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Masters Degrees (Community Engagement)

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The MSc Community Learning and Development offers an exciting and innovative opportunity for advanced study based around community learning practice and inquiry. Read more
The MSc Community Learning and Development offers an exciting and innovative opportunity for advanced study based around community learning practice and inquiry. The programme is offered as a workplace based, blended learning programme of study using online materials and communication media, with study workshops and tutor support.

Why study for the MSc CLD at Dundee?

The programme will have flexible entry and exit points and can be studied either as a CLD qualifying programme, accredited by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland, or as continuing professional development (CPD) with optional modules including Organisational Management, Community Engagement, Interprofessional Collaboration and Action Research. It is expected that the options available will be expanded over time to include modules in Family Learning, Literacies and Arts & Communities.

What are the aims of the programme?

The programme is designed to enable participants to:
- Identify, reflect on, develop and appraise critical community based practice, individually and in collaboration with others;
- Integrate community learning and development practice with theoretical studies and investigative techniques;
- Enhance commitment to community learning and development values, ethical codes of practice and ongoing professional development;
- Engage in processes of active learning involving cyclical processes of action and reflection with participants towards development of empowerment, capacity building and co-production;
- Contribute to ongoing construction of theory and practice by communicating with communities of participation and practice the outcomes of investigations and development projects.

Who should study this course?

Applicants for the qualifying CLD programme require a relevant first degree and current professional practice in a public and voluntary CLD context. This new award offers graduates from a range of disciplines such as education, social work, housing, planning, the arts, health, politics or law an opportunity to undertake a postgraduate qualification in Community Learning and Development.

Practitioners with an existing CLD qualification can choose to study the optional modules through a continuing professional development route. The programme is also suitable for returning students who have a PG Diploma in CE/CLD, who wish to complete the Masters dissertation.

How you will be taught

The Programme can take 2 to 3 years depending on a student's circumstances with modules being delivered by blended and distance learning and are supported by the use of the University's Virtual Learning Environment and other online tools such as Adobe Connect and Google+. This means the Programme is available anywhere and anytime there is access to the internet.

The MSc CLD is characterised by progression through Certificate, Diploma to Masters with exit points at each level. These awards aim to build on professionals' initial training and professionalism which has developed throughout their work experience. Because of the considerable distance learning element in the programme, significant individual support is offered through:

On-line tutorials and workshops
Study guides
Telephone tutorials
Face to face tutorials
E-mail
Written feedback (electronic)
Virtual learning environments

What you will study

Students on all routes are required to complete the two Certificate level core modules:

Research Methods for Professional Inquiry (30 credits)
Critical Pedagogies (30 credits)
The CLD Standards Council qualifying route requires the completion of two Diploma level modules:

Evidence-Based Practice 1 (30 credits)
Evidence-Based Practice 2 (30 credits)
Those on the CPD route can instead select two optional 30 credit modules from the range available to complete the Diploma level.

All Masters students will then be required to complete the 60 credit Dissertation module.

How you will be assessed

Formative assessment and feedback are a feature of all modules. Formative and summative assessments are designed to arise naturally from study and work. Assessments may be in a range of styles including written assignments, portfolios, presentations all designed to best evidence the learning of any given module.

Careers

The programme offers excellent professional qualifications and options for ongoing CPD for those in seeking practitioner and managerial posts in:
Local Authority Services and Projects
Third Sector Organisations
Community Learning and Development Services
Culture and Leisure Services
Community Health
Youth Work
Housing
Community Development
Adult Literacies and Numeracies
Family Learning
Community & Adult Learning
Local Economic Regeneration
Social Enterprise Development
Further & Higher Education

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Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today. Read more

Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today.

Core modules explore the nature of heritage and how meanings of objects, artworks and buildings change in different contexts. You will examine the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders, and the changes that have led some museums to move towards the role of the ‘manager’ rather than the ‘curator’.

You will choose from optional modules to tailor your degree to your interests or career plans – including the opportunity to undertake a work placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

Supported by our Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you will benefit from our partnerships with major arts and cultural organisations to find out what it means to work in this challenging sector.

You will study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a wide variety of world-leading and innovative arts and heritage organisations, from the Royal Armouries, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse and Northern Ballet through to nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many contemporary art spaces.

We are also close to everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Science and Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Brontë Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Interdisciplinary learning

This exciting programme has been developed in close collaboration with the School of Performance and Cultural Industries and allows students to undertake core and optional courses in both Schools. Students become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy the opportunities that membership offers.

Course content

All MA students in the School take two core modules.

In Arts Management and Cultural Leadership, students will examine theoretical concepts in the emerging field of arts management and the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders. Dialogue with our arts and cultural partners will give an insight into the exciting possibilities opened up by bringing theory and practice together. Students can deepen their learning in this area through optional modules that explore a variety of key issues, such as audience engagement and impact, cultural entrepreneurship, and contemporary cultural strategies, technologies and media.

In Heritage Studies: Key Words, students will develop a critical exploration of heritage through the ways in which people have sought to preserve, understand and pass on their cultures. This is underpinned through combining a sustained theoretical engagement with key ideas which animate heritage – place, community, memory, archive, future – with embedded skills development in heritage and museum interpretative and curatorial practice (which are a core set of sector skills). Students can build on these skills through optional modules such as exploring anthropology and representation, cultural memory and material culture.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Performance and Cultural Industries. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to allow students to benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures.

Students will also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this course, allowing students to develop individual skills and prepare for taught sessions

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Arts Management and Heritage Studies Dissertation 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Heritage Studies: Key Words 30 credits
  • Arts Management and Cultural Leadership 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory & the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art & Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art & Representation 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Performance & Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement & Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures. You’ll also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your individual skills and prepare for taught sessions.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you may experience a range of different assessment methods. These usually include essays of around 7,000 words, individual and group presentations, in-course assessment and project work. You may also be asked to complete a reflective log for your projects, allowing you to look back and critically assess your own practice.

Placement opportunities

All students have a choice of two optional modules. A number of these modules have a work or enterprise component to gain first-hand experience of contemporary museum and gallery practice. If you have a particular ambition in mind for a work placement, we try to find a role that suits you.




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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification. This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification

This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management and policy context of this work at a postgraduate level, especially for those who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. This might include those practising in community development, housing associations, community health, community enterprise, neighbourhood regeneration, community arts, and professionals in a range of statutory, voluntary and private sector posts that have an element of community involvement and engagement; for example, economic development, planning, policing, transport, and voluntary sector development.

The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. Core modules enable students to explore and develop their understanding of management, policy and practice in this field, as well as learn core research methods skills and carry out their own piece of advanced research. Students have a choice of optional modules to enable more focused study in their own areas of interest.

Course structure

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

Core Modules

-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing in Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice and Management in Community and Youth Work plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice, Management in Community and Youth Work and Professional and Personal Development, plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community work and reflect the diverse range of community settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Community Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives to which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing. Read more

Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing.

It provides an alternative to the standard model of psychological enquiry that foregrounds the individual at the expense of the collective, instead contextualising the difficulties faced by particular communities before seeking to develop solutions through participatory and action-oriented research.

The central focus of this course is to provide knowledge and training platforms that allow you to work towards addressing the institutional marginalisation and disempowerment that drives local and global community issues. It introduces critical, liberation and human rights perspectives, reflecting on traditional modes of scientific enquiry and what they mean for groups and individuals struggling with issues of marginalisation.

Our degree programme is among the few in the country that allow you to work directly with local communities to facilitate social change. With the help of our award-winning Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp), it gives you the opportunity to apply your skills as a psychologist and gain professional experience in the field.

This course will be of particular interest to those interested in developing a career in mental health.

Course structure

The course is primarily taught through intensive teaching sessions where modules run over blocks of two to three days, though some optional modules require weekly attendance.

Through lectures, workshops, seminars and the facilitation of community research partnerships, the course provides opportunities to explore the appropriateness and significance of how we work as community psychologists and to better understand the role of ideology inherent in the creation of an effective community psychology. It achieves this while retaining a degree of flexibility within the syllabus such that you are able to tailor your learning towards the kinds of areas most relevant to your work and interests.

The programme also offers an extended masters route for international students, allowing you to combine the degree itself with an English language course. Depending on your present language level, you will study English for between two and four months before starting your MA.

Areas of study

Community psychology is a culturally relative discipline and therefore takes different forms in different parts of the world. To help you maintain an open-minded approach to the subject, we introduce you to both local and international examples of community psychology in practice.

The syllabus is informed by contemporary research into such diverse areas as homelessness, older adults, disadvantaged young people, LGBT mental health, organisational wellbeing and mental health literacy in Cambodia, as well as by the experiences of our core teaching staff, Carl Walker, Katherine Johnson and Liz Cunningham.

For the Social Research Practice module, you undertake an action-orientation project in a community psychology setting. Those who are working in a related profession can relate the project to their employer's needs; those who aren't have the opportunity to work with community and voluntary organisations including Mind, Age Concern and the Richmond Fellowship.

Modules

  • Community Psychology: Theory and Practice
  • Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Community and Clinical Approaches to Mental Distress
  • Social Research Practice
  • Dissertation

Dissertation

The dissertation forms a focal part of the MA and allows you to gain practical skills as a psychologist by doing fieldwork in the community. Previous students have used the opportunity to:

  • do a piece of participatory action research to explore the challenges faced by the growing population of Brazilian women in Brighton
  • use life-history narratives to investigate experiences of academic and social acculturation for international students
  • work with a local LGBT mental wellbeing service in order to reflect on the way that the development of a community has affected not only the wellbeing but the identities of its members.

Cupp

We strongly believe that it is our duty to use our knowledge and resources for social benefit, which is why we set up the Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp) back in 2003.

Cupp is an award-winning project that aims to tackle disadvantage and promote sustainable development through partnership with local organisations. Our combined efforts have made a tangible difference to the effectiveness of community sectors and the lives of local people.

As a Brighton student, you will have the opportunity to volunteer through Cupp and work in the community yourself, all the while developing your vocational skills and gaining valuable work experience.

Careers and employability

The course explores processes of social change and participatory engagement and equips graduates with theoretical knowledge, research skills and practical insights for working in the field of community psychology. It also serves as an ideal grounding for the further use and study of participatory modes of enquiry at doctoral level.



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Program Overview. Study online or in class. . The program is targeted towards both working professionals and post- baccalaureate students seeking to develop administrative and analytical skills with a global comparative perspective. Read more

Program Overview

Study online or in class. 

The program is targeted towards both working professionals and post- baccalaureate students seeking to develop administrative and analytical skills with a global comparative perspective.

Students who are enrolled full-time typically complete the degree in 21-24 months. Part-time students may take a longer period of time to complete the program’s 39 credits.


You can request more information here

Why Study Global Public Administration?

Globalization and the increasing complexities of today’s interconnected world challenge the traditional functions and boundaries of government. There is a growing call to rethink the way public administration education is provided to appropriately train future generations of public administrators, analysts, and scholars.

The urgency of global issues calls for incorporating a global perspective in the design of courses within the public administration curriculum, including:

  • questioning the relevance of existing theories when applied to global settings
  • using international case examples
  • introducing comparative global research


Learning Outcomes

Public Administration education with a global perspective will:

  • enhance students' capacity for analyzing and managing public policy problems
  • raise students' awareness of global issues, particularly of global inequity and the role that community engagement and leadership can play in designing policies to address such inequities
  • deepen students’ understanding of American public administration

International students will find the program helpful for career development in their home country, either in government or nonprofit organizations.


Career Opportunities

Graduates will be competitive public administrators, analysts, and scholars in the following careers:

  • leadership in international nongovernmental organizations like the African Leadership Forum, AIDS Action Foundation, Association for the Study of World Refugee Problems, Development Alternative Network, Red Cross/Red Crystal/Red Crescent
  • management of departments and commissions in supranational organizations like the United Nations or the World Health Organization
  • service within nonprofits and federal, state, and municipal executive branch departments with strong international orientations

International students will find the program helpful for career development in their home country, either in government or nonprofit organizations

You can request more information here


Accolades and Strengths

Pioneering and Distinctive

The McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at UMass Boston offers the only Global Comparative Public Administration in New England.

High-quality and Affordable

U.S. News and World Report named our Global Comparative Public Administration Program as a 2017 Best Online Business Program (non-MBA). In 2016, they ranked our public administration programs #77 in the top 100 in its category. It is ranked #2 among public universities in New England. Learn more about UMass Boston rankings from U.S. News and World Report

According to College Affordability Guide, our public administration programs are ranked the most affordable in New England and in the top 50 nationwide.

Using information from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) as its guide, BestValueSchools.com published its 2015 list of the 50 Most Innovative Public Service Schools in the United States. Noting the public service mission of the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, the list ranks UMass Boston 29th.

Values-Driven and Impactful

At UMass Boston, we focus our teaching, research, and service on equity, community engagement, and serving underrepresented populations.

With an emphasis on social and economic justice and effective and innovative governance, the McCormack Graduate School’s public administration programs have an international reputation for values-driven research, award-winning interdisciplinary education, and services that impacts local and global communities.

Graduate Studies in Boston

UMass Boston’s beautiful waterfront campus is located in a leading city with a high density of world-renowned colleges and universities. New England’s premier urban public research university offers its diverse students an intimate learning environment and the rich experiences of a city known for ideas, politics, history, and transformation.

You can request more information here



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Overview. YOUTH AND COMMUNITY WORK. This course is primarily for those working in, or intending to work, in local authority and voluntary organisation youth and community work settings, as well as those working with, and managing organisations for young people. Read more

Overview

YOUTH AND COMMUNITY WORK

This course is primarily for those working in, or intending to work, in local authority and voluntary organisation youth and community work settings, as well as those working with, and managing organisations for young people. You will gain knowledge and experience of the policies, best practice and skills required to develop both personally and professionally.

This is one of the few professional youth work courses in the West Midlands which provides you with the opportunity to meet national Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) standards Professional Graduate Certificate/Postgraduate Certificate. You will benefit from Newman’s considerable national and international reputation for critical community engagement.

You will professionally qualify at the Postgraduate Diploma level. Those going onto the Master’s will develop further research skills and have the opportunity to research their areas of interest in their dissertation. Upon successful completion of this programme you may wish to progress to the Work-Based Learning (Youth & Community Work) MA. Please refer to the website for further information.

Fees

2018/19

MA - Home/EU Students £4,950

PG Diploma - Home/EU Students £3,300

Please note for 2019/20 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.



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Are you driven to make an impact on the world around you? Civic engagement, digital media, political discourse, data and democracy, social justice, youth participation—whatever your cause, Emerson’s . Read more

Are you driven to make an impact on the world around you? Civic engagement, digital media, political discourse, data and democracy, social justice, youth participation—whatever your cause, Emerson’s Civic Media: Art and Practice (CMAP) Master of Arts program will prepare you for a life and career of improving the world through media, technology, and activism. This intensive one-year residential program, housed in Emerson’s Engagement Lab, will help you become a leader in the knowledge economy, ready to pursue a wide range of paths, including:

  • Civic engagement roles within non-profit, non-governmental, and governmental organizations
  • Community-building roles in news and media organizations
  • Leadership roles in innovation offices of municipal governments
  • Creative digital roles at foundations and corporations

From local neighborhoods to international contexts and even the developing world, no matter where you want to be, your degree will position you as an innovative leader in the burgeoning field of civic media.

Program Details

Civic Media: Art and Practice (CMAP) is a one-year intensive applied research MA program housed in Emerson’s Engagement Lab. In contrast to traditional coursework, you’ll connect with potential community stakeholders from the outset and work with those organizations as you formulate your thesis project.

The CMAP program responds to the burgeoning landscape of media and technology with a program that is applied, embedded in communities, and represents a deviation from the traditional way a graduate higher education program works. The program is design-oriented and requires the building of technologies, games, public art installations, participatory storytelling platforms, and other processes and practices that support the ambitions of the cohort.

We understand the components of CMAP as follows:

  • Civic Media are the technologies, designs, and practices that support connecting a common purpose, ranging from systematic interventions to the creative and interpretative acts that rest in the realm of art. The program focuses on the challenges of implementation: each student is confronted with the complexity of moving theory into practice, together with organizational partners.
  • Art in our program is understood as the production of creative objects, platforms, and actions that go beyond the walls of galleries and museums and relate to questions of collective good rather than, or in addition to, personal self-expression.
  • Practice is understood here as the application of student experiences in the real world. This does not mean where students will go for jobs once they are finished, but rather the application of all curricular work towards community engagement, whether local, national, or global, and non-profit, governmental, or private.

Learning Outcomes

CMAP pulls all of the core concepts and ideas of civic media into an intensive one-year program, during which students will:

  • articulate a sophisticated understanding of contemporary issues in media, communication, and technology that impact civic life
  • use a variety of participatory design and research approaches and methodologies, including human-centered design and participatory action research
  • employ the appropriate strategies to effectively communicate and work with communities
  • address, in classes and projects, the major scholarly debates regarding the interplay of new technologies, art, and civic and political life
  • discuss, write about, and design projects around the global scope of civic media and be able to situate local problems within a global context

In Demand in Today's Market

There is an increasing number of jobs in civic media within the public, private, and non-profit sectors. Students in the program gain experience working with a variety of community-based organizations and will be prepared for jobs such as:

  • Community Manager
  • Director of Civic Engagement
  • Civic Technologist
  • Civic Artist
  • Digital Strategist
  • Innovation Director
  • Civic Designer
  • New Media Catalyst
  • Communications Director
  • Community Relations Specialist
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Manager

Past graduates of CMAP currently work in various industries and organizations where they apply the skills and knowledge gained from the program, including the Obama FoundationGlobal Family Research ProjectHarvard Kennedy School, and more.



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A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Community Health prepares public health professionals to address public health issues in diverse popula- tions. The curriculum fosters development of core public health competencies, training students to plan, implement, and evaluate rural health initiatives. Through coursework, research, and community engagement, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to respond to public health needs in rural settings. Program start date: Fall

Required Program Courses

Minimum of 45 credit hours

HLTH 600, Social/Behavioral Determinants
HLTH 605, Biostatistics HLTH 610, Epidemiology
HLTH 620, Current Topics in Rural Health
HLTH 625, Research and Assessment
HLTH 630, Health Disparities
HLTH 640, Program Planning
HLTH 645, Program Evaluation
HLTH 651, Environmental and Occupational Health
HLTH 655, Health Policy and Administration
HLTH 690, Internship I
HLTH 691, Internship II
HLTH 696, Professional Project I
HLTH 697, Professional Project II

Electives: 3-6 credit hours

Uniqueness of Program

Graduates of the M.S. program will be prepared to identify, prevent and solve health problems as well as develop and evaluate health-related programs and policies, especially those affecting rural health populations. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of both part-time and full-time students. Many of our graduates will serve as managers, administrators, re- searchers, and educators. The MS offers graduates a breadth of knowledge they can apply to almost any public health topic, such as: STI prevention; promotion of breast or other cancer screenings; substance abuse prevention; or the promotion of physical activity and nutrition.

Testimonials

“Interning at Cornell Cooperative Extension has given me a look at what Community Health is all about. To work directly with the population in need is not only eye-opening, but extremely rewarding. I really feel that I have grown from this experience in a number of ways.” —Emily Nye, CCE Intern

“My internship at Hospice and Palliative Care of St. Lawrence Valley provided me with unforgettable memories and experiences. The projects I was able to complete while interning at Hospice were things I never dreamed possible. The amazing and courageous staff deserves all the thanks in the world for what they do on a day-to-day basis. This internship was truly a once in a lifetime experience.” —Kaley Arsenault, Hospice Intern

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This degree meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) standards for community nursing specialist practice. District nursing is an exciting, challenging, varied and rewarding role; a specialism providing care and support to patients living in the community. Read more
This degree meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) standards for community nursing specialist practice. District nursing is an exciting, challenging, varied and rewarding role; a specialism providing care and support to patients living in the community. This course is focused towards inspiring, innovating and implementing improvements in the quality of specialist district nursing care. Community healthcare is undergoing rapid and immense change following structural changes and reorganisation within NHS Wales. Policy driven by changes in demography, technology and economics have set community nursing as the future.

District nursing means working collaboratively with patients, family, carers, other community nurses, health professionals and individuals from both statutory and voluntary organisations. The degree will focus towards enhancement of your leadership skills. It requires engagement in reflective inquiry, self-awareness, assertiveness and critical thinking skills. Excellence in case load management is also fostered.

Delivery of care includes assessment, diagnosis, prescribing, follow up and discharge for a diverse range of patients including those with acute conditions, highly complex care needs, long term health conditions, safe guarding needs, requiring wound management health promotion, palliative and end of life care.

The degree is fully funded by the Welsh Government and gives you a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the contemporary primary and community health agenda. It will support your progression towards becoming a district nursing leader for the future. When you successfully complete this degree, you will have the NMC recordable specialist practice qualification in Community Health District Nursing.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/944-msc-community-health-studies-district-nursing

What you will study

Modules:
Year One
- Fundamentals of Community Practice
- Decision Making
- Specialist Practitioner

Year Two:
Core module
- Research methods
- Law, ethics and nurse prescribing

Optional modules:
- Transition
- Living well with long-term health conditions
- Diabetes care
- Minor illness for Primary Care Nurses
- Continuing care for children and young people
- Advances in epilepsy care

After two years you will attain a recordable specialist practice qualification with the NMC and an option to exit the course with a PgDiploma.

Year Three:
- Dissertation

After three years you will attain the MSc qualification.

Please note modules and module content may change from time to time.

Learning and teaching methods

Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, self-directed study, workshops and a clinical placement. As part of the course you will complete 40 academic days which run from September to May.

Year one requires attendance every Tuesday. In your second year lectures will be delivered on various days depending on which modules you choose. In addition you will undertake 40 clinical days per year. Ideally you should be working in a community setting, however if you are not, placements may be negotiated. While in practice, you will be assigned a mentor who will assess your clinical competence. All students are required to organise a tripartite meeting between student, mentor and academic supervisor during the first month in order to set objectives for clinical learning.

If you have undertaken the Fundamentals of Community Practice Module (30 credits) within the last five years, this can be transferred to the degree.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Undertaking this course ensures you will graduate with the knowledge, skills, competencies and capacity to provide safe and effective nursing care in community settings. Additionally, having employees with a specialist practitioner qualification is valued by nursing managers, commissioners and the Welsh Government.

Assessment methods

You will be assessed by a range of methods including writing essays and case studies, formal presentations, poster presentations, examinations, dissertation, literature reviews and clinical practice assessments.

Facilities

As part of the Decision Making module you will use the Hydra Suite which is used to help analyse and improve decision making for a variety of scenarios faced by professionals within district nursing.

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The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. Read more

The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is being driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for science to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy decisions. Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between science and various stakeholder groups and ever more creative methodologies for science engagement are being explored.

Our part-time online distance learning programme provides an opportunity to gain a formal qualification in science communication without having to leave your job or move to a different location. You may elect to begin with the Post-Graduate Certificate in the first instance and then decide to study for a Diploma and/or a Master’s degree. You will engage with other students from around the world, from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and you will enjoy a rich learning experience while studying on the programme.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement methodologies and issues. In the process, you will develop critical thinking and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice. Your learning in individual courses is transferable, ensuring interconnection across the programme, thus providing opportunities for deeper learning and for the application of key principles in different contexts.

The programme attracts students from across the globe, from a range of academic and professional backgrounds and provides a formal qualification for those working in science communication and public engagement or a conversion route for those interested in moving into this field.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

The programme can be studied to PG Certificate, PG Diploma or Masters level – if you are interested, in a formal qualification in science communication then sign up for our Post Graduate Certificate. You can then opt to continue to the Diploma and the Masters degree.

Year 1 (Certificate) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Introduction to Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science and Society A
  • Science and Society B
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science
  • Science Education
  • The Role of Social Media in Science Communication

Year 2 (Diploma) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science, Policy and Practice
  • Science and the Media
  • Effective Exhibit and Programme Development
  • Creative Arts in Science Engagement
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science

Year 3 (Masters)

  • Dissertation project.

Career opportunities

To address the need for effective science communication and public engagement with science, there has been a significant rise in opportunities available for professionals with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and public.

These roles can be found in, for example, Higher Education Institutions, Research Centres, Museums, Science Centres, Learned Societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making. Examples of specific roles are engagement managers, information and education officers, policy and knowledge brokers, in addition to the traditional science communicator role.



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Our MA in Urban and Public Affairs program trains students in public policy, urban studies, and grassroots organizing, examining ways policy and community engagement can effect positive change. Read more

Our MA in Urban and Public Affairs program trains students in public policy, urban studies, and grassroots organizing, examining ways policy and community engagement can effect positive change.

Our program combines graduate seminars in urban studies, politics, sociology, and public policy with hands-on experience in community-based research, policy design, policy analysis, advocacy and implementation. Graduates are uniquely equipped to formulate policy and initiatives for more equitable and vibrant urban areas, inspired through thoughtful engagement with the theory and practice of social justice.

Internship - gain hands-on experience in the field and build a network of professional contacts

Career Opportunities - supported by academic and field mentorship, and leadership development

Distinguished Faculty - comprised of both leading academics and accomplished professionals and practitioners in the field

Learning Outcomes

Student will:

  • Master foundational concepts of urban history, sociology, and politics, and demonstrate the capacity to apply these ideas in real-world settings
  • Demonstrate expertise in one or more areas of urban public policy
  • Contemplate models of social change and social justice while developing the requisite skills and knowledge to actuate change
  • Apply knowledge gained in the classroom in various and diverse community settings
  • Apply knowledge gained in the community to inform classroom learning and scholarship
  • Build networks through interactions with professionals from fields including public policy, advocacy, community organizing, and public service
  • Engage in meaningful career planning through both self reflection as well as through interactions with colleagues and professionals in the field
  • Contribute to the public discourse around contemporary urban policy issues
  • Demonstrate professional skills in writing, urban and participatory research, and policy analysis
  • Propose, design, and implement a research project that combines the conceptual and practical tools provided by the program

You can request more information by visiting our website

San Francisco Advantage

Our program is uniquely situated at the center of San Francisco Bay Area politics. The Bay Area is well known nationally for pioneering policy measures on environmental issues, gay rights, housing policy, and many other urgent social justice concerns. Students engage in the vibrant living classroom of the region, developing practical research and policy development



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Discover the First Management Degree for Performing Artists. In the 21st century, performing artists need to be both masters of their chosen craft and experts in the professional and business skills that today’s rapidly evolving global arts economy demands. Read more

Discover the First Management Degree for Performing Artists

In the 21st century, performing artists need to be both masters of their chosen craft and experts in the professional and business skills that today’s rapidly evolving global arts economy demands.

The Master of Arts in Arts Management and Entrepreneurship at The New School’s College of Performing Arts is one of the first graduate programs designed specifically to help performers gain the critical skill set they need to become recognized artistic leaders—onstage and beyond.

This innovative new program is designed for students who have just completed undergraduate performing arts programs as well as performing artists out in the world. The program enables musicians, composers, actors, directors, and playwrights to further develop their skills as performers while acquiring the competencies they need to excel as independent artists, reinvent existing cultural organizations, and launch their own arts-related enterprises.

Set the Stage for Success

In the MA in Arts Management and Entrepreneurship program, students have the unique opportunity to:

  • Develop the administrative, strategic, and technical skills creative entrepreneurs need to innovate and stand out
  • Take tailored core courses that immerse them in entrepreneurial theory contextualized for a growing arts economy
  • Expand the boundaries of traditional arts administration while learning from leading nonprofit and management practitioners
  • Continue developing as artists by participating in world-class productions and performances that take advantage of The New School’s state-of-the-art performing arts building, Arnhold Hall, along with other performing arts venues across New York City
  • Build a skill set applicable to a diverse range of career options in performing arts management, community arts, arts education, project management, arts administration, entrepreneurship, partnership management, and more

You can request more information here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/arts-management?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_copa&utm_term=arts_management

Interdisciplinary University Network

The schools within the College of Performing Arts— Mannes, Jazz, and Drama—have a long and rich history of artistic excellence, playing an integral role in performance culture in New York City and around the world. The three schools’ collaborative, interdisciplinary curricula perfectly position students as ground-breaking players in the varied landscape of the performing arts in the 21st century.

Performing Arts students also have direct access to the other colleges within The New School, particularly the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy. Through integrated, holistic training, students find their place at the critical nexus between artistic excellence, commerce, and The New School’s century-long tradition of community engagement.

New York City: Home to Enterprising Artists

The city that never sleeps serves as our inspiration, laboratory, and classroom. New York is an epicenter for great performances. Students enjoy the benefit of having some of the best live music clubs and theaters in the world within walking distance of their school in Greenwich Village, a historic hub of artistic excellence.

Almost every day, at least one of our students is performing or auditioning at one of the city’s theaters and clubs. New York is also home to many arts organizations, cultural institutions, world-class venues, and festivals. Students can secure invaluable real-world industry experience and establish lasting professional relationships.

You can request more information here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/arts-management?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_copa&utm_term=arts_management



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The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. Read more

The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. In a fast changing, global economy, the MSc will equip you to assess the wider interconnections between organisations and their local, national and international contexts. You will build up a solid understanding of key management practice and develop your critical insight.

This MSc is specifically designed for anyone who may be looking to complement their non-business degree and has little or no prior business background. Alternatively, you may have completed to ordinary degree level and be aiming to enhance your qualifications. You will study a range of modules and complete a community based project where you will work with either a commercial business, community, voluntary or social enterprise. You can study for the general MSc International Management and Leadership or tailor your studies with our routes in Events, Family and Smaller Enterprise, Hospitality and Tourism (as follows).

Teaching learning and assessment

You will attend lectures and seminars, work in groups and carry out independent learning. You will be expected to participate in discussions, develop ideas and engage with experiential learning. Assessment methods will include management reports, essays, web-based discussions, reflections on practice and group work with presentations. A central part of the course experience is the regular involvement with industry, through specific visits, guest speakers and events all of which provide valuable insights into practice, contemporary trends and thinking. Class sizes are normally 10-30.

Teaching hours and attendance

Modules studied on campus require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Attendance requirements at QMU will depend on which module you are studying and whether you are full or part-time. In most instances the taught elements of the full-time course occur on Tuesday, Wednesday (AM) and Thursday. Part-time students have the option to select different modules each year.

Links with industry/professional bodies

We work continually with a wide range of business organisations and public services, as well as the third sector, individual business leaders and industry experts to develop our courses. This ensures that along with in-depth theoretical underpinnings, the courses are rooted in relevance and industry practice. As your course progresses you will hear from guest lecturers, participate in visits to a wide range of industries and organisations, and engage in a range of other networking opportunities with staff and industry experts. In recent years we have engaged with: Diageo; New Lanark Heritage Centre and Hotel; Nairns; AG Barr (Irn-Bru); Waldorff Astoria, Edinburgh; Glenkinchie Distillery; Henderson’s restaurants; Isle of Eriska Hotel; Scottish Ambulance Service; Turcan Connell; and Dakota hotels, to name but a few.

Modules

Contemporary Issues in International Management/ Strategic Thinking/ International Marketing/ Introduction to Management Accounting and Finance/ Organisational Behaviour All MSc students will then take three further modules in their specific area, for example: Events Leadership in Action (Events)/ Family Business Governance (FASE)/ International Leadership Power and Policy (General)/ Critical Issues in Hospitality and Tourism Leadership (Hospitality/ Tourism)

You will also complete a 60 credit project (Community Impact and Practice) focused towards your specialism in partnership with an external organisation. The project is designed to have a positive community outcome and could be based within the commercial, public or third sector. This is your opportunity to discover, propose, plan, lead and deliver an externally driven project. whilst developing your skills of reflective  practice and personal development planning.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses are designed to enhance your career prospects by opening up a wide range of global opportunities. Our graduates take with them enhanced employability and confidence whether they obtain a position with a multinational organisation, work within the public sector, create their own business, gain employment in the third sector or go on to further studies.

Quick Facts

There is a practical project instead of a dissertation. Students are challenged to research, plan, manage and evaluate a project in conjunction with an external business or organisation, allowing them to develop career-enhancing skills, confidence and opportunities.

Reflecting contemporary working practice, our teaching and assessment takes a strong group and team focus.

Class sizes are beneficially small: this enables students to work closely with fellow students from diverse backgrounds and allows lecturers to develop strong relationships with the students. The smaller cohort of students also allows for participation in regular visits and events.




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The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Read more
The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Planning has a key role to play in improving the condition of life in our towns, cities and rural areas. Towns and cities themselves impact on global sustainability and can play a very influential role in tackling global environmental, social and economic problems. Equally, implementing sustainability principles within urban and rural areas is essential for the well-being of the local residents and improvement of the local environment. Creating more sustainable towns and cities will be central to the future of society and the planet. The planning system is so important because it provides one of the most sophisticated mechanisms for regulating environmental change. Recent policy changes have made planning in neighbourhoods and in communities even more important.

About the course

Increasingly planners are being required to facilitate the creation of more sustainable urban environments. This requires expertise and skills in a diverse range of disciplines and nationally there is a shortage of relevant skills. This course offers both personal opportunities for students to gain valuable skills that make them highly employable, and allows them to contribute to a much needed and fast changing professional area.

Why choose this course?

This exciting new course is specifically aimed at people wishing to gain expertise in contemporary sustainability issues. It provides graduates with excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design, community development, regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and other planning related careers. The course is suitable for:
-Students who have work experience in planning or related discipline and require a postgraduate qualification and subsequent professional accreditation to develop their career further
-New graduates starting their career in planning with a first degree in geography, environmental science, conservation, sociology, architecture and urban studies
-Students from other disciplines who have developed an interest in planning from voluntary work, work experience or project work.

Key Features

-A combination of stimulating academic study and strong career orientation
-Focus on the role of planning in addressing key sustainability concerns: climate change; urban sprawl; social cohesion; and demands for personal mobility
-Using the latest techniques including GIS; urban design tools and community design engagement techniques such as charettes
-Practical problem based approach to learning that uses real planning issues and case studies
-Flexibility of study based on a programme of short courses scheduled over two or three days at weekends
-UK field trips including visits to the start of town planning nearby at Letchworth and the first New Towns
-International study visit to look at European best practice in France and Germany

This course is available both full and part-time. Full time study in Semester A takes 1 year. Full time study beginning in Semester B will take 15 months. Part time study options typically take two years but students are given a maximum of five years to complete.

Careers

When you graduate from this course you will have excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design and urbanism, community development and regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and adaptation and other planning related careers - all with a special focus on maximizing your sustainability expertise. Prospective employers include: local government; private sector planning consultancies; specialist consultancies in environmental management, urban design, transport planning; public involvement bodies; national government agencies; third sector employers including charities with an urban and rural focus; and professional bodies.

Teaching methods

The MSc Sustainable Planning course structure is based on a series of two to three day short courses and tutorials that usually run Friday and Saturday, though some modules may require a Thursday as well.

For full time students the modules run approximately twice a month which means that you will be attending classes on four weekdays and two Saturdays.

Part-time students attend the MSc Sustainable Planning short courses over two years. This makes the course easy to attend and fit around a busy workload schedule.

Structure

Core Modules
-Development Viability
-Place-making and Spatial Mediation
-Planning law, policy & practice
-Research Methods
-Spatial Planning: Theories and Strategies
-Sustainable Communities & Environment
-Sustainable Energy
-Sustainable Planning Dissertation
-Urban Design and Conservation

Optional
-Community Engagement and the Planning Process
-Planning for Rural Communities
-Research Methods
-Spatial Analysis for Planning
-Urban Regeneration
-Water Resources

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The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. Read more

The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. It caters for students wishing to enhance their artistic and professional careers as well as those seeking to prepare for doctoral study. The course provides opportunities for students who are relatively new to the subject area to establish a foundation in the discipline as well as those who wish to pursue further study. It prepares students for doctoral study and/or employment in film, screen media and creative industries, as well as those who wish to employ their knowledge of screen media and practice in educational, social and community settings.

The course thus builds on extensive links between the University of Manchester and professional contexts and communities in Manchester and the North West. It encourages the research and practice of film in academic and creative contexts, in particular with engagement in non-traditional and/or community sites, combining artistic and academic exploration with a focus on social responsibility, critique and transformation.

Programme Director: Dr Felicia Chan (  )

Teaching and learning

The MA Film Studies programme offers a solid foundation in theoretical and critical film studies, built on staff expertise and specialisms from form and theory to historical and cultural approaches to national cinemas to the politics of identity, gender and sexuality, and film music as well as practice, for students who may wish to pursue the discipline at postgraduate level for personal or professional development. It also offers opportunities for research and practice in aspects of and approaches to applied Film Studies, for students who may be interested in pursuing more practice-based and socially engaged research, for example, using film production and audio-visual methodologies for research, knowledge exchange and community engagement. This involves acquiring practical skills in addition to theoretical knowledge, such as documentary film-making, sound design, film curation and programming, that could be applied to education, community and activist contexts, as well as work placement opportunities.

Following a mandatory first semester of two core modules, students are free to construct their MA programme from a diverse range of options, including established study options within School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, a directed reading or practice option (enabling you to pursue a specific area of research with the careful supervision of specialist staff), and a work placement option. Study options vary from year to year depending on staff availability.

Students are taught in seminars, small group tutorials, workshops and surgeries, offering opportunities for lively and engaged discussions. One-to-one supervision is offered on all dissertations. Assessment is primarily by written assignment, also there will also be opportunities for those interested in practice as research.

Coursework and assessment

Written coursework in each taught 30 credit taught module is constituted by a 6,000 word essay, or its equivalent, constituted by a combination of various kinds of written work, including essays, log books, evaluation reports, project critiques and practice analysis. The dissertation is constituted by a 15,000 word project on a topic chosen in consultation with the dissertation supervisor.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This Masters degree teaches and develops a range of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a wide range of career options. Previous MA students have continued to take up PhD study with us, and many of these have gone on to academic and teaching careers in further and higher education institutions. Others have gone on to work for the BBC, in independent television production companies, festivals, film education and other areas of the film and screen media industry.



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