• Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
Liverpool John Moores University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"community" AND "developm…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Community Development)

We have 2,902 Masters Degrees (Community Development)

  • "community" AND "development" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 2,902
Order by 
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. Read more

This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. The programme examines advanced knowledge about the theory and practice of social work and community development in an international context. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of global social issues (such as social exclusion, poverty, environmental degradation, and disasters) and relate this knowledge to developments in their own country. You will be equipped with the skills to engage in research and to apply research findings effectively in practice. The programme includes a two-week field-based learning opportunity in a social work or community work agency. The dissertation provides space for you to carry out research on an aspect of social or community work in the UK. 

Durham University is a world leader in international social work and community development research, theory, and practice. Our social work team has edited the prestigious International Social Work journal and works closely with social work’s key international organisations - , the International Association of Schools of Social Work, .the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), and the International Council of Social Welfare (ICSW). Its Programme Director also represents social work at the UNFCCC and other UN bodies.

Course structure 

You will study in a small group of international students, and also alongside UK students on postgraduate social work and research degree programmes. This will give you plenty of opportunities to share knowledge and experience in addition to your learning through lectures, presentations and seminars.

The MA consists of five core modules, designed to give you an understanding of social work as it is practiced in the UK, and a thorough grounding in research methods and their application. You will also choose two specialist modules according to your particular professional interests. Finally, you will undertake a research project and write a dissertation. To achieve the Master's degree, you must accumulate a total of 180 credits, as listed below.

Core Modules

International Social Work (30 credits)

  • International social work: Debates and controversies.
  • The history of international social work.
  • International institutions and social work theories and practices.
  • Legislative underpinnings to international social work
  • Internationalised Social problems 

Social Work: Context and Practice (30 credits)

  • Contemporary social work and social welfare in a diverse society
  • Construction of social problems
  • Ethical frameworks for social practice
  • Contemporary social work theories and practice.

Community Development and Organising (15 credits)

  • Critical analysis of communities
  • Origins, history, and theoretical approaches to community development
  • Contemporary forms of community development practice
  • Community and public policy.

Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

  • Uses of research in social welfare policy and practice
  • Approaches to social research
  • Ethical issues in research
  • Literature reviewing, sampling, data collection and analysis methods.

Field Based Learning (15 credits)

  • Social work practice
  • Comparative theory/practice approaches
  • Social and community work organisations
  • Practice based pedagogies

Note students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Optional Modules

These are subject to staff availability. In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

  • Youth policy in the UK
  • Origins, development, and theoretical underpinnings of youth work
  • Critical overview of contemporary youth work practice Key forms of intervention.

Management in Community Settings (30 credits)

  • Critical analysis of a range of perspectives which have informed the management oforganisations in community settings, including those relating to:
  • Development of understanding in effectively managing and developing these organisations in the current context to increase their effectiveness in achieving their aims in ways that are consistent with professional values
  • Personnel management
  • Physical resource management
  • Financial management
  • Strategic management
  • Change management.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cress-tabulations, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Crime, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)



Read less
This programme provides you with the opportunity to study established and emerging theoretical dimensions of adult education, community development and youth studies. Read more

This programme provides you with the opportunity to study established and emerging theoretical dimensions of adult education, community development and youth studies. You will gain in-depth knowledge in a specialism of your choosing, as well as a solid foundation in educational and social research.

Why this programme

  • The programme provides you with the key attributes for professions in adult education, community development and youth work, developing both in-depth knowledge and breadth.
  • You will develop analytic and research skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base, and a practical understanding of the settings in which adult education, community development and youth work take place.
  • You will be benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the School of Education, who have a breadth of teaching and research experience in a range of areas of study across the three specialist areas.
  • You will have the opportunity to link up with a range of community-based organisations in Central Scotland for your dissertation work.
  • There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars, with leading-edge academics and practitioners and speakers from the UK and abroad.

Programme structure

You will take four core (two of which will be dependent on your chosen specialist pathway) and two optional courses (chosen from the other specialist pathways). You will also undertake a research dissertation in your chosen specialism. Courses employ a range of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, teamwork and participatory teaching methods. There is also the possibility of joining undergraduate students from the BA Community Development on an international study trip.

Core courses

  • Introduction to educational and social research
  • Modern educational thought.

Adult Education

  • International issues in adult and continuing education
  • The psychology of adult learning. 

Community Development

  • Educational approaches to community learning and development
  • Empowerment and social change. 

Youth Studies

  • Perspectives of youth and young adulthood
  • Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Optional courses may include

  • Educational approaches to community learning and development
  • Empowerment and social change
  • International issues in adult and continuing education
  • Perspectives of youth and young adulthood
  • The psychology of adult learning
  • Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with adult education, community development or youth work, as well as policy development. In addition, it is an excellent professional development choice for those currently working in any of the three specialist fields. The programme also provides a solid pathway towards doctoral-level study.



Read less
This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge to work alongside people in communities to initiate sustainable social change.

Why this programme

◾You will discover ways in which you can help people realise their potential and work together for a fairer, healthier and happier world.
◾Upon successful completion of the PgDip, you will be awarded a professional qualification accredited by the Community Learning and Development Standards Council in Scotland.
◾This qualification will enable you to work in the field of community learning and development, including community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration.
◾You will have the opportunity to participate in a network of community development projects. Project leads contribute to the taught aspects of the programme and also provide you with placement opportunities.
◾Our students come from a wide range of professional, academic and cultural backgrounds and all bring with them a curiosity about how social justice can be developed by people working together for change.

Programme Structure

You will take two core and two optional courses from a specialist pathway. There is a large practical element either in the form of a placement or as part of your current workplace. Throughout the programme there is emphasis on participative and experiential learning. For the MEd you will also undertake an in-depth supervised research project, on a related topic of your choosing.

Core courses
◾Practice and policy inquiry
◾Theoretical frameworks for practice

Optional courses

Adult education
◾Curriculum development in adult education
◾The psychology of adult learning

Community development
◾Educational approaches to community learning & development
◾Empowerment & social change

Youth work
◾Perspectives in youth & young adulthood
◾Working with youth: Education & learning for change

Career prospects

You will have many employment opportunities open to you in the areas of community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration. With an accredited CLD Standards Council for Scotland qualification, you will have the opportunity to work for local authorities, the voluntary sector and further and higher education institutions.

Read less
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This course will allow you to become a qualified youth and community worker, increasing your employment opportunities in this rapidly changing field. Read more

This course will allow you to become a qualified youth and community worker, increasing your employment opportunities in this rapidly changing field. It is validated by the National Youth Agency.

You will participate in a rich and culturally diverse teaching and learning environment and undertake two challenging placements, enabling you to apply your knowledge and hone your practical skills. During your studies, you will critically engage with the tensions and challenges of current practice, build a sophisticated knowledge of effective management approaches, debate how youth work and community development has responded to shifting government policies and learn how to support inclusive practice that can inspire positive social change.

This course has been designed on the principles which promote social justice, and challenge injustice and inequality. Alongside the taught modules, you will be able take advantage of our professional development programme, which offers the chance to explore and understand recent developments in the field, exchange experiences with colleagues and practitioners and learn from one another. You will also gain an understanding of how to conduct research as a practitioner, and undertake an in-depth dissertation study.

Course Benefits

On this course you will undertake a total of 400 hours of placement practice - half of this time will be spent with young people aged 11-25, with the main focus being 13-19 years. One placement may be in your current place of work, and while both aim to meet the fieldwork practice requirements of the NYA. You will have access to our online learning portal, with 24/7 access to modules and bespoke specialist resources produced by our course team and wider University.

Alongside the modules runs a professional development programme providing further opportunity for you to critically analyse recent developments in the field and to exchange experiences with colleagues and practitioners. In addition, you will gain an understanding of conducting practitioner research and undertake a substantial dissertation.

Core modules

  • Critical Perspectives in Youth Work & Community Development
  • Contemporary Approaches to Management, Leadership & Enterprise
  • Personal & Professional Development (including 150-hour alternative placement)
  • Promoting Inclusive Practice
  • The Professional Practitioner - substantive placement (250 hours' minimum placement)
  • Understanding Social Research & Evaluation
  • Dissertation

Job Prospects

By enhancing your ability to build trusting, professional relationships with troubled and challenging young people, coupled with proven experience of working in multi-agency settings, you will become an effective youth and community worker who will be sought after by employers.

  • Youth Worker
  • Community Development Worker
  • Behavioural Support Worker
  • Charity Project worker


Read less
Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This award includes a professional qualification validated by the National Youth Agency and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) of Youth Leaders and Community Work. Read more
This award includes a professional qualification validated by the National Youth Agency and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) of Youth Leaders and Community Work. This is conferred at Postgraduate Diploma level (120 credits at level 7) on successful completion of the relevant taught units and placements (but we encourage students to register for full MA where possible). The PgDip/MA is aimed at graduates with relevant experience, particularly in working with young people/communities, and with a commitment to community/social education, youth development, and the possibilities of social justice and change. The course is designed to prepare the student for management and leadership roles in both voluntary and statutory organisations.

The award teaching, learning and assessment strategies will reflect the values, ethical principles and codes of practice that underpin the profession. They are based on a framework of quality drawn from national guidelines (QAA Youth and Community Work Benchmark Statement) and institutional strategies (The Manchester Metropolitan University’s Mission Statement and Learning and Teaching Strategy), as well as National Standards set by the NYA.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

Features and benefits of the course

-Masters level continuing professional development tailored for students own context, priorities and interests, drawing on multi/interdisciplinary perspectives
-Professional development and recognition
-Contemporary partnership contexts fully explored
-Positive commitment to exploring issues of equality and diversity in an urban context
-Participation in a large, dynamic and forward-thinking taught post graduate community

Read less
Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about.

This MA, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, was started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification.

A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development.

This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development and community arts, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork are attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment. We also encourage you to audit courses run by the Art, Music and Cultural Studies departments, and in general to make the most of all the wonderful political and arts events organised by Goldsmiths staff and students every week.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, normally in community arts settings, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations.

The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork 1: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community arts. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community arts are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community arts practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in community arts practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 140 hours plus 20 hours observations) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community arts and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This course is suitable if you want a JNC-approved qualification or if you are working in a community or education setting working predominantly with young people. Read more

This course is suitable if you want a JNC-approved qualification or if you are working in a community or education setting working predominantly with young people.

You will be taught to reflect on your role as a practitioner, asked to question and critically evaluate your professional role and create an environment where knowledge transfer and skills develop is encouraged.

The fieldwork practice arrangements required for this course will include two periods of supervised fieldwork practice, which will be 592 hours in total. In line with the National Youth Agency criteria, at least 148 of these 592 hours will be in an alternative practice context. The experience will be in two locations and 50% of the committed time will be with young people in the 11-25 age group. The total number of fieldwork practice hours will be equally divided over the course duration.

Why should I choose this course?

  • You will develop your professional career in youth work and community as you specialise in this rewarding area.
  • You will be given a choice of specialist modules that allow you to customise your degree to suit your career aspirations.
  • You will learn advanced techniques for research and communication and how to apply them to the industry.
  • You will learn a variety of industry approaches around social justice, management and personal and professional change.
  • You will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of industry trends from a variety of perspectives.


Read less
​MA Managing Community Practice. This programme is designed to enhance the professional practice of experienced practitioners by facilitating a critical and reflective approach to management, staff development, innovatio​n and researching practice. Read more

Course Overview

​MA Managing Community Practice: This programme is designed to enhance the professional practice of experienced practitioners by facilitating a critical and reflective approach to management, staff development, innovatio​n and researching practice. Many of the modules are taught interprofessionally including colleagues from community work, youth work, teaching, PRUs and health in both voluntary and statutory sectors. This provides for rich interprofessional learning and reflects the practice realities of interprofessional working.

PgD in Youth and Community Work: This professionally endorsed award is particularly suitable for graduates who have increasingly found themselves working in the field of youth and community work and who wish to gain a professional qualification. The programme requires students to undertake two separate supervised placements in the field of youth and community work. Students attend university on one evening a week where they undertake taught modules and tutorials. Students on this programme tend to develop into a highly supportive, friendly and analytical professional group.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Youth-and-Community-Work---PgD--Managing-Community-Practice---MA-.aspx

​Course Content​​

MA Managing Community Practice:
The programme consists of three core and one optional module, followed by a dissertation. Most students choose to take two modules per year over two years (one evening per week during term time) followed by the dissertation, although full-time and accelerated modes of attendance may be negotiated.

MA Core Modules:
- Researching Practice
- Reflective Practice
- Managing and Leading Community Practice

MA Optional Modules:
- Mentoring
- Leading and Facilitating Reflective Practice
- Education: Character and Context

PG Dip in Youth and Community Work:
The taught and fieldwork elements of the programme are part time and can be completed in two years. Once both taught and fieldwork elements of the programme are satisfactorily completed it is possible to continue onto the MA. Students will need to attend taught sessions and tutorials on one evening a week.

PgD Core modules:
- Principles and Practice of Youth and Community Work
- Management in the Youth and Community Sector
- The Community Context of Practice (Fieldwork and Tutorials)
- The Social Context of Practice (Fieldwork and Tutorials).​

Learning & Teaching​

​MA:
Most of the modules have a strong application to professional practice and often involve the undertaking of practice-based projects.

PgD:
Students will be expected to undertake a considerable amount of self-study to enhance the collective learning process. It is envisaged that students will utilise their experiences to enhance the level of analysis in all collective sessions. Students are expected to engage in reflective learning processes throughout the duration of the programme.

Teaching methods will tend to emphasise small group discussions and informal lectures.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on both their youth and community work-based practice and their academic assignments through a range of assessment types including essays, presentations, group exercises, portfolios, reflective writing, and viva voce.

Employability & Careers​

MA:
The programme is aimed at practitioners and managers in the generic and expanding field of youth and community development work. It aims to enable people to develop their professional understanding and skills through a supportive and challenging learning environment.
The programme will be of particular interest to experienced practitioners who manage aspects of youth or community development provision and who wish to develop their analytical and professional capabilities. It is one of the pathways on the Master's CPD framework.

PgD:
The PgD is a programme leading to professional qualification in youth and community work which is endorsed by the Wales ETS. As such it enables graduates to qualify in this growing occupational area while enhancing their academic profile.

​Successful Post Graduate Diplomats may wish to continue with their studies to obtain the MA.

Contact for MA:
Jan Huyton:
Email:
Tel: 029 2041 6499​​

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

Read less
The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. Read more

The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. The course will provide you with a unique blend of theory and practice teaching, aimed at deepening your knowledge of the history of communications within the development process of emerging economies. It will critically evaluate the impact of international and regional institutions from a critical political economic perspective. Teaching by academic staff, guest lecturers and other carefully selected staff from development organisations will provide you with an overview of the policies, actions and impact of state and non-state institutions within the area of communication media and development.

A distinctive feature is its emphasis on the practical role of communication media in development. You will participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme, offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. As part of the work experience module, students participate in an extensive NGOs and media seminar series featuring experts and panel discussions. The work placement programme is in line with the University of Westminster’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner.

The course team is led by Dr Winston Mano and includes Professor Daya Thussu, Professor Christian Fuchs, Professor David Gauntlett, Professor Naomi Sakr, Dr Anthony McNicholas, Dr Xin Xin, Dr Anastasia Kavada, Dr Maria Michalis, Dr Roza Tsagarousianou, Dr Tarik Sabry, Paul Majendie, Geoffrey Davies and Michaela O’Brien. Visiting Lecturers include Jackie Davies, founder and Director of the Communication and Development Network (C4D) (http://www.c4d.org), a community of professionals working in communication for development. As a peer network the C4D Network is aimed at communication for development practitioners plus allied development workers, donors, academics and communication experts from the BBC, UN and major development organisations. The joining criterion is an engagement in communication for development - either professionally or through academia. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

One Semester One module from the below:

Semester 1 (option modules)

One Semester Two module from the below:

Semester 2 (option modules)

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with media and development organisations such as UNICEF, UNESCO, C4D, BBC Media Action, Internews Commonwealth Public Media Alliance.

Our large network of alumni keep our name and reputation alive in the industry.

Career path

Graduates apply for posts in development organisations based in London such as OneWorld, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, BBC, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid and War on Want. Some students were able to build on knowledge, skills and their background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (in Romania, Pakistan and India) and a range of international business organisations, including the BBC. The course also prepares students for further studies and for a higher degree, e.g., a PhD. Some students apply for PhD Scholarships advertised by the Faculty of Media, Arts and Design and they were all encouraged to join the Communication for Development Network (C4D) which meets once a month in London.

We are aware that the range of skills needed is exceptionally diffuse, and that students on the course hope to develop careers in a variety of fields in many different countries. We are also aware that we are preparing you for careers in a rapidly changing job market and the structure of the course allows you take advantage of change, and not to be its victim. It, therefore, would be misleading and unhelpful to place too much emphasis on acquiring a precise set of skills drawn from one part of the media and development sector. Finally, with a view to your professional development planning, the course is designed to give you a wide-ranging and critical knowledge of the development industry that you plan to enter.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X