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Masters Degrees (Complexity)

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The Modelling Biological Complexity MRes is designed for students who wish to develop the skills to apply mathematical, computational and physical science techniques to real biological problems. Read more

The Modelling Biological Complexity MRes is designed for students who wish to develop the skills to apply mathematical, computational and physical science techniques to real biological problems. The programme provides a broad overview of the cutting edge research at the interface of the life, mathematical and physical sciences.

About this degree

Foundation courses use innovative teaching methods for interdisciplinary research to provide essential background knowledge in mathematical, computational and physical techniques and a broad introduction to core biological concepts and systems. A range of interdisciplinary research-driven projects follow in which students gain experience of different research techniques and a range of areas of biological interest.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four compulsory modules: foundation courses module, transferable skills module (20%), three mini projects (40%) and a research (summer) project (40%).

Core modules

  • Modelling Biological Complexity: Foundation Course (non credit bearing)
  • Transferable and Generic Skills
  • Mini projects
  • Research (summer) Project

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research (summer) project, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 15,000 words, a short presentation and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, laboratory work, case presentations, seminars, tutorials and project work. Student performance is assessed by essays, mini projects, oral and poster presentations, a computer programming and biological database task, web development, the research project and an end-of-year viva.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Modelling Biological Complexity MRes

Careers

After passing the MRes, students may have the opportunity to progress onto a PhD at UCL.

Employability

CoMPLEX has built upon relationships with partners within academia and industry, to develop our existing CoMPLEX programme. so that it continues to be designed specifically to provide training that meets market needs. Graduates have excellent publication outputs, this, together with CoMPLEX's international reputation means that graduates are and will continue to be recognised when entering the job market. 70% of recent graduates have taken up positions in research centres in the UK and abroad. As small number have pursued careers in science policy analysis, cyber security, science teaching, statistical and mathematical consultancy, technology consultancy, or in management and the financial sector.

Why study this degree at UCL?

CoMPLEX is UCL's centre for interdisciplinary research in the life sciences. It brings together life and medical scientists with computer scientists, mathematicians, physicists and engineers to tackle the challenges arising from complexity in biology and medicine.

CoMPLEX collaborates with 250+ supervisors from 40 UCL Departments and maintains strong links with leading UK/International research institutions, charities and industrial partners e.g. AstraZeneca, British Heart Foundation, CRUK, Francis Crick Institute, GlaxoSmithKline, Microsoft Research and Renishaw. As a result CoMPLEX students have a vast range of projects to choose from and the opportunity to network with a plethora of scientific partners.

Peer-to-peer learning is a crucial part of the training, and students will take part in cohort activities, such as, mentoring events, a seminar series, outreach groups and an annual retreat.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. Read more

Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. To impress employers you need the flexibility to learn on the job, leverage open data and program open source software. This MSc draws on UCL's unparalleled concentration of expertise to equip you for future research or significantly enhance your employability.

About this degree

Students learn about a wide range of concepts that underpin computational approaches to archaeology and human history. Students become proficient in the archaeological application of both commercial and open source GIS software and learn other practical skills such as programming, data-mining, advanced spatial analysis with R, and agent-based simulation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Archaeological Data Science
  • Complexity, Space and Human History

Optional modules

  • Exploratory Data Analysis in Archaeology
  • GIS Approaches to Past Landscapes
  • GIS in Archaeology and History
  • Remote Sensing in Archaeology
  • Spatial Statistics, Network Analysis and Human History
  • The Archaeology of Complex Urban Sites: Analytical and Interpretative Technology
  • Web and Mobile GIS (by arrangement with the UCL Department of Civil and Geomatic Engineering
  • Other options available within the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Careful provision is made to facilitate remote access to software, tutorials, datasets and readings through a combination of dedicated websites and virtual learning environments. Assessment is through essays, practical components, project reports and portfolio, and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Computational Archaeology: GIS, Data Science and Complexity MSc

Careers

Approximately one third of graduates of the programme have gone on to do PhDs at universities such as Cambridge, Leiden, McGill, Thessaloniki and Washington State. Of these, some continue to pursue GIS and/or spatial analysis techniques as a core research interest, while others use the skills and inferential rigour they acquired during their Master's as a platform for more wide-ranging doctoral research. Several graduates who went on to doctoral research are now lecturers in computational Archaeology: at the University of Cambridge, Queen's University Belfast and the University of Colorado. Other graduates have gone to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations worldwide. These include specialist careers in national governmental or heritage organisations, commercial archaeological units, planning departments, utility companies, the defence industry and consultancies.

Employability

This degree offers a considerable range of transferable practical skills as well as instilling a more general inferential rigour which is attractive to almost any potential employer. Graduates will be comfortable with a wide range of web-based, database-led, statistical and cartographic tasks. They will be able to operate both commercial and oper source software, will be able to think clearly about both scientific and humanities-led issues, and will have a demonstrable track record of both individual research and group-based collaboration.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The teaching staff bring together a range and depth of expertise that enables students to develop specialisms including industry-standard and open-source GIS, advanced spatial and temporal statistics, computer simulation, geophysical prospection techniques and digital topographic survey.

Most practical classes are held in the institute's Archaeological Computing and GIS laboratory. This laboratory contains Linux servers, ten powerful workstations running Microsoft Windows 10, a digitising table and map scanner.

Students benefit from the collaborations we have established with other institutions and GIS specialists in Canada, Germany, Italy and Greece together with several commercial archaeological units in the UK.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The . Specializing Master Sustainable Design for Complexity.  is a First and Second-level Politecnico di Milano Specializing Master, born as an . Read more

The Specializing Master Sustainable Design for Complexity is a First and Second-level Politecnico di Milano Specializing Master, born as an evolution of the five editions of the Specializing Master Sustainable Environments and Architecture to give designers, architects, and engineers bespoke, specialized training for ecologically and bioclimatically compatible projects in the built environment, integrating energy planning into new and existing architectural spaces. 

For more informations, visit http://www.polidesign.net/en/psc



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Initially students will enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma award. If they are successful they can apply to undertake the top-up MSc Advanced Clinical Practice award by completing the 60 credit Dissertation module. Read more
Initially students will enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma award. If they are successful they can apply to undertake the top-up MSc Advanced Clinical Practice award by completing the 60 credit Dissertation module. Graduates from the full MSc course will receive confirmation that they have completed an RCN Accredited Advanced Nurse Practitioner pathway.

The School of Health and Social Care at London South Bank University has been delivering high quality Royal College of Nursing (RCN) accredited Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) education for over 20 years, with demand increasing year on year. While initially the focus was on developing experienced nurses working in primary care settings, this has subsequently expanded to include nurses from secondary and tertiary services.

This course has therefore been developed for both experienced qualified registered nurses and other health professionals working in primary, secondary and tertiary health care settings, who wish to undertake advanced clinical education at master's level. This education will provide high-quality preparation not only for Advanced Nurse Practitioners (ANP) but also for Advanced Clinical Practitioners and health professionals who need to work at a higher level of practice.

RCN Accreditation

While not all of the students undertaking this course will be nurses, other health professionals will benefit from the rigorous standards set by the RCN Accreditation unit for advanced nurse practitioner preparation. Their standards are currently the only quality marker for Advanced Practitioner preparation in England. RCN Accreditation indicates that this course has been evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria for educational preparation and judged to prepare practitioners to an advanced level (RCN, 2012).

Further, in accordance with the RCN endorsement (2012), the course has also been designed to comply with the Department of Health (England) (2010) position statement on Advanced Level Nursing.

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2021.

Modules

PgDip:

The structure for the course comprises of a prescribed sequence of six compulsory modules, the order depending on the start date (September or January) and the rate of progression.

Each 20 credit module accounts for 200 hours of total student effort. This typically comprises of 36 – 42 classroom contact hours, 14 blended learning activity hours, practice based learning hours (equivalent to a minimum of 3 hours per week) and the remainder for self-directed study.

A range of assessment strategies will be used to reflect the academic, clinical and professional aspects of the programme. This includes use of exams, a written case study, an essay, completion of a Practice Based Learning record including Practice Facilitator feedback and evaluation of practice, OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) and production of a clinical portfolio including patient feedback.

The first part of the course includes:

Physiological Principles for Advanced Clinical Practice
Clinical Assessment Skills for Advanced Practice
Non Medical Prescribing

The second part of the course includes:

Clinical Reasoning in Advanced Practice
Leadership and Research Skills for Advanced Practice

There is an option for the final module according to work setting from:

Managing Complexity in Advanced Clinical Practice (Community and Primary Care)
Managing Complexity in Advanced Clinical Practice (Emergency Care)
Managing Complexity in Advanced Clinical Practice (Acute and Critical Care)

The Complexity modules share a common learning framework and approach to assessment but the focus, content and assessment requirements are adapted for the context.

MSc (top-up):

Students can progress to undertake the Dissertation module (60 credits) to gain the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice award.

Teaching and learning

There are a range of facilities to support teaching practice skills and simulation. These include the skills laboratories, clinical and simulation equipment, themed notice boards, resources, anatomical models and the media/skills technicians who maintain the labs and prepare for sessions.

Students are supported by a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) using “Moodle”. Students have access to the VLE using a web browser from home, from campus, or when mobile if they have a smart phone or tablet. Open access computers are provided in the Library and Learning Resource Centre on our Southwark campus. These computers enable access to the internet, email, Microsoft office and other supported software. Direct IT helplines are available to support students

E-learning will complement face-to-face delivery for all modules within the course, with 14 specific hours assigned to blended learning activities in each timetable.

Skills workshop

A four day workshop will continue to be provided mid-way through the course, to give the opportunity for students to practise, consolidate and develop their new skills in a supervised, supportive environment. This is currently used as an effective strategy which is very highly evaluated by our students.

Placements

Practice based learning requirements
The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) (2007) identify that learning within the work place is integral to a higher education programme and is demonstrated through engagement within the practice environment. This is particularly important for preparation for a course of this nature; for any students, even those with many years of experience, some of the areas covered by the programme will be new such as history-taking, physical examination skills, ordering and interpreting investigations, making differential diagnoses, pharmacology, prescribing, social sciences and mental health assessment, etc. One of the key requirements for the course is that the practice experience provides learning opportunities that enable students to achieve the course learning outcomes (RCN, 2012) and so in order to ensure this, learning in practice is purposely structured and assessed.

Students will spend the equivalent of 3 hours per week working in a "supernumerary capacity" in order to focus specifically on their clinical and professional development. This requirement extends beyond the University semesters to include the summer periods.

Practice Based Learning is supported through identification of a doctor/qualified Advanced Practitioner to act as the student's "Practice Facilitator" to initially supervise and subsequently support their clinical development. Other experienced senior clinicians can also supervise and support student development.

Evidence of practice based learning (36 hours of direct supervision and 180 hours of indirect supervised clinical practice) and feedback on progress is used as an element of assessment on the following modules: 1. Clinical Assessment Skills for Advanced Practice [Level 7] 2. Clinical Reasoning in Advanced Practice [Level 7] 3. Managing Complexity in Advanced Clinical Practice [Level 7]

The overall total for supervised hours through successful completion of these modules is 648 hours.

Employability

Graduate and employer surveys and feedback indicate our graduates are making a positive impact on patient care and service innovation in general practices, walk-in centres, urgent care centres, minor injury units, emergency departments, projects for refugees, asylum seekers and homeless populations, elderly care facilities, “out of hours” developments, rapid response services, intermediate care teams, prison services, acute medical and surgical teams, critical-care outreach and specialist hospital services.

Some of our graduates are now lead nurses within social enterprises, nurse partners in general practices, nurse representatives on commissioning boards, community matrons and consultant nurses. To date two graduates have gone on to pursue doctoral studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we. But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we. Read more

Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we.

But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we.

Then join us in this innovative new postgraduate programme from Schumacher College in collaboration with the School of Architecture, Design and Environment at Plymouth University, the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, the Dartington Hall Trust and surrounding communities.

Ecological Design Thinking

Never has there been a more important time for a new approach for engaging with the challenging situations we face from the local to the global levels. In a rapidly changing dynamic situation, solutions rarely remain optimal for very long and continuous active participation is a necessary ingredient for success. Growing resilience in individuals and communities is the way to keep going despite the continuous change around us.

Our programme in Ecological Design Thinking embraces and explores this complex world of interactions with lively engagement and an optimistic approach. It offers powerful, practical and ecology-centred skills and knowledge to apply to a diverse range of practices from design, education and business to the more specific roles of leadership, management and consultancy.

The Ecological Design Thinking programme is trans-disciplinary, insightful and universal in its application; pragmatic and integrative in its operation. It brings together theoretical and practical discourses on ecologically inspired design, with methods of design thinking that are merged with the latest developments in anthropology, psychology and socio- political economics. It aims to create a novel ground for change makers at the forefront of our transition to sustainable societies.

Ecologically inspired design includes the study of ecological worldviews, systems dynamics and applied complexity theory alongside the philosophies and practices of permaculture and biomimetic design.

Design thinking is a well-established participatory technique grounded in the empathic understanding of the feelings, experiences and emotions of others. It engages people in lively conversations, visually stimulated interactions and playful prototyping. It frames problems as opportunities, forms insights and generates creative and collaborative solutions in complex situations.

The Ecological Design thinking programme aims to provide a nourishing environment for participants by incorporating short-courses led by internationally recognised thinkers, place-making projects in collaboration with the Dartington Hall Trust, the home of Schumacher College, and short placements offered by external partner organisations.

This programme is the fourth radical postgraduate programme developed at Schumacher College and contributes to and enhance the College’s ongoing collaborative inquiry into sustainable living – a live and networked inquiry of practice underway around the world by the College’s 20,000 alumni and others.

Who is this course for?

We would be delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to develop your understanding of a practice that is of great importance to all of our futures. We encourage applications from community practitioners and activists as well as planners, educators, architects, politicians and policy makers. You do not necessarily need a first degree in design to apply for this course. You only need to be enthusiastic, resilient and committed.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-design new approaches to the way we live that are socially just and ecologically sustainable. We are looking for those prepared to take risks and stand on the cutting-edge of new practices in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in a diverse mix of cultural experience and age that allows for rich peer- to- peer learning.

You Will Learn

  • The foundation of an ecological worldview through subjects such as ecology, deep ecology, systems thinking, complexity science and Gaia theory.
  • Living systems principles through the philosophy and practice of permaculture design, biophilia and biomimicry.
  • Creative and process-focused problem solving techniques by applying the methods and principles of design thinking
  • A multi-perspective appreciation of ethical issues and their implications for the future consequences of redesigning existing systems and creating new ones.
  • To apply ecological design thinking knowledge and skills to the design of social systems as a part of an emerging new economics
  • Personal and group enquiry practices to raise awareness of the interdependent relationship between the individual, society and nature and between theory and practice
  • Co-creative participatory practices and theoretical principles for new approaches to the ecological design process that include a range of stakeholders in the full lifecycle of projects, and you will apply these both in the studio, on the Dartington Hall Estate and in short placements on live projects

Special Features

An interdisciplinary programme integrating design methods with those of ecology and the social sciences.

An integrative design programme rooted in deep ecological understanding and practice and informed by cutting edge thinking in new economic approaches and social dynamics.

A balanced distribution of time and resources on skill-based and cognitive-based knowledge and between practice and theory.

Access to some of the world’s leading thinkers and practitioners in design, Gaia theory, complexity, climate science, systems thinking, new economics and social change.

Short courses led by internationally recognised thinkers and researchers.

Short practical placements with a range of partner organisations operating at the leading edge of social innovation.

An immersive, integrative and transformational teaching and learning approach rooted in the principles established by Schumacher College and Dartington Hall, and engaged in a living and working community on and around the Dartington Estate in Devon.

Where you will go?

Ecological Design Thinking can be applied to a wide range of contexts, from the personal to the societal. This programme aims to create a new generation of designers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, educators, researchers, consultants and activists. Graduates will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transformation of society.



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This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. Read more
This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. It is often taken in its part-time format.

It is aimed at engineers who have specialised in a traditional discipline but are now expected to understand, operate in, develop and integrate entire systems that are not only increasingly complex but rapidly changing.

The block taught format of the programme and the option to elect assessment by coursework rather than exam makes it a popular part time course and a CPD option.

Core study areas include systems thinking, systems architecture, systems design, verification and validation, and an individual project.

Optional study areas include enterprise systems management, holistic engineering (industry-led module), sensors and actuators for control, imagineering technologies, engineering and management of capability and understanding complexity.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
• Systems Thinking
• Systems Architecture
• Systems Design
• Validation & Verification
• Individual Project

Optional Modules (choose four):
• Enterprise Systems Engineering
• Holistic Engineering (industry-led module)
• Sensors and Actuators for Control
• Imagineering Technologies
• Engineering and Management of Capability
• Understanding Complexity

Block taught, individual modules are also highly suitable as CPD for professional engineers working onsystems engineering projects and challenges.

How you will learn

The curriculum stimulates thinking and extends the capabilities of technical managers and engineers to handle complexity, enabling them to remain effective in the workplace by providing:
- an integrated systems engineering view of inter-related technologies, processes, tools, techniques and their effective use;

- essential systems skills such as model-based systems architecture and design, against a background of the need for traceability in managing complex projects;

- knowledge and technical expertise in a range of systems technologies;

- experience of the importance to ultimate success of effective, integrated, multi-skilled project teams working in extended enterprises beyond the confines of any particular organisation;

- increased depth of technical and management knowledge through elective modules; and

- the ability to transfer systems skills and knowledge into the workplace through the individual master’s project.

Teaching staff comprise a varied skill set of international expertise to give the broadest perspectives and modules frequently feature master classes from industry practitioners.

- Assessment
There is the option to complete without written examinations as all compulsory modules are assessed by coursework. Where examinations are taken these are in January and May.

Facilities

We employ advanced modelling, simulation and interactive visualisation tools and techniques to enable you to gain greater understanding of the performance, behaviour and emergent properties of advanced technology and complex systems.

Many of these facilities are part of the Advanced VR Research Centre ( AVRRC) http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/avrrc/facilities/

Careers and further study

Graduates of this course gain capabilities that are in global demand across a range of sectors and which can be applied to the challenges and issues posed by any complex system design and operation.

Promotion within their company for sponsored students is common since the course enables them to match higher job expectations and demands. Employed students often bring a work-relevant topic to their individual project giving the opportunity to display newly acquired skills.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

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The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. Read more

MSc Biology

The two year MSc Biology concerns understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The biosciences aim to understand living systems and to help preserve biodiversity and our environment and simultaneously produce sufficient healthy and safe food.

Programme summary

Biological issues are at the forefront of the technological progress of modern society. They are central to global concerns about how we effect and are affected by our environment. Understanding the complexity of biological systems, at scales ranging from single molecules to whole ecosystems, provides a unique intellectual challenge. The MSc Biology allows students to get a broad overview of the latest developments in biology, ranging from genes to ecosystems. They learn to critically discuss the newest scientific developments in the biological sciences. Within their area of specialisation, students deepen their knowledge and skills in a certain subject. To prepare for a successful international career, we strongly encourage our students to complete part of their programme requirements abroad.

Specialisations

The MSc Biology offers nine specialisations:

Animal Adaptation and Behavioural Biology
This specialisation focuses mainly on subjects as adaptation, mechanisms involved in these adaptations and behaviour of animals.

Bio-interactions
In this specialisation, you obtain knowledge about interactions between organisms. You learn to understand and interpret interactions on different levels, from molecular to ecosystem level.

Molecular Ecology
In this specialisation, you learn to use molecular techniques to solve ecological questions. You will use, for example, molecular techniques to study the interaction between a virus and a plant.

Conservation and Systems Ecology
This specialisation focuses initially on fundamental processes that play a key role in ecology. You learn to interpret different relations, for example, the relation between chemical (or physical processes) and bioprocesses. Furthermore, you learn to analyse different ecosystems. You can use this knowledge to manage and conserve these ecological systems.

Evolution and Biodiversity
The systematics of biodiversity in an evolutionary perspective is the central focus of this specialisation. Subjects that will be addressed in this specialisation are: evolution, genetics, biosystematic research and taxonomic analysis.

Health and Disease
This specialisation focuses on regulatory mechanisms that have a central role in human and animal health.

Marine Biology
Choosing this specialisation means studying the complexity of the marine ecosystem. Moreover, you learn about the impacts of, for instance, fishery and recreation on this ecosystem or the interaction between different species in this system.

Molecular Development and Gene Regulation
This specialisation focuses on gene regulations and the different developmental mechanisms of organisms.

Plant Adaptation
This specialisation focuses on the adaptations that different plants gained in order to adjust to various conditions. You learn to understand the regulation processes in plants that underlie these adaptations.

Your future career

Many graduates from the MSc Biology study programme enter careers in fundamental and applied research or go on to become PhD students. Some find a position as communication officer, manager or policymaker. Compared with other Dutch universities, many biology graduates from Wageningen University find a position abroad.

Alumna Iris de Winter.
"I work as a PhD student at Wageningen University. In my research, I aim to understand the effect of human disturbance on the parasites prevalence in lemurs. I also look at the potential risks of the transmission of diseases and parasites from lemurs to humans, but also vice versa, from humans (and their livestock and pets) to wild lemur population. I alternate my fieldwork in Madagascar with parasite identification, analyses and writing manuscripts in the Netherlands. With this research, I hope to gain more insight in the factors that increase parasite prevalence in natural systems and hereby to improve the protection of both lemurs and their natural habitat."

Related programmes:
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Plant Biotechnology
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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Accredited by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), our Management and International Business course teaches you the fundamental skills and attributes you need to become a successful international manager. Read more
Accredited by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), our Management and International Business course teaches you the fundamental skills and attributes you need to become a successful international manager. You’ll become adept at strategic and tactical business decisions, understanding international cultural differences, and managing and motivating staff in businesses on an international scale.

You will experience working in internationally diverse student team based projects collaborating to deliver effective and professional reports and presentations as part of module assessments reflecting the professional practice of international management. Throughout the course, the programme team will give you the support you need to realise your potential and we look forward to working with you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills for the career of your choice.

What's covered in the course?

Initially in the first stage, you will examine the key challenges faced by global businesses to fully appreciate the complexity and dynamics of leadership and management practice. This will see you broaden your skills in organisation, communication and working with others, particularly within an increasingly diverse cultural context.

During the second stage of your course, you will begin to explore the complexity of international operations management integrated with corporate social responsibility, sustainability and the role of innovation.You’ll be taught international strategy while also developing your research skills in preparation for your major project.

The final core Major Project module is tailored to your career aspirations. The module provides three project options;
-A work-based study route enabling you to relate the project to a current employer;
-A ‘consultancy project’ option where you find a client who has an international business problem that you feel you can solve;
-A traditional dissertation involving an in-depth exploration of both the theory and practice of international business using primary research.

Whatever route you choose, it will give you the opportunity to identify a topic and industry of your choice related to your specialist area of International Business tailoring your degree to enhance your employability for your final chosen career destination. Previous projects have involved International marketing strategy, global supply chain management in the food sector and sustainability issues in the sourcing of cotton.

Why Choose Us?

-You will develop fundamental skills in business management while having the opportunity to gain enhanced and specialist expertise to help you enter the complex and challenging field of international business operations.
-On graduating you will receive an industry recognised professional qualification from the Chartered Management Institute (CMI).
-You will work alongside a diverse range of international students giving a real experience of what it is like to work and collaborate with your peers from a range of diverse cultures from Europe, Nigeria, India, China, Vietnam and North America .
-You will have the opportunity to visit a leading service or manufacturing company to gain insight into the complexity of real world global operations, such as Jaguar Land Rover.
-You will be supported with Business English language diagnostics and tutor support to help improve you in the international language of business.
-You’ll be taught by highly qualified module tutors with significant professional practice experience of a range of management and international business roles.

Other admission requirements

Entry on to Stage Two
-A Postgraduate Certificate (Level 7 or equivalent, minimum value of 60 credits) in a business subject aligned with the chosen pathway (international business, finance, marketing or entrepreneurship)
-Candidates will be required to submit an extended application to evidence how their Postgraduate Certificate meets the programme learning outcomes at the equivalent stage

Entry on to Stage Three
-A Postgraduate Diploma (Level 7 or equivalent, minimum value of 120 credits)* in a business subject aligned with the chosen pathway (international business, finance or marketing).
-Candidates will be required to submit an extended application to evidence how their Postgraduate Diploma meets the programme learning outcomes at the equivalent stage.
-Candidates will be required to have passed a research methods module (Level 7 or equivalent, minimum value of 20 credits)* and will be required to submit an original Dissertation Proposal that has been passed by the Programme Team prior to admission approval.

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Western science is dominated by ‘reductionism’ – the idea that natural phenomena can be Stephan Harding, Head of Holistic Science at Schumacher Collegefully explained in terms of their component parts. Read more
Western science is dominated by ‘reductionism’ – the idea that natural phenomena can be Stephan Harding, Head of Holistic Science at Schumacher Collegefully explained in terms of their component parts. Although it is a useful tool in certain circumstances, reductionism as a world view is incomplete and can be dangerous on its own since it suggests that by analysing the ‘mechanical’ workings of nature we can fully predict and manipulate it entirely for our own benefit.

Holistic Science integrates the useful aspects of reductionism and mainstream science by developing a more comprehensive basis for seeing and knowing. At the heart of this is Goethe’s rigorous and systematic way of involving the imagination in an appreciation of nature’s qualities, complexity and intrinsic value. Holistic thinking is stimulated by exercises using phenomenology and in tackling challenges related to physics, earth system science, ecology, evolutionary biology, organisational development and health studies. Since 1998, when the programme was pioneered at Schumacher College, it has developed a coherent methodology of holistic enquiry, providing a rigorous and ethical framework for a mature science.

The MSc takes you into a profound personal transformative learning journey helping you to join a growing group of international alumni contributing positively to ecological, economic and social change.

“Interactive, experiential and participatory learning encourages novel approaches to scientific investigation. Various non-traditional teaching formats, learning experiences and assessments are facilitated. Investigations are holistic in the sense that they are embodied as well as rational/intellectual and often result in different outcomes to traditional styles of research and reporting.”

- Philip Franses, Senior Lecturer of Holistic Science

Programme Overview

Develop an understanding of the pros and cons of using western science as a tool for gaining reliable knowledge about the world.
Learn how contemporary sustainability issues have come about and how we can successfully address them by combining rational and intuitive ways of knowing.
Gain an understanding of the importance of sensing, feeling and intuition for an expanded science.
Learn about a range of cutting edge alternative methodologies which integrate qualitative experience and quantitative measurement.
Develop an understanding of the emergent properties of whole systems through the lenses of chaos, complexity and Gaia theories, and discover how these approaches can help us deal with ecological, social and economic problems.
Understand how Holistic Science is being applied in the worlds of business, economics, health and mainstream science in the creation of a more sustainable world.
Develop a clear understanding of your own rational and emotional states and processes in the study of nature through experiential and reflective group enquiry.

Our Teachers and Guest Contributors Have Included:

Rupert Sheldrake
Patricia Shaw
Satish Kumar
Craig Holdrege
Mike Wride
Shantena Sabbadini
Jules Cashford
Bruce Lipton

Career Opportunities:

Our graduates from around the world have used their skills and knowledge for sustainable change to become eminent and important contributors to many fields, including climate change advocacy, education, scientific research, ecological design, healthcare, green business, protection of indigenous cultures, ecological restoration and sustainable agriculture. Working in in public, private and NGO sectors, many have set up their own projects or organisations.
What Past Participants Have Said:

“What I learnt and experienced from the MSc is that everything is ever changing. Working with the concepts of holistic science I experienced living with complexity and change as a way of life rather than as a stage I had to survive. For me, the gift of holistic science was to learn to appreciate the inherent potential in all situations. This has taught me to more effectively think, act and live with the tension of transitions through multidisciplinary approaches.”
- Anne Solgaard, Green Economy for UNEP/GRID-Arendal

“During my MSc in Holistic Science I learned a comprehensive qualitative approach to science that binds natural and cultural phenomena. It was a unique experience that transformed my own inner way of relating to complex circumstances and empowered me with the tools necessary to develop the way of life I’ve always dreamed of.“
- Sebastian Eslea Burch, founder of Gaia y Sofia

“The MSc certainly opened my eyes to new ways of doing business in a complex world. Both the formal teachings and the tremendous networking potential of the College have helped me in forging a professional life that I feel reflects my ideals.“
- Sophia Van Ruth, co-founder Urban Edibles

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Building on the latest research on how organizations function, this Master’s program offers a inter-disciplinary, Social-Science perspective on the ways in which highly complex organizations respond to fast-changing, dynamic environments. Read more
Building on the latest research on how organizations function, this Master’s program offers a inter-disciplinary, Social-Science perspective on the ways in which highly complex organizations respond to fast-changing, dynamic environments.
The Master in Organization Studies provides you with a critical understanding of how organizations and people within them behave and is especially focused on organizational complexity and dynamics.

It is designed for those seeking a sound theoretical basis in organization studies, a deeper level of understanding about how organizations deal with complexity and dynamics and an advanced level study that will generate transferable skills and facilitate employment in a great variety of organizations.

Why should you choose to study MSc Organization Studies at Tilburg University?
1.This English-taught Master’s program is clearly structured and focused on complexity and dynamics.
2.You learn to understand and analyze organizations from an interdisciplinary perspective (i.e., involving Organization Science, Sociology, Psychology and Business Management), which is a unique approach in the Netherlands.
3.You will be prepared for teamwork through frequent group assignments in real-life settings, as well as through the acquisition of knowledge on team processes.
4.You will be trained by means of a variety of interactive teaching methods such as team work, peer review, case studies, presentations, workshops, etc.
5.You have the unique opportunity to expand your program with the Extended Master’s Program Organization Studies, which strengthens your career prospects by adding a one-year professional traineeship to your experience in a wide range of companies.
6.You will receive support and feedback from a small group of fellow students while writing your thesis in the so-called Thesis Circles.

Career Perspective

Students who graduate in Organization Studies at Tilburg University have very good career opportunities. In a society where changes follow changes ever more rapidly, organizations need people who have knowledge and a deeper understanding about organizations and organizing, and who can research and analyze problems in organizations and the way these problems are interconnected.

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What is the Master of Geology all about?. You will gain much from the strong emphasis on research in this programme. Read more

What is the Master of Geology all about?

You will gain much from the strong emphasis on research in this programme. Besides enhancing knowledge and skills in numerous specialised courses, including a field-mapping course, you will conduct your own master’s thesis project within a research team (professor(s), postdoc(s), PhD-student(s)) and at the same time develop important scientific skills, such as reporting and presenting, needed in your future career. 

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The master’s programme offers 4 different majors: Geodynamics and Georesources, Surface Processes and Paleoenvironments, Geology of Basins and Soil and Groundwater.

  • In Geodynamics and Georesources, you will study rock-forming processes and mineral resources in the subsurface. The interaction between various physico-chemical processes in the Earth forms the core of this major. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complexity of the various interacting physical and chemical rock-forming processes and apply this knowledge to the exploration of natural resources.
  • In Surface Processes and Paleoenvironments, you will study the interaction between the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. The focus is on understanding present-day and past processes and placing these processes in a context of global change on various time scales. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complex interaction of surface processes relating to the variability of various aspects of the Earth’s surface.
  • In Geology of Basins, you will study the processes steering the genesis and evolution of sedimentary basins and the surrounding areas. Special attention is given to sedimentary fluxes, the spatial organisation of basins, the evolution of the paleoenvironment, dating of events and exploration strategies. You will develop the ability to analyse and explain the complexity of interacting processes that determine the evolution of sedimentary basins.
  • In Soil and Groundwater, you will study hydrogeological and pedological characteristics and processes with a focus on fundamental and applied aspects of soils and groundwater, including the response to external influences and aimed at sustainable management and protection of these resources. You will develop the attitude to analyse and explain the complexity of physical and chemical processes influencing soil and groundwater, and to come up with remedial measures. 

Departments

The programme is firmly rooted in the research of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (KU Leuven) and the Department of Geology (Ghent University). Both departments continuously develop and maintain innovative and widely recognised research programmes on fundamental and applied aspects of geoscience. These generally involve collaborative efforts in various international research networks.

Career perspectives

As a Master in Geology you may be involved in development tasks, research or management functions. In consultancy, you are likely to find a job in environmental geology, hydrogeology or geotechnology. In industry, you will be involved in exploration, exploitation andtreatment of natural resources. In governmental agencies and research institutions, you may be responsible for the inventory, management, research and use of the subsurface or for environmental issues.

If you dream of an academic career, you can start by embarking on a PhD-project in Leuven, Ghent, or elsewhere.



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Studying for your Masters in TESOL is the key to unlocking international career opportunities in a sector that is enjoying impressive sustained growth. Read more

Studying for your Masters in TESOL is the key to unlocking international career opportunities in a sector that is enjoying impressive sustained growth.

We will help you to master the main theories and principles of language learning and teaching so that you can apply them with confidence and imagination in your own teaching practice.

A range of optional modules will allow you to specialise, while the dissertation will enable you to undertake in-depth research into a topic of particular interest to you.

This course is a great complement to a teaching qualification, opening up opportunities to become an active member of the international academic and professional English Language Teaching community.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

This programme is designed for students who have little or no previous language teaching experience or training but who have a strong interest in English language teaching and who are planning a career in the sector.

It's main aim is therefore to provide a sound academic basis in English language teaching through the exploration of major issues in language teaching and learning, including how practice is informed by theory, thereby determining the methods/approaches as well as the materials teachers use and their impact in ESOL classrooms.

The programme thus combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, TESOL with opportunities for application and practice. Specifically, the programme aims to:

  • Advance students’ knowledge and understanding of the grammatical, lexical and phonological structures and stylistic registers of English and how they work together in producing effective communication
  • Introduce students to theoretical issues in TESOL through an exploration of scholarly writing in the field and to the application of these theories within the ESOL classroom
  • Promote critical engagement with concepts, theories and practices associated with English language teaching through reflection and evaluation
  • Provide a theoretical and methodological framework within which students can take responsibility for their own learning and formulate and address their own research questions
  • Provide opportunities for students to create and carry out a project of significant complexity in the field of TESOL
  • Foster reflective practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Describe and explain the underlying grammatical, lexical and phonological structures of the English language
  • Demonstrate understanding of the way communication is constructed, maintained or repaired through English
  • Evaluate theoretical issues relevant to second language acquisition and learning
  • Critically assess the principles underpinning curriculum design, language teaching methodology and materials selection
  • Demonstrate understanding of the main issues relevant to testing and assessment of language learning
  • Apply the principles which underpin the design and implementation of research projects in English language teaching

Intellectual/cognitive skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem-solving skills
  • Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies and practical classroom practice
  • Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study
  • Create and carry out a project of significant complexity in the field of TESOL
  • Critically appreciate and evaluate theories of language acquisition and learning, curriculum design, teaching methodologies and apply this

Professional practical skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in TESOL
  • Critically assess the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various TESOL context
  • Apply appropriate English language teaching methodologies in various TESOL contexts
  • Evaluate and apply appropriate methods of assessment and testing in language teaching
  • Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, conducting independent research

Key/transferable skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • Manage learning self-critically
  • Critically evaluate research using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
  • Organise and manage a research project of significant complexity

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Master's specialisation in International Relations. Analysing conflict and cooperation in a globalising world. Tackling global issues in the 21st Century requires a deeper understanding of the essential players that shape global politics. Read more

Master's specialisation in International Relations

Analysing conflict and cooperation in a globalising world.

Tackling global issues in the 21st Century requires a deeper understanding of the essential players that shape global politics: governments, intergovernmental organisations, media, multinationals, and NGOs.

Our International Relations specialisation will provide you with an insight into these players and into fundamental questions of contemporary international relations: is the international community equipped to address violent conflict and (cyber) terrorism? Why do states intervene in some cases of human rights violations, but not in other? Will the competition for natural resources intensify domestic and international conflict? What are the political consequences of regional integration (in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia) and of the emergence of powers such as Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRICs)? What are the political ramifications of global trade and finance?

In our Master’s specialisation in International Relations you will learn to master different perspectives in order to understand the complexity of global issues and the dilemmas behind the political choices made by policy-makers. Our emphasis on both analytical skills and empirical knowledge will provide you with the tools to critically analyse contemporary global issues, thus preparing you for a career in international affairs and diplomacy.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ir

Why study International Relations at Radboud University?

- Our programme is consistently ranked number one by leading Dutch ratings organisations in the field of higher education. The key to this success is the high quality and strong commitment of our instructors.

- We focus on current global and regional issues, helping you comprehend both the complexity and diversity of today’s global political arenas.

- Our programme also trains you to understand vital decision-making processes. We study how political choices are legitimised, discussing the power of persuasion, the role of norms and the impact of identity.

- We are also motivated by the challenges raised by globalisation and try to explain why some distributional effects of globalisation lead to political conflict while others do not. We also look at how national political systems deal with such conflicts.

- Our international staff has a wide range of expertise on international organisations, crisis management, gender, international political economy, foreign policy analysis, and ethics. The themes and issues discussed are cutting edge.

- We offer small, interactive classes. Students are taken seriously as young academics and reflective practitioners.

- Our programme is analytical as well as practice oriented. We have close links with public and private organisations, which students could use to find an internship position for themselves.

- Our Political Science Department thrives on a vibrant community of Dutch and international students, and welcomes active student involvement.

Disentangling structures of power

At Radboud University you’re taught to look beyond the daily news and to disentangle deeper global structures of power that underlie the causes and outcomes of global conflicts. You’ll be trained to not just develop possible options for a particular stakeholder, but to take it one step further and adopt different perspectives for different stakeholders, assessing whether they are willing and capable of pursuing those solutions.

Career prospects

Our alumni have positions as policy-makers in international organisations, political parties, government ministries, market authorities, the European Parliament, and the European Commission. Our alumni also work as consultants for profit and non-profit organisations and as researchers at think-tanks and universities. They are employed by banks and other financial institutions and by the media. This is because our graduates have the skills that employers want, namely sound research and analytical skills, excellent written and oral communication skills, and experience in working both in teams and independently.

Our approach to this field

We invite you to become part of our vibrant academic community in which we encourage independent critical thinking. Our committed staff takes the views and contributions of our students seriously. You will learn to:

- Distinguish, historically situate and apply a wide range of different theories and stakeholders’ perspectives.

- Develop sound judgments of existing research and become a confident researcher and responsible professional.

- Produce different types of written products with direct relevance to your future career and to develop the oral skills to handle these products in work-related settings.

We believe that by introducing students to the fascinating field of international relations new generations can meet the challenges of global politics in the 21st century. International Relations at Radboud University focuses on the following themes:

1. Security crises

2. nternational conflict and cooperation

3. Comparative regionalism

4. Global trade and finance

5. Global justice, human rights and development

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ir

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity. Read more

Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity.

Software plays a role in almost every aspect of our daily lives and in every organisation anywhere in the world. It can often be a crucial key to their success. Well-structured software that is attuned to an organisation’s needs and future plans can be cost effective, improve efficiency, offer better services and be innovative. Many companies, in every branch out there, are therefore looking for highly skilled software specialists. Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Software Science will have no trouble finding a job.

Producing software is not merely a technological enterprise but a deeply scientific and creative one as well. Modern cars drive on 20 million lines of code. How do we develop all this software and control its complexity? How do we ensure correctness of software on which the lives in a speeding car literally depend on? This specialisation goes far beyond basic code writing. It’s about analysing and testing code in order to improve it as well as simplify it.

Why study Software Science at Radboud University?

- Although not the only focus, our programme puts a lot of emphasis on embedded software and functional programming.

- We teach a unique range of software analysis techniques and application down to practical/commercial use in industry.

- This specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) in areas such as model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages. We also closely collaborate with the Embedded Systems Institute.

- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.

- For your Master’s research we have a large number of companies like Philips, ASML and NXP offering projects. There are always more projects than students.

- Thanks to free electives students can branch out to other Computing Science domain at Radboud University such as security, machine learning or more in-depth mathematical foundations of computer science.

- The job opportunities are excellent: some of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all of our graduates have positions within six months after graduating.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Computing Science or related area

In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Computing Sciences or a related discipline.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)

- IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Writing good software is a highly creative process, which requires the ability to approach problems in entirely novel ways through computational thinking. Besides creativity, a professional software scientist also has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. By combining software programming, model-checking techniques and human intellect, software scientists can make a real difference to help and improve the devices that govern such a large part of our lives.

The job perspective for our graduates is excellent. Industry desperately needs software science specialists at an academic level, and thus our graduates have no difficulty in find an interesting and challenging job. Several of our graduates decide to go for a PhD and stay at a university, but most of our students go for a career in industry. They then typically either find a job at a larger company as consultant or programmer, or they start up their own software company.

Examples of companies where our graduates end up include the big Dutch high-tech companies such as Océ, ASML, Vanderlande and Philips, ICT service providers such as Topicus and Info Support and companies started by Radboud graduates, like AIA and GX.

Our research in this field

The Master’s programme in Computing Sciences is offered in close collaboration with the research Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS). Research at iCIS is organised in three different research sections:

- Model Based System Development

- Digital Security

- Intelligent Systems

The Software Science specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of iCIS in areas such model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages.

Research project and internship

For your research project, you may choose to do your internship at:

- A company

---- SME, such as as Océ, Vanderlande, Clarity or GX

---- multinational, such as the Philips, ASML, NXP, Logica or Reed Business Media

- A governmental institute, such as the (Dutch) Tax Authorities or the European Space Agency.

- Any department at Radboud University or another university with issues regarding software, like studying new techniques for loop bound analysis, the relation between classical logic and computational systems, or e-mail extension for iTasks.

- One of the iCIS departments, specialising on different aspects of Software Science.

- Abroad, under supervision of researchers from other universities that we collaborate with. For instance, exploring a new technique for automata learning at Uppsala University in Sweden, or verifying the correctness of Erlang refactoring transformations at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Digital processes are transforming culture, the economy and society. This course explores the origins and impact of these changes. Read more
Digital processes are transforming culture, the economy and society. This course explores the origins and impact of these changes. It gives you the training to understand and make use of digital media
critically, creatively and productively.

If you’re pursuing a professional career in knowledge-based companies, whether in museums, marketing agencies, businesses, charities, new-media production companies, public relations or think-tanks, this course is for you. It will equally qualify you with the academic skills for further doctoral study.

You’ll develop a critical and practice-based understanding of the impact of links, queries, downloads and uploads, file formats, archives, databases and networks more generally. Core modules introduce you to the conceptual and methodological dimensions of the digital realm. You then select two or three option modules in areas that cover the theoretical and socioeconomic aspects of digital culture, urban science, big data and complexity. A dissertation allows you to explore your own questions and interests in more depth.

Core Modules

-Approaches to the Digital
-Digital Objects, Digital Methods
-Dissertation

Masters Optional Modules

-Visualisation
-Social Informatics
-Big Data Research
-Hype or Revolution?
-Complexity in the Social Sciences
-Media and Social Theory
-Digital Sociology
-Post Digital Books
-User Interface Cultures
-Design, Method and Critique
-Playful Media
-Ludification in the Digital Age

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