1: spectral analysis
Formal foundations of linguistic theories
Laboratory Phonetics and Phonology
Computational theories of grammar and meaning

The elective courses may include:

History and Globalisation of English
Corpus Linguistics
Technology, Language, and Communication
Speech Production, Hearing and Perception
Advanced Syntactic Theory
Speech Processing 2: acoustic modelling
Bilingualism and the Maintenance of Irish
Multilingualism

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This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan. Read more

Programme description

This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan.

It is designed primarily for graduates with a background related to linguistics and/or psychology who wish to develop their knowledge of current research on language acquisition (first, second, bilingual, and impaired) and language change from a cognitive perspective and from the point of view of current linguistic theories.

Joining a vibrant research community of developmental linguists, you will have the opportunity to carry out advanced research to try to answer questions related to the area of language development and bilingualism, such as ‘how do children learn language?’ or ‘what happens when we forget a language?’

You will benefit from the programme's strengths in:

scope (with equal emphasis on first and second language acquisition and bilingualism)
interdisciplinary teaching (staff drawn from linguistics, psychology and informatics)
skill-oriented training (through methodology courses, lab sessions and project work)

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
Introduction to Syntax
First Language Acquisition
Second Language Acquisition
Psychology of Language Learning
Univariate Statistics and Methodology Using R

Option courses may include:

Sentence Comprehension
Discourse Comprehension
Language Production
Origins and Evolution of Language
Simulating Language
Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
Experimental Pragmatics
Developmental Language Disorders
Research Methods in Developmental Linguistics
Language Evolution in the Lab
Computational Phonology
Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research in language learning and development. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.

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The one year MSc program offers four tracks. Business Communication and Digital Media. Communication Design. New Media Design. Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

The one year MSc program offers four tracks:

  • Business Communication and Digital Media
  • Communication Design
  • New Media Design
  • Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Besides the 1 year Master, also a two- year Master is offered:

  • Research Master in Language and Communication

The MSc in Communication and Information Sciences offers a unique program in which you learn about how people acquire and transfer information and how new means of communication can be used creatively and innovatively. The approach taken at Tilburg University is unique in the sense that the broad concept of communication is examined from many perspectives, including those of linguistics, cognitive and social psychology, computational modeling and document design.

This program is intended for highly talented and motivated students with a keen sense of intellectual curiosity and intellectual ambition. In this Master’s program, you will encounter state-of-the-art research in the broad interdisciplinary field of communication. The point of departure is natural communication: how is information transferred from one person to another? For what purpose? You will participate in a wide range of courses such as communication strategies, non-verbal communication and computer vision. This unique combination of approaches and research traditions will enable you to work as a communication expert, and answer questions such as:

•What is the best way to present information to an audience?

•How do people communicate within an organization?

•How can you influence people's behavior through language?

You take a particular interest in language and you are seeking to broaden and deepen your academic knowledge. You are interested in the many different aspects of communication such as the effect that words can have, how people produce language, and linguistic phenomena such as metaphors, and the stories behind them.

This one-year MSc program offers four different specializations: Business Communication & Digital Media, Communication Design, New Media Design and Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence.  

Career Prospects Communication and Information Sciences

After completing your MSc program in Communication and Information Sciences, a broad range of career paths in business, research and education will be open to you. You will be able to analyze and consult on internal and external communications. With a Master's degree, you can start your career as a scientific researcher in this field. And remember that these opportunities are worldwide because your studies are internationally-oriented.



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In the two-year Research Master's specialization Language and Cognition (MA Linguistics), you will study patterns of language and speech and the way our brain employs and organizes them. Read more
In the two-year Research Master's specialization Language and Cognition (MA Linguistics), you will study patterns of language and speech and the way our brain employs and organizes them. The programme offers a unique combination of n euro- and psycholinguistics, theoretical linguistics, developmental linguistics, computational linguistics, and communication science.

The programme is meant for talented students who aspire to do research in the field of Linguistics. After finishing the degree, you will have acquired essential research skills and fundamental knowledge of linguistic analysis, language development, and language processing. In addition, you will be able to study language at different levels, such as words, sentences, meaning and interaction.

The programme is linked to the excellent, multidisciplinary research carried out at the Centre for Language and Cognition Groningen (CLCG) and the Groningen Research School for Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience (BCN).

After finishing the programme you receive a Master of Arts degree in Linguistics.

Why in Groningen?

- Intensive supervision by high-quality researchers in small groups
- A challenging multidisciplinary approach
- Partial Talent Grants and Research Assistantships

Job perspectives

After graduation, you are well prepared for a career in research. In fact, this programme is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD position at a university. You can conduct research in Linguistics, such as Neuro- or Clinical Linguistics, Language Development or Theoretical Linguistics. Other options are Speech Technology, and Communication and Computer Linguistics.

Job examples

- Research oriented career in Linguistics

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Programme description. This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan. Read more

Programme description

This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan.

It is designed primarily for graduates with a background related to linguistics and/or psychology who wish to develop their knowledge of current research on language acquisition (first, second, bilingual, and impaired) and language change from a cognitive perspective and from the point of view of current linguistic theories.

Joining a vibrant research community of developmental linguists, you will have the opportunity to carry out advanced research to try to answer questions related to the area of language development and bilingualism, such as ‘how do children learn language?’ or ‘what happens when we forget a language?’

You will benefit from the programme's strengths in:

  • scope (with equal emphasis on first and second language acquisition and bilingualism)
  • interdisciplinary teaching (staff drawn from linguistics, psychology and informatics)
  • skill-oriented training (through methodology courses, lab sessions and project work)

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

  • Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • First Language Acquisition
  • Second Language Acquisition
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Univariate Statistics and Methodology Using R

Option courses may include:

  • Sentence Comprehension
  • Discourse Comprehension
  • Language Production
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Simulating Language
  • Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
  • Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
  • Experimental Pragmatics
  • Developmental Language Disorders
  • Research Methods in Developmental Linguistics
  • Language Evolution in the Lab
  • Computational Phonology
  • Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research in language learning and development. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.



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This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in specialised translation in the scientific, technical and medical areas. Read more
This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in specialised translation in the scientific, technical and medical areas. The programme offers you the opportunity to develop your translation and language skills, to deepen your understanding of the workings of language as an essential tool of communication and to gain vital experience in the rapidly developing area of translation technology.

Degree information

By focusing on the translation of scientific, technical and medical texts, you'll be equipped with the skills needed for professional work in the translation industry and for research in translation studies. You'll practice translation in specific language pairs and will become conversant with computer-based translation technology which has been transforming the way in which professional translators work.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 5 core modules (90 credits), 2 optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Language & Translation
-Translation Technology
-Language & Automation
-Scientific & Technical Translation
-Medical Translation

Optional modules - students choose two optional modules from the list below:
-Accessibility to the Media
-Localisation
-Professional Skills for Translators
-Subtitling
-Translating for Voiceover & Dubbing

Part-time students take optional modules in year two.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words consisting of either an annotated translation or a critical discussion of a theoretical aspect of translation.

Teaching and learning
The degree programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, interactive practical seminars, practical translation assignments and hands-on experience with a wide range of translation tools and technology. Assessment is carried out through essays, project work, take-home translation assessments and in-class tests.

Careers

Most students find challenging and rewarding work within the translation industry on completion of the degree. Some are working as in-house and freelance translators, while others are active as project managers, translation tools experts and computational linguists in organisations such as Xerox, Amazon, SDL International, Expedia, Hogarth, Cannon, SDI-Media, ITR, VSI and Deluxe to name but a few. In addition, the MSc is designed to serve as a basis for a Translation Studies PhD.

Employability
Translation is a dynamic and rapidly developing profession, which calls for linguistically talented people with a clear understanding of the issues involved in cross-cultural transcoding and who are able to utilise the latest computer-based tools.
On completion of this MSc, you will be well placed for a fast-track progression in your chosen career. We aim to make you highly attractive to employers within the translation industry and the world of communications, an to international institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union. In addition, the skills acquired through taking this MSc will be highly relevant if your aim is to establish yourself as a freelance translator.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of London, UCL is excellently placed to offer opportunities for networking and to establish professional contacts. At UCL we prepare you for the professional world by performing different roles within the translation workflow and by translating specialised texts on the widest possible variety of material, ranging from medical reports and research papers to user guides, product documentation, patents, technical specification, audiovisual programmes and web pages.

We organise a wide range of activities which offer you a unique opportunity for informal contact with professional translators, translation agencies and leading academics. We also work closely with industry partners to ensure that the programme possesses the maximum professional relevance.

You will enjoy working with a team of renowned academics and professional translators, which has gained an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research.

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