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Masters Degrees (Community Regeneration)

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The regeneration of local economies, local places and local societies is high on the political agenda. Read more

Technology, Design and Environment / Department of Planning

The regeneration of local economies, local places and local societies is high on the political agenda. Current discussion in the UK of an urban renaissance, about creating sustainable communities and about growing disparities between the economies of London and other regions and cities in the UK overlays the traditions of inner-city regeneration and neighbourhood renewal that have long been a focus for British urban policy.

You will develop an understanding of the application of planning and action to the regeneration and sustainable development of local and regional economies, and societies. The major aims of this course are to develop a critical understanding of key issues in regeneration theory, policy and practice, and to ground you as a reflective practitioner who is also aware of the ethical and political dilemmas of practice.

Course content

The major aims of this course are to:

develop a critical understanding of key issues in regeneration theory, policy and practice

develop a critical understanding of the history and the nature of regeneration as an intervention in local economies, communities and environments

develop an in-depth understanding of varying dynamics of market driven and public policy driven strategies, along with an ability to adjust these to mutual benefit

ground students as reflective practitioners who are also aware of the ethical and political dilemmas of practice

enable students to access and understand the data sources relevant to analysing current processes and generating policy responses

enable students to compare, monitor and evaluate such policy responses in relation to relevant objectives, in order to make the highest quality strategies practicable in any particular context

develop skills to work effectively in a range of regeneration contexts.

The postgraduate certificate is based on the completion of three core modules and is worth 60 level 7 credits in total. To obtain the award you must pass all three modules (see below):

Introduction to Regeneration

introduces you to the context within which regeneration takes place and to different approaches to securing desired change. The challenges facing regeneration and the varying ways in which these have been met over time and space are critically reviewed. The main contemporary policies, objectives, strategies, funding regimes and agencies are introduced and critically analysed.

Regeneration and Neighbourhoods

critically examines key issues in current regeneration theory, policy and practice, focusing on neighbourhood renewal and people-based approaches to regeneration. As well as looking at particular initiatives the module explores issues involved in community participation in regeneration. The unit builds relevant skills in participation, drawing up community-based strategies and working in partnerships.

Delivering Regeneration

focuses on the implementation and management of regeneration projects, including valuation and appraisal, project management, evaluation and monitoring, strategy and project formulation, bidding for funds and funding packages, partnership working and working with the private sector. It aims to build your awareness of implementation issues and skills in delivering regeneration.

All teaching is currently on Tuesdays. Introduction to Regeneration is delivered in Semester 1, Regeneration and Neighbourhoods in Semester 2 and Delivering Regeneration as a 'long, thin' module over both semesters.

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification. This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification

This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management and policy context of this work at a postgraduate level, especially for those who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. This might include those practising in community development, housing associations, community health, community enterprise, neighbourhood regeneration, community arts, and professionals in a range of statutory, voluntary and private sector posts that have an element of community involvement and engagement; for example, economic development, planning, policing, transport, and voluntary sector development.

The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. Core modules enable students to explore and develop their understanding of management, policy and practice in this field, as well as learn core research methods skills and carry out their own piece of advanced research. Students have a choice of optional modules to enable more focused study in their own areas of interest.

Course structure

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

Core Modules

-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing in Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice and Management in Community and Youth Work plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice, Management in Community and Youth Work and Professional and Personal Development, plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community work and reflect the diverse range of community settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Community Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives to which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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The MSc Community Learning and Development offers an exciting and innovative opportunity for advanced study based around community learning practice and inquiry. Read more
The MSc Community Learning and Development offers an exciting and innovative opportunity for advanced study based around community learning practice and inquiry. The programme is offered as a workplace based, blended learning programme of study using online materials and communication media, with study workshops and tutor support.

Why study for the MSc CLD at Dundee?

The programme will have flexible entry and exit points and can be studied either as a CLD qualifying programme, accredited by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland, or as continuing professional development (CPD) with optional modules including Organisational Management, Community Engagement, Interprofessional Collaboration and Action Research. It is expected that the options available will be expanded over time to include modules in Family Learning, Literacies and Arts & Communities.

What are the aims of the programme?

The programme is designed to enable participants to:
- Identify, reflect on, develop and appraise critical community based practice, individually and in collaboration with others;
- Integrate community learning and development practice with theoretical studies and investigative techniques;
- Enhance commitment to community learning and development values, ethical codes of practice and ongoing professional development;
- Engage in processes of active learning involving cyclical processes of action and reflection with participants towards development of empowerment, capacity building and co-production;
- Contribute to ongoing construction of theory and practice by communicating with communities of participation and practice the outcomes of investigations and development projects.

Who should study this course?

Applicants for the qualifying CLD programme require a relevant first degree and current professional practice in a public and voluntary CLD context. This new award offers graduates from a range of disciplines such as education, social work, housing, planning, the arts, health, politics or law an opportunity to undertake a postgraduate qualification in Community Learning and Development.

Practitioners with an existing CLD qualification can choose to study the optional modules through a continuing professional development route. The programme is also suitable for returning students who have a PG Diploma in CE/CLD, who wish to complete the Masters dissertation.

How you will be taught

The Programme can take 2 to 3 years depending on a student's circumstances with modules being delivered by blended and distance learning and are supported by the use of the University's Virtual Learning Environment and other online tools such as Adobe Connect and Google+. This means the Programme is available anywhere and anytime there is access to the internet.

The MSc CLD is characterised by progression through Certificate, Diploma to Masters with exit points at each level. These awards aim to build on professionals' initial training and professionalism which has developed throughout their work experience. Because of the considerable distance learning element in the programme, significant individual support is offered through:

On-line tutorials and workshops
Study guides
Telephone tutorials
Face to face tutorials
E-mail
Written feedback (electronic)
Virtual learning environments

What you will study

Students on all routes are required to complete the two Certificate level core modules:

Research Methods for Professional Inquiry (30 credits)
Critical Pedagogies (30 credits)
The CLD Standards Council qualifying route requires the completion of two Diploma level modules:

Evidence-Based Practice 1 (30 credits)
Evidence-Based Practice 2 (30 credits)
Those on the CPD route can instead select two optional 30 credit modules from the range available to complete the Diploma level.

All Masters students will then be required to complete the 60 credit Dissertation module.

How you will be assessed

Formative assessment and feedback are a feature of all modules. Formative and summative assessments are designed to arise naturally from study and work. Assessments may be in a range of styles including written assignments, portfolios, presentations all designed to best evidence the learning of any given module.

Careers

The programme offers excellent professional qualifications and options for ongoing CPD for those in seeking practitioner and managerial posts in:
Local Authority Services and Projects
Third Sector Organisations
Community Learning and Development Services
Culture and Leisure Services
Community Health
Youth Work
Housing
Community Development
Adult Literacies and Numeracies
Family Learning
Community & Adult Learning
Local Economic Regeneration
Social Enterprise Development
Further & Higher Education

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This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge to work alongside people in communities to initiate sustainable social change.

Why this programme

◾You will discover ways in which you can help people realise their potential and work together for a fairer, healthier and happier world.
◾Upon successful completion of the PgDip, you will be awarded a professional qualification accredited by the Community Learning and Development Standards Council in Scotland.
◾This qualification will enable you to work in the field of community learning and development, including community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration.
◾You will have the opportunity to participate in a network of community development projects. Project leads contribute to the taught aspects of the programme and also provide you with placement opportunities.
◾Our students come from a wide range of professional, academic and cultural backgrounds and all bring with them a curiosity about how social justice can be developed by people working together for change.

Programme Structure

You will take two core and two optional courses from a specialist pathway. There is a large practical element either in the form of a placement or as part of your current workplace. Throughout the programme there is emphasis on participative and experiential learning. For the MEd you will also undertake an in-depth supervised research project, on a related topic of your choosing.

Core courses
◾Practice and policy inquiry
◾Theoretical frameworks for practice

Optional courses

Adult education
◾Curriculum development in adult education
◾The psychology of adult learning

Community development
◾Educational approaches to community learning & development
◾Empowerment & social change

Youth work
◾Perspectives in youth & young adulthood
◾Working with youth: Education & learning for change

Career prospects

You will have many employment opportunities open to you in the areas of community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration. With an accredited CLD Standards Council for Scotland qualification, you will have the opportunity to work for local authorities, the voluntary sector and further and higher education institutions.

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This MSc engages with a great challenge facing urban professionals. the decay of cities and their planned renaissance. Read more
This MSc engages with a great challenge facing urban professionals: the decay of cities and their planned renaissance. It will equip you with the ability to critically analyse complex urban issues, the boldness to address those issues in a creative, strategic manner and the confidence to propose appropriate implementation plans.

Degree information

You will acquire the latest knowledge of the social, economic and spatial issues involved in regenerating urban areas and you will gain a case-based, multidisciplinary experience of real urban regeneration schemes. The programme provides a platform for informed reflection on the latest theory and practice and will develop your creative thinking and problem-solving abilities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits in total.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits, full-time nine months, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four core modules (60 credits), full-time six months, is also available.

Core modules
-Urban Problems and Problematics
-Development Projects
-Preparing Regeneration Projects
-Implementing Regeneration Projects
-Critical Debates in Urban Regeneration
-Urban Design: Place Making
-Support course: Planning Research (not credit bearing)

Optional modules - you can choose optional modules from across UCL which may include the following specialisms:
-Cities and the Environment
-Housing
-Modules on the Global South from the Development Planning Unit (DPU)
-Sustainable Urban Development
-The Representation of Cities and other modules from the Urban Lab
-Transport Policy and Planning
-Urban Design
-Urban Economics and Politics

Students taking RTPI accreditation must take the following:
-Planning Practice
-Plus either Comparative Planning Systems and Cultures OR Spatial Planning: Concepts and Context

Dissertation/report
In order to develop your research skills and critical thinking you will undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through individual and group project work, lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshops. You will participate for free in a field trip to mainland Europe and in several site visits in the UK. You will be assessed through essays, individual and group projects, presentations, reports, an unseen written examination and the dissertation.

We make every effort to bundle teaching for the core modules on two days per week so that students studying on a flexible basis can attend lectures one day per week. However, due to timetabling and venue availability restrictions no guarantee can be given that we will be able to offer this every year. There is also no guarantee that the electives you may wish to choose will be offered on the same day as the rest of your classes. Your coursework may require you to dedicate more than one slot per week on fieldwork or study.

Fieldwork
A field trip will take place in the reading week of term two.

Careers

Graduates who were not already employed have been very successful in finding jobs in a wide variety of public, private and third sector organisations in the UK and around the world. Your career following graduation may include employment in a diverse range of areas like planning, real estate, regeneration and economic development consultancies; national and regional regeneration, housing and economic development agencies; local authorities; specific regeneration and local economic development programmes as well as voluntary and community sector organisations and NGOs. You may also wish to continue with further research for a PhD degree.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Architect, Foster + Partners
-Analyst, Savills
-Policy Officer, Ministry of Land and Transport
-Landscape Architect, Atkins
-Socio-Economic Consultant, Regeneris

Employability
The programme will equip you with up-to-date knowledge, creative skills and a unique way of thinking about the built environment in an integrated manner. A diverse range of employers readily appreciate these attributes and often make direct requests for recommendations.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett School of Planning has been at the forefront of planning research and teaching in the UK and internationally since 1914. The programme, one of the oldest in the Bartlett, is delivered by globally distinguished academics.

You will be engaged with practitioners, alumni and academic guests through seminars, site visits and workshops in the UK and overseas. Upon graduation you will join both the UCL alumni network and the MSc Urban Regeneration network.

Following graduation you will also be eligible to apply for membership of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Institute of Economic Development (IED) and, depending on your elective modules, the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI).

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The programme aims to facilitate the personal and intellectual development of students and to produce graduates with the knowledge and skills appropriate to manage change and the delivery of integrated service provision, and appreciate the dynamic forces that shape the relationship between people and place. Read more
The programme aims to facilitate the personal and intellectual development of students and to produce graduates with the knowledge and skills appropriate to manage change and the delivery of integrated service provision, and appreciate the dynamic forces that shape the relationship between people and place.

Key benefits

- Accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) for the purpose of fully meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Membership.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/msc-community-planning-and-governance-ft-jn

Course detail

- Description -

This is an innovative programme bringing together knowledge from the disciplines of spatial planning and governance, leadership and change management, and community development, to offer a programme designed for those wishing to develop specialist and transferable skills for implementing service delivery, shaping spatial change, successful collaborative working, and span sectoral and organisational boundaries.

The degree programme will enable successful students to engage with, understand and debate:
• Place-shaping
• Planning and Regeneration
• Change Management
• Collaborative Governance
• People and Place
• Service Delivery
• Leadership
• Performance Management
• Resilient Communities

- Course purpose -

Community Planning and Governance has been designed to provide insight into the evolving governance relationship between people and place, and to critically discuss models of integrated service delivery for enhancing social, economic and environmental well-being.

- Teaching and learning assessment -

A variety of learning and teaching methods are adopted across the modules on this course, to place emphasis on independent, reflective and experiential learning, which include, for example, interactive lectures, facilitated seminars, cafe symposium style workshops, problem-based learning scenarios, reflective discussions, project work, case study examples and self-directed learning.

Assessments include professional reports, individual and group presentations, academic essays, personal reflective logs, and an independent community planning research project (at MSc level).

Career options

Graduates from the PgDip/MSc in Community Planning and Governance will be able to: demonstrate knowledge and competencies of the contemporary – and changing – governance context that shapes the relationship between people and place; have skills to practice the appropriate methods for developing integrative models of service delivery that enhances social, economic and environmental well-being; demonstrate intellectual qualities, including high level cognitive skills, enabling them to analyse, synthesise and objectively evaluate complex issues, construct and defend a balanced argument, and identify problems and possible solutions in a changing service delivery and governance context.

How to apply: http://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: http://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course will provide the opportunity to develop and improve your skills, knowledge and understanding of a range of regeneration-related disciplines, enabling you to make a key contribution to the work of your organisation. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course will provide the opportunity to develop and improve your skills, knowledge and understanding of a range of regeneration-related disciplines, enabling you to make a key contribution to the work of your organisation.

Regeneration is concerned with the physical, social, environmental and economic development of communities. It is central to the work of a wide range of public, private and voluntary sector agencies, including local authorities, registered social landlords and community-based agencies.

Regeneration for Practitioners is accredited by the Institute of Economic Development (IED), enabling you on completion to apply for membership.

Delivered through the University of Chester’s Work Based and Integrative Studies (WBIS) framework, our course provides individually negotiated learning pathways to meet your needs and those of your organisation.

Unlike other university-level regeneration courses, this course emphasises the use of your professional practice to gain academic credit, using theory to inform practice and negotiate your own programme of learning.

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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​This programme focuses on the application of the key principles of multidisciplinary public health practice to the breadth of 21st Century public health challenges. Read more

Course Overview

​This programme focuses on the application of the key principles of multidisciplinary public health practice to the breadth of 21st Century public health challenges. Our aim is to develop reflective public health practitioners capable of designing, implementing and evaluating community-focussed public health interventions – in Wales, the UK and internationally.

In this programme we will challenge your preconceptions and practice, developing your knowledge, skills and competences, helping you develop as a reflective public health practitioner. We place a strong emphasis on your own area of practice, and encourage you to base your studies on the issues and situations you face in your own field.

The programme has been designed to meet the needs of a wide range of public health practitioners, professionals, community workers and volunteers working to achieve improvements in the wider determinants of health. Our objective is to support you in further developing your public health knowledge and skills in order to improve your current and future practice, and enhance your career options.

The programme is aimed at anyone with an interest in improving the full range of social, economic and environmental determinants of health: for example, people working in education, health promotion, housing, transport, leisure, environmental health, community development, health & wellbeing partnerships, planning, social services, school nursing, and health visiting (not an exhaustive list!). We welcome applicants from all sectors: public, private and the voluntary & independent sector. The programme retains an international focus, addressing public health issues faced around the world, as well as in Wales and the UK.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Applied-Public-Health---MSc.aspx

​Course Content​​

The course is designed as a Masters programme but it has exit points at both postgraduate certificate & diploma level. Reflective practice is integrated into the programme: we’ll encourage you to reflect upon your learning as you progress, culminating in an assessed reflective statement demonstrating the integration and development of your learning and practice through the course of your studies. The dissertation also incorporates a reflective practice element. The programme is available on a part-time and full-time basis; you can also apply to study individual modules on a CPD basis.

For the Postgraduate Certificate, you’ll complete the following modules:
- Assessing Health, Wellbeing & Inequity (20 cred​its): Assess, evaluate and communicate information about the health and wellbeing of populations & communities

- Health Risk Perception & Communication (10 credits): Appraise the sociocultural, emotional and psychological factors that influence responses to threats to population health and wellbeing

- Public Health Policy Development (10 credits): Evaluate the political, social and economic framework within which policies influencing health & wellbeing are developed

- Applied Research Methods and Design (20 credits): Develop the qualitative and quantitative research skills necessary to undertake research and evaluate interventions and day-to-day practice.

For the Postgraduate Diploma, you’ll undertake the above modules, plus the following modules:
- Frameworks for Public Health Intervention (30 credits): Explore approaches to intervention for the protection and improvement of health and wellbeing, and integrate learning from across the programme in the development a coherent multidisciplinary intervention on an identified public health issue.

- Health Protection (20 credits): Assess, prevent and manage risks to health arising from the general environment, communicable disease and environmental health hazards.

- Reflective Public Health Practice (10 credits): Reflect on your learning, practice and experiences in order to evidence the development of your professional public health practice.

To obtain the MSc, you will also complete a Dissertation (60 credits): Design, plan and undertake a piece of independent applied research, and present the findings.

Learning & Teaching​

- ​Course Delivery
Attendance for taught modules is usually one evening per week (part time) or two evenings per week (full time). SHS7000 Applied Research Methods & Design is currently delivered as a blended learning module over four contact days, two days in the autumn term (October) and two further days in the spring term (February), supported by e-learning materials and activities. The APH7008 Health Protection module follows a similar approach, being taught via three 2-day short courses spread through the academic year (November, February, April), plus an assessment day in May.
During your dissertation studies, you will attend research project workshops and be allocated individual supervision time. These usually begin in March (of the 2nd year of study for part-time students).

- Learning & Teaching Activities
The teaching and learning strategy for the programme places a strong emphasis on application of theoretical frameworks to real problems and situations, and allows for substantial student input and discussion. During the programme you will engage with a variety of learning & teaching activities, including:

- Lectures
Lectures will be used to provide you with a framework of ideas and theory, into which you can fit material obtained from independent study and tutorials. Whilst lectures are seen as opportunities for imparting key information they are also intended to be interactive, and debate is encouraged.

- Seminars
These will provide you with the opportunity to discuss problems related to specific subjects. Group seminars will enable you to share experiences and discuss, analyse and evaluate possible solutions.

- Workshops
Tasks will be set requiring you to work together to develop problem solving strategies and to analyse issues.

- Student Symposia
Learning activities led by students will form part of the programme. You will be required to develop and present short papers and facilitate discussion relating to specific issues.

- Case Studies
These sessions will present a case for discussion based on previous events, and you’ll be expected to analyse the situation and suggest appropriate public health interventions in response. These studies will be aimed at improving your skills with respect to the analysis of problems and the synthesis and evaluation of solutions.
Preparation for such a case study may include the following:
- Presentation of available data and information about the case.
- Group discussions, tutorial and individual learning to enable you to identify the problem and synthesise possible solutions.
- Discussions and lectures with relevant professionals to understand the rationale behind the adoption of specific solutions.
- Debriefing by way of tutorials and seminars.

- Contact Time and Self-Directed Learning
The direct contact time between student and tutor varies from module to module. Generally, unless otherwise stated on the module guide, 10 credit modules will include up to 18 hours contact time and 20 credit modules will include up to 36 hours contact time. An exception to the above is APH7010 Frameworks for Public Health Intervention, which includes student-led group work supported by keynote lectures.

In addition to direct contact time you are generally expected to undertake a further 3-4 hours of self-directed learning for every 1 hour of contact time.

- Introduction to Academic Skills
Included within the introduction to the programme is an introduction to the academic skills needed to study at Masters level. This includes the provision of specific e-learning material, a formative assignment and access to a Personal Tutor.

- Moodle
You can access programme material both on and off campus via Moodle, the University’s virtual learning environment. This includes access to lecture presentations, recommended and required reading, group forums, e-portfolios and a range of other learning and teaching resources specific to the modules and programme.

- Personal Tutors & Professional Development
In addition to a general open door policy, we encourage you to meet with the Programme Director and tutors regularly throughout the programme to discuss feedback on assignments and the development of academic skills.
You’ll be an allocated a Personal Tutor at the beginning of the programme, who you can work with to develop your academic skills and consider how you can integrate your learning experiences with your own professional development needs and aspirations. Your aspirations for professional development will be discussed during the induction to the programme. Support and guidance will then be tailored throughout the programme to ensure that you are best able to fulfil your chosen professional development needs.

Assessment

To reflect the applied nature of study, the programme contains no unseen written examinations. Instead, teaching and assessment will focus on case studies, exercises & scenarios reflecting contemporary issues in public health practice, often located within your own professional experience and environment. Examples of assessment tasks include: reports, essays, briefings, oral presentations, group work, observed practice scenarios, online tests and posters.

Throughout the programme, the assessment tasks we set will encourage you to select specific topics of study that are relevant to your interests and practice. For example, in the Assessing Health, Wellbeing and Inequity module, you will be asked to assess and evaluate the health and wellbeing of a specified population (in general or focussed on a specific issue/range of issues). You’ll be free to select a population and issue of professional and/or personal interest to you.

Employability & Careers​

The promotion, protection and improvement of public health are key objectives for the Welsh Government, UK Government and at an international level, as exemplified by the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.

Our programme is closely mapped to Levels 6 & 7 of the Public Health Skills & Knowledge Framework - the recognised competence framework for public health at all levels in the UK. The programme provides the underpinning knowledge to enable you to pursue UK Public Health Practitioner registration (which requires completion of an assessed portfolio through a recognised development scheme, such as that operated by Public Health Wales – see http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/888/page/49062 for details). We are also working on a project with Public Health Wales to develop and pilot a scheme to enable recognition of Advanced Practice (Public Health), supported by work-based learning.

If you'd like to find out more about career development opportunities in public health, we strongly recommend the PHORCAST website - http://www.phorcast.org.uk/.

Graduates from the programme have progressed to advanced positions in their chosen specialist career areas. Examples of roles our graduates have attained include:
- Project lead for Safeguarding, Public Health Wales
- Director of Business Performance for a large UK voluntary organisation
- Senior Project Co-ordinator, mental health charity
- Public Health Fellow (American India Association) and Project Manager, Tata Steel Rural Development Society
- Senior Public Health Practitioner, Public Health Wales
- Community Health Advocate
- Environmental Health Team Leader, Welsh local authority
- Program Manager, Maternal and Child Health, Pakistan non-profit organisation
- Data and Information Officer, research funding organisation
- Project Co-ordinator, community regeneration charity
- Lecturer in Health, Wellbeing and Sport, Welsh university
- Service Improvement/Change Manager at NHS Wales

Graduates have also progressed to further study on research degrees leading to MPhil and PhD qualifications.

The programme team are currently investigating opportunities for accrediting the programme with the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (http://www.iuhpe.org) and the Agency for Public Health Education Accreditation (http://www.aphea.net/). We will provide further updates on this process as it progresses.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Get your music-related business off the ground with our ‘JAMES’ accredited Masters programme and make the most of our industry connections with major and independent record labels. Read more
Get your music-related business off the ground with our ‘JAMES’ accredited Masters programme and make the most of our industry connections with major and independent record labels.

About the programme

The rise of the ‘new artist model’ - placing emphasis on commercial autonomy by artists and practitioners within the music sector – has created the need for the development of a new music business skillset which this programme addresses. It develops business models within the music industry and uses music as a core asset in developing businesses across all the creative industries and beyond.

Taught at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts, the programme covers the creative economy, entrepreneurship, and social media, and involves weekly contributions from a variety of expert practitioners.

You will have access to networks that will provide you with creative, intellectual and business connections. This culminates with the presentation of your business idea to potential investors, where previous funding has secured £2,000 – £30,000.

Practical experience

You will receive credit for work-related learning during the Innovative Enterprise module.

Your learning

The programme has three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Global Music Industries: Creative Economy
• Innovation & Creativity
• Research Development: Methods & Practice

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Entrepreneurship
• Social Media: Manipulation & Impact

Options (students choose one module):
• Identity, Opportunity & Exploitation (SCQF 10)
• Music, Film & Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Professional Music Practice (SCQF 10)

- MA (180 credits):
Innovative Enterprise: Music Project (60 credits at SCQF 11) – this is a live business proposition within the current music business environment, supported by academic and industry mentors.

Our Careers Adviser says

This programme is endorsed by practitioners at the highest levels of the creative industries who recognise that it produces individuals with the skillset to make a successful living from the 21st century music industry. A business that was ‘incubated’ within the MA received start-up funding of £40,000, with others receiving smaller amounts of seed funding.

Professional accreditation

This programme is accredited by JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Support).

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity. Read more
This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity.

The course will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists analyse the role of the mass media in the social construction, representation and understanding of difference and social diversity and get a critical understanding of the social and media structures and journalistic practices that impact upon these processes. It will also equip you with practical skills that will enable you to produce your own media product on a topic related to social and cultural diversity.

The course combines a portfolio of theory modules aimed to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the processes of managing and making sense of cultural diversity, key issues in intercultural communication and of various aspects of the sociology of news with a number of practice-oriented modules intended to give you first hand experience in the practice of inclusive journalism.

Drawing upon this unique combination of rigorous theoretical engagement and specialist practical training, this course is designed to equip you with a comprehensive conceptual/theoretical grounding and the practical skills to engage in responsible media coverage of diversity, to practice culturally informed and inclusive journalism and to develop a career (whether practical, strategic, or research-based) involving understanding and responding to the challenges of social diversity.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced academics and journalism professionals with expertise in inclusive journalism.

Course content

Two study routes to suit your future plans: You can choose one of two routes for the award: the Dissertation Route or a Practice Route culminating in a final project.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document.

Semester one
Core module
-APPROACHES TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AGE, DISABILITY
-INTRODUCTION TO INCLUSIVE JOURNALISM
-MEDIA PRODUCTION SKILLS
-ISSUES IN JOURNALISM: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, ETHICS AND DEMOCRACY

Semester two
Core modules
-DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: MODELS, INSTITUTIONS, PRACTICES

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: MIGRATION, RACE, ETHNICITY
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: FAITH AND RELIGION
-PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS
-MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND POLITICS
-SOCIOLOGY OF NEWS
-MEDIA AUDIENCES

Associated careers

This course is designed to attract a mix of new graduates, often with a media-related degree or work experience, and people who have already worked in journalism, but want to enhance their understanding of social diversity and their skills in the area of inclusive journalism. It is suitable for existing media professionals that want to reflect on their practice as journalists, as well as students who want to pursue a career in the media, national and local government, IGOs and NGOs or who intend to embark on a relevant research/academic career. It will be a valuable asset for civil servants and local authority staff, NGO workers working on immigration, equality, social inclusion and cohesion and community regeneration whose duties involve communication and media work.

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Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. Read more
Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. This programme equips you for a creative media career, offering network contacts, an impressive portfolio and essential practical skills.

About the programme

This unique programme will help you explore and consolidate your creative identity, working with others from diverse creative backgrounds to nurture your creative potential and create new opportunities to help sustain your career.

Informed by research excellence and expert professional practice, the programme will bring out your creative potential, while providing the critical focus essential to respond flexibly to new opportunities and sustain your career.

Practical experience

The Pg Diploma and Masters programmes offer work-related learning through the module Creative Skills 2, either as a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project.

Your learning

There are three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Creative Skills 1 – introducing new creative skill areas in short creative projects

• Critical Media Contexts – an essential overview of contemporary critical debate

• Creative Media Practice – intensive CPD workshops with reflective analysis

Students choose one option including:
• Motion Graphics (SCQF 10)
• Producing for Film & Television (SCQF 10)
• Producing Factual Formats (SCQF 10)
• Writing the One Act Play (SCQF 10)
• Music Film and Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Podcasting and New Media (SCQF 10)

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
• Creative Skills 2 – a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project

• Collaborative Project – a previous venture won the 2013 BAFTA New Talent Award

• Research: Critical Development – introduction to research methods associated with creative practice and preparation of a creative research proposal

- MA (180 credits):
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. production of a feature screenplay, a documentary or digital media project. Previous successful Masters creative projects include an e-publishing project for fairy stories which was subsequently funded by Creative Scotland.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates have found roles such as independent producer; scriptwriter; TV development producer; documentary maker; and digital media producer/ developer. For graduates of design for the moving image, careers include artist filmmaker and motion graphics designer.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Learn from industry professionals on Scotland’s only songwriting Masters programme. Ideal for graduates from a range of music/ performance disciplines and professional writers/performers, there is a strong focus on live projects to develop your professional career alongside your studies. Read more
Learn from industry professionals on Scotland’s only songwriting Masters programme. Ideal for graduates from a range of music/ performance disciplines and professional writers/performers, there is a strong focus on live projects to develop your professional career alongside your studies.

About the programme

The programme provides an exciting, transformative creative environment for the development of songwriting skills. Explore your creative identity through a series of structured collaborative projects interwoven with individual music briefs, with feedback from renowned industry practitioners. The programme provides a broad range of demanding content, strongly reflective of the creative industries but with an academic focus, to offer opportunities to conduct research and analysis, undertake critical reflection, and develop a major creative project.

Our Ayr Campus features state-of-the-art recording/television studios and performance spaces suitable for the development and completion of course work.

Practical experience

The modules and assessments are built on professional models. The Songwriting Workshop includes a five day co-writing residency, and a short work placement to develop and run a small-scale project within the community. The Creative Skills 2 module requires the completion of a professional project (e.g. record release). The Collaborative Project is an interdisciplinary module culminating in a music performance.

Your learning

Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits)
Awarded on successful completion of:
• Songwriting Workshop (40 credits)
• Analysing Songwriting (20 credits)

Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits)
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Songwriting Workshop (40 credits)
• Analysing Songwriting
• Collaborative Project
• Creative Skills 2 (NB you may opt for the Music Film and Sound Aesthetics module instead with the consent of the Programme Leader)
• Research: Critical Development

Masters Creative Project (60 credits)
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. recording an album, the creation of a performance or series of performances with written contextualisation.

Our Careers Adviser says

UWS graduates enjoy recording and touring careers, writing and producing for other artists, developing and managing large-scale research/ knowledge exchange projects and teaching/supervising at school, undergraduate and MA level. Graduates are accomplished, reflective arts practitioners with a set of excellent creative tools and the ability to thrive autonomously in a range of professions.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Research degree supervision is available in a number of areas within the social sciences and humanities. These include leisure and sport history; leisure, lifestyle and wellbeing; leisure, sport and physical activity policy; and community regeneration. Read more
Research degree supervision is available in a number of areas within the social sciences and humanities. These include leisure and sport history; leisure, lifestyle and wellbeing; leisure, sport and physical activity policy; and community regeneration.

With the construction of a health and wellbeing centre on the University campus, the school is particularly keen to receive proposals that explore the relationships between leisure, lifestyle and wellbeing.

The University’s Centre for Worktown Studies, working in close co-operation with Bolton Museum and Archive Service, provides a portal for the academic use of the Humphrey Spender ‘Worktown’ photographs taken for Mass Observation in the 1930s. In this context, we would be interested in applications that explore the potential of these images in enhancing our understanding of leisure practices and experiences in this period.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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