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Masters Degrees (Complex Adaptive Systems)

We have 11 Masters Degrees (Complex Adaptive Systems)

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Learn how to create artificial information systems that mimic biological systems as well as how to use theoretical insights from AI to better understand cognitive processing in humans. Read more

Learn how to create artificial information systems that mimic biological systems as well as how to use theoretical insights from AI to better understand cognitive processing in humans.

The human brain is a hugely complex machine that is able to perform tasks that are vastly beyond current capabilities of artificial systems. Understanding the brain has always been a source of inspiration for developing artificially intelligent agents and has led to some of the defining moments in the history of AI. At the same time, theoretical insights from artificial intelligence provide new ways to understand and probe neural information processing in biological systems.

On the one hand, the Master’s in Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems addresses how models based on neural information processing can be used to develop artificial systems, probing of human information processing in closed-loop online settings, as well as the development of new machine learning techniques to better understand human brain function.

On the other hand it addresses various ways of modelling and understanding cognitive processing in humans. These range from abstract mathematical models of learning that are derived from Bayesian statistics, complexity theory and optimal control theory to neural information processing systems such as neural networks that simulate particular cognitive functions in a biologically inspired manner. We also look at new groundbreaking areas in the field of AI, like brain computer interfacing and deep learning.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/computation

Why study Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems at Radboud University?

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Behavioural Science Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- Master’s students are free to use the state-of-the-art facilities available on campus, like equipment for brain imaging as EEG, fMRI and MEG.

- Exceptional students who choose this specialisation have the opportunity to study for a double degree in Artificial Intelligence together with the specialisation in Brain Network and Neuronal Communication. This will take three instead of two years.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You will be able to use these facilities for developing new experimental research techniques, as well as for developing new machine learning algorithms to analyse the brain data and integrate them with brain-computer interfacing systems.

Some examples of possible thesis subjects:

- Deep learning

Recent breakthroughs in AI have led to the development of artificial neural networks that achieve human level performance in object recognition. This has led companies like Google and Facebook to invest a lot of research in this technology. Within the AI department you can do research on this topic. This can range from developing deep neural networks to map and decode thoughts from human brain activity to the development of speech recognition systems or neural networks that can play arcade games.

- Brain Computer Interfacing

Brain computer interfaces are systems which decode a users mental state online in real-time for the purpose of communication or control. An effective BCI requires both neuro-scientific insight (which mental states should we decode?) and technical expertise (which measurement systems and decoding algorithms should be used?). A project could be to develop new mental tasks that induce stronger/easier to decode signals, such as using broadband stimuli. Another project could be to develop new decoding methods better able to tease a weak signal from the background noise, such as adaptive-beam forming. Results for both would assessed by performing empirical studies with target users in one of the EEG/MEG/fMRI labs available in the institute.

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Google, Facebook, IBM, Philips and the Brain Foundation. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems could get:

- PhD researcher on bio-inspired computing

- PhD researcher on neural decoding

- PhD researcher on neural information processing

- Machine learning expert in a software company

- Company founder for brain-based computer games

- Hospital-based designer of assistive technology for patients

- Policy advisor on new developments in neurotechnology

- Software developer for analysis and online visual displays of brain activity


Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Sweden and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/computation

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018

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Cover theory and practice for the design and implementation of intelligent systems – you’ll be well prepared for research and development. Read more
Cover theory and practice for the design and implementation of intelligent systems – you’ll be well prepared for research and development.

Whether you’re from a computing background or not, our introduction to Java will develop your programming skills and enable you to access our specialist options.

You have the opportunity to study key areas in machine learning and complex systems, as well as a range of topics in cutting-edge areas such as:
-Cognitive modelling
-Evolutionary computation
-Image processing
-Natural language processing
-Consciousness science

This course is currently subject to validation, in line with our procedures for assuring the quality of our degrees. This means that some course detail may change. The validation process will be concluded before the course starts.

How will I study?

You will study a number of core modules and options. In the summer term, you will undertake a supervised dissertation.

You may have opportunities to work with an industrial partner, with scope offered to specialise. Some project work has led to journal and conference publication.

You are assessed through:
-Unseen examinations
-Programming projects
-Group projects
-A 12,000-word dissertation

MSc project

On our Masters courses, you’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. The project is designed for you to excel in your personal and professional development and to consolidate the material covered in your modules. It demands individual responsibility and exposes you to issues of:
-Project management
-Documentation and communication
-Critical awareness and creative thinking

In Informatics, you are encouraged to seek a project with a commercial or industrial flavour. Finding an industrial sponsor or host is fine, though you will still need an academic supervisor.


Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017


Our students are highly employable, with 95% of recent graduates’ job roles being at professional or managerial level.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in software development, systems analysis and technical communication. A high proportion of our graduates go on to undertake research degrees at Sussex and other prestigious universities.

Employers of our graduates include:
-American Express

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The Master of Computer Science is a two-year (120 ECTS) advanced study in computer science organized by the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, a Flemish university located in Brussels, Belgium. Read more
The Master of Computer Science is a two-year (120 ECTS) advanced study in computer science organized by the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, a Flemish university located in Brussels, Belgium. This English-speaking programme is designed for students with a solid, basic academic background in computer science (Bachelor in Computer Science). The objectives of the programme are to provide a deeper understanding and knowledge of various specializations of computer science and to prepare the student for an active role in computer science research and development. The following specializations are offered: Artificial Intelligence, Multimedia, Software Engineering and Web & Information Systems.

Course outline

All students study a core programme of 30 credits; do a research training of 6 credits and a master thesis of 24 credits. Students should choose one out of four specializations: Artificial Intelligence, Multimedia, Software Engineering, or Web & Information Systems. 30 credits should be spent to mandatory and optional courses within the chosen specialization. The 24 remaining optional courses can be taken within the specialization or from another specialization. Finally, 6 credits can be chosen completely freely form any of the VUB courses. This brings the total to 120 ECTS credits. The master thesis as well as the research training needs to be related to the chosen specialization.

Specializations offered

 Artificial Intelligence
The focus in this specialization is on building intelligent software artifacts. The theories of complex dynamic systems and self-organization are emphasized starting from the theory of complex dynamic systems as developed in related fields such as mathematics, physics, and biology. Students will be exposed to current research in the areas of adaptive systems, multi-agent systems, and the origins of language.

 Multimedia
Students in this specialization will conduct in-depth exploration of techniques for signal processing and communication of multimedia content. The program is designed to build thorough technological and scientific knowledge of various multimedia domains such as digital television, telephony and video phony, computer animation, computer games, and the Internet. Students will gain experience with complex ICT architectures for the processing, distribution, and consumption of multimedia content.

 Software Engineering
In this specialization, students gain the skills needed to build complex software applications and software intensive systems. Students are also taught scientifically sound methods, as well as the newest techniques and tools for the developing of software. The curriculum also includes research topics in programming languages and integrated development environments.

 Web & Information Systems
This specialization is geared towards information system development and application development in the context of the Web. Students will learn about data and semantic representation techniques and acquire thorough technological and scientific knowledge related to the newest technological developments for the Web. Students can participate is research in the area of ontologies, new media systems (multimedia, Virtual Reality, games, social systems), and the "Internet of Things".

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.


Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.

Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ

link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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Effective project management skills are in great demand in an increasingly complex global organisational environment. Read more
Effective project management skills are in great demand in an increasingly complex global organisational environment. This MSc in Project Management aims to provide graduates with a broad range of specialist technical (hard) and interpersonal (soft) skills that will equip them to develop successful careers in this demanding and rapidly expanding field.

A strong theme of project and programme complexity will weave throughout the course and will provide a framework to explore fundamental and contemporary theory relating to leadership, cultural diversity, operational management, strategy, systems and complexity itself. This coupled with an in depth exposure to cutting edge practice across a range of sectors will enable graduates to deliver successful projects in an increasingly uncertain and complex global organisational context.

The structure of the course reflects the need for graduates to be adaptive practitioners by removing the barriers between technical and interpersonal skills and focusing on equipping them with the tools to recognise and understand the need to adapt practice, both in terms of leadership and management, to different contexts and demands. To this end the course structure will span leadership, management & strategy, risk management, contract negotiation, project finance, current issues, tools & techniques and law. The course will culminate in a final project – the Capstone Project – that will challenge students to investigate and report on a topic of relevanc​e to their work or to more general practice.​

*This programme is subject to validation and the information may be subject to change. All new programmes at the University must undergo validation, the purpose of which is to ensure that the proposed programme is aligned to the University's Mission and its content reflects appropriate levels of academic standards and quality.​

Course content

Our MSc Project Management programme is unique and distinctive as it is designed and developed in alignment to key professional bodies in Project Management, APM (Association of Project Management) and PMI (Project Management Institute) knowledge areas and competencies framework which applies for any project domains and context. Students will have an ability to transfer and apply the knowledge, skills and competencies acquired from this Programme into wider context and various project, program and portfolio environment. ​

This MSc Project Management programme while building theoretical and contextual knowledge but more eminently prepares students a career in a collaborative world.


Project Management Theory and Practice (20 Credits)
Project Leadership (20 Credits)
Strategic Project Management (20 Credits)
Project Risk Management (20 Credits)
Project Commercial Management (20 Credits)
Management of Mega and Complex Projects (20 Credits)
Caps​tone Project (40 Credits)​

Learning & teaching

The course will be delivered through a mixture of lectures, group work, practical sessions and distance learning via the Moodle Virtual Learning Environment.

Postgraduate programme within the School operate on a semesterised basis with 140 credits of taught modules being delivered over two teaching semesters.

Modules are led by experienced members of staff and, in some instances, professional practitioners from industry and for each 20 credit module students will normally have:
48 hours of face to face contact and 152 hours of self –managed (tutor directed) learning.

We are a Registered Education Provider – Global Provider – with the Project Management Institute (PMI) the largest project Management professional body in the world. Students will have the opportunity to attend PMI meetings and events locally and nationally and to develop their own personal professional networks and contacts. We also work closely with Agile South Wales who encourage professional contact at events and have input to course teaching.

Advice and guidance is available via the course tutors or through the extensive personal tutoring service available in the school.


A variety of assessment methods are used including individual coursework, presentations, group practical assessment and debates. Extensive project management resources are available in the library and via the electronic catalogue as well as curated by individual tutors and made available through Moodle, the university virtual learning environment.

Employability & careers

Projects are key to the successful implementation of organisational strategy and those people with the right skills are increasingly seen as employees vital to success. Global demand for project managers is increasing to such an extent that demand is seriously outstripping supply.

On successful completion of this MSc you will be equipped to take on a challenging career in project management across a range of sectors from IT to construction, third sector, business and government. You will also be able to develop your current project management skills and experience to be able to specialise in such areas as risk management, finance and contract management or to take on more of a leadership role of your organisation’s portfolio of projects and programmes.

Upon completion of the MSc you can undertake further study at doctoral level via research or professional routes.

How to apply

Selection Procedure:
Application form/personal statement and if necessary an interview.

Applications for this course should be made direct to the university via our self-service facility. For further information please visit our How to Apply pages at http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply.

Key facts

Place of Study:
Cardiff School of Management
Llandaff Campus

Course Length: One year full-time or two years part-time.

International Applicants:
Before making an application, international students (those outside of the EU), should contact the International Office at Cardiff Met to discuss the necessary procedures in relation to studying with us. For further information visit http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/international.

Tuition Fees and Financial Support:
For up to date information on tuition fees and the financial support that may be available. Please refer to http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/fees.

Postgraduate Scholarships:
The university also offers a postgraduate scholarship scheme to help students whilst at university. To see if you are eligible, visit http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships.​;

For general enquiries please contact the Admissions Team on 029 2041 6044 or email .

For course specific enquiries, please contact the programme leader, Langes Supramaniam:
Email: ​​

Full terms and conditions in relation to accepting an offer to study at Cardiff Metropolitan University can be found by visiting http://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/terms

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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary research organisation within the University of Greenwich. Read more

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary research organisation within the University of Greenwich. The award-winning institute leads research on food security, environment, agriculture and rural development in developing countries, although it has an expanding portfolio of activities within the UK, Europe and other industrialised countries.

Research Awards:

The NRI's recent awards include:

  • The Queen's Anniversary Prize 2016 for its food security research on African cassava crops
  • The Guardian University Awards 2015 Research Impact prize
  • Times Higher Education Awards 2014 International Collaboration of the Year prize for its flagship project Cassava: Adding Value for Africa (C:AVA), supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation:

Multidisciplinary research specialisms:

The NRI provides a thriving environment for MPhil and PhD students working in agricultural, health, environmental, social and food sciences. Each of the NRI's departments (details below) has a strong portfolio of research activities and groups, of which students form an integral part. NRI's work provides many opportunities for postgraduates to be involved in multidisciplinary projects.

Agriculture, Health and Environment Department:

The Agriculture Health and Environment department has a specialists in ecology, entomology, molecular biology, plant physiology and environmental science. The major area of expertise is on the biology of pests and diseases of plants, livestock and humans that affect livelihoods in developing countries, specialising in the complex biology of the insect vectors of disease to plants and animals. This includes understanding the molecular biology of disease transmission by vectors to crops, detection of plant viruses, the effects of endosymbionts on insect vectors, the behavioural entomology of mosquito mating and sensory cues for egg-laying and host detection. Other areas of work are around ecosystem services in agriculture such as pollination, ecological engineering, carbon dynamics, climate adaption in crops, sustainable agriculture and biodiversity in agricultural systems.

Research is undertaken in the UK, using the NRI's state-of-the-art laboratories, insectaries and glasshouses, but often with its application in developing countries.

Food & Markets Department:

The Food and Markets Department works on food security and food safety aspects of crops and livestock products. The department works with all aspects of the operations of the food sector and has recently taken over a state of the art research facility (Produce Quality Centre) at East Malling. The research interests of the department include by way of example:

  • Post-harvest technology, storage and food waste reduction
  • Nutrition and understanding nutrition behaviours
  • Food quality analysis and management
  • Compliance with food standards
  • Food processing and value addition
  • Value chain analysis from economic, social and environmental perspectives
  • Information and communication technologies for agriculture
  • Private and public sector standards
  • Market development and smallholder access to markets
  • Capacity development for agricultural innovation systems
  • Microfinance for the agricultural sector

Livelihoods and Institutes Department:

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on several themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Its interests include:

  • Participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation
  • Agricultural service delivery
  • The governance of rural development
  • Performance and impact assessment methodologies
  • Community-based natural resource management
  • Land tenure and land policy
  • Urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages
  • Pastoralism and dryland development
  • Vulnerability to disasters
  • Climate change
  • Gender and social difference
  • Responsible business

Recent PhD Projects

  • Reasons for multiple loans in microfinance and their effect on the repayment performance
  • Evaluating the impact of climate change on postharvest quality of perishables
  • Dormancy and sprout control in root and tuber crops
  • Chemical signals that affect oviposition behaviour of Aedes aegypti
  • Bat activity in UK Agricultural landscapes
  • Using values to identify drivers of land-use change for REDD
  • Next generation sequencing of yam viruses
  • Role of endosymbionts on biology of Cassava Whitefly
  • Introducing a pro-vitamin A rich staple: analysis of decision making along the orange fleshed sweet potato value chain in Uganda
  • The scope of Learning Alliances as a mechanism for more innovative urban water management.
  • Livelihood impacts of staple crop commercialisation on smallholder farmers
  • Creating capabilities for sustainable smallholder agriculture: a systems perspective on innovation and the adoption of Conservation Agriculture in Kenya and Madagascar
  • Margins in the mountains: poverty dynamics in India's Western and Eastern Ghats
  • Climate change impacts, vulnerability and resilience in a pastoral livelihood system: the case of the Borena pastoral area
  • Enhancing the adaptive capacity of Ghanaian crop farmers in response to climate variability and change

Degree aims

This degree aims to:

  • Provide you with the ability to conceptualise, design and realise a project for the generation of new knowledge, and a deep understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry
  • Allow the creation of new knowledge, through original research and advanced scholarship, to extend the forefront of that disciplinary field or area of practice
  • Provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily related to a topic of relevance to a developing, transition or developed country
  • Strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of professional backgrounds
  • Strengthen capacity to undertake research and develop your ideas

Our Master of Philosophy (MPhil) with possibility to transfer to our Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) involves the systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge in your chosen academic disciplinary field.


You will be assessed through submission of a thesis and an oral examination.

Employability and career development

We have developed strong relations with many academic institutions and research centres both in the UK and overseas. This offers you networking, mentoring and internship opportunities, making it a perfect location to develop your career. 

Helping graduates into careers is a very important part of our mission as a university. Many of our PhD students go on to obtain employment at middle and senior levels and positions in ministries, NGOs, universities and international organisations.

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Professional engineering institutions now require engineers to have at least an MEng or MSc qualification for Chartered Engineer status. Read more
Professional engineering institutions now require engineers to have at least an MEng or MSc qualification for Chartered Engineer status. And with many high-tech engineering companies now operating pan-European and globally, Master's level qualifications are often considered essential for career development.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) , which confirms it meets standards set by the Engineering Council for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC).

Course detail

The MSc Mechanical Engineering is designed to allow BEng and BSc (Hons) Mechanical Engineering graduates, and those from related disciplines, to top up qualifications through the MSc-route equivalent of an MEng Mechanical Engineering. The Department of Engineering Design and Mathematics has a longstanding reputation for offering IMechE-accredited BEng (Hons) and MEng Mechanical Engineering degrees, alongside a range of MSc programmes in related specialised subjects.

Graduates with an in-depth understanding of engineering design and analysis, and the ability to appreciate the challenges of managing complex operations, are in high demand. This course is designed to meet that demand, and to bridge the skills and knowledge gaps for BEng or BSc graduates, and make them more employable. With its foundations in mechanical engineering, this course is a great opportunity to learn how to develop advanced solutions to engineering problems using the latest computer tools and simulations. It also addresses a need for people who work well in project teams, and an extended piece of independent research is a significant part of the course.


Core modules include:

• Modelling and Simulation
• Computer Vision and Modern Control
• Innovations in Operations Management
• Masters Group Project

Optional modules include:

• Design of Fluid Systems
• Structural Integrity in Design
• Industrial Applications of Vision and Automation
• Robotics Fundamentals
• Intelligent and Adaptive Systems


Assessment is through a combination of examinations and coursework, and your dissertation project.

Careers / Further study

An accredited Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering provides an essential stepping stone for any mechanical engineer aspiring to take their career to the highest level. Mechanical engineers are vital to society and the economy. For example, they're often involved in making maximum use of high-capital plants and operations such as power stations, oil refineries, chemical plants and hospitals.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx


- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This programme will develop your critical understanding of concepts and principles of positive behaviour support. Course structure. Read more

This programme will develop your critical understanding of concepts and principles of positive behaviour support.

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.


The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme:

  • Concepts of applied behaviour analysis
  • Functional assessment and analysis of challenging behaviour
  • Developing and implementing interventions
  • Advanced issues in values, ethics and professional practice
  • Challenging behaviour and positive behaviour support
  • Research methods

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • Critical understanding of concepts and principles of positive behaviour support
  • In-depth knowledge of values and ethical principles and how to apply these in professional practice
  • Advanced knowledge of methods of observing, recording and analysing behaviour
  • Advanced and in-depth knowledge of methods of assessing and intervening to manage challenging behaviour and support adaptive behaviour
  • Practical understanding of cognitive, communicative and social characteristics of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities whose behaviour is described as challenging and the impact of these characteristics on assessment of challenging behaviour
  • In-depth knowledge and critical appreciation of biological, social and environmental causes of challenging behaviour in intellectual/developmental disability
  • Advanced knowledge of methods of applying positive behaviour support practices in working with individuals whose behaviour is described as challenging
  • Advanced knowledge of use of positive behaviour support to understand, assess and intervene in systems/settings for people who have intellectual/developmental disabilities (e.g. schools, residential settings, families, communities, workplaces etc.)
  • Critical understanding of research methodology and basic statistical analysis

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: the ability to organise information clearly and respond to written sources
  • numeracy: if you are doing the statistical element of the research methods module, you will make sense of statistical materials and integrate quantitative and qualitative information. You will also become familiar with ways of summarising and presenting data
  • information technology: the ability to produce written documents, undertake online research
  • working with others: the ability to work co-operatively on group tasks both within the virtual learning environment and during the residential workshops
  • improve your own learning: the ability to explore your strengths and weaknesses, time management skills and review your working environment
  • problem-solving: the ability to identify and define complex problems, explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them.

Dynamic centre of expertise

This programme is taught by the University's renowned Tizard Centre. An annual seminar series runs at which staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection..

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)

Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions

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