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Masters Degrees (Community Psychology)

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Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing. Read more
Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing.

It provides an alternative to the standard model of psychological enquiry that foregrounds the individual at the expense of the collective, instead contextualising the difficulties faced by particular communities before seeking to develop solutions through participatory and action-oriented research.

The central focus of this course is to provide knowledge and training platforms that allow you to work towards addressing the institutional marginalisation and disempowerment that drives local and global community issues. It introduces critical, liberation and human rights perspectives, reflecting on traditional modes of scientific enquiry and what they mean for groups and individuals struggling with issues of marginalisation.

Our degree programme is among the few in the country that allow you to work directly with local communities to facilitate social change. With the help of our award-winning Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp), it gives you the opportunity to apply your skills as a psychologist and gain professional experience in the field.

This course will be of particular interest to those interested in developing a career in mental health.

Course structure

The course is primarily taught through intensive teaching sessions where modules run over blocks of two to three days, though some optional modules require weekly attendance.

Through lectures, workshops, seminars and the facilitation of community research partnerships, the course provides opportunities to explore the appropriateness and significance of how we work as community psychologists and to better understand the role of ideology inherent in the creation of an effective community psychology. It achieves this while retaining a degree of flexibility within the syllabus such that you are able to tailor your learning towards the kinds of areas most relevant to your work and interests.

The programme also offers an extended masters route for international students, allowing you to combine the degree itself with an English language course. Depending on your present language level, you will study English for between two and four months before starting your MA.

Areas of study

Community psychology is a culturally relative discipline and therefore takes different forms in different parts of the world. To help you maintain an open-minded approach to the subject, we introduce you to both local and international examples of community psychology in practice.

The syllabus is informed by contemporary research into such diverse areas as homelessness, older adults, disadvantaged young people, LGBT mental health, organisational wellbeing and mental health literacy in Cambodia, as well as by the experiences of our core teaching staff, Carl Walker, Katherine Johnson and Liz Cunningham.

For the Social Research Practice module, you undertake an action-orientation project in a community psychology setting. Those who are working in a related profession can relate the project to their employer's needs; those who aren't have the opportunity to work with community and voluntary organisations including Mind, Age Concern and the Richmond Fellowship.

Modules:

Community Psychology: Theory and Practice
Research Methods in the Social Sciences
Community and Clinical Approaches to Mental Distress
Social Research Practice
Dissertation

Dissertation

The dissertation forms a focal part of the MA and allows you to gain practical skills as a psychologist by doing fieldwork in the community. Previous students have used the opportunity to:

• do a piece of participatory action research to explore the challenges faced by the growing population of Brazilian women in Brighton
• use life-history narratives to investigate experiences of academic and social acculturation for international students
• work with a local LGBT mental wellbeing service in order to reflect on the way that the development of a community has affected not only the wellbeing but the identities of its members.

Cupp

We strongly believe that it is our duty to use our knowledge and resources for social benefit, which is why we set up the Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp) back in 2003.

Cupp is an award-winning project that aims to tackle disadvantage and promote sustainable development through partnership with local organisations. Our combined efforts have made a tangible difference to the effectiveness of community sectors and the lives of local people.

As a Brighton student, you will have the opportunity to volunteer through Cupp and work in the community yourself, all the while developing your vocational skills and gaining valuable work experience.

Careers and employability

The course explores processes of social change and participatory engagement and equips graduates with theoretical knowledge, research skills and practical insights for working in the field of community psychology. It also serves as an ideal grounding for the further use and study of participatory modes of enquiry at doctoral level.

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The MSc in Social & Community Psychology prepares psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of social and community psychology. Read more

Overview

The MSc in Social & Community Psychology prepares psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of social and community psychology.

Keele has a vibrant, well-established and ever-expanding community of researchers in aspects of social and community psychology, combining tradition and innovation. Students will benefit from their expertise across a wide range of areas including experimental social psychology, group dynamics, cyberpsychology; and critical social psychology, qualitative, participatory and arts-based research approaches. MSc students are made to feel part of this research culture both through the formal modules and through involvement in research seminars and meetings.

- Career destinations:
Many of our MSc graduates go on to take up positions in the workplace or register for a PhD in psychology.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/socialandcommunitypsychology/

Course Aims

The programme provides taught content and research training in a range of areas in social & community psychology, building on areas of staff research expertise. Strengths include critical social psychology, qualitative, participatory and arts-based research approaches; community-based action research; experimental social psychology, group dynamics, and cyberpsychology.

Course Content

The programme addresses written and communication skills, independent learning skills, data analysis, critical reflection and critical evaluation. Our students benefit from a wide range of support including accessible academic staff with a wide range of expertise, laboratory and other research space, study space, and access to IT and research tools.

List of Module Titles:
- Advanced Study in Social & Community Psychology (30 credits)
- Contemporary Research in Psychology (15 credits)
- Advanced Research Skills & Design (15 credits)
- Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits)
- Advanced Quantitative Statistics (15 credits)
- Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (15 credits)
- Dissertation (75 credits)

Teaching & Assessment

The course is of one year duration for full time and two years for part-time.

The course is assessed through written coursework, unseen examination, verbal presentation of research, and independent research written up as a dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme. Limited support is available for research-related expenses.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/
or
http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Closing Date

30th June 2016

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If you choose to specialise in Community Psychology, you'll develop the practical skills you need to apply psychological techniques to a range of social issues. Read more

If you choose to specialise in Community Psychology, you'll develop the practical skills you need to apply psychological techniques to a range of social issues. New Zealand is becoming a more diverse society, so it's vital you can apply these techniques in a fair and culturally sensitive way – during your MAppPsy(Com) you'll learn how to do this. You'll develop the ability to analyse complex situations and plan appropriate actions. You'll be introduced to research and inquiry methods, and carry out your own practical research. Throughout your studies, you'll gain an in-depth understanding of the key ideas, principles and fundamental values relating to this area of psychology.

In the first year of your MAppPsy(Com) studies, you'll gain experience in human and social services by completing a programme evaluation for a service provider. In the second year, you'll gain this experience by working with a relevant community organisation or organisations.

The MAppPsy(Com) also provides a pathway into the Postgraduate Diploma in the Practice of Psychology (Community Psychology). This is a one year work-based programme accredited by the New Zealand Psychologists Board, which enables graduates to become registered as psychologists in New Zealand.

Course structure

Students in the MAppPsy(Com) must pass the equivalent of 240 points at 500 level.

This is made up of 75 points from the following compulsory papers (or equivalent papers from another university)

Core Papers

  • PSYC511 (15 points) Evaluation Research Design
  • PSYC513 (30 points) Evaluation Research Analysis
  • PSYC582 (15 points) Community Health Psychology
  • PSYC583 (15 points) Foundations of Community Psychology
  • PSYC575 (15 points) Psychological Applications and the Treaty of Waitangi

And 30 to 90 points from optional 500 level papers in Psychology, Human Development, Anthropology, Development Studies, Screen and Media Studies, Geography, History, Sociology, Women's and Gender Studies, Demography, Political Science, Philosophy and Public Policy.

In the second year of study students will complete either a 60-point dissertation (PSYC592) or a 90-point thesis (PSYC593) or a 120-point thesis (PSYC594). Although the regulations offer students the option of a 60-point dissertation, in practice students are strongly encouraged to take either the 90 or 120-point option.

Up to 120 points of the MAppPsy may be waived for students who have already completed four-year degrees (for example, an honours degree or other four-year undergraduate degree) provided that:

  • No required papers are waived, unless the student has already taken these papers (or equivalent papers) in their fourth year of study, and
  • At least 195 of the 240 points must have been psychology papers.

Optional papers should be selected in consultation with the Community Psychology Programme Convenor.

Career opporunities

Once you've gained your MAppPsy(Com), you'll be qualified to work in health services, community service organisations, government departments and in private practice. You may choose to do contract work with human service organisations as a researcher, trainer or consultant.



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The programmes provide high quality and up-to-date training in theory, practice and research in clinical and community psychology. Read more
The programmes provide high quality and up-to-date training in theory, practice and research in clinical and community psychology. All teaching is informed by the distinct UEL DClinPsy perspective: where psychological processes are understood in direct relation to social and cultural contexts, diversity and inequalities. The programmes provide training with the same strong emphasis on the historical and current social, political and cultural issues that affect clinical and community psychology provision.

The programmes are situated in our School of Psychology, a large and well-established scholarly community, with a strong record for delivering high-quality undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, research and consultancy. Students will benefit from excellent teaching and research facilities located in a purpose-built block (a major refurbishment of which was completed in 2008) with new experimental facilities, dedicated research laboratories (virtual reality technology, eye-tracking equipment and EEG suite) new teaching accommodation, and a well-stocked library of test equipment.

Programme structure:
We aim to provide flexibility in learning patterns to meet the varying needs of students from a variety of backgrounds and current employment statuses. There are 10 modules available, 6 taught and research modules and 4 placement modules.

Students may tailor their training choices to fit with their interests, current employment roles and future career ambitions. The level of qualification sought can be matched accordingly. The programme is highly flexible, and may be taken in part-time or full-time modes. Student may enrol in Semester A (September) or Semester B (February).

Students must obtain 180 credits, including credits obtained via core modules (Clinical & Community Psychology Theory & Practice and the Research Methods & Dissertation) to be eligible for the MSc.

Students obtaining 120 credits (by passing 4 taught or placement modules, which need not include the core/research modules) are eligible for the PG Diploma. Students obtaining 60 credits (by passing 2 taught or placement modules, which need not include the core/research modules) are eligible for the PG Certificate.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience aims to equip students with the skills necessary for research careers across a range of scientific areas.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK

- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)

- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)

- The MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is unique and novel in the range of modules and techniques the programme offers

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of cognitive neuroscience research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Ability to offer international students mentoring throughout the course

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is at the intersection of cognitive science, brain imaging, and clinical neuroscience.

It is considered one of the most significant areas of contemporary science and it is beginning to transform the understanding of both normal and damaged brain function.

The importance of cognitive neuroscience has been recognised by the Welsh Government which created the multi-centre Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, drawing together the psychology departments at Swansea, Cardiff and Bangor Universities.

A core aspect of the provision for MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience will also be collaboration with the College of Medicine at Swansea University.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience may include:

Theoretical Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience

Practical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

Statistical Methods

Computing skills

Generic Research Skills

Special Research Skills

Neuropsychology

Introduction to Research Programming

Psychology of Ageing

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Course Structure

The full-time master's degree for Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is studied over one year and involves attending University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday).

The part-time degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, which is studied over two years, normally involves attending the University for one full day a week.

Taught modules are provided in the first two semesters, with a final high credit-bearing empirical research project with a strong cognitive neuroscience component typically undertaken over the summer.

Sessions may be arranged occasionally on other days of the week (e.g. visiting clinician talks/workshops and employability sessions).

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course is suitable for:

- anyone looking for a valuable academic foundation for future doctoral training

- anyone looking to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science

- UK and international psychology graduates seeking positions as researchers in psychology, cognitive neuroscience or related fields.

- psychology graduates aiming to secure a PhD by research in a psychology, cognitive neuroscience, or a related discipline

- graduates from other disciplines such as Biology, Neuroscience, and Medicine who wish to develop further skills related to psychology and cognitive neuroscience

Career Prospects

Students have successfully used the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience qualification to gain positions on PhD research programmes. Others have successfully gained employment as Research Associates/ Officers, as well as working in Teaching positions, the Business Sector and in Administration.

On completion of the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course students should also be able to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program at the College of Psychology provides students with a strong academic foundation in the theories and concepts of experimental psychology. Read more

The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program at the College of Psychology provides students with a strong academic foundation in the theories and concepts of experimental psychology. Students are equipped with comprehensive skills in scientific inquiry and research methodology. These skills may prepare students for admission into a doctoral program in psychology or for career opportunities that include teaching and research in industrial, government, private consulting, health care, and community settings.

The college's Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program is offered on NSU's main campus.

Why Choose This Program?

  • To develop mastery of advanced theoretical, statistical, and methodological foundations of experimental psychology
  • To prepare for a professional career as a researcher and experimental psychologist
  • To prepare for admission into a doctoral program in psychology

The M.S. in Experimental Psychology degree prepares students for research-focused doctoral programs as well as career opportunities that include teaching and research in industrial, government, private consulting, health care, and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

The successful M.S. in Experimental Psychology graduate is expected to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, theories, and supportive research in the four non-clinical foundational areas of experimental psychology (biological, cognitive, developmental, and social psychology) and in experimental design and analysis;
  2. Apply research skills in at least one area of experimental psychology by carrying out an independent piece of research in at least one area of experimental psychology with collaboration from a faculty mentor;
  3. Demonstrate the ability to write experimental reports using APA format and language of the discipline.

Curriculum

The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program provides students with a strong academic foundation in the theories and concepts of experimental psychology. Through focused coursework and the experience of mentored independent research, students are equipped with comprehensive skills in scientific inquiry and research methodology. These skills may prepare students for admission into a doctoral program in psychology or for career opportunities that include teaching and research in industrial, government, private consulting, health care, and community settings.

Core Courses (12 credits)

  • PSYC 5100 - Behavioural Neuroscience (3 credits)
  • PSYC 5200 - Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
  • PSYC 5300 - Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
  • PSYC 5400 - Social Psychology (3 credits)

Required Methodology Courses (9 credits)

  • PSYC 5900 - Psychological Quantitative Methods I (3 credits)
  • PSYC 5910 - Psychological Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)
  • PSYC 5920 - Research Methods in Experimental Psychology (3 credits)

Thesis (6 credits)

  • PSYC 6000 - Master's Thesis (3 credits, repeatable)

Career opportunities

Graduates of the M.S. in Experimental Psychology program can pursue doctoral education in subfields of experimental psychology or become leaders in a variety of professional positions and settings, including:

  • Adjunct Professor
  • Business / Government Agency
  • Lab Manager
  • Market Analyst
  • Psychology Lecturer
  • Research Project Manager
  • Statistical Consultant


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Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?. Read more
Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?

Our MSc Psychology is an advanced fast-track conversion course for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than psychology, or for those whose undergraduate Psychology degree was not accredited by the British Psychological Society.

This course combines the award of a Masters with eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society. The GBC is the minimum academic qualification required to work as a professional psychologist, so passing our course demonstrates that you have studied and acquired an advanced understanding in Masters-level study in psychology. With this qualification you will also be eligible to apply for professional training in any branch of professional psychology.

Our staff have a wide range of research interests, so you gain a critical and detailed understanding of the core areas of psychology, plus some specialisation, and learn research methods to an extent which will enable you to devise, carry out and analyse an empirical research project. Topics studied include:
-Visual and auditory perception and cognition
-Language, concepts, memory and attention
-The relation between brain and behaviour
-Developmental psychology
-Social psychology

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both graduates who have recently completed their studies, and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Recent graduates of MSc Psychology have found employment as a research assistant at the Anna Freud Centre, a clinical psychologist for the NHS, a child psychologist for Children First and a lecturer at the University of Surrey. Other graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Brain and Behaviour
-Personality and Individual Differences
-Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology I
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology II
-Advanced Social Psychology
-Advanced Developmental Psychology
-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)

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The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge. Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Read more
The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge
Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Positive psychology differs from historical psychological approaches because of its unique emphasis on the empirical study of human flourishing. While the study of psychology has traditionally focused on improving the human condition by identifying and relieving what is negative in life, positive psychology complements this approach with a focus on strengthening what is positive.

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program at the University of Pennsylvania was the first in the world to offer a degree in this rigorous field of study. Dr. Martin Seligman, founder of the discipline of positive psychology, created the MAPP program to educate and train students at the cutting edge of the field.

Designed for working professionals
The program's hybrid model allows you to explore the theory and practice of positive psychology without relocating to Philadelphia, so you can continue working full-time. The program includes nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters. The low-residency format consists of 10 required on-site visits to the University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia, where students and faculty gather for intensive weekends of learning and networking.

Structured for real-world application
Whether you are a credentialed professional seeking to transform your workplace or career, or are building a foundation for further graduate study, the MAPP curriculum allows you to apply the topics most relevant to your interests and goals. You will receive a thorough grounding in the research methods and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, and learn to apply its theories and perspectives within individual and organizational settings. The program culminates with an individual capstone project that advances both your professional development and the field of positive psychology itself.

Renowned faculty and passionately engaged peers
Program alumni report overwhelmingly that their favorite aspect of the program is the exceptional group of people who make up our diverse, intellectually stimulating and intensely supportive community.

Each year, approximately 40 students enroll in the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, including successful businesspeople, practicing psychologists and medical professionals, scientists, artists, life coaches, lawyers and more. They’re all gathered to study with a faculty composed of major pioneers in the field, who are also dedicated and personable teachers.

Flourishing after MAPP
Through their experiences in the Master of Applied Psychology program, students find a powerful new perspective on their workplaces, career plans and personal lives. Our students go on to incredibly diverse careers, applying what they’ve learned to transform their current workplaces or to begin new careers in consulting, teaching, business, healthcare, media and more.

We look forward to speaking with you about the exciting opportunities at MAPP and discussing how our program can help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) curriculum is designed to train you in the history, theory and research methods of positive psychology, as well as its application in professional settings.

The program consists of nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters.

During the fall semester, you will begin the program with courses that focus on the science, research and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, giving students a strong foundation to build on throughout the remainder of the program.
The spring semester courses offer content to help you learn how to apply positive psychology in various professional settings, including creating a plan for positive interventions in a real organization.
The capstone project, which is completed during the summer semester, allows you to integrate what you’ve learned throughout the program, and apply it in the professional or research domain most significant to you. It often serves as a stepping stone to the application of positive psychology in a particular professional domain or to further research in a specific area.
The curriculum includes the following eight classes, in addition to the capstone project:

Introduction to Positive Psychology
An introduction to the research, theory and intellectual history of positive psychology.

Research Methods and Evaluation
A methodology course exploring the valid and reliable assessment of positive emotions, character strengths and meaning in life.

Foundations of Positive Interventions
An investigation into the theoretical, empirical and experiential nature of positive interventions.

Approaches to the Good Life
An examination of four perspectives on human flourishing.

Applied Positive Interventions
A service-learning course in which students study the applied work of master positive psychology practitioners and create positive psychology applications for non-profit organizations.

Positive Psychology and Individuals
An exploration of positive psychology applications in coaching, clinical and other relational settings.

Positive Psychology and Organizations
An exploration of positive psychology, appreciative inquiry and positive organizational scholarship in traditional and social business settings.

Humanities and Human Flourishing
An exploration of integrating culture and science to support the deeper understanding and more effective cultivation of human flourishing.

Capstone

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. Through the capstone project, you will explore, in depth, the theories and practical applications you’ve learned in the program, to advance the field of positive psychology itself. Previous capstone projects have included empirical studies, literature reviews, book prospectuses, workshops and other endeavors.

The capstone is completed during the summer semester and has no on-site course requirements. You will conduct this project work independently, with your advisor’s ongoing guidance, in a setting that is significant to you and most relevant to your future professional goals.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology aims to provide an opportunity to research and learn about a wide range of topics in psychology; from basic learning and cognition, to neuropsychology, and to applied topics in clinical and educational psychology.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK

- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)

- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)

Teaching and Employability:

- High-level training in advanced research methods and skills

- Exciting opportunities to conduct basic and applied research projects in a wide range of areas.

- Unique mix of small-group teaching in seminars, workshops, and practical sessions, as well as a diverse range of assessment methods and access to staff and other one-to-one teaching support from demonstrators for technical subjects.

- International student mentor to all international/overseas fee-paying Psychology students

- Opportunity to gain funding for Ph.D. places, and to gain access to professional training courses in Clinical Psychology and Educational Psychology

This MSc in Research Methods in Psychology provides students with high-level training in advanced research methods and skills, and offers exciting opportunities to conduct basic and applied research projects in a wide range of areas.

Research Methods in Psychology students learn to use a range of research tools, such as databases, statistical software, and computer programmes.

By the end of this training, students on the Research Methods in Psychology course will have acquired a wide range of practical research skills to apply in any context where human behaviour is important. They will have gained practical knowledge of the nature and limitations of the scientific method and the main alternatives, and knowledge of the general historical, theoretical, and philosophical issues underlying psychological and behavioural science.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology MSc typically include:

Generic Research Skills

Computing Skills

Empirical Projects

Philosophy of Psychology

Special Research Skills

Statistical Methods

Qualitative Methods

Dissertation (MSc Research Methods)

Research Methods in Psychology Course Structure

The full-time Research Methods in Psychology course, which will last one year, will normally involve attending the University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday). The part-time course, which lasts two years, will normally involve attending the University one full day a week.

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology course is suitable for:

- Anybody with an interest in developing a career in research, either in psychology, or social and health sciences, or those wishing to apply research skills in the private sector.

- Students who wish to pursue further professional training in professional and applied areas of psychology have found the research training provided very helpful in developing this aspect of their skills portfolio.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Read more
Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Using this understanding, clinical psychologists assess and treat people of all ages and ability levels who are experiencing psychological distress, behavioural problems or related issues. Students taking the MSc will be introduced to the theory and knowledge that underpins effective practice in clinical psychology, will explore this in relation to a range of conditions, will gain an understanding of the range of research methods used by clinical psychologists, and will conduct their own research project in a relevant area.
How the course can further your career progression

This course will be of particular interest to:
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical or health psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training.
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical and health psychology and who have already gained relevant work experience. Completing the MSc course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training.
- graduates in psychology or closely related disciplines who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical or helath psychology. The MSc course is accredited as providing an appropriate research training for those wishing to progress to a PhD or to employment in a research post.
- qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical psychology.

Clinical psychology training in the UK involves the completion of a three-year training programme leading to a doctorate in clinical psychology and eligibility to apply for chartered clinical psychologist status. The training is funded by the National Health Service (NHS) and almost all trainees go on to work in the NHS after qualifying. Entry to these programmes is highly competitive and applicants must have good academic and research skills as well as relevant work experience, usually two years in a paid, full-time assistant psychologist position or equivalent. The MSc aims to provide students with a profile of academic knowledge and research skills which, combined with relevant work experience, will equip them to make a credible application for clinical psychology training, either in the UK or elsewhere.

About the School of Psychology
The School of Psychology at Bangor, which was ranked in the Top 20 in the UK in the most recent Research Exercise Framework with 89% of research rated either 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent', brings together a large group of outstanding scientists with international research reputations in clinical psychology, neuropsychology and clinical and cognitive neuroscience. A number of staff also hold appointments as consultant psychologists or medical consultants with the NHS and contribute to clinical practice as well as to the training of clinical psychologists, medical students and NHS staff. The School runs its own clinical psychology training programme, leading to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Key research strengths within the clinical psychology domain include dementia, neuropsychology and rehabilitation, learning disability, developmental disorders, addictions, and cognitive-behavioural approaches. Close links with other departments and with NHS services produce tremendous opportunities for collaborative clinical psychology research. The School supports the practical implementation of research findings to improve patient care by hosting groups such as the Dementia Services Development Centre Wales.

The School has an extensive library of psychological tests and measures. Participant recruitment is facilitated through the availability of research panels for neurological patients and people with dementia, as well as student and community participation panels, supported by the School’s full-time patient co-ordinator. The School has a range of specialist laboratories and researchers in the School use a wide range of the latest techniques for understanding brain-behaviour relationships, including functional brain mapping with event related potentials (ERP), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

The School has a vibrant, diverse postgraduate community. Students on our MSc programmes are drawn from a range of backgrounds and nationalities. The School is known for its friendly and informal atmosphere, which combined with excellent facilities helps to ensure that studying here is a pleasant and enjoyable experience.

Course Structure
The course includes three components: content modules, research methods modules, and a research thesis. Content and methods modules are all 20 credit modules and the research thesis is worth 60 credits. Students achieving 120 credits on the taught modules, but not completing a research thesis, may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma. The content modules are designed to provide an in-depth look at theory, evidence and practice in clinical psychology.

The course lasts one full calendar year if taken full-time and is also available part-time. During Semester 1 and Semester 2 you will combine taught modules with work on your research project. During the summer period all your time is devoted to completing and writing up the research project.

A variety of teaching approaches are used including lectures, case presentations, small-group sessions and seminars, and individual or group supervision. Assessment will include coursework and examinations, and the research thesis.

Career Prospects
This course will be of particular interest to psychology graduates aiming for a career in clinical psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training. For graduates who already have relevant work experience the course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training. It is also an excellent preparation for graduates who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical psychology and for qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical and health psychology.

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Why Surrey?. Our innovative MSc Health Psychology programme applies the theories, methods and techniques of psychology to issues of health and illness. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our innovative MSc Health Psychology programme applies the theories, methods and techniques of psychology to issues of health and illness.

These are integrated into the psychological processes related to the maintenance of health, the promotion of the psychological wellbeing of the physically ill, and the normal and pathological responses to ill health and stress.

Programme overview

Our MSc Health Psychology programme will equip you with a sound knowledge of theories and practical issues relevant to health psychology.

You will consider the psychological and physiological responses of the individual to ill health, as well as the social and community contexts of health-related behaviours and healthcare systems.

The programme will equip you with a sound knowledge of theories and practical issues relevant to health psychology, in addition to a solid understanding of quantitative and qualitative approaches to research.

The programme, which is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), provides the academic component (Stage One) on the route towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The aims of the programme are:

  • To provide students with advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in Health Psychology in accordance with the 15 competence requirements pertaining to Stage 1 of the British Psychological Society criteria for achieving Chartered Status in Health Psychology
  • To train students in the informed and systematic application of the research-practitioner involving problem analysis and formulation, intervention design and evaluation
  • To enable students to harness relevant theory and evidence in the integrated formulation of a wide range of commonly encountered health problems and issues
  • To produce students equipped with the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of health problems, and for the effective design, implementation and evaluation of health interventions
  • To prepare students for professional work pursued in a highly responsible, self-regulated, self- efficacious and politically sensitive fashion
  • To facilitate self-reflection in support of personal and professional development via constructive feedback

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas: 

Knowledge and understanding

Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • Health psychology as an applied science
  • The relevance of theory to professional practice
  • Theory and evidence pertaining to the core areas as detailed by the british psychological society: context and perspectives in health psychology, epidemiology in health psychology, biological mechanisms of health and disease, health-related behaviour, health-related cognitions, individual differences, stress, chronic illness/disability, lifespan, gender and crosscultural perspectives, health care contexts, applications of health psychology, research methods, empirical research project, measurement issues and professional issues
  • Basic and advanced research design and methods of investigation (qualitative and quantitative), data analysis principles and techniques
  • The contemporary economic and political context of health care work
  • Place and value of health psychology within an interdisciplinary framework

Intellectual / cognitive skills

Students will be able to:

  • Critically assess and comment on both published and unpublished sources of research and commentary on health psychology issues
  • Critically weigh up the contributions and limitations of health psychology in addressing various problems and issues
  • Analyse and theoretically formulate various problem scenarios and issues pertinent to the practice of health psychology using a range of models and theories consistent with the principle of integrative practice
  • Design, conduct and evaluate health psychology research and researchbased health psychology interventions
  • Analyse and take into consideration the economic and political context of a health problem or issue in the process of designing and implementing tailormade interventions
  • Reflect on particular case examples (hypothetical and real) with a view to informing theory development/elaboration in an iterative fashion

Professional practical skills

Students will have the skills to:

  • Select, design, implement and evaluate a wide range of research techniques pertinent to research and research-based practice in health psychology
  • Acquire some preliminary skill in designing research-based health interventions
  • Analyse and interpret quantitative and qualitative data in a competent and critical manner
  • Present/communicate their work in a professional manner for both academic, non-academic and business audiences, in both written and verbal (one-to-one, group) formats
  • Apply problem-solving strategy and techniques
  • Prioritise work, multi-task and manage time under pressure

Key / transferable skills

Students will be able to:

  • Communicate ideas, principles, theories and problem formulations by oral, written and visual means
  • Elicit high quality information and data from field sources
  • Operate within a problem-solving research-based practitioner framework
  • Conduct oneself in a professional (accountable, responsible), self-regulated and constructively critical fashion
  • Use interpersonal and social skills as appropriate
  • Apply analytical skill in a problem solving context
  • Use information technology
  • Pursue continuous improvement via self-reflection and other forms of professional and personal development activity

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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The MSc in the Psychology of Mental Health aims to give students a broad understanding of current issues in mental health care in the UK. Read more
The MSc in the Psychology of Mental Health aims to give students a broad understanding of current issues in mental health care in the UK. This course also offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in psychological research methods.

Why study Psychology of Mental Health at Dundee?

The MSc in the Psychology of Mental Health draws upon the recognised expertise of numerous research-active and clinical staff, and will address a broad range of material, including the scientific study of mental health problems, addiction and eating disorders. In addition to being of interest to those wishing to pursue a career in Clinical Psychology the course will also provide suitable training for those who wish to study for a PhD and would be suitable for professionals working with children or adults with a range of psychological disorders. In addition, this course will provide overseas students with a basic training for job opportunities in their home countries.

As part of the course, students will have the opportunity to complete a research dissertation. This will be jointly supervised by staff from the School of Psychology and a practicing Clinical Psychologist from NHS Tayside.

Please note, completion of this course does not entitle graduates to practice as Applied Psychologists.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis.
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of mental health
engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences.
Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of Psychology of Mental Health
Graduates considering a professional training in a developmental field, such as Educational or Clinical Psychology
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD in Clinical Psychology

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes and demonstrations. Joint dissertation supervision by clinical and academic members of staff is designed to promote interdisciplinary collaboration and provide continuity in the learning experiences.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback. Some of the exercises will be group-based. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions.
What you will study

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Foundations of Adult Mental Health
Current Issues in Psychological Health Care
Research Dissertation
One Advanced Module, typically from:

Developmental Psychopathology
Altered States of Consciousness
Social, Emotional and Moral Development
Evolution and Behaviour
Health in Groups
Find out more about the modules offered from the course webpage.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within mental health or Clinical Psychology.

We expect that this course will significantly improve the chances of students gaining a place on Clinical Psychology Courses as well as providing overseas students with a basic training for job opportunities in their home countries.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.

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The Graduate Diploma in Psychology offers a fast route to eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS) - the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist. Read more

Course Summary

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology offers a fast route to eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS) - the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Course details

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology comprises seven modules that make up 160 credits in total. The course therefore provides you with a thorough grounding in the theory, themes, issues and practical skills that are central to any undergraduate psychology course. You will also be allowed to participate in up to one additional module per semester free of charge; but will not be assessed in such modules.

The 2006 British Psychological Society (BPS) regulation for Graduate Diploma students means that if you APL for any of the 20 credit modules you are required to take a substitute module at level 6. However, you can APL only 50% of the level 5 modules, and not the dissertation.

You will conduct and submit a research project as part of this course, and must achieve 160 credits with an overall mark of at least 50 percent, to be eligible for Graduate Basis for Chartered membership with the BPS.

Semester 1 (Level 5)

Biological and Atypical Psychology (20 Credits)

The overall aim of Biological and Atypical Psychology is to introduce students to the study of the brain and its interaction with the environment (e.g. behaviour). The module covers the structure and function of the nervous system from the micro (genetics and neurons) to the macro (gross anatomy and function of the nervous system) as well as applied aspects such as the biological psychology of mental health, addiction, stress and other psychologically relevant aspects of biological psychology.

Atypical psychology is embedded in each of these topics. Lectures present the background concepts, theories, and related issues while seminars involve a variety of learning activities including lab-based demonstrations of neuroanatomy, physiological measurement of behaviour, group discussions of talks by leading academics in the field, and use of online activities to self-assess and develop students’ understanding of key issues.

Students' ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a short group presentation and accompanying 500 word essay, and by a 1.5 hour unseen examination (60 multiple choice questions).

Individual Differences (20 Credits)

This module examines the concepts, theories, methods and findings in the psychology of personality and intelligence. A key component is principles of measurement and psychometric testing in the study of similarities and differences between people. A variety of learning activities, including guided reading, lectures, and seminar activities will be employed throughout the module. Students’ ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a written portfolio and by an unseen examination.

Further Research Methods (20 Credits)

This module takes students beyond the introductory level in their research methods training in psychology and will cover some more key concepts/ issues and additional methods at a more advanced level. It will cover some more complex experimental designs, survey designs, psychometrics, and more advanced qualitative methods. The lectures will provide an overview of the key concepts, issues and procedures while the workshops will provide hands on experience of the research process. As part of the process students continue to develop skills in all aspects of the research process getting closer to the goal of becoming competent in carrying out independent research projects.

Semester two (Level 5)

Lifespan Development (20 credits)

This module examines the concepts, theories, methods and findings in the field of developmental psychology. The module takes a lifespan perspective, focusing on human development from early childhood through to later developmental stages such as adolescence, adulthood and old-age. A variety of learning activities, including guided reading, lectures, and seminar activities will be employed throughout the module. Students’ ability to communicate knowledge and understanding of basic concepts will be assessed through a critical review and an unseen examination.

Cognition in Action (20 credits)

An overview of cognitive psychology is given by going through a range of classical topics such as perception, attention, imagery, memory, problem solving, decision making, thinking, language and concept formation. A variety of practical exercises are undertaken and several methodological approaches are visited.

Social Psychology (20 credits)

Social Psychology focuses on a variety of issues concerned with the social and interactive aspects of human behaviour. The module provides an overview of the main areas of study and introduces the diversity of social psychology, presenting the findings on a variety of topics central to social psychological enquiry. In addition, this module lays the foundation for subsequent study and research that may be pursued for the dissertation. It provides a basis for further academic consideration of these issues in social psychology.

Semesters 1 and 2 (Level 6)

Graduate Diploma Psychology Dissertation (40 credits)

This module helps you conceptualise and carry out a piece of empirical psychology research, to a standard suitable for submission for publication. You will learn how to present research ideas to peers and the wider academic community in verbal and poster presentations. It is the practical and theoretical realisation of what you will have learned in the Further Research Methods modules and other theory-driven modules.

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The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist.

Who is it for?

The DPsych aims to develop ethical, reflective and professional practitioners of counselling psychology who work collaboratively with their clients to provide high-quality psychological services, drawing on evidence-based psychological practice in the context of a therapeutic relationship characterised by trust, respect, and appreciation for the subjective experience of the person and individuality of the client and their unique world view.

Our programme seeks to sit at the interface of science and practice. We value reflective professional practice and development of practice through the rigor of top class research.

You are equipped to work with a wide range of complex presenting issues; with individual adults and children, couples, families, groups and organisations; short and long term; in single and multi-professional contexts; and through transferring psychological skills to others in multidisciplinary teams.

You are actively supported during your studies by the course team to develop your own personal theory of the evolution, maintenance and resolution of psychological problems, based on your reading, lectures, practical skills workshops, personal development, collaborative learning and clinical and research experience.

We want you to have a stimulating, challenging, inspiring and personally supportive professional training environment in which to develop your knowledge and skills and further develop as a person and professional. We view you as active contributors to your learning and to the overall success of the course, treating each of you with respect and working with you in a genuinely collegial atmosphere as a developing professional.

Objectives

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist registered with the HCPC, and Chartered Psychologist with the BPS.

Our professional, clinical and academic training is combined with the opportunity to develop your own portfolio of placement experience. This equips you to build a successful and fulfilling career in a broad range of settings, including:
-The NHS (e.g. inpatient settings, community mental health teams, specialist services such as early intervention, with different clinical populations e.g. older adults)
-The independent hospital sector
-Forensic settings including HMPS and probation
-Organisations in areas such as occupational health
-The Third (voluntary) sector
-Industry
-Government
-Private practice (including Employee Assistance Programmes)
-Academic and research settings

Placements

In addition to the taught components of the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course, you are also required to complete 400 hours of professional face-to-face client practice in placements and 45 hours of indirect client work; frequent clinical supervision; personal development; 40 hours of personal therapy (at least 15 hours in Year 1); and various pieces of assessment throughout the three years, including a doctoral thesis.

Who arranges the placements?
It is your responsibility to find and arrange your own placements, although advice and support is offered by the Placements Co-ordinator and personal tutors. If your application is successful, on acceptance of a place on the course you will be sent further information about finding placements and available opportunities.

Do placements have to be in London?
No, you can undertake your placements wherever is convenient for you as long as you ensure your supervision is from appropriately qualified professionals. Supervisors should be registered with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a 'Practitioner Psychologist', 'Registered Psychologist', 'Counselling Psychologist' or 'Clinical Psychologist'. All placements arrangements need to be approved by your personal tutor.

Supervision
Supervision should normally be in the ratio of one hour of supervision for every 8 hours of counselling work in Years 1 and 2, with a minimum of one hour of supervision per fortnight. In Year 3, supervision should be in the ratio of one hour for every 8 hours of counselling work, with a minimum of two hours of supervision per month.

Teaching and learning

A wide range of learning and teaching methods are used, including lectures, group discussion, group work, role play, trainee presentations, supervised clinical practice, personal therapy and personal development activities.

Assessment

You will be assessed through role plays, learning logs, skills assessments, essays, process reports, client studies, examination, critical literature review and DPsych portfolio.

Student focus

We want your time on the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course to be as inspiring, challenging and stimulating as it can be. As part of our dedication to enhancing the overall student experience, we support you throughout your studies in many different ways:
-Personal Tutors
-Student-staff liaison committees
-Placements Co-ordinator

Modules

Year one:
-Context, Diversity and Standards in Professional Practice (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 1 (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 2 (30 credits)
-Professional components of counselling psychology (45 credits)
-Personal and professional development (15 credits)
-Cognitive behavioural approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Person-centred approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Psychodynamic approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Professional development and supervision (15 credits)

Year two:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (45credits)
-Systems and Systemic Psychological Therapies in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Psychopathology: Clinical Skills and Critical Approaches (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis one (30 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Contemporary Developments in Psychological Approaches (15 credits)
-Specialist group supervision (15 credits)
-Psychometrics A: Ability and Aptitude Training (15 credits)

Year three:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (60 credits)
-Psychometrics B: Personality Measures (15 credits)
-Negotiating Relationships: Advanced Skills (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis two (45 credits)
-Integrative and Pluralistic Approaches to Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Specialist Group Supervision (15 credits)
-Supervising, Consulting and leading in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)

Career prospects

Counselling Psychology graduates are typically employed in a variety of settings, including NHS primary, secondary or tertiary care, the prison service, schools and voluntary agencies.

Employers of recent graduates include:
-St Bartholomews Hospital
-South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
-Central & North West London NHS Trust
-City, University of London
-Maggie's Cancer Centre
-Imperial College London
-Roehampton University
-London Metropolitan University
-Homerton University Hospital
-The Priory
-Capio Nightingale Hospital

Job titles included Consultant Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, High Intensity Therapist, Lecturer, and Practitioner Psychologist.

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