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Masters Degrees (Comparative Physiology)

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The Department of Zoology at UBC is internationally renowned for its research in a variety of modern biological sciences, including ecology, evolution, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology and development. Read more
The Department of Zoology at UBC is internationally renowned for its research in a variety of modern biological sciences, including ecology, evolution, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology and development. The department has many strong interdisciplinary connections between different areas of research.

Zoology has a solid computing infrastructure of computer labs, compute servers, loaner equipment, colour and poster printers, and three computing support staff for knowledgable help.

Program Overview

Zoology encompasses over 50 principal investigators. Research interests of faculty members can be divided into several broad categories with substantial overlap of interest and collaboration among these arbitrary groups. The program vigorously promotes integrative research in biology and actively participates in several interdisciplinary programs, including the graduate programs in genetics, neuroscience, applied mathematics, and resource management.

Zoology offers a wide variety of research programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following areas: cell and developmental biology, community and population ecology, comparative physiology and biochemistry, neurobiology, and evolutionary biology.

In addition Zoology is actively involved in several interdisciplinary programs of instruction and research including:
- Fisheries Centre
- Centre for Biodiversity Research
- Centre for Applied Conservation Research (CACR), Faculty of Forestry
- Genetics Program
- ICORD (International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries)
- Institute of Applied Mathematics
- BC Cancer Research Centre
- Life Sciences Institute

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Zoology
- Subject: Life Sciences
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

Research focus

- Cell and Developmental Biology: molecular and genetic bases of development and cellular function
- Comparative Physiology: aspects of animal physiology from a comparative perspective, particularly those mechanisms underlying adaptive responses to environmental constraints
- Ecology: blends field ecology and natural history with ecological theory and conservation biology
- Evolution: encompasses evolutionary ecology, evolutionary genetics, conservation genetics, theory, and systematics

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1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only). Read more
1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only)

MRes in Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery (Bio-Imaging) is a unique 12 month full-time multi-disciplinary course which aims to give all participants an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging (including hardware and probe development, in vivo and in vitro experimental application, software development and data analysis). In addition, participants will be given training in comparative anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of laboratory animals, they will also obtain a Home Office Personal licence and hands-on experience of a range of in-vivo techniques used in research.


Students will follow already taught courses in Biomedical Imaging, and Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery. Students will also be taught transferrable skills subjects, such as safety awareness, intellectual property management, time and project management and presentation and communication skills. In addition, students will undertake an individual research project throughout the course and submit a research thesis.


Aims and Objectives

Provide science graduates with:

- an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging
- the ability to perform biomedical imaging, such as probe development or the experimental applicatoin of imaging in vivo
- intensive hands-on in vivo functional biology research training
- the ability to perform the physiological and pharmacological studies in drug development


Content and Structure

Part A: Bio-imaging, animal handling, Home Office training course, comparative anatomy and physiology and drug discovery.

Part B: Six practical modules focused on in vivo research skills (problem solving, e-learning, journal club and lectures).

Part C: 21 week in vivo research project

Career opportunities

The course will provide students with an insight into the principles of drug discovery and translational medical science. Importantly, those students wanting to undertake a PhD in in-vivo science will have gained a Home Office personal licence and be confident in animal handling and techniques. The students will thus be well equipped to make rapid progress in research. Furthermore, having learnt about biomedical imaging from development to application, they will also be better equipped to develop a fully integrative approach to their research problem. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will give students the ability to appreciate the importance of translating the results of scientific and cliical discoveries into potential benefits to healthcare.

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RVC Master of Research (MRes) may be for you if you do not wish to commit to undertaking a PhD but want to try a sizeable research project and get the generic skills applicable to research. Read more
RVC Master of Research (MRes) may be for you if you do not wish to commit to undertaking a PhD but want to try a sizeable research project and get the generic skills applicable to research. You can do this over one-year full time, or over two years part-time while you are continuing your career.

The MRes is designed to equip you to acquire the experience and the skills needed to enter a PhD programme or to move on to careers where advanced research experience will help you. It is an excellent training opportunity for both biological and veterinary graduates and addresses both basic and clinical problems in the biosciences, with applications in veterinary and human medicine. Research areas span cell and molecular science, whole animal physiology and population medicine.

An RVC MRes will develop you as a scientist who is capable of working across interdisciplinary teams and who can tackle problems of practical relevance to veterinary and medical science. You will:
- Learn from experts who produce cutting-edge research in a range of subjects and are published in the top academic journals
- Join an international team of staff and students
- Benefit from close proximity to other international centres of excellence in biomedical and biological sciences.


With more than 100 research-active staff at the RVC, the range of research topics is vast, extending from molecules to whole animals and animal populations. We focus on two main research themes:

- Comparative physiology and medicine: our understanding of animal disease, together with the superb facilities at the RVC, means that we are all well placed to contribute to the way in which human diseases are diagnosed and treated.
- Livestock production and health: there is international recognition of the need for new approaches to meet the growing challenges of livestock production, to control infectious diseases that threaten humans and animals.

You will join the RVC to undertake a specific piece of work under the direction of two supervisors, working within one or more of the RVC’s research groups. We offer a range of specific MRes projects which you can apply for, or you may have your own area of research in mind. Most of our MRes students are self-funded, but we do occasionally have funded MRes projects.

Your MRes will culminate in a research dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words and an oral presentation.

To underpin the research you are undertaking you will participate in training skills workshops, courses and seminars alongside other post-graduate researchers.

For our October 2017 MRes intake we are offering range of self-funded projects. The projects currently available are listed below. Further projects will be added:

- Dr Camilla Benfield Potential of a portable DNA sequencer, MinION, to detect animal viral disease
- Dr Rowena Packer Owner decision-making in the treatment and management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy
- Dr Monica A Daley Quantitative assessment of the interaction of personality and social dominance in poultry
- Dr Rob Noad Putting the bite on red mite: Towards anti-parasite vaccines in poultry

You will be expected to contribute to the running costs of a project. The sums required will vary between projects and you should discuss this with your supervisor.

The deadline for applications is 24th April 2017


If you are interested in undertaking a self-funded MRes project and your area of interest lies outside the projects listed above you can still apply to study with us.

You need to have an area of research in mind and your research project and supervisor should be agreed before you formally apply via UKPASS.

You will be expected to contribute to the running costs of a project. The sums required will vary between projects and you should discuss this with your supervisor.

The deadline for applications is 30th June 2017

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The Department of Integrative Biology is comprised of faculty members in three overlapping fields of emphasis. Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Comparative Physiology. Read more
The Department of Integrative Biology is comprised of faculty members in three overlapping fields of emphasis: Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Comparative Physiology. Research is focused on a wide variety of organisms (from microbes to plants to animals) at multiple levels of organization (from molecules and cells through to entire ecosystems). Basic research is being used as a foundation to address some of the most important regional and global issues.

Research Environment and Facilities

The University of Guelph is home to diverse, state-of-the-art facilities that contribute to research and graduate training. Extensive freshwater and saltwater holding facilities for aquatic organisms are available in the Hagen Aqualab. The University is home to one of the largest herbariums in Canada, and has a strong partnership with the Royal Botanical Gardens. The Biodiversity Institute of Ontario
provides first class facilities to investigate the genetic diversity of organisms, and the Limnotron enables experimental manipulation of aquatic food webs.

The department engages in field work throughout the world including local (the Arboretum, RARE in Cambridge, Algonquin Park), Arctic (Churchill, MB, Alaska, Yukon), African (Serengeti), and tropical (Costa Rica, Cambodia) sites. The department has access to field sites at the Arboretum, Algonquin Park, and the Huntsman Marine Science Center in New Brunswick, as well as access to extensive greenhouse and plant growth facilities across campus. Graduate students have access to facilities in the Advanced Analysis Centre including those for Genomics, Mass Spectrometry, NMR, X-ray crystallography and facilities for the growth of bacteria, yeast, mammalian and plant cells. These latter facilities are located in the Summerlee Science Complex, a 400,000 sq. ft building designed to enhance team-based science that crosses traditional discipline boundaries.

Funding

All graduate students are guaranteed financial support through Research Assistantships, Teaching Assistantships and internal/external scholarships.

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Taught at our University Centre Shrewsbury, this course is founded on two core elements. 1.The national aims set by the Joint Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons. Read more
Taught at our University Centre Shrewsbury, this course is founded on two core elements:
1.The national aims set by the Joint Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons
2.The historical aims of Dr William Penny Brookes of Much Wenlock, Shropshire, the true founding father of the modern Olympic
movement; activity and sport for social-cultural, mental and physical well-being.

Why study with us?

There is an increasing demand for postgraduate studies and professional development in exercise medicine in the UK and internationally. With the specialist and internationally respected reputations of the academic staff at University Centre Shrewsbury, this course aims to provide for the broader need around exercise in health, disease management and prevention.

The learning experience

This MSc (Full-time 12 months, Part-time 2 to 4 years) aims to provide opportunities for healthcare and medical practitioners to advance knowledge and practical applications in exercise science as related to health and medicine. You will be required to undertake three core modules and then select three other elective modules from the following choices, plus an independent research project.

Core modules will include:

• Physical Activity, Exercise and Sport in Public Health
• Psychology and Human Behaviour in Health and Performance
• Research and Analyses in Physical Activity, Exercise and Sport

You will then choose three more modules to determine your own personally applied pathway from the following*:

• Comparative Exercise Physiology in Health, Disease and Human Performance
• Exercise Testing, Prescription and Programming in Human Health and Performance
• Biomechanical Techniques in Human Health and Performance
• Comparative Nutrition in Health, Disease and Human Performance
• Pharmacy in exercise and ergogenic aids
• Musculoskeletal health and physical activity
• Independent Clinical or Health Setting Application
• Physical Activity and Mental Health
• Research Project

*With the exception of the Independent Clinical Setting and the Research Project Modules, all other optional modules' delivery may be subject to the enrolment of a minimum number of students.

If you are currently working in practice, you may be encouraged to integrate your studies with work by way of the optional independent study module and/or in your independently chosen research project.

The course will provide you with a multidisciplinary approach to public health in physical activity and sports medicine.

How will I be taught?

The learning experience will be based on a flexible learning model. You will attend modules that involve 20-30 hours of block tutoring over three to four days in Shrewsbury (this will include lectures, workshops and laboratory work), plus self-directed distance learning and/or practice-based experiential learning for approximately 150 hours.

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The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure. Read more

Overview

This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure.

Course Modules

The MSc programme is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis during two teaching blocks (semesters one and two) and a period of supervised and independent study (summer). It may also be completed over a two-year period on a part-time basis. The first two semesters (15 weeks each) include 4 taught modules. The dissertation is studied during the subsequent 20 week period in the summer. Each taught module is worth 15 credits whilst the dissertation is 60 credits.

Programme

Semester One (September to January)
Animal Physiology / Comparative Animal Nutrition / Wildlife Resources / Research Methods
60 Credits

Semester Two (January to May)
Animal Ethics and Welfare / Animal Protection and Habitat Conservation / Behaviour / Current Issues in Animal Science
60 Credits

Summer (May to September)
MSc Dissertation
60 Credits

The full MSc degree course consists of 120 compulsory taught credits plus 60 core credits from the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) can be awarded with 120 taught credits. Whilst a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) can be awarded on the successful completion of any 60 taught credits. Credits obtained from the dissertation can also be used when considering whether a postgraduate diploma can be awarded. Before progressing onto the Masters dissertation from the Diploma, students would need to complete the Research Methods module or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Entry Requirements

Applicants will normally hold a good BSc Honours degree (2.2 or above) from a recognised university in a related science subject such as animal science, agriculture, biological sciences, zoology, veterinary or bioveterinary science or other appropriate life-science degree. Applicants with a BSc (Hons) 3rd class pass, with extensive industrial experience may also be considered for the Masters programme. Applications from non-UK students are particularly welcome. All applications received will be reviewed and decisions for admission to the programme will be made on individual merit. Applicants may be interviewed if there is some doubt over the extent of academic qualification or linguistic skills.

Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to demonstrate a level of competence that enables them to study at a postgraduate level. A test score of 6.5 is required in the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests.

Learning & Teaching Methods

The teaching methods are a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, visits and student managed learning. The self-guided study takes place under the supervision of experienced staff from the Centre of Equine and Animal Science at Writtle University College. Students are assessed using a number of methods, for example written examination, reports, essays, seminars, debates, oral presentations, case studies and project dissertation.

The research project is an essential part of the MSc programme and provides the opportunity to carry out an independent piece research, critically analyse data and write a dissertation. The project will normally include hands-on practical experimentation to teach students how to gather and process data and problem solve. The project is supervised by an academic member of staff and takes place over an extended period during the spring and summer. The project can be based either at Writtle University College or other suitable external institution.

Potential areas for dissertation projects

Investigation of keeper-animal relationships in zoos
Animal behaviour and welfare research in collaboration with Colchester Zoo
Assessment of prevalence and risk factors for obesity in companion animals
Lameness detection and measurement in dairy cows
Estimation endangered wild animal population densities
Use of molecular biology techniques in conservation genetics of captive wild animals
Incidence of small mammals in agricultural landscapes
Diet selection and nutrient intakes in captive animals
Behavioural indicators of welfare and performance using different castration methods in lambs

Careers

Graduates are likely to use their award to secure management-level jobs and/or to improve their promotion prospects if they are already employed both in international and national organisations. Many opportunities exist in either government services or related agencies services: for example senior positions in DEFRA as quarantine officers or animal health inspectors. There are also numerous career opportunities in companies specialising in farm animal nutrition and pet food manufacturing, breeding and reproduction, veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. There also opportunities in charities engaged in animal welfare such as the RSPCA, zoos, animal rescue centres and safari parks. Also, independent wildlife agencies such as the RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England, and the Countryside Council for Wales would be interested in Animal Welfare and Conservation graduates. Some graduates may take up lecturing positions in universities and colleges or proceed to do further postgraduate study e.g. PhD.

Fees and Financial Support

Part-time student fees for each semester will be charged on a pro-rata basis. There are limited bursaries for part-payment of fees (for UK students only) from the Alice Noakes Memorial Trust. Applications for these bursaries can only be made via the course manager on admission to the course.

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The MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy programme is designed to optimise and enhance the competencies of Chartered Physiotherapists to produce technically competent, effective and safe veterinary physiotherapy practitioners in line with current professional standards. Read more
The MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy programme is designed to optimise and enhance the competencies of Chartered Physiotherapists to produce technically competent, effective and safe veterinary physiotherapy practitioners in line with current professional standards. Individuals will be encouraged and supported through critical reflection on the similarities and differences relating to practice in the human field of physiotherapy.

In particular the course promotes the philosophy of life-long learning and encourages students to develop their skills in critical thinking. You will be encouraged to critically analyse research and evidence and apply your findings to practice.

The course aims to help you recognise your role and responsibilities in the field of veterinary physiotherapy and animal welfare. It will enhance your clinical skills as well as your capacity to deal with complex relationships between animals, their owners/handlers and other healthcare professionals. The course will also introduce you to the legal, ethical and financial issues involved in veterinary physiotherapy/ private practice.

This part-time programme is available to registered physiotherapists who are looking to specialise in animals. Graduates from this programme will either have a Postgraduate Diploma or MSc in Veterinary Physiotherapy, which will allow them to upgrade from Category B membership of ACPAT to Category A. Once qualified, students will be eligible to set up their own business in veterinary physiotherapy or be employed in the industry.

Topics you study on this programme could include Clinical Practice, Comparative and Applied Anatomy Physiology and Biomechanics, Understanding Veterinary Diagnostics and Physiotherapy Assessment, Research Methods and Applied Business Management.

Students will also be able to complete their own research and explore their own interests by completing a postgraduate dissertation in the third year if they choose to. You will also be required to undertake periods of clinical placement and students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent learning.

The course is offered on a part-time basis with teaching delivered in ‘blocks’ of study (each block is usually between two and four days in length and there are approximately 12 blocks of attendance per year) on both weekdays and weekends. Additionally, there will be times when students are required to attend for individual days, e.g. where assessments are scheduled.

The campus is equipped with excellent equine and animal science facilities including laboratories, hydrotherapy both canine and equine, treadmills both canine and equine, a world class championship arena and much more.

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This three-year PgDip course has been designed for health and science graduates who would like to gain the knowledge, skills and values necessary to register as midwives on the Nursing and Midwifery Council's (NMC) professional register. Read more
This three-year PgDip course has been designed for health and science graduates who would like to gain the knowledge, skills and values necessary to register as midwives on the Nursing and Midwifery Council's (NMC) professional register. This is an NMC approved course.

What will you study?

You will study a wide range of subjects that provide the scientific knowledge base for midwifery practice, such as maternal and neonatal physiology and care; health promotion and education; professional, ethical and legal issues; and research. You will be exposed to a variety of educational and practice settings and encouraged to view learning as a lifelong process. Reflection is emphasised throughout the course to enhance the integration of theory and practice.

Module listing

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Year 1
-Birth as a Life Event
-Introduction to Professional Practice
-Foundation for Biosciences in Childbearing
-From Embryo to Neonate

Year 2
-Women's Health and Illness
-Principles of Research
-Public Health and Childbearing
-Dimensions of Health and Midwifery Practice

Year 3
-Midwife as a Professional
-Facilitating Women-Centred Care
-Comparative Maternity Care
-Improving Practice through Research

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The MSc Equine Science develops a systematic understanding and a critical awareness of current issues at the forefront of equine science. Read more
The MSc Equine Science develops a systematic understanding and a critical awareness of current issues at the forefront of equine science. Enhancing the student’s understanding of techniques applicable to research and scholarship in equine science, the course encourages the original application of knowledge to address complex issues.

This MSc Equine Science, awarded by the University of Central Lancashire, recognises the multidiscipline approach of the subjects. The course aims to extend the student’s existing expertise to the full range of skills and knowledge required to inform and lead industry developments. The MSc will encourage debate and critical evaluation of industry practices and research within this field. The course will enable students to reflect on current issues and develop problem solving skills which encourage originality of thought.

Year 1 (Note all modules will be taught in Year 1 on the full time option)

Equestrian Sport, Culture and Society

Application of social science theories and concepts to evaluate the role of the horse in modern sport, culture and society.

Current Issues and Innovation in the Equine Industry

A quest for solutions for complex issues currently impacting on the horse and the equine industry, incorporating consideration of cross-discipline techniques and approaches.

Comparative Exercise Physiology

To systematically review the latest research findings and methodologies in application to athletic animals, including humans.

Year 2

Applied Techniques for Sustaining the Equine Resource

Development of analysis protocols for the recognition of threats to the equine and exploration of feasible preventative and prophylactic approaches to minimise risk.

Equitation Science

Development of a critical awareness of the latest advances in techniques, research and scholarship relating to the scientific study of the horse: rider dyad.

Research Methodology and Design

This module provides students with the essential personal, organisational, management, theoretical and statistical skills needed to work at Postgraduate Level. It will explore research philosophies, research process and design and the process of questionnaire development and design. The module will develop skills in advanced data organisation, presentation, dissemination and problem solving.

Year 3

Masters Dissertation

The dissertation is a triple module and allows students to design and conduct a substantial piece of independent, supervised research in the field of equine science. The dissertation is an independent piece of academic work which allows the student to identify and work in an area of interest to them and manage the research process to agreed deadlines.

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