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Masters Degrees (Community Welfare)

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The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms. Read more

The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms.

The programme is delivered by researchers and teachers from both the Jeanne Marchig International Centre for Animal Welfare Education (within the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies) and the Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) with a series of guest lecturers from around the world.

The programme offers courses in a variety of areas, including:

  • history, culture and concepts of animal welfare
  • animal behaviour
  • animal welfare assessment
  • animal ethics
  • recommendations and policy
  • legislation, regulation and enforcement
  • science communication
  • applied animal welfare - production, companion and captive wild animals

Learn more about why you should study with us:

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy:

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

A blend of online learning methods are utilised, such as discussion forums, podcasts and live tutorials. The programme is modular, allowing us to offer a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied.

Students may choose to study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

Students can take up to 6 years to complete the full MSc programme and there is also the option to graduate with either an International Animal Welfare, Ethics and Law postgraduate certificate or diploma.

Year 1: certificate

You will take two compulsory courses - International Animal Welfare Science and Animal Ethics, Policy and Law - plus an optional course.

Year 2: diploma

You can choose up to 60 credits of optional courses, which include:

  • Production Animal Welfare
  • Cat and Dog Welfare
  • Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
  • Animals in Research, Testing and Education
  • Clinical Animal Behaviour
  • Equine Behaviour and Welfare
  • Equitation Science
  • Anthrozoology (new for 2017)

Year 3: masters

You complete a dissertation of between 10,000-15,000 words which can be a research project or an extended systematic review of the literature in a topic of Animal Welfare Science, Ethics or Law.

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Career opportunities

Graduates can use their qualification to enhance their career prospects in academia, research, governmental and non-governmental organisations and consultancies.



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Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more

Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

  • Top 100 University.
  • This animal welfare degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health.
  • When studying animal welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
  • In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
  • A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
  • The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
  • You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture.
  • We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
  • We have currently the following partners involved in this programme
  • Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA)
  • Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie
  • Blair Drummond Safari Park
  • Chester Zoo
  • The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne)
  • National Museum Scotland

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 40 flexible credits in the 2nd term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Animal welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.



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This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. Read more

This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. The programme examines advanced knowledge about the theory and practice of social work and community development in an international context. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of global social issues (such as social exclusion, poverty, environmental degradation, and disasters) and relate this knowledge to developments in their own country. You will be equipped with the skills to engage in research and to apply research findings effectively in practice. The programme includes a two-week field-based learning opportunity in a social work or community work agency. The dissertation provides space for you to carry out research on an aspect of social or community work in the UK. 

Durham University is a world leader in international social work and community development research, theory, and practice. Our social work team has edited the prestigious International Social Work journal and works closely with social work’s key international organisations - , the International Association of Schools of Social Work, .the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), and the International Council of Social Welfare (ICSW). Its Programme Director also represents social work at the UNFCCC and other UN bodies.

Course structure 

You will study in a small group of international students, and also alongside UK students on postgraduate social work and research degree programmes. This will give you plenty of opportunities to share knowledge and experience in addition to your learning through lectures, presentations and seminars.

The MA consists of five core modules, designed to give you an understanding of social work as it is practiced in the UK, and a thorough grounding in research methods and their application. You will also choose two specialist modules according to your particular professional interests. Finally, you will undertake a research project and write a dissertation. To achieve the Master's degree, you must accumulate a total of 180 credits, as listed below.

Core Modules

International Social Work (30 credits)

  • International social work: Debates and controversies.
  • The history of international social work.
  • International institutions and social work theories and practices.
  • Legislative underpinnings to international social work
  • Internationalised Social problems 

Social Work: Context and Practice (30 credits)

  • Contemporary social work and social welfare in a diverse society
  • Construction of social problems
  • Ethical frameworks for social practice
  • Contemporary social work theories and practice.

Community Development and Organising (15 credits)

  • Critical analysis of communities
  • Origins, history, and theoretical approaches to community development
  • Contemporary forms of community development practice
  • Community and public policy.

Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

  • Uses of research in social welfare policy and practice
  • Approaches to social research
  • Ethical issues in research
  • Literature reviewing, sampling, data collection and analysis methods.

Field Based Learning (15 credits)

  • Social work practice
  • Comparative theory/practice approaches
  • Social and community work organisations
  • Practice based pedagogies

Note students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Optional Modules

These are subject to staff availability. In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

  • Youth policy in the UK
  • Origins, development, and theoretical underpinnings of youth work
  • Critical overview of contemporary youth work practice Key forms of intervention.

Management in Community Settings (30 credits)

  • Critical analysis of a range of perspectives which have informed the management oforganisations in community settings, including those relating to:
  • Development of understanding in effectively managing and developing these organisations in the current context to increase their effectiveness in achieving their aims in ways that are consistent with professional values
  • Personnel management
  • Physical resource management
  • Financial management
  • Strategic management
  • Change management.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cress-tabulations, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Crime, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)



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Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference. Read more
Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-social-welfare-and-social-policy

How does globalisation impact on social welfare provision and planning in different countries? Do issues like poverty and social exclusion, street living and migration need to be culturally and locally specific, or could there be global solutions? You’ll explore these and many other issues in our MSc which will prepare you for a career in social welfare and policy. The emphasis is on comparative and global analysis, exploring social welfare and planning responses to issues such as street children, criminal justice and social welfare in areas of political conflict. You’ll have the chance to build and expand on skills relating to policy making, social sciences, leadership and strategies of change. An understanding of comparative and global welfare policies is important for national and international organisations. Therefore, our course is a positive step towards a career in a national and international context, working within the area of social welfare and policy.

Careers

Career possibilities once you’ve graduated are likely to be in the fields of community development social policy, social welfare, youth work, education, higher education, consultancy or policy making in local, regional and international governmental and non-governmental bodies. You’ll also be prepared to carry out further research and study towards a PhD.

- Links with industry and professional recognition
Our Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education works in collaboration with a number of universities from across Europe on the International Doctoral Studies in Social Work (INDOSOW) project. This is the first European Doctoral Programme of its kind and offers the opportunity to take part in an international interdisciplinary study of social work, welfare systems and social policies. For further information about the INDOSOW project visit: http://www.indosow.net.

Core modules

Globalisation, Social Welfare & Social Policy
Comparative Social Policy & Social Welfare
Research Studies
Major Project

Optional modules:
Global Leadership
Collaborative Practice for Integrated Care
Essential Issues in Public Health Policy

You will choose one optional module from the above list. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a range of ways to examine the development of your skills throughout our course, leading to the submission of your Major Project bringing together aspects of learning from earlier modules. Assessment strategies include essays, reports, case studies and debates; there are no exams in this course. You’ll have plenty of group workshop and individual supervised support for your Major Project.

Special features

The course leader is a specialist in research and teaching within an international context.

Our students come from across the globe including Bangladesh, Columbia, Ghana, India, Kenya and the UK. Each of our students brings their individual experience in areas as varied as international relations, psychology, social work, social policy, sociology and economics. With lively classroom debates at the top of our agenda, you can be sure that each topic is discussed from multiple perspectives.

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This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices. Read more

This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices.

We provide students with an understanding of animal welfare that can be applied in animal research, management, care, production, inspection, assessment and preparation of legislation.

In addition to the core teaching team, we have many guest lecturers travel to Edinburgh each year to teach on the programme, allowing you to benefit from the experience and knowledge of professionals working throughout the animal behaviour and welfare community.

Programme structure

The programme involves taught courses and your own dissertation.

Throughout the taught courses you will take part in many visits to farms and animal facilities and will study the following courses:

  • Introduction to Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare
  • Biology of Suffering
  • Animal Cognition and Consciousness
  • Scientific Methodology
  • Animal Welfare Applications
  • Read more about the taught courses

You can complete the programme over one, two or three years.

Dissertation

From March until August, you will work on a research project.

Career opportunities

Graduates move on to a variety of jobs such as research technicians, scientific advisors and lecturers. Many will also continue their study and enrol in a PhD.



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Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Read more
Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Underpinned by strong values of social justice Youth and Community Workers seek to critically analyse the social world and nurture the development of others through collaborative and creative practice leading to social change.

The main aim of the MA in Youth and Community Work with JNC professional qualification is to develop skilled, innovative and reflective practitioners, who are able to engage and develop positive relationships within communities, which lead to education and discovery. Through practice workers will demonstrate a clear commitment to promoting participation and empowerment, equality, partnership working and to the personal, social and political development of those involved.

This new MA Youth and Community Work programme has been designed in partnership with service users and leading professionals employed in the field. This collaboration ensures teaching is current and reflective of today’s youth and community work agenda preparing you effectively for a successful career.


Curriculum

This course is delivered through a full-time (1 year) or part time (2 years) route and will provide you with a blend of academic and practice-based learning to develop both your theoretical understanding and experience through two professional practice placements. Students will build a solid foundation in youth and community work through an exploration of the theoretical frameworks of informal education and community development along with advanced studies examining key youth and community work methods and settings, contemporary issues, youth development, welfare and social policy.
- Youth Work Theory and Practice (20 Credits)
- Practice Placement 1: Linked to Youth Work Theory and Practice, Community Empowerment for Social Change (20 Credits)
- Critical Themes and Issues Influencing Contemporary Practice (20 Credits)
- Managing Youth and Community Work (10 Credits)
- Advanced Research Seminars (20 Credits)
- Dissertation Preparation and Research Methods (10 Credits)
- Practice Placement 2 (20 Credits)
- Dissertation (60 Credits)

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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Recognition of the importance of equine welfare has never been higher, both with industry lead bodies and the general public. Equine welfare underpins safe management of the horse and facilitates a longer and more successful career in every area of their use. Read more
Recognition of the importance of equine welfare has never been higher, both with industry lead bodies and the general public. Equine welfare underpins safe management of the horse and facilitates a longer and more successful career in every area of their use. To achieve a high standard of welfare understanding the principles of the study of equine behaviour is essential. With a large number of horses on site, and many links with industry stakeholders we believe that UWE Hartpury is well placed to support postgraduate level study in this fundamental area. At postgraduate level it is expected that you can engage and inform with developments and innovations in this fast moving subject area. This programme develops an applied understanding of the principles of equine behaviour and welfare, and supports the students in gaining and applying the research techniques necessary to evaluate and contribute to current understanding.

Postgraduate study in Equine Science at Hartpury can be the start of many exciting opportunities. The programme consists of taught modules delivered via weekend study blocks to facilitate study alongside your career. As a postgraduate student of Equine Science, you will have a personal academic tutor to help support you to achieve your individual goals and interests. Study skills module weekends are also held during the induction period and combine with formative assessment opportunities to help support your academic development. This is combined with staff who are engaged with advancing equine science on the international stage yet remain accessible and committed to promoting your achievement. Students are encouraged throughout their programme to attend conferences, present their research and become a member of the wider academic community including at our own annual Alltech-Hartpury Equine Performance conference.

The friendly, supportive and personal atmosphere here at Hartpury combines with the flexible modular programme to offer a unique, inspirational, engaging and enjoyable postgraduate experience.

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Study at Liverpool John Moores University for this registered qualification providing routes in School Nursing and Health Visiting (Specialist Community Public Health Nursing) and have your professional competencies, set out by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, assessed in practice. Read more
Study at Liverpool John Moores University for this registered qualification providing routes in School Nursing and Health Visiting (Specialist Community Public Health Nursing) and have your professional competencies, set out by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, assessed in practice.

-Study for a registered qualification providing routes in School Nursing and Health Visiting
-Learn from expert nurses and visiting specialists on this contemporary programme which encompasses registration for practice
-Benefit from a curriculum praised for its enhanced practice perspective and ‘outstanding’ fitness for practice from the NMC
-Have your professional competencies, as set out by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), assessed in theory and practice
-Experience 22 weeks of practical placements
-This course will only run subject to minimum numbers


Teaching builds on your existing clinical experience, extending your theoretical and professional knowledge and understanding. Many sessions are shared with other LJMU community nursing programmes, enabling you to better understand and appreciate the roles of other healthcare specialists.

As a public health nurse you must be able to work flexibility and creativity, demonstrating high quality practice leadership. The programme prepares you to take responsibility for vulnerable individuals, identify healthcare needs, facilitate health-enhancing activities, safeguard health and welfare and influence health policies.

You can study full time (52 weeks) or part time (104 weeks), with modules delivered two or three days a week and clinical placements interspersing the classroom learning blocks. Theory days can be used for activities such as non-module specific sessions, masterclasses, personal study and assignment preparation.

You will be appointed a personal tutor to support and oversee your progress through the course and you will work with an experienced practitioner - your practice teacher - on work placements.

Formal teaching takes place in Tithebarn Street in the city centre campus. This vibrant location offers everything you could possibly need during your studies. The resident Avril Robarts library, for example, is open 24/7 during semesters and has computer rooms, learning spaces and on-site catering facilities

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Level 7

-Public Health
-Leadership and Management
-Research in Health and Social Care
-Vulnerability and Integrated Practice
-Contemporary Issues in SCPHN Part 1
-Contemporary Issues in SCPHN Part 2
-Managing Complexity in Safeguarding
-Engagement for Health

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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There is a separate entry on admission to the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare. The programme is run on an in-service basis over one academic year, entailing attendance at an induction course and nine block weeks in Trinity College as well as the completion of course-related assignments in the workplace. Read more
There is a separate entry on admission to the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare.

The programme is run on an in-service basis over one academic year, entailing attendance at an induction course and nine block weeks in Trinity College as well as the completion of course-related assignments in the workplace. The multidisciplinary in-take comprises experienced and senior personnel from a range of relevant disciplines, for example, social work, public health nursing, education, community based and residential child care, psychology, An Garda Siochana, youth and project work. The course is designed to strengthen the capacity of the health, social service, education and criminal justice systems to identify and respond to the needs of vulnerable and abused children and their families. It is organised in close collaboration with the Department of Health and Children and the Health Services Executive. Candidates who successfully complete the Diploma course and meet the eligibility criteria for the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare (see earlier entry under Taught Masters Programmes) may proceed to a second year to complete the Masters course.

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This part-time, flexible course is for post-qualifying Social Work professional study. Read more
This part-time, flexible course is for post-qualifying Social Work professional study. The MSc programme accommodates a range of modules to allow students to build credit towards either a “generic” Masters qualification (MSc in Applied Professional Studies) or a range of specialist qualifications by following prescribed pathways of study.

Key information

-Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate, University Certificate.
-Study methods: Mixture of online and classroom delivery.
-Duration: This programme is flexible so durations are for guidance. PG/UG Cert-12 months, PG Diploma-24 months, MSC-30 months.
-Start date: Both Spring and Autumn start-dates are available.
-Course Director: Duncan Helm.
-Location: Stirling Campus.

Accreditation

Our qualifications are recognised and accredited by organisations such as Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC). By mainlining strong links with key stakeholders we ensure that our programmes anticipate learning needs in the workforce and that we are at the forefront of contemporary practice and thinking.

Course objectives

This course is a post-qualifying award designed to support experienced professional staff in developing advanced knowledge, skills and understanding.

Child Welfare and Protection

This is a post-qualifying course for staff working in child welfare and protection, including those in social work, health, education, the police and associated disciplines. With a focus on improving outcomes for children, this course tackles core challenges in practice including assessment, planning and effective practice. The course builds professional knowledge and competence sequentially through consideration of key frameworks (such as attachment theory and resilience), critical reflection on multi-professional judgement and decision-making, through to examination of the latest research and practice developments in care planning and intervention.

The Certificate consists of three 20 credit modules (Scottish Qualifications and Credit Framework) which are designed to be taken sequentially across one year of study. Each module is delivered over seven days through a blend of direct teaching and structured learning activities. Modules are structured to accommodate the pressures experienced by professionals combining adult learning with demanding workloads. Unique to this course, there is a final day in the timetable which provides students with the tools and opportunity to review their learning across the course. This review of learning is designed to facilitate embedding of learning in practice and to dovetail the learning outcomes from the course with the student’s ongoing professional development.

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work.

We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice.

The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill.
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C.
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component.
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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Delivered by representatives of the University of Stirling, the NSPCC and a range of experts from across Scotland, this fully accredited programme has been introduced to enable students to develop advanced skills in child welfare and protection practice with children and families. Read more

Advanced Practice Skills in Child Welfare and Protection

Delivered by representatives of the University of Stirling, the NSPCC and a range of experts from across Scotland, this fully accredited programme has been introduced to enable students to develop advanced skills in child welfare and protection practice with children and families.

Unlike most other postgraduate courses in the field, this course has an emphasis on gaining practical skills and experience. In particular the course is designed to bridge an existing gap in practice skills development, and students will gain knowledge, skills and experience for working within the most challenging settings.

The syllabus will provide access to the latest insights, from experts in fieldwork and clinical practice across a range of settings, which inform contemporary practice in Scotland.

It will include a variety of innovative learning and assessment methods including videotaped role-play, extended case study work, peer review. Introducing a more intensive model of skills validation for experienced practitioners, the course will encourage criticality and a culture of evidence informed practice and interventions, and approaches to self-evaluation.

For more information, see the website: http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/applied-social-science/applied-professional-studies/

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work. We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice. The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill.
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C.
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component.
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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This is a post-qualifying course for staff working in child welfare and protection, including those in social work, health, education, the police and associated disciplines. Read more

Child Welfare and Protection

This is a post-qualifying course for staff working in child welfare and protection, including those in social work, health, education, the police and associated disciplines. With a focus on improving outcomes for children, this course tackles core challenges in practice including assessment, planning and effective practice. The course builds professional knowledge and competence sequentially through consideration of key frameworks (such as attachment theory and resilience), critical reflection on multi-professional judgement and decision-making, through to examination of the latest research and practice developments in care planning and intervention.

The Certificate consists of three 20 credit modules (Scottish Qualifications and Credit Framework) which are designed to be taken sequentially across one year of study. Each module is delivered over seven days through a blend of direct teaching and structured learning activities. Modules are structured to accommodate the pressures experienced by professionals combining adult learning with demanding workloads. Unique to this course, there is a final day in the timetable which provides students with the tools and opportunity to review their learning across the course. This review of learning is designed to facilitate embedding of learning in practice and to dovetail the learning outcomes from the course with the student’s ongoing professional development.

For more information, see the website: http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/applied-social-science/applied-professional-studies/

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work.

We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice.

The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill.
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C.
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component.
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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This course aims to further develop your professional knowledge and understandings in specific areas of education and welfare. Read more
This course aims to further develop your professional knowledge and understandings in specific areas of education and welfare.

It is based upon a critical concern for social justice and the ways this is understood and implemented through policy and practice to affect the lives of disadvantaged children and young people as well as poor and marginalised groups and communities.

The MA Education (Social Justice) aims to:
• Increase awareness of, and access to, a range of academic ideas and research findings in relation to issues of education and social justice
• Promote personalisation of broad themes around the challenges posed by changing global political, social and economic landscapes and to meet the needs and interests of students while providing a focused line of study
• Promote vocationally relevant and varied assessment formats with a negotiated focus to support individual and organisational needs
• Promote engagement with key issues in education and social justice, involving critical examination of a wide range of key sources and texts
• Encourage evidence-based practice and reflexive practice-based understandings through engagement with work-based settings allowing student to integrate theoretical ideas with practical implications.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/education-social-justice

Course detail

The MA in Education (Social Justice) is designed to develop a breadth of understanding of the theoretical debates that underpin the process and practice of education and social welfare and will enable you to analyse and reflect on research that contextualise the complexities of working with disadvantaged and marginalised groups across community, local authority and voluntary sector settings.

The course will strengthen your ability, and equip you to apply for jobs (or further training) in a wide range of educational settings as teachers, community workers, social workers, police, probation officers, education welfare workers, home school link or family welfare workers and professionals working across the voluntary sector.

This Master's degree will also enable you to progress to doctoral study in specific specialist areas.

Modules

• Education and Social Justice
• Citizenship and Welfare in the 21st Century
• Analysing Policy: Children’s Voice
• Research Methods in the workplace
• Dissertation (Social Justice)

Assessment

You will complete a range of assessments, many of which you can tailor to your existing or developing interests and experience.

You will do a number of oral presentations, which not only improve your ability to present information in a professional and coherent way but also enable the sharing of research and experience amongst the group. One unit also includes a debate as part of the assessment.

Written assessments include case studies, essays and literature reviews.

You will develop your research skills throughout the course and apply them to a final dissertation.

Careers

Bringing your subject knowledge from the areas you have studied, you will have gained knowledge and skills through this course that will make you a specialist in relation to social justice and education.

Graduates who have completed the master's course are most likely to seek jobs:
• Teaching in schools FE or HE
• Community or social work
• Police, probation officers
• Local Authority work
• Home, school link of family welfare workers
• Voluntary sector work

Those who have postgraduate degrees are most likely to progress in these careers and to go into management roles more quickly.

The course has a strong employability focus with contact with those in a range of jobs related to Education and Social Work.

For those who wish, there will be the option of applying to progress to doctoral study.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link:

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This interdisciplinary course, delivered in association with Everton in the Community (the official charity of Everton Football Club), provides you with a unique opportunity to undertake cutting-edge, impact-focused and policy-relevant teaching and research related to health and wellbeing in sport, physical activity and related sectors. Read more
This interdisciplinary course, delivered in association with Everton in the Community (the official charity of Everton Football Club), provides you with a unique opportunity to undertake cutting-edge, impact-focused and policy-relevant teaching and research related to health and wellbeing in sport, physical activity and related sectors.

You will have the opportunity to work with academic experts, practitioners and other professionals to further your understanding of the complex links between sport, physical activity and mental health and develop expertise in the design and evaluation of programmes intended to promote mental health and wellbeing. You will also examine how mental health may be compromised, as well as enhanced, by participating and working in community and professional sport.

The programme is suitable for graduates as well as current practitioners, professionals and policy makers, who have an interest in sport, physical activity and mental health or health and wellbeing more broadly. The course will also be highly relevant for those working in community and professional sport, including coaches, current and former athletes, safeguarding and welfare officers, and support staff.

What will I study?

This programme enables you to study the prevalence and determinants of mental health and illness and their association with various forms of inequality. You will analyse how sport and physical activity are commonly used to address mental health and illness, become familiar with how sport and physical activity programmes are designed and evaluated, and explore how these programmes emerge out of local, national and international policy processes and priorities.

Optional modules provide you with the opportunity to study how mental health can be compromised and enhanced at community and/or professional levels of sport and physical activity, in addition to investigating how the mental health needs of different populations can be addressed.

Following an introduction to major research methodologies, methods and approaches, undertaking an independent research dissertation on a topic of your choice will enable you to develop an in-depth understanding of project and people management, how organisations address mental health and illness, and the ethical dilemmas involved in researching mental health in sport and physical activity contexts.

You will be encouraged to inform this project with any insight derived from relevant work experience in sport, physical activity and mental health settings. If you wish to undertake applied work experience to inform your studies, you will be supported to do so by engaging with key partners including Everton in the Community.

How will I study?

The course will be delivered in a variety of ways, including lectures, workshops, student-led seminars and discussions, tutorials, applied work experience, and practitioner-oriented mentoring.

You will typically be required to attend one afternoon/early evening session per week and engage in supported activity (e.g. tutorials) as appropriate.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework (including essays, policy briefings and reports, and programme evaluations), individual presentations and a research dissertation.

There are no formal written examinations as part of the current assessment methods on this programme.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by academic staff who possess expertise in a variety of disciplines allied to sport, physical activity and mental health, including sociology, psychology, psychiatry, physiology, policy analysis, and performing arts.

Practitioners and professionals who work in sport, physical activity and mental health, in addition to other guest speakers involved in teaching and research, will also regularly contribute to the delivery of the programme.

What are my career prospects?

You will graduate well placed to pursue a variety of career paths, including working in community and professional sport as a mental health practitioner, programme manager/worker, policy maker, coach, administrator, safeguarding and welfare officer, or as part of a sports science support team.

Alternatively, you may wish to pursue a career in research, youth and social work, or in the sport, leisure and business management sectors. The course also provides ideal preparation to progress onto doctoral study in sport and physical activity.

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