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There are exciting challenges facing Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) practitioners on a local, national and international level. Read more
There are exciting challenges facing Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) practitioners on a local, national and international level. Increasingly, CAM appears in the mainstream delivery of health within the UK, this coupled with the ever increasing public demand for choice in healthcare, necessitates the provision of highly qualified complementary therapists. The University of Wolverhampton is able to offer this new award which can develop skilled graduate professionals to higher level practice incorporating additional therapeutic skills. The course is designed to offer a unique and coherent award, offering dual accredited practitioner status. The award is within the School of Health and Wellbeing portfolio, The school has itself established an excellent reputation for the quality of its courses, for an innovative approach to teaching and learning, and for the friendliness of its staff.

Potential students who have graduated in the field of health and social care can now evolve their practice with new specialisms at a post graduate level.

The course has a strong focus on developing high standards in the professional therapeutic approaches to healthcare in context. The award aims to enhance practice skills where they already exist, and develop new skills where they do not. To develop therapeutic practitioners who have the specialist knowledge base and skills to enable them to practice effectively, in a safe and accountable manner, and in a variety of health and social care settings. To achieve this, the award will enable you to meet the requirements leading to registration as an aromatherapist with the International Federation of Professional Aromatherapists (IFPA); and reflexologist with the International Federation of Reflexologists (IFR). In addition to the fundamental aspects of Complementary Therapy, which will be gained to a high level, the award will also enable the student to develop digital literacy and business development skills necessary to operate as an independent autonomous complementary therapist.

The independent project module will be studied alongside other health and social care students, which will broaden your understanding of the health and social care arena and provide opportunities for inter disciplinary learning and gain a deep understanding of work within the wider health economy. Students from many different professional backgrounds will come together and share diverse and challenging ideas and knowledge.

We believe it is important that you are encouraged to make your own contribution to the effective operation and development of your chosen course. We are, therefore, keen to hear your views and would welcome any suggestions that you may have about ways of improving any aspect of your course and/or the student experience here at the University. In practice, you will have the opportunity to do this through our student voice processes.

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This Masters in Computer Systems Engineering exposes students to state-of-the-art miniaturised and mobile computer systems and smart device technology, allowing them to acquire the complementary hardware and software knowledge and skills required for understanding and designing such systems. Read more
This Masters in Computer Systems Engineering exposes students to state-of-the-art miniaturised and mobile computer systems and smart device technology, allowing them to acquire the complementary hardware and software knowledge and skills required for understanding and designing such systems.

Why this programme

◾You will be taught jointly by the Schools of Engineering and Computing Science. You will benefit from their combined resources and expertise and from an industry-focused curriculum.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾If you are a computer engineering graduate, this programme will enhance your knowledge; if you are an electronic engineering graduate you can focus on developing your software skills; or if you are computer science graduate you can focus on developing your hardware skills.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Computer Systems Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses
◾Digital signal processing
◾Either networked systems or computer communications
◾Human–computer interaction
◾Software and requirements engineering
◾MSc project.

Optional courses typically include
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Computer architecture
◾Digital communications 4
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾Microwave and millimetre wave circuit design
◾Optical communications
◾Real time embedded programming
◾Safety critical systems.

Projects

◾In addition to taught work and practical assignments you will also complete a joint research project worth 60 credits in one of the state-of-the-art laboratories in the schools.
◾This extended project is an integral part of the MSc programme: many of these are linked to industry while others are related to research in either of the participating Schools.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Computer Systems Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾As computer systems have reduced in size, and are increasingly mobile with more complex functionalities, they are now a fundamental component of smart device technology.
◾This postgraduate programme is particularly suited to acquiring the complementary hardware and software knowledge and skills required for understanding and designing such systems.
◾The programme makes use of the combined resources and complementary expertise of the engineering and computing science staff to deliver a curriculum which is relevant to the needs of industry.
◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributions in Computer Systems Engineering include: IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the computer/software industry.
◾The Computer Systems Engineering MSc programme also provides excellent preparation for those wanting to pursue a PhD in a similar research field.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in software development, chip design, embedded system design, telecommunications, video systems, automation and control, aerospace, development of PC peripherals and FPGA programming, defence and services for the heavy industries, for example generator and industrial motor control systems, etc.

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The Master of Architecture is ideal for students who have completed undergraduate studies in architecture and want to be equipped to address the growing challenges of the evolving built environment. Read more
The Master of Architecture is ideal for students who have completed undergraduate studies in architecture and want to be equipped to address the growing challenges of the evolving built environment. Graduates will be trained as integrated urban professionals to have the vision to design progressive architecture that responds to the dynamic needs of contemporary society and speculates about the future of our built environment.

The Master of Architecture enables graduates to meet the academic requirements leading to registration as Architect in Australia.

As a student you will undertake high-level study in specialised areas of architecture, from housing and urban design to digital practices. Through project based design studios you will gain exposure to leading design practices. An integrated program of study will allow you to select from a range of design studios in conjunction with advanced architectural studies - complementary depth units that introduce students to the methods and tactics of architectural design research and engage with the multidisciplinary socio-cultural, political, economic, historical, theoretical and technical dimensions relevant to contemporary architecture and urbanism. You will also develop knowledge of architectural practice within the context of multi-disciplinary collaborations and evolving construction methods and practices. Your studies will culminate in the final year with a self-directed project.In order to register as an Architect, graduates must also complete two years of professional practice and pass the AACA Architectural Practice Examination. For more details please visit the Architectural Registration Board of Victoria website at http://www.arbv.vic.gov.au.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/architecture-f6001?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts.

Part A. Advanced architecture and design studios
These studies will focus on advanced concepts and skills relevant to architecture design. Through project based studio classes you will gain exposure to leading design practices. In conjunction with studios, you will select from a range of advanced architecture studies units, which are complementary depth units. These will introduce you to the methods and tactics of architectural design research and engage with the multidisciplinary socio-cultural, political, economic, historical, theoretical and technical dimensions relevant to architecture and urbanism. Studies culminate in the final year in a self-directed project.

Part B: Applied professional practices
These studies focus on the core business and regulatory aspects of practice as an architect within the context of multi-disciplinary collaborations and evolving construction methods and practices.

Part C. Electives
These studies provide complementary depth units and enable you to tailor your studies to individual interests. You may select units from either architecture-specific advanced architecture studies depth units or other units offered by the University.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/design-and-architecture

ABOUT MADA

Welcome to Monash Art Design & Architecture (MADA)
MADA is a multi award-winning community of artists, designers and architects working together to create a better future for individuals and communities around Australia and the world.
We’re part of Monash University, the largest university in Australia, and among the most highly regarded in the world. Monash is a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities in Australia.

Located at the Caulfield campus of Monash University, our vibrant community of students, academics, researchers and staff generates creative activity at the highest level and is at the forefront of education in the creative arts, architecture, and design disciplines.
As a student with us, you’ll customise your studies from an incredible range of options – single degrees, double degrees and electives from across MADA and the rest of Monash – so you can become the creative professional you want to be.
And as a Monash graduate, you’ll have a strong sense of purpose, a global outlook, and the skills and confidence to make positive change to your own life, and to the lives of those around you.
As long as you have the drive to pursue, question and achieve, we’ll help you get there.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/architecture-f6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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January, May or September. The time is ripe to develop low carbon alternatives to petroleum-based products both in terms of what society wants and what economics demand. Read more

Start dates

January, May or September

Overview

The time is ripe to develop low carbon alternatives to petroleum-based products both in terms of what society wants and what economics demand. This makes it’s an exciting time to be part of the rapidly developing Biotech Industries. However, biorefining is a highly technical field and the successful growth of the industry is resulting in a lack of sufficient staff with the technical knowledge necessary to support its expansion. This course has been designed in consultation with existing UK industries to address this skills shortage. Since this programme is aimed at people who are already working, training is via distance learning and we hope to complement these with workshops.

Taught by experts at both Aberystwyth University (AU) and Bangor University (BU) through AU, the Industrial Biotechnology course offers you a highly vocational option.

The MSc comprises five core modules and four complementary modules which have been selected to allow students to study the main components of the biorenewable pipeline, from raw materials through extraction and processing to products; and to carry out your own work-based research. They are:

Core Modules

Biorenewable Feedstocks - each January

Students will learn about dedicated crops, agricultural waste and food waste streams and look at how to match feedstock to end-use. The module will examine: the scale of the challenge facing land-based crop production in the 21st century; the role of emerging technologies to meet these needs sustainably; and practical and economic considerations to scaling up production.

Biorefining Technologies - each January

This module will equip students with a detailed fundamental and practical knowledge of biorefining including pre-processing, processing and product isolation. It will teach them to evaluate the relative limitations and merits of different extraction, microbial biotechnology & fermentation technologies

Biobased Product Development - each September

This module will focus on potential end-products from bio-refineries including the relevant performance tests and the available processing/manufacturing technologies; both current and emerging technologies will be discussed. The module will also pay attention to the product innovation chain including commercial elements, life-cycle analysis and regulatory considerations.

Waste Stream Valorisation - each May

This module explores the potential to valorise a range of waste streams and will include case studies of exemplary waste streams as well as from students’ own chosen areas of interest.

Drivers of the Bioeconomy - each September

This module examines the societal drivers that shape the bio-economy and looks at what makes production viable. The need for energy efficient will be highlighted, along with vertically integrated production pipelines.

Research Methodologies and Advances in Bioscience

This module provides a framework for developing your research skills in the context of your own research question. You will be paired you up with a supervisor whose research field is in your area of interest and your supervisor will then guide you as you develop your ideas.

Work-based Dissertation

You may start your dissertation in any semester but should only be taken when Research Methodology and Advances in Biosciences has been completed and will involve a work-plan developed with your ATP tutor, academic supervisor and employer (if relevant). Working at a rate of 10-15 hrs per week we would expect the dissertation to take a year to complete.

Complementary Modules

Carbon Footprinting and Life Cycle Assessment - each January

(BU) This module will provide a theoretical and critical analysis of the practice and application of Carbon Footprinting (CF) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as key tools in assessing the environmental impact of agricultural systems.

Genetics and Genomics - each May

(AU) This module focuses on the challenges facing land based production and the role of emerging technologies to meet these challenges sustainably.

Anaerobic Digestion - each May

(BU) This module covers not only the technological aspects of AD, but also the opportunities and consequences of different feed-stocks, the alternative uses of the produced energy and digestates.

Climate Change - each September

(BU) After an introduction to the science and effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the module will assess historical climate change and will look at current predictions of future change. Methods by which agriculture and industry could adapt to the consequences of – and mitigate its effect on – climate change will be discussed.

Each distance learning module runs for 12 to 14 weeks. Students can start with whichever module they like and take as many or as few as they are able to over the five years of registration.

To achieve a PGCert, students must complete three taught core modules
To achieve a PGDiploma students must complete any six taught modules
To achieve an MSc, students must complete four core modules, two complementary modules and a work-based dissertation.

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This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/. Read more
This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/

It will help you to sharpen your practical skills as a creative artist. On a practical level, it will assist you in working as a freelance writer, composer or producer of musical theatre.

The MA focuses on the dramaturgy of the musical as a key factor in the future development of the genre.

Expert professionals are regularly employed as visiting tutors, to maintain direct links with the industry.

You follow one of the two pathways as either:

-producer
-writer or composer

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with students on the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Secretary.

Modules & Structure

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

You elect to follow one of two pathways on the programme – Producers, or Writers and Composers. In each case, the programme involves five separate modules:

1. Genre study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module runs for 20 weeks. It begins in autumn with an historical survey of the development of the American musical, from ‘Showboat’ (1927) to ‘Sweeney Todd’ (1979). It continues in the spring term with a look at new forms of musical theatre that have resulted from the fragmentation of the classic tradition of ‘book’ musicals, with the innovation of the ‘concept’ musical, the impact of rock musicals, the ‘invasion’ of Broadway by the British ‘megamusical’ and the subsequent globalisation of the market by Cameron Macintosh and Disney.

2. Case study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module involves a 15-week introduction to the different structural components (book, music, lyrics, choreography, scenography) and industrial factors (producers, marketing, technology, conomics)
determining the production of musicals today. The module is taught by a range of professional and academic experts with a variety of different perspectives on the subject.

3. Shared complementary/contextual module 1 – autumn term.

Students choose one of these modules:

4. Shared complementary/contextual module 2, - ‘Musical Theatre and Society’
5. Creative project/dissertation – spring and summer terms, both pathways.

Assessment

Genre study is assessed by two 3,000-word essays; the case study is assessed by means of a 4,000-word essay. The nature and form of creative projects, dissertations and research/placement projects are agreed with the Module Convenor during the programme.

Skills

You will develop a critical understanding of the collaborative processes involved in the creation of musical theatre in the UK and USA.

Composers and librettists/lyricists will achieve an enhanced ability to engage with the integration of dramaturgical and musical components of musical theatre writing, and a comprehension of the various factors involved in working within the industry.

Producers will acquire an overall perspective on the industrial and organisational factors involved in musical theatre production, including methods of theatre marketing, systems of arts funding and policy, and a working knowledge of the strategies involved in producing a small-scale musical.

Producers will also develop skills of leadership and teamwork and the ability to develop and critique their own approaches to working in musical theatre production.

Careers

Typical careers for graduates of this MA include:

musical theatre composer
librettist
lyricis
tproduce
marketing manager
production assistant

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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One of the first EdD programmes to be established in the UK and offering a range of pathways, the EdD at Exeter is offered by modular study and is specifically directed to professional development through research. Read more
One of the first EdD programmes to be established in the UK and offering a range of pathways, the EdD at Exeter is offered by modular study and is specifically directed to professional development through research. The programme is of particular relevance to experienced practitioners in education from the UK, EU or overseas and the academic tutors recognise the particular needs, interests and policy contexts of students who are also professionals in their own right.

The EdD is a ‘Professional Doctorate’ which is equivalent in level to a PhD, but includes a modular phase as well as the thesis. It is particularly suited to professionals who aim to link research closely with their existing professional practice. The PhD is more suited to those planning to become professional researchers.

The taught element of the EdD programme introduces different understandings of, and approaches to, educational research, including distinctive methodologies and methods. You can explore, in depth, a particular field of study, together with its implications for your own professional practice.

Pathways include: Generic Pathway; Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE) pathway; Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) pathway; and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in Dubai pathway.

The EdD will enable you to:

- reflect on, and experiment with, new concepts and ideas, professional understandings of practice, and research skills - all within a safe but challenging environment amongst a supportive community of peers;
- review and evaluate research, theory, policy and practice; examine and challenge your own professional practice and its relationship with theory and policy;
- integrate recent and applicable theory with the latest developments in professional practice;
- make strong links between your assignments/research thesis and professional practice and service needs;
- design and carry out your own ethically-informed research;
- network and share experiences with a worldwide community of professionals and policy-makers practising in a broad range of educational contexts and fields related to education;
- increase your knowledge about other professionals and their organisations and thereby gain a wider perspective on the environment in which you work;
- potentially enhance your opportunities for career progression.

Programme structure

The programme is divided into two ‘phases’. The first ‘pre-thesis phase’ (equivalent to 1 year of full-time study or 2 years of part-time study) offers specialist research-led modules which provide access to current thinking about key issues pertaining to research in your professional field and provide the opportunity to reflect on and experiment with new concepts and ideas, professional understandings of practice, and research skills within a challenging research environment amidst a supportive community of peers. This is followed by a ‘thesis phase’ (equivalent to 2 years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study) in which you complete a thesis that makes a substantial contribution to knowledge and/or practice within a professional field.

The Doctor of Education programme offers specialisms in the following fields: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL); Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE); Generic Route, suitable for professionals and policy-makers from across public and private sectors

Generic pathway

The generic EdD route brings together professionals and policy-makers from across sectors that have traditionally been, and mostly remain, separated.
These include:
• early childhood education and care
• schools and further education colleges
• adult and community education
• higher education
• medical education
• health and social care

It encourages the growth of a community of professional scholars with varied but complementary interests in exploring theories, policies and practices associated with education, training, teaching and learning at different stages in the life course, together with the complex, overlapping roles of professionals engaged in these processes. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/generic/

Special Needs and Inclusive Education (SNIE) pathway

The EdD Special Needs and Inclusive Education focuses on professional and theoretical knowledge and understanding in the area of special and inclusive education. You join a research community of professional and academic scholars and peers with varied but complementary interests in exploring theories, policies and practices associated with special and inclusive education at different stages in the life course and in different contexts. Past and current doctoral students include teachers, school leaders, university lecturers, speech and language therapists, other health professionals and medical educators.

Our international community of researchers has an excellent record of winning external funding, and our research centres provide structure and support, promoting collaboration and impact. The Centre for Special Educational Needs and Disability (http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/education/research/centres/specialeducationalneeds/) is interested in educational aspects (in widest sense) of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (in various senses of these terms). http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/snie/

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) pathway

The EdD TESOL aims to provide experienced senior professionals within the field of language teaching with an opportunity to study at advanced level for a doctoral degree by means of a taught programme plus a thesis. The course involves an in-depth examination of issues related to language learning and teaching and language teacher education. It also provides a solid grounding in research methodology appropriate for undertaking research at doctoral level within these fields.

We are committed to and actively engaged in undertaking research into a number of different aspects of TESOL and our students have published in a wide variety of journals. We are a very multicultural course, with students from over 30 countries including Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bahrain, Botswana, Cameroon, Cayman Islands, Canada, China, Cyprus, Dominican Republic, England, Finland, France, Greece, Holland, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, South Africa, Sudan, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates, United States of America and Wales. (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/education/eddoctoral/tesol)

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For creative practitioners working in the modern world of communication, it is essential that you are able to draw on a wide number of associated and complementary disciplines, thereby extending your ability to communicate effectively to a wide variety of audiences. Read more
For creative practitioners working in the modern world of communication, it is essential that you are able to draw on a wide number of associated and complementary disciplines, thereby extending your ability to communicate effectively to a wide variety of audiences.

In this rapidly developing environment, the most successful practitioners are those people who can embrace alternative approaches, adopt the widest range of skills, and fully appreciate the many methods of media communication.

To help meet the challenge of multi-disciplinary design communication, the University of Gloucestershire has developed this innovative MA programme that draws on the strengths of its staff working across many creative fields.

Graphic Design, Photography, Illustration, Digital, Moving Image and Animation are just some of the complementary disciplines that you will be able to explore during this one year MA programme.

This is your opportunity to investigate integrated design and associated subject areas and then harness those particular skills to produce a uniquely effective creative communication.

You will be actively encouraged to look at problem-solving from alternative viewpoints, with an emphasis on creative experimentation and innovative risk-taking.

Your studies will be supported and enhanced through a stimulating programme of lectures and seminars, while further inspiration will be gained through talks and discussion groups led by visiting professional practitioners.

Your MA studies will have at their core your desire to develop a practical creative project; one you already have in mind or which arises as a result of consultation with your lecturers at the University of Gloucestershire.

The range of outcomes is unlimited, or rather; they are only limited by your imagination. Your final Major Project will predominantly be a practice-based piece that is either the product of a cross-disciplinary creative approach or focussed around a particular specialism.


Benefits

* supports both specific and cross disciplinary project work
* individually navigated projects
* opportunity to work with staff and peer groups from all complimentary disciplines including illustrators, graphic designers, animators, web designers, photographers etc.

Career paths

* This course will support your progress with a wide range of careers within the creative industries.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

Course detail

You will develop a thorough and specialist knowledge of comparative law, human rights, environmental law and international law. You will also gain a range of skills valued by many employers including: critical judgment skills; problem-solving skills; the ability to formulate sound arguments; and the ability to interpret and explain complex information.
You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying law at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective. We offer a truly international experience, with students from every continent studying English law alongside comparative, regional and international law. You can choose from a wide range of modules that include Islamic Law, International Criminal Law and Human Rights in the Developing World.

SOAS law graduates are highly sought after by some of the world's leading law firms and NGOs such as Amnesty International, governments and international bodies such as the UN.

Expert at where the world is changing

We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law across the globe, complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.
Many of our academics are experienced advisors to governments, international organisations and NGOs and have professional experience as qualified lawyers and members of regulatory bodies.

Format and assessment

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language module. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmchineselaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Courses or the following modules associated with the Chinese Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmislamiclaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Islamic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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