• Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"composing"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Composing)

  • "composing" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 43
Order by 
The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices. Read more
The NFTS trains composers in both live and electro-acoustic music for the moving image in a production context closely modelled on Industry working practices.

-Training in live and electro-acoustic music
-Students compose for wide variety of audio visual material
-Creative and technical skills developed
-Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment
-Flexible curriculum adaptable to individual needs
-Individual music suites
-Recording sessions with live musicians Business, legal and professional skills taught
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/fees-funding/funding-guide

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. Our emphasis on collaboration means that Composing students are informed and involved throughout the filmmaking process. In particular, composers work closely with other students in Editing and Sound Post Production, increasing their understanding of the relationship between audio and moving images.

Today’s language of screen music has shifted. While many scores still provide a musical commentary on the action, others find a way to integrate music into the fabric of the film itself, creating a seamless weave analogous to the camerawork or editing, to the assimilation of music into the sound world of the film as a whole. Sound design and music grow ever closer - in fact, the roles of sound designer and composer are becoming blurred to the extent that a close collaboration between the two processes is often essential.

The application of music to film - the choices inherent in the "when", "how" and "why" - all stem from an informed understanding of the intention of the film and the contribution music could make to it. Informed understanding, musical versatility and the fostering of an individual musical voice are the intentions of this course and these are determined by the practical and intellectual demands on composers working in the industry.

Composing graduates are qualified to take on all forms of work in film and television as well as productions in multimedia and interactive programming.

CURRICULUM

The Composing course is developmental and progressive. In year one, students are taught the techniques and contexts which inform writing music for the screen. The first term comprises an intensive process during which students compose to a variety of exercises, each one chosen to focus on a particular problem of film composition. Some of these exercises are completed by each student and discussed in seminars and individually assessed. In term two, further exercises concentrate on issues having to do with scoring for live instruments, the combination of live and electro-acoustic elements and the integration a limited range of sound design into film scores. In addition, students will begin engaging with projects generated by other students at the NFTS. This process will continue and dominate the third term. Each student contribution to those films will also be assessed. Students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

In year two, students’ activities will be dominated primarily by work generated from other parts of the school. However, lectures, seminars and the occasional workshop will be provided to clarify and expand issues arising from those projects. As in year 1, students will also participate in visits from industry professionals.

YEAR ONE
A series of composing workshops combining practical exercises and seminars:
-Basic narrative techniques
-Midi (sampling) use of samples and audio
-Combining music and sound
-Narrative with dialogue
-Non-fiction scoring
-Instrumentation and orchestration
-Composing to script

Ongoing analysis of feature film soundtracks and film structure Orchestration and recording with live musicians

Workshops with Sound Design and Editing students:
-Abstract Film Workshop
-Without Images - a sound-only project
-Animation exercises
-Dramaturgy Workshop – focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance

Productions
-Zen and Beyond Time - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
-Documentary poetry exercise collaborating with Documentary Direction, Editing and Sound Design
-First Year Film – the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments
-Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production
-Cross Spec - an introduction to film language and storytelling involving all departments

YEAR TWO
-Orchestration and recording with live musicians
-Continued analysis of films
-2nd year short fiction production, shot on a digital format
-Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

Read less
This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Read more
This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Taught by experienced professional film/TV composers, it provides an opportunity to collaborate with filmmakers and animators, as well as the chance to write for ensembles.

Key features
-The curriculum is enriched by a broad view of musical styles and genres, exploiting the diversity of a repertoire that encompasses Western classical music, popular and world musics.
-The wide selection of option modules (see the course webpage) allows you to tailor the course to your interests. The major project also enables you to compose an extensive piece of music to picture and work with filmmakers, enhancing your research and project development skills.
-There is a wide range of music groups at Kingston University, ranging from a chamber choir to Javanese gamelan, and you will have the chance to write for a range of ensembles, including the professional ensemble in residence.
-There are many possibilities for collaboration with filmmaking and animation students.

What will you study?

You will compose music for moving image and work with filmmakers, screen designers and animators. You will analyse film and TV scores, exploring how music is used to create atmosphere, convey mood and depict setting, character and action. In addition, you will explore the relationships between composer and producer, directors and music editors. You will also study and practise the use of main themes, underscoring and the harmonic languages of soundtracks. There will be an opportunity to have your compositions performed by a professional ensemble, conducted to picture in a professional recording environment. You will also learn about the technology used to produce high-quality soundtracks for the music industry, as well as business and copyright issues.

Assessment

Compositions, soundtracks, essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Major Project
-Professional and Live Aspects of Composing for Film and Television
-Researching Music
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television

Optional modules
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

Read less
The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry, so we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have. Read more

Award: Master of Arts, University of Chichester

The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry, so we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have. It’s a strongly project focused course and you will develop an effective workflow, remote working and collaboration and a clear understanding of what’s expected of the game composer as a member of the game audio team. All your tutors are working professional video game composers.

You will work on an inspiring range of games, including commercial releases, provided as part of your course materials. You will learn not only how to create inspiring interactive music but also how to implement your score inside the game using industry standard middleware like FMOD and WWise.

There are plenty of music production schools yet, despite increasing interest in video games soundtracks, almost none who specialize in scoring computer games.

This is currently the only online master’s degree in composing for video games. So if you enjoy working in a vibrant and rapidly evolving area of music production, if you embrace the technical and creative challenges that scoring computer games will involve, then come and join us.

Course Highlights

- Personal 1-to-1 tuition from top professional composers.
- Work on over 30 real-world projects. The workload is challenging but it’s only through hard work that you will truly reach the next level.
- Detailed feedback from working professionals, online workshops and tutorial groups, forum discussions and exclusive webinars.
- Unique programme developing key, industry facing skill sets, to prepare you for a career as a video game composer.

Fees

All of our postgraduate courses have a flat fee, regardless of whether you are full or part time.

Course: £8,850 / $12,950 / €11,600

Fees can be paid as one upfront cost, or as instalments spread monthly across the duration of the course.

Students are required to buy, rent or access additional books, scores, recordings, films and other reference material.

Time Commitment

In the UK, an MA involves 180 academic credits and each credit represents a notional 10 hours of work..

For Composing for Video Games students there are 24 projects including a longer Major Project at the end of the course.

Practice based creative degrees are notoriously difficult to quantify in terms of how long they take to complete. It depends to a large extent, on how fast you write music. Some students write 5 minutes of music a day while others write 5 minutes a week or less. If you work reasonably productively, i.e. 2-3 minutes a day, which is probably average in the professional working industry, you would complete the work in much less time.

A well organized person, working productively, might be able to complete the course in two or three days a week whereas another working slower, might take 5 days a week. Assume therefore that the full-time lies somewhere between 2 and 5 days a week depending on your work rate. Part time would be pro-rata so a three year schedule would be 1-2 days a week.

The Provisional Schedule

Both full-time and part-time students join the same course. Full time students will compete their taught modules by the end of the 9th month. The rest of the year is spent on their major project. Part time students will do their modules in roughly twice the time.

To encourage a sense of “togetherness”, most of the group activities are not locked into particular modules. Guest lecturers, webinars, workshops and solo live sessions will be scheduled regularly throughout the year and are free for all to attend. The individual module work is normally more focused on individual or small group tuition and so is more flexible in terms of timing.

Application

When you are sure you are ready to apply for the programme, go to the course page and click the “apply now” button. This will take you to our store where you can pay the non-returnable application fee of £50 / €70 / $90.

Once your payment has been processed, you will be able to login and complete the application pack.

We will need your personal details, details of your academic, musical and technical background. If you are offered a place, we will require copies of a number of documents including those confirming your academic history, identity and language ability where English is not your first language.

You will also be required to send us some music.

For full details on the application procedure, please visit our website below.

Visit the MA Composing for Video Games page on the ThinkSpace Education website for more details!

Read less
Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

Read less
-Join a programme that is sharply tailored to respond to the current demand for creative professionals who are able to provide sound and music content for the film and video game industry. Read more
-Join a programme that is sharply tailored to respond to the current demand for creative professionals who are able to provide sound and music content for the film and video game industry
-Develop a showreel demonstrating your creative talent in composing music and designing sound for a wide range of media (video, film, video games), opening up a 360º horizon of possibilities and opportunities for work
-Collaborate with MA Film students in our School of Creative Arts
-Learn in the university’s top-class facilities, assisted by tutors who are themselves industry professionals

Why choose this course?

This course is conceived to meet the current industry’s demand for creative professionals who are equally versed in music composition as well as sound design, and can work effectively across a range of media – whether it’s video, narrative film or interactive games.

All aspects of the soundtrack are systematically explored in both linear and non-linear environments, leading to a fuller understanding of the discipline, of the industry, and of the production processes.

On this course, you will harness the whole gamut of sonic resources for your creative practice – from acoustic instruments to electroacoustic sound, utilising all the latest studio techniques and technologies.

You’ll study in the University’s top-class studios, supported by tutors who are experienced industry professionals, with potential to collaborate with students from our MA Film course.

With targeted sessions and expert guidance, you’ll develop a showreel demonstrating your creative talent in providing sound and music for a wide range of media (video, film, video games), opening up a 360º horizon of possibilities and opportunities for work.

What our students say

“The course is well structured, giving opportunities to explore the field of composition in a very broad way and also focus on particular areas of interest. I have genuinely found it exciting and inspiring to participate and I found the atmosphere just as I hoped: creative, relevant, stimulating, professional and fun.”
Nicola Hutchison, teacher at Hertfordshire College of Music and active multidisciplinary artist

"The MSc Composition course was a real eye-opener as to the many applications of composition, allowing me to produce work far beyond the realms of what I thought possible."
Chris Moorhead, freelance composer for media, and session player

"It has been a life changing experience for me, and that is no overstatement. Your particularly vigorous and passionate dedication to cracking open our own personal artistic consciousness underpinned a revelatory roller coaster ride from which I learned and will continue to learn a great deal."
Alex Simler, instrumental teacher at Hertfordshire Music Services

Careers

Graduates from this programme will be ideally positioned to pursue a career in the thriving field of acoustic/electroacoustic composition and sound design for film, television, and interactive games. You may, in addition, consider positions in music publishing, music journalism and criticism, teaching or you may continue your higher education at doctoral level.

Graduate successes

Sebastien Crossley graduated in 2010, and is currently composing for a new Channel 4 sitcom.

Nichola Hutchison graduated in 2011 and teaches composition at Hertfordshire College of Music. She is also active as a multidisciplinary artist creating A/V installations for galleries.

Chris Barn graduated in 2012 and is composing for the Channel 4 Random Acts series with renowned poet Benjamin Zephaniah.

Edward Abela graduated in 2013, and has composed for several short films for SABB productions, SMMusic Library, and Candie & Bell, amongst others.

2014 graduate Jamie Stonehouse is now working as an assistant composer and audio engineer at media company Urban Soul Orchestra, and has just been awarded a 3-year studentship for doctoral studies at Kent University.

Callum Judd graduated in 2015 and is working as a free lance composer for a variety of commercial projects, including a documentary on Japan.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance, recording, as necessary. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Major Study:Music Projects
-Music, Media and Production (Discourse/Reflection)
-Practice 1:Soundtrack and the Cinematic
-Practice 2: Soundtrack in Digital and Interactive Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

Read less
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

Read less
This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. Read more
This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. For your final major project you will focus on composition and production within the popular music genre, producing an extended professional-quality album of your popular music compositions/covers.

Key features
-The wide selection of option modules allows you to tailor the course to your interests.
-Several members of staff are engaged practically with the professional production of popular music. You will also have the chance to attend masterclasses and workshops run by national and international producers, performers and composers - such as Youth, Gavin Greenaway, Rick Astley and Steve Martland.
-We have five, state-of-the-art recording studios, including one with a large live room used for professional recordings. We also have two computer laboratories containing iMacs with full music software for sequencing and processing.
-Lunchtime concerts, involving students or visiting artists, take place throughout the year.

What will you study?

You will focus on the production of current popular music, creating and recording tracks using the University's high-quality recording facilities.

You will also explore the composition of popular music, recording techniques and the marketing of popular music. In addition, you will widen your musical knowledge and experience by choosing one option module from an extensive range, including those covering sound design, ensemble performance and composing for film and TV.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, compositions, productions, and major recording project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

Read less
If you have a broad range of musical interests and would prefer not to specialise your studies, this course is ideal. Read more
If you have a broad range of musical interests and would prefer not to specialise your studies, this course is ideal. It aims to develop a range of musical and critical skills and knowledge; encourage initiative, creativity, critical evaluation and independence of thought; develop a systematic understanding of relevant musical knowledge and a critical awareness of contemporary issues; and provide knowledge of research practices, enabling you to undertake a substantial individual dissertation or composition project.

Key features
-You will have the chance to attend masterclasses and workshops run by national and international performers and composers, such as Judith Weir, Howard Skempton, Stephen Coombs, Jane Manning, Steve Goss, Steve Martland, Arditti String Quartet, Brian Ferneyhough, Kate Ryder and Kathron Sturrock.
-Lunchtime concerts, involving students or visiting artists, take place throughout the year.
-Facilities include a large rehearsal and performance space with supporting recording equipment, an extensive collection of musical instruments and a fully networked IT environment.

What will you study?

The core modules concentrate on research methods and colloquia, and will introduce you to a broad range of issues in music. You can then choose from an extensive list of modules, which include those based in performance, composing, music education and popular music.

The major project offers you the opportunity to focus on an area of your own choice and specialise through written work or composition. You can choose from a wide range of possible topics relating to your own interests. In addition, you can join any of the variety of University ensembles or form your own ensemble.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, compositions, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

Read less
This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and understanding of both current and prospective music educators. Read more
This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and understanding of both current and prospective music educators. It provides a unique opportunity for students from all over the world to investigate the UK system of music education, consider major issues in international music education research and undertake a comparative study of music education practices across different cultures.

Key features
-You can tailor the course to your own interests by selecting one option module from a wide range of music topics.
-The core modules will develop your research, project planning and development skills in preparation for your major project, and you will receive guidance from a specialist tutor.
-The curriculum is enriched by our eclectic view of musical styles and genres, exploiting the diversity of a repertoire that encompasses Western classical music, popular and world musics.

What will you study?

You will develop and implement a musical project within an educational environment and undertake a substantial research project on a topic of your choice. Alongside this core study, which encompasses key research issues in music as well as in music education, you can choose from a variety of option modules and develop new skills to exploit in your own teaching.

You will have the opportunity to develop and enhance your skills as a practitioner by devising, delivering and evaluating a music education project. As part of the broader musical community, you will be able to further enhance your performance skills by participating in some of the many University ensembles.

Assessment

Assessment includes essays, critiques, position papers, practical projects, presentations, research papers and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Performance Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

Read less
This course aims to create informed, skilled and insightful performers across a wide range of musical genres. It is ideal if you aspire to become a professional performer or are an instrumental teacher and would like to further develop your knowledge of music performance. Read more
This course aims to create informed, skilled and insightful performers across a wide range of musical genres. It is ideal if you aspire to become a professional performer or are an instrumental teacher and would like to further develop your knowledge of music performance. You will receive individual tuition on your instrument or voice from a top professional performer.

Key features
-You will have the opportunity to develop and enhance your performance skills through one-to-one tuition, masterclasses, recitals and ensemble participation.
-Facilities include a large rehearsal and performance space with supporting recording equipment, an extensive collection of musical instruments and a fully networked IT environment.
-You will have the chance to attend masterclasses and workshops run by national and international performers and composers - such as Stephen Coombs, Jane Manning, Steve Martland, Judith Weir, Steve Goss, Howard Skempton, Arditti String Quartet, Brian Ferneyhough - and take part in events with a range of performers from different backgrounds.

What will you study?

You will cover issues of performance practice, preparation of performance, aesthetics of music performance, analysis for performers, the psychology of performance, and performance presentation. You will also be asked to critique and evaluate your own performances, and will undertake a performance-based project. A range of option modules allows you to develop your skills in related topics, such as composition, conducting, arranging and ensemble performance.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods is used, including a major public performance recital; a portfolio of presentational and promotional materials; essays, critiques and critical reviews; and a position paper, presentations and research paper.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-Major Project
-Performance Studies
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

Read less
This is a one-year, research and compositional performance-based MSc with a focus on practices for composing music and sound for the screen. Read more

Programme description

This is a one-year, research and compositional performance-based MSc with a focus on practices for composing music and sound for the screen.

The focus of the compositional investigations will include film/TV music as well as current computer multimedia production practices, such as for YouTube ‘virals’ and music videos, commercials, video games and web pages. You will become proficient in the technical, artistic and intellectual demands of composing music and sound for use in TV/radio/ film and other media environments, such as the internet. You will be able to experiment with new styles in media, and receive practical experience and timely feedback in collaborating with others.

The programme also provides an opportunity for students to enhance business and management skills in the media industry as they pertain to music and sound.

An exciting, recent development within the School has been the establishment of the Edinburgh Film Music Orchestra, which currently performs film music in all facets of performance and could potentially feature performances by Composition for Screen students.

Programme structure

This programme is structured around four compulsory courses and two option courses. You will also complete a final project by creating a music composition for a screen-media environment, along with an accompanying written essay component.

Learning outcomes

Goals and outcomes of the programme include:

Development of compositional skills, especially those related to musical/dramatic association with the screen.
Update and enrich student’s current electronic music and media skills, including notational software, sequencer software, hardware and mixing, and media synchronisation and production methods.
Develop a portfolio and demo reel for scoring work through experience in media music projects.
Become familiar with collaborative processes when working with others in a media music environment.
Learn to observe and research processes in media music and improve abilities to communicate those processes with others.
Develop a resourcefulness and self-sufficiency that will enable you to undertake music for screen projects in a professional atmosphere.

Career opportunities

The rise of the internet and other multimedia platforms for film has significantly improved career prospects for composers. Your degree will not only set you apart from the competition, it will also provide you with a network of peers and industry professionals who can assist you in getting your work to the screen.

Read less
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

Read less
Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more
Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers
• animation
• video game trailers
• science fiction
• dramatic cinema
• silent film
• costume drama
• documentary and…
• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

• Practical Composition 1 and 2
• Film and Television Score Production
• Business of Music
• Orchestration
• Combining Sounds
• Composers' Workshop Series.

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Music is a vital and dynamic aspect of a school curriculum and is an important human practice throughout the world. The PGCE Secondary (Music) course prepares students to teach this challenging and fulfilling subject in a way which reflects the essence of music itself, i.e. Read more
Music is a vital and dynamic aspect of a school curriculum and is an important human practice throughout the world. The PGCE Secondary (Music) course prepares students to teach this challenging and fulfilling subject in a way which reflects the essence of music itself, i.e. a unique practical and creative discipline in which we can understand and express our ideas.

The course allows student teachers to develop their musicianship in the context of the classroom and thus empower young people to use music as part of their lives.

You can exit the PGCE courses with one of two awards. The Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) is awarded to those students who gain less than 40 Level 7credits, but who pass all modules, gaining 100 or 120 Level 6 credits. If you achieve 40 or 60 Level 7 credits and pass all the modules, you will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE). All students completing a PGCE will also be recommended for QTS.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/pgce-secondary-music.aspx

Course detail

The aims of the course are:
• to challenge assumptions about the nature of music and music education;
• to analyse the various theories and practices of music education through active learning;
• to place listening, composing and performing, in a wide range of styles and genres, at the centre of the student teacher’s learning experience;
• to experience working alongside teachers in music departments;
• to give access to the latest teaching and learning resources;
• to develop the student teacher as a reflective and enthusiastic practitioner;
• to develop skills which complement the student teacher’s existing expertise;
• to help student teachers develop a well principled philosophy of music education which they are able to use in the profession as the basis of their practice.

The course is organised in partnership with schools in Kent and beyond. We use the expertise of teachers in partnership schools and tutors in university sessions to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding required for teaching music to young people, across the full secondary age and ability range.

Suitability

The course is for people who want to become qualified teachers.

Content

All PGCE courses cover three main areas: Curriculum Studies, Professional Studies and Enhanced Studies. However, all learning on the course is designed to complement professional practice and the academic study will be informed by and inform practice.

PGCE students will be placed in two schools for a mixture of blocked time and serial (e.g. one day a week) time adding up to meet the current Government requirement for a minimum 120 days in school.

• Professional Studies
Professional Studies sessions aim to inform you about aspects of professional practice which are central to your work, whatever your subject, including how do we learn, how do we include all children, how is teaching a professional activity, how can education be organised and how can learning be assessed.

• Curriculum Studies
This module involves work in studying key concepts that underpin the various curricula and syllabi for your subject. The sessions allow discussion of different pedagogies and allow reflection on differing school approaches to the subject.

• Enhanced Studies
The module enables you to choose an area of personal interest to you to study this in more depth through a research project based in a school.

Format

Across the PGCE year there is an equivalent of 12 weeks of taught input which take place at university on the Canterbury Campus. The teaching on these days will be a mixture of seminar and workshop activity. There will also be a small number of lecture inputs.

Across the PGCE year there is the equivalent of 24 weeks spent in school. Student teachers will learn in a variety of ways in school, including from experienced mentors, through observing others and through experience. There is also a degree of individual support for learning offered in this course provided by mentors in school and the university tutors.

Tutors and mentors who lead the learning on this course are all qualified teachers.

Assessment

You will be assessed in two main ways­ via academic assignments and assessment of your teaching.

You will submit academic assignments for 20 credits in each curriculum, professional and enhanced studies modules. Each submission will include a written element, but you may also be assessed via presentations or practical performances as relevant to their chosen subject options.

What can I do next?

Upon successful completion of the programme students can teach in schools as qualified teachers.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less
This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music. Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. Read more
This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music.

Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. These are followed by a major project: a musicological dissertation or edition for musicologists (including those on the Russian Music and Medieval Music pathways), a minor and a major recital for performers, and a portfolio of compositions for composers.

The content of this MA programme relates closely to the research interests of the academic staff.

Programme structure

Core units

All students take the Research Skills for Musicians unit (20 credits).

Optional units can vary each year but may include:

Composition Pathway
-Contemporary Compositional Ideas and Techniques (40 credits)
-Introduction to Professional Composing (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits)
-Portfolio of Compositions (60 credits)

Medieval Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Latin (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Musicology Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Performance Pathway
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Four optional units (20 credits each)
-Performance (60 credits)

Russian Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Russian (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Music have gone on to careers as musicians, senior music assistants, organ scholars and self-employed composers. A number of MA graduates have also become music teachers.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X