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Masters Degrees (Community Music)

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Professor Lee Higgins, director of the ICCM, writes that ‘music making is a fundamental aspect of the human experience and is therefore an intrinsic and foundational part of human culture and society. Read more

Professor Lee Higgins, director of the ICCM, writes that ‘music making is a fundamental aspect of the human experience and is therefore an intrinsic and foundational part of human culture and society. As a perspective those that work this way do so with a commitment to musical expression as a crucible for social transformation, emancipation, empowerment, and cultural capital.’ This MA is designed for those that want to deepen an understanding of their practice by exploring practice-led research through a variety of theoretical frameworks.

Course structure

Studying an MA in Community Music at York St John University enables you to reflect deeply on your existing practice whilst receiving support to test new ideas through appropriate research designs and theoretical frameworks. As a member of the ICCM, you will have opportunities to contribute to the development and growth of community music practice and scholarship worldwide. Your own practice is placed at the centre of the programme with an independent supervised project flanked by two distinctive modules, Community Music Perspectives and Research Ideas and Practices. As a member of the ICCM you will be expected to play a key part in developing its activities which includes student research symposiums, Transform: New Voices in Community Music, our online journal, plus various networking events and conferences.

Modules may include:

  • Research ideas and Practices (20cr)
  • Community Music Perspectives (40cr)
  • Community Music Independent Project 120cr)

Teaching and learning

The programme will be delivered through a number of lectures, seminars, workshops, and individual supervisions from York St John University staff and visiting practitioners/scholars. Our Academic Support Team provides help in areas such as written English, study, research and technology skills.

Assessment and feedback

There are three summative assessment points cumulating at the end of each module. In dialogue with the learner our staff provide regular formative assessment that scaffolds the students journey, helping them to consolidate learning. The Independent Project will require an Individual learning pro-forma which is tailored to the students project and ensures that the assessment strategy is appropriate to the research area.

Research opportunities

Since its inception in 2014 the ICCM has been involved in the growth and development of research activity in the UK, Canada, USA, Australia, Norway, Italy, and Germany. We are regularly working on, and developing funding bids in order to nurture community music research, teaching, scholarship, professional practice and pedagogy. You will be expected to get involved in these activities playing an active role in making the ICCM relevant for the contemporary community music field.

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. Read more
York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. This MA is intended for students who wish to develop their skills and interests in a range of community settings and it draws upon many department specialisms including developments in education and disability arts, world music, theatre and technology.

About 'Community Music'

The term ‘community music’ covers a wide range of activities.

It covers musicians working outside formal settings like the concert-hall in, for example, schools, prisons or hospitals; it covers the development of music in under-resourced areas and with disadvantaged people, and it covers the development of creative partnerships between people of different skills and cultures.

It is now a growing career option. Many orchestras and arts organisations are seeking to extend their audience base into the community. Many young musicians, in response to changing employment patterns, are developing multi-skilled ‘portfolio’ careers or are simply expressing a personal preference for more participatory forms of work.

Course structure

The MA is based on short course modules, a seminar series and a placement and related dissertation.

The short course modules are offered as a five-day block, two per term, starting on a Wednesday or Thursday and finishing the following week. This five-day structure has proved ideal for mature students and those wishing to fit the course around work commitments. All students are expected to have attended all six short course modules by the end of their course.

Weekly 1½ hour seminars on ‘Issues of Professional Development’ are held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. These seminars carry credits but no marks. Two of these per term will be included in the short course modules, to accommodate part time students. The seminar in week 7, Spring Term will take the form of a course review.

The placement comprises ten days contact with an outside agency by arrangement. The dissertation is 10,000-12,000 words (or an equivalent package including recordings and video). Together they form a research project.

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This course is highly regarded in both music business education and the industry at large. It will prepare you to become one of the next generation of music industry leaders and entrepreneurs. Read more

This course is highly regarded in both music business education and the industry at large. It will prepare you to become one of the next generation of music industry leaders and entrepreneurs. All teaching staff on the course are currently working in the music industry, and every week there are a number of high-level industry guests. You will need to be a self-motivated and open-minded student, as this is an intense course, but one which can help you to progress your career across a wide range of music business disciplines.

Working with music industry leaders and organisations, the course has developed a unique curriculum. You will be able to combine a strong underpinning of key business skills (entrepreneurialism, leadership, organisational management, and marketing with essential music industry management knowledge (strategic innovation technology, intellectual property and copyright) and academic concepts and theories relevant to the industry today.

Formal teaching is conducted through sessions which each include a formal lecture, industry guest speaker and seminar exercises. Each of the six modules has a minimum of two assignments. The final project (equivalent to three modules) is a report of a minimum of 12,000 words.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Industry links

The course is globally recognised and industry leaders are weekly guests to the Central London Cavendish teaching campus for guest speaking , Q&A sessions and networking with students . Furthermore , our alumni are working across the international music industry on all continents, in areas of the industry ranging from music companies to live music and publishing , artist management to tech start up, with a wide variety of companies and organisations, large and small, including:

  • Apple
  • Spotify
  • Sony Music
  • Universal
  • Sony ATV Publishing
  • Kobalt
  • Shazam
  • Pledge Music
  • 365 Management
  • Cooking Vinyl
  • Outdustry –China
  • Tileyard
  • East City Management
  • Robomagic
  • Hypesong
  • Warners
  • Ministry of Sound
  • Machine Management
  • Universal Music Publishing
  • Kilimanjaro,
  • Platinum Rye

Graduate employment

Course graduates have gone on to work in a wide variety of creative industries, from mobile marketing through to the Arts Council. Many of our graduates are working in the music industry, with companies including Apple , Spotify Universal, Sony Music ,  Pledge Music , Kobalt , Shazam and  PIAS. Our international students are working around the globe in music and music –tech related companies, including EMI Holland , PIAS European office and Outdustry in mainland  China .

Today's music industry organisations need graduates with both strong degrees and skills relevant to the workplace. The MA Music Business Management course is committed to developing employable graduates by ensuring that:

  • Career development skills are embedded in the course
  • Opportunities for internships, placements and work-related learning activities are available to students
  • Our staff links with employers in all areas of the music industry and their willingness to come to the university and give guest talks , enables students to network with potential employers in class and in social situations to make important contacts and strengthen their employability skills.
  • Alumni keep in close contact with the course , often returning to deliver guest speeches  and meet and network with students. This strong “community of learning” assists with recruitment and internship opportunities.


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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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The . MMus Music.  degree is aimed at successful graduates from Music or Popular Music courses who possess particular interests and strengths in the following areas. Read more

The MMus Music degree is aimed at successful graduates from Music or Popular Music courses who possess particular interests and strengths in the following areas:

  • music performance and leadership
  • musical direction and conducting
  • analysis and musicology
  • composing and performing your own material

Study at Masters’ level in Music will offer you a dual emphasis in Music Performance and Music Performance Studies, aiming to develop your knowledge and critical awareness of current trends and opportunities in the professional practice of music and musical performance.

What happens on the course?

You will study a range of modules including Performing Music, Professional Practice and Shaping Music in Performance, combined with elements of Research Methods and Independent Study.

You will demonstrate self-direction and autonomy in defining your relationship to the broad field of performance while continuing to advance your understanding and skills. These will inform your final Project that will act as a summation of all that you will have achieved.

Why Wolverhampton?

The MMus in Music has a strong focus on practical performance-based work as well as equipping you with the analytical and writing skills that are relevant to the Music Industry and pedagogy.

You will be encouraged and be able to focus on issues of technique in the performance and interpretation of music from both practical and theoretical perspectives, enabling you to analyse and reflect on your preferred approach and cultural ‘take’. The application and development of your interests and skills will ultimately determine the precise nature of your degree and its usefulness to you as a practising musician, teacher, researcher, etc.

The University of Wolverhampton continues to develop state of the art facilities to greatly enhance your learning experience. The Performance Hub, opened in 2011, has a diverse range of fully equipped music teaching, performance and practice rooms (accommodating single person to large band / ensemble), two high-end professional recording studios, and two bespoke technology suites boasting sixty Apple iMacs running industry standard software including Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Max, Pure Data and SuperCollider.

Our two recording studios offer the perfect blend of digital and analogue technologies giving students the opportunity to combine classic analogue recording technique with the flexibility and reliability digital technology provides. As well as a dedicated live room each for recording, for increased flexibility and choice of room acoustic, any of the music rehearsal rooms surrounding each studio can also be patched into the studio's control room.

Career path

The course will equip teachers, performers and music graduates with a diverse range of skills and the experience to enhance their career prospects. You will develop practical, critical, analytical and research skills from studying a broad spectrum of repertoire and literature.

You will acquire transferable skills relevant for pursuing a research degree and a range of employment opportunities in areas such as the professional music industry, education (secondary/FE), music retail, community music, self-employment, freelance performing, arts administration, research assistantships/studentships, and employment in HE institutions.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you, the student, will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of a variety of topical viewpoints in music performance, pedagogy and musicology, taking an independent and holistic perspective.

2. Develop analytical, critical, evaluative and creative skills appropriate to performing musicians, music teachers or academics, through a selection of appropriate methodologies and technologies.

3. Apply techniques of critical discourse relating musical text to sounding performance through a systematic understanding of historical, compositional, sociological, musicological, philosophical and literary theories.

4. Explore, develop and refine problem-solving techniques for music performance, from the technical to the expressive, in a wide range of performance environments and situations.

5. Analyse features of style in performance and synthesise and critically evaluate information from a variety of sources to arrive at valid concepts of authenticity and artifice.

6. Exercise personal autonomy in learning and performance situations through effective self-management, working in both individual and team scenarios.



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Submission of an essay or college-level paper.
• A video of the candidate teaching a class or coordinating a rehearsal. Candidates may also submit a live or video audition on the candidate’s primary instrument.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Music in Education at the Crane School of Music is one of the largest music teacher preparation programs in the world. Crane-prepared music teachers are sought after by schools everywhere. For years, our students and faculty have held lead- ership positions in local school districts, as well as in state and national organizations that shape our nation’s musical future. The program strives to assist teachers to become reflective practitioners, lifelong learners, and persons able to integrate their knowledge of subject matter, pedagogy, students, the school and the larger community to maximize the education and welfare of students. Program start dates: Summer, Fall, Spring.

Required Program Courses

Option A: Minimum of 30 credit hours, with Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE 699, Thesis/Graduate Research Project in Music Education
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)

Option B: Minimum of 30 credit hours, without Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)
Two free electives: 6 credit hours

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

Making music is at the heart of every Crane degree program. Our philosophy is that all our students are first and foremost musicians. The Crane School of Music was founded in 1886 and was one of the first institutions in the country to have program dedicated to preparing specialists in teaching music in the public schools. Crane is proud to have many of the finest music educators, scholars and performers in the United States as members of the faculty, all working to make Crane a vital, innovative and exciting place.

Testimonials

“The Crane School of Music is a unique community. It provides a focused and serious environment to grow as an artist while remaining extremely supportive. It was an ideal place for me to develop musically while forging lifelong professional relationships.” —Christopher Still ’93

“Crane provides the full package for students by offering degree programs in just about every area of the music world. There are ample opportunities to perform weekly in a great atmosphere. Performing is fully supported by a wonderful staff of teachers. Crane really prepares you to be successful.” —Mark Sophia ’12

“The degree programs at Crane provide a full and rich education in music and the liberal arts. I’m convinced this balanced and thorough curriculum laid the groundwork for the success I’m now enjoying in my life and career.” —Richard Regan ’91

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Our MA provides a broad range of personalised learning experiences underpinned by professionally relevant research, knowledge exchange and enterprise that is strongly aligned to. Read more

Our MA provides a broad range of personalised learning experiences underpinned by professionally relevant research, knowledge exchange and enterprise that is strongly aligned to:

  • Songwriting 
  • Production 
  • Music industries

Upon successful completion of the MA, amongst other valuable skills and experience, you will have:

  • Developed a wide range of advanced skills on a professional level 
  • Used the structures of the course to support professional development planning and career building 
  • Built extensive, detailed knowledge and understanding of a number of music specialisms 
  • Be able to work independently, demonstrate initiative, self-organisation and time-management, progressing through the degree course to become an independent learner at the forefront of professional practice

Placement Opportunities

There will be an opportunity for you to engage in live community music projects – a growing employment sector within the music industries – and other live events. Our existing music MA courses already have a significant track record in accessing live, high profile projects for students and graduates, some examples of which are below:

  • Digital Commonwealth 2014 
  • Pits, Ponies, People & Stories research project 
  • The Falkirk Music Pot via Creative Scotland

Course Details

There are four options on our MA course:

  • MA Music
  • MA Music (Songwriting)
  • MA Music (Sound Production)
  • MA Music (Industries)

Options

The four options on our MA course are:

MA Music (Songwriting) is for students interested in the practice of songwriting and composition, with a focus on practice-based / inquiry-based research, collaboration and the cultural contexts within which songwriters work. You will work towards the release of an album or equivalent professionally focused output.

MA Music (Sound Production) is for students with an interest in the technical aspects of music production. Working in our professional-quality studios, you will develop skills and competencies intended for work in environments including:

  • Studios 
  • Production houses 
  • Live music venues 
  • New media enterprises

MA Music (Industries) is for students with an interest in the businesses, processes and developments that underpin work within the music industries as well as the creative and cultural industries more broadly.

MA Music is our bespoke degree and for those that have a broad interest in the creative, technical and industrial elements of music. You will be able to design your own flexible and personalised curriculum, drawing from modules across the three specialised fields of: 

  • Songwriting 
  • Sound production
  • Industries

Teaching & Assessment

Our MA Music course is delivered across a range of methods. Some of these methods include: 

  • Intensive workshops 
  • Classroom and studio delivery 
  • Online delivery
  • Range of self-directed professional briefs

You will reflect on your learning using a combination of tutor and peer feedback.



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The MA Music Industry Entrepreneurship combines traditional business practice with specialised tools, techniques, approaches and case studies unique to the music and entertainment industries. Read more
The MA Music Industry Entrepreneurship combines traditional business practice with specialised tools, techniques, approaches and case studies unique to the music and entertainment industries.

Modules in Creative Music Management, Economics, Lean Business Planning, Marketing, Legal and Business Affairs, Live Event Management and New Media Technology combine generic industry practice with a specialised focus on the music and entertainment industries.

The programme is designed to prepare students for a future as label owners, publishers, managers, promoters, new technology pioneers and creative business specialists and is jointly delivered by UWTSD and Tileyard Studios. Tileyard Studios is the largest professional music community in Europe featuring 82 recording studios and 110 entertainment businesses, based in King’s Cross, London.‌‌‌

Course Overview

The MA Music Industry Entrepreneurship is delivered on the UWTSD London campus and at Tileyard Studios, King’s Cross, London. Tileyard Studios is the largest professional music community in Europe featuring 82 recording studios, 110 entertainment businesses and the new Tileyard Education Centre.

The programme is designed to prepare students for a future as label owners, publishers, managers, promoters, new technology pioneers and creative business specialists. In addition to the UWTSD London Campus facilities and resources, Tileyard Studios provides students with direct access to more than 1000 creative industry entrepreneurs, while developing cutting edge thinking and insight into the management and growth of independent record labels, music publishing, artist management, promotion, marketing and new technology entrepreneurship.

The course provides a critical understanding of music and entertainment management and organisations in a global context both on and offline. The core of the programme focuses on digital and independent entrepreneurial skillsets and practice as well as more traditional business methods within the context of the new mixed media economy. The course consist of six taught modules in Part I and an industry-related major business project in Part II.

Alongside specialised modules in Creative Music Management, Marketing, Live Event Management and New Media Technology, MA Music Industry Entrepreneurship students will develop a major business plan project for presentation to a panel of seed and incubation investors and business angels, curated by Tileyard Studios, seeking to invest in new creative business opportunities and IP.

Students will have access to the new Tileyard Education Centre featuring a professional recording studio, audio-visual tech lab and writing production rooms where they can collaborate with other creative MA students such as Commercial Songwriting and Production.

This industry-centric course also includes regular, large-scale industry networking events, held at Tileyard Studios in partnership with Notting Hill Music and sponsors, an unrivalled masterclass series, a one-to-one electronic mentoring program, work-based learning projects and access to the annual calendar of industry-centric events held on site at Tileyard Studios.

Modules

-Creative Music Management
-Economics, Planning and Finance
-Legal and Business Affairs
-Entertainment Marketing
-New Technology in Music and Creative Entertainment
-Live Music and Event Management
-Creative Business Project

Key Features

-Industry-led, academically robust programme
-Direct involvement and access to industry networks
-One-to-one contact mentoring and supervision
-Co-learning opportunities with other students and creative practitioners to support discussion, sharing of ideas, innovation and practice
-Access to academic and professional facilities and resources

Assessment

The course assessment consist of a range of coursework including portfolios, essay, reports and presentations.

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the MA Music Industry Entrepreneurship can expect to find employment with or set up in business as:
-An independent (or major) record label
-A music publisher
-An artist / composer / songwriter producer manager
-A live agent or agency
-A live music or entertainment promoter
-A live events venue, company, promoter or music / cultural festival organiser
-A creative designer for music and entertainment
-A music marketing consultant or agency
-A music PR consultant or agency
-A new media creative entertainment business, platform, application or online community
-An independent or national TV broadcaster
-An independent or studio film production company
-A games development company
-A music synchronization business
-A creative songwriter / producer / artist brand / entrepreneur
-A lifestyle, entertainment or youth focused brand or agency
-A music and entertainment education practitioner or business
-A music legal, licensing and/or music accounting business
-A music product and merchandise creator, licensor or platform

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A career in music therapy. Learn how to use music to support the development and wellbeing of people with complex emotional, intellectual, physical or social needs. Read more

A career in music therapy

Learn how to use music to support the development and wellbeing of people with complex emotional, intellectual, physical or social needs.

You'll get a comprehensive grounding in music therapy. Study the theory and put it into practice in a clinical or social community setting. Then take what you've learned from your practical experience and apply that to your research project.

Studying at the New Zealand School of Music (NZSM), you'll learn from dedicated staff with many years' experience as music therapists.

If you have a mature and compassionate attitude, curiosity and a knack for critical thinking, and a passion for practical, creative music-making then this programme is for you.

Professional registration

The programme was developed in association with Music Therapy New Zealand(MThNZ). You'll be encouraged to join this organisation during your training so you can start building links with other professionals and the supporting community.

Once you've completed your degree you'll be able to apply for accreditation as a Registered Music Therapist through the Music Therapy Registration Board of MThNZ.

Available qualifications

  • Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research
  • Master of Music Therapy by research

Most students do the Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research, which is in two parts. In Part 1 you'll do coursework and in Part 2 you'll do casework and research.

If you're already a music therapist with an appropriate postgraduate qualification you can go straight to Part 2—the Master of Music Therapy by research.

How you'll study

Learn through practical musical and placement study, theory and research. You and your tutors will work closely together in small groups to problem-solve, reflect on theory and practice, and consider questions that can lead to practice-based research.

What you'll study

In Trimester One you'll do courses covering the principles and methods used in music therapy. In Trimester Two you'll do courses on the exploration of music from cultures other than your own, and learn how this applies to your practice, along with courses on approaches to music therapy research and a workplace practicum.

For Part 2, you'll do a range of music therapy casework, followed by a supervised practice-based research project linking to what you observe and experience on your placement. For the Master of Music Therapy by research, your study may be practice-based or more theoretical, depending on your interests and research questions. Both options are full-year courses.

Community placement

You'll do placements both through your Part 1 practicum and your Part 2 casework. Your placement will be clinically supervised by lecturing staff in Part 1 and by external registered music therapists in Part 2. You'll also be supported by on-site liaison staff who may be music therapists, specialist teachers or other healthcare professionals.

Placement opportunities may include clinical practice in:

  • special schools and special units of mainstream schools—primary and secondary
  • central regional health schools for young people with mental health needs
  • child development centres and paediatric wards of hospitals
  • specialist pre-school units for conductive education of children with physical and neurological needs
  • visual resource centres
  • deaf education units
  • specialist hospital and community units for adults with neurological disorders and psychiatric conditions such as eating disorders and complex dual-diagnoses—learning difficulties and psychiatry
  • centres for adolescents and adults with intellectual handicaps
  • dedicated music and allied therapy centres in Auckland and Christchurch
  • aged-care
  • drug and alcohol rehabilitation services
  • hospice and palliative care

Duration

The Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research can be completed in two years of full-time study or in three to five years part time.

The Master of Music Therapy by research can be completed in one year full-time or in two to three years part-time.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. This programme is demanding, so you need to be cautious about how much paid work you take on. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your study workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Where you'll study

You'll do Part 1 in Wellington. You may be able to do Part 2 in Auckland or Christchurch if suitable professional supervision is available. Talk to the programme administrator to learn more.

Research topics

You'll be able to choose your practice-based research project based on what you observe and experience in your casework.



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About the course. 2019 start. This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

2019 start

This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world.

Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation. You'll gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music.

The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with MA Traditional Music of the British Isles, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. World Music Studies is interpreted quite literally as encompassing, in principle, the study of any and all musical activity in the world: Western as well as ‘exotic’, popular as well as classical, amateur as well as professional.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

The University offers a range of scholarships and funding for the brightest students and the Department of Music offers a number of studentships for the strongest candidates. Small grants are also available to support postgraduate research project.

For more information about funding opportunities including application deadlines visit: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/funding

Find information about scholarships and funding for international students at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/international/enquiry/money/scholarships

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, world music performance workshops and email tutorials with supporting course texts and guidance notes. Assessments take a variety of forms such as reports and essays, fieldnotes and recordings, and a final dissertation or folio.

Distance learning

Distance learning means most of the teaching is done through online course materials and readings supported by email, phone or Skype tutorials. You will need to attend the University for one residential each year.



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LEARNING OUTCOMES. Become a registered Music Therapist and understand relevant clinical conditions and the application of music as a treatment/special education modality. Read more

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Become a registered Music Therapist and understand relevant clinical conditions and the application of music as a treatment/special education modality
  • Use and evaluate concepts and principles of music therapy and theories that underpin the practice of music therapy
  • Acquire skills in the assessment, design, implementation and evaluation of music therapy programs in a diverse range of clinical/special education settings
  • Ability to carry out independent research and analysis into music therapy
  • Develop a lifelong commitment to enhancing the well-being of clients

The Master of Music Therapy provides a course of study for those wishing to practice as music therapists in settings such as hospitals, special schools, aged care facilities, community health programs and private practice. The course is open to music graduates and graduates from courses related to health and wellbeing.

The two-year program provides advanced knowledge of the theory, practice and research of music therapy. You learn traditional and ground-breaking theoretical approaches to practice with people across the life span, from preschool aged children through to older adults, with Music Therapy Skills classes covering voice and guitar skills, improvisation, songs and performances with dyads and groups, as well as receptive music therapy. A major component of the course consists of four clinical training placements supervised by qualified music therapists in settings such as hospitals, schools, residential care and the community. You also undertake a minor thesis in which you conceive, plan and execute a small research study.

The course is approved and validated by the Australian Music Therapy Association (AMTA), leading to registration as Music Therapists upon completion.

The Master of Music Therapy is available in two modes:

On-Campus Mode

Taught in the traditional mode of lectures and tutorials for students who live in the Melbourne area. Theoretical and music therapy skills subjects are taught via weekly lectures and intensive teaching periods. You will also participate regularly in clinical placements, amounting to a minimum of 80 days across the two years. 

Blended Learning Mode

The Blended Learning option is delivered online and through intensive learning periods for students living interstate and in rural areas, where approved clinical training arrangements are available. It covers all subjects offered in the traditional on-campus mode. Theoretical subjects are taught online weekly, music therapy skills subjects are via intensive mode twice each semester, your clinical training will be carried out in your home state where suitable supervision from a qualified Music Therapist is available, and tutorials are incorporated into the intensive learning periods. Music therapy skills subjects and tutorials are workshop based, and so attendance at the intensive learning days is essential. 



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About the course. Prepare to be one of the next generation Music Industry leaders with this prestigious, personalisable degree. Read more

About the course

Prepare to be one of the next generation Music Industry leaders with this prestigious, personalisable degree. Taught across the Department of Music and the Management School, our programme allows you to specialise in your areas of interest while gaining wider insight into the principles and strategies of management across the creative industries. Suitable for those looking to launch a management career in the music industry and for music creators wishing to enhance their prospects of success.

You can choose modules in management practices (finance, marketing, entrepreneurship) and specialise in several areas of arts management (festival management, music branding, audience development, arts funding) giving you the chance to develop an independent programme tailored to your needs ensuring your final dissertation project can be used to take you to the next level.

Practical work is embedded in our programme and we have close working relationships with a range of arts organisations including Music in the Round, Tramlines Festival and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene. A range of exceptional facilities and opportunities will support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces. The University of Sheffield Concerts Series provides opportunities to get actively involved as an intern or volunteer in staging events, and we support a local and international placement scheme.

As the music industry rapidly changes, private and public sector organisations are looking for graduates who can bring a high degree of flexibility and critical insight. The University of Sheffield's Music Management MA provides you with the essential knowledge, skills and experience needed to be a future leader in this environment.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project. More details available here  

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and individual tutorials. Projects may see students undertaking consultancy and promotions work with national partners.

Assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays.



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About the course. 2019 start. This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

2019 start

This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation.

Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with MA World Music Studies, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. Traditional Music of the British Isles takes advantage of Sheffield's position as a major hub of both English and 'Celtic' musical activity to pursue in-depth studies on British and Irish traditional musics.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

The University offers a range of scholarships and funding for the brightest students and the Department of Music offers a number of studentships for the strongest candidates. Small grants are also available to support postgraduate research project.

For more information about funding opportunities including application deadlines visit: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/funding

Find information about scholarships and funding for international students at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/international/enquiry/money/scholarships

Course tutors

The course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars, individual tutorials and fieldwork. Assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.

Distance learning

Distance learning means most of the teaching is done through online course materials and readings supported by email, phone or Skype tutorials. You will need to attend the University for one residential each year.



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Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK. Read more
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

If you’re an experienced musician and want to put your skills to use supporting children and adults with additional needs, our emphasis on clinical placements will prepare you for a rewarding career.

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, we’ll introduce you to the most recent, effective music therapy approaches. You’ll reflect on your own practice in our clinical supervision group discussions, supported by regular individual tutorials.

In the UK there are two central elements of music therapy: the use of improvised and pre-composed music; and the significance given to the relationship between client and therapist. These principles will underpin your training. Our experiential teaching includes: development of your improvisation skills; focused work on your first instrument; keyboard, single line instrument and voice; music therapy theory and links to practice; block clinical placements in at least two fields, including community settings, schools, hospitals and hospices; and experience in multidisciplinary teams.

Your training will take place in our new state-of-the-art Music Therapy Centre and Clinic, where you’ll often study with MA Dramatherapy students. All our students go on supervised clinical placements, preparing you for employment in many different settings.

Throughout the course you'll be supported by our team of qualified music therapists, who have a strong reputation for research. In 2013 we appointed Jörg Fachner as Professor of Music, Mind and the Brain, to further develop our research activities. One of our course tutors, Professor Amelia Oldfield, was recently awarded the first ever Clinical Impact Award by the World Federation of Music Therapists. And in 2014, our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research was acknowledged as 'world-leading' in the UK Government's Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two days a week plus two days on a clinical placement (Year 1). One day a week on campus plus a placement of least one day a week (Year 2).

Careers

As a qualified music therapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas including the NHS, hospices, social services, the education sector and the voluntary sector. The NHS Agenda for Change has led to improved career paths for music therapists at levels similar to, or higher than, those of other allied health professions.

You may also choose to work privately, or on a freelance basis, with a client base including adults and children with learning difficulties, mental health problems, and other special needs.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council, a legal requirement for music therapists in the UK. Your qualification should also be recognised around the world.

You’ll benefit from our links with the British Association for Music Therapy and other allied health professions; Professor Helen Odell-Miller, for example, advises at government level for the profession. You’ll also be able to forge links with practitioners such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Year one:
• Music Therapy Practical and Clinical Skills
• Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multi-Disciplinary Theoretical Studies
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (1)

Year two
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (2)
• MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as clinical improvisation and composition. You’ll also undertake some self-analysis and reflection with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress and process towards becoming a music therapist will be assessed by an examiner. Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project, which involves clinical evaluation. Meanwhile, in your final oral assessment you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules touches on dramatherapy and covers content from our MA Dramatherapy, as well as the Music Therapy course. Where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you’ll be taught separately but on more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you’ll benefit from working together.

Specialist facilities

You'll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. We have a large range of musical instruments, specifically chosen for clinical work, and high-quality recording and videoing equipment in the therapy rooms.

You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms.

Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our music therapy staff members are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our research is recognised as world-leading. We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

***This course has now reached full capacity for September 2016 but we are now accepting applications for September 2017***

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The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows you to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. Read more

The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows you to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. It will provide an excellent foundation for undertaking postgraduate research at doctoral level, but will also benefit the professional development of musicians intending to pursue careers in teaching, arts administration, broadcasting, and other domains.

Students on the taught MA programme join a vibrant international postgraduate community and study with scholars, composers, and performers who have achieved international recognition in their fields. The Music Department was ranked #1 in The Sunday Times University League Table 2016, and was in the top three music departments in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and the Complete University Guide 2017.

The MA Music programme supports study of the following areas of specialism:

  • Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Composition (acoustic and electronic)
  • Performance

In addition, other options typically available have included:

  • British Music
  • Indian Music
  • Music, Mind, and Culture
  • World Music Analysis
  • Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis

Course structure

You will choose modules from sections A, B, C, and D below:

A. Major project, weighted at 60 credits (a dissertation, a public recital, or a portfolio of compositions/orchestrations and arrangements – depending on your chosen area of specialism)

B. A 30-credit module linked to your chosen area of specialism

C. Two compulsory core 30-credit modules embedding research training and engaging with major intellectual issues attendant on all subject areas

D. An additional 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B, subject to approval of the Board of Studies in Music.

Example: MA with specialism in Musicology

A. A 12,000-word dissertation on a musicological topic weighted at 60 credits

B. 30-credit module ‘Contemporary Musicology’

C. Compulsory core 30-credit modules, ‘Core Research Seminars’ and ‘Research Methods and Resources’

D. 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B

Core Modules

  • Research Methods and Resources
  • Core Research Seminars

And

the following specialism-specific modules will be offered every year: 

  • Contemporary Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology in Practice and Theory
  • Compositional Techniques
  • Music Performance 

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • British Music
  • Music Analysis
  • Practice and Theory of Choral Conducting
  • Electronic Music
  • Orchestration and Arranging
  • Indian Music
  • World Music Analysis
  • Music, Mind, and Culture
  • Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of seminars, practical sessions and one-to-one supervision. Seminars provide opportunities for you to discuss and debate particular issues, and to present your own original work, informed by the knowledge that you have gained through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical sessions in areas such as studio or field recording techniques help to prepare you for your own independent work. All students must undertake an independent project (dissertation, composition portfolio, or performance), which is developed with the help of one-to-one expert supervision. Finally, optional modules can be drawn from the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes of Music or of other departments –these free-choice modules may involve other forms of staff-student contact, depending on the subject area. The Department actively promotes interdisciplinary approaches to the study of music and you are encouraged to engage with other disciplines in the humanities and sciences.

The contact hours experienced by each individual student will vary considerably, given a high degree of flexibility in the programme. You will typically attend between 2 and 4 hours of seminars per week in term time, as well as additional practical sessions as appropriate. Individual supervision of dissertations, performance projects and composition portfolios amounts to an average of 6 hours spread over the second and third terms.

Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to attend research seminars, both student-led and those involving staff or guest academic speakers (typically 1-2 hrs each week). You must also undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and assessments, to broaden your subject knowledge and to prepare your dissertations or portfolios. You are encouraged, as an integral part of your studies, to take advantage of other opportunities including participating in performance opportunities (including staff-led ensembles) and attending research and composition seminars, some of which are organised in conjunction with University research institutes.

There is a busy programme of musical performance, both within and outside the Music department, which complements your academic programme by providing opportunities both to listen to and to perform a wide variety of music. The many musical ensembles to which you can contribute includes both independent societies (including orchestras, choirs, opera and musical theatre as well as a Javanese gamelan) and department-run ensembles such as the New Music Ensemble and Korean percussion group.



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