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Masters Degrees (Community Archaeology)

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This course gives you the opportunity to reflect on and investigate community archaeology in both theory and practice. During the course you will consider focussed case studies, theoretical perspectives and academic and applied research. Read more
This course gives you the opportunity to reflect on and investigate community archaeology in both theory and practice. During the course you will consider focussed case studies, theoretical perspectives and academic and applied research. You will be encouraged to engage with community archaeology in a range of local and national contexts, and to study a variety of archaeological projects and organisations. The course will help develop the knowledge, skills and networks that will assist you in your career.

Delivered flexibly through campus-based and online learning the course is designed for those already employed in the sector as well as those seeking to enter it. Studies are supported by a dedicated team of specialist tutors and a well-developed and resourced virtual learning environment. You will benefit from other facilities and resources, such as the University’s Archaeology Lab and our summer Archaeological Field School programme.

You will be studying at the cutting edge of community archaeology, gaining valuable practical experience via a range of case- or site-based studies. The course offers awards of Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or the full MA Degree in Community Archaeology.

By the end of the course, you will be fully equipped to progress onto a variety of careers in the field of community archaeology, or further study, having acquired an extensive repertoire of skills.

What you will study -

In your first year, you will study a Contemporary Issues module, followed by Archaeology and Communities, Professional Practice in Community Archaeology and Research Skills. Those studying part-time will take Contemporary Issues, and either Archaeology and Communities or Professional Practice in Community Archaeology.

During your second year, you will produce a Dissertation. Your Dissertation comprises the final module of the course for those completing the MA Degree. Students studying part-time move onto either Archaeology and Communities or Professional Practice in Community Archaeology, plus Research Skills.

If you are studying part-time students you will normally complete the MA Degree in your third year, undertaking the Dissertation module. This is the culmination of your studies and an opportunity to explore your interests in the heritage education field.

“So far, the course has been interesting and enjoyable. I especially like the fact that the course has been easy to fit around a full time job.” Claire, MA in Community Archaeology student

Assessment -

We use a wide range of different types of assessment throughout the course, including essays, impact reports, resource packs, research portfolios and a dissertation. We support you in this work through a mix of campus-based and at-a-distance teaching, with lectures, site visits and workshops, and also discussion and interaction via a virtual learning environment.

Please send your applications to the following address:

Admissions
Bishop Grosseteste University
Longdales Road
Lincoln
LN1 3DY

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Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers. Read more
Training the next generation of archaeological pioneers

Why choose this course?

The MA in Field Archaeology offers a perfect blend of theory and practice, equipping you with wide-ranging, advanced practical skills, while giving you a deep theoretical knowledge and understanding of the logistical challenges, legal requirements and ethics involved in archaeological fieldwork. It is both challenging and rewarding.

York has been called the ‘heritage capital of the UK’. Here, we have routine contact with local, national and international leaders in archaeology and heritage management. We work closely with our neighbours at the Council for British Archaeology, English Heritage and Natural England, as well as local commercial units including York Archaeological Trust. You will also meet visiting lecturers of national standing, including John Oxley, the most experienced Local Authority Archaeologist in the UK, and Patrick Ottaway, formerly Fieldwork Director of York Archaeological Trust and now a respected archaeological consultant. You will also:
-Develop wide-ranging advanced field skills
-Build a deeper understanding of the theoretical, legislative and ethical context of archaeological fieldwork
-Study among a community of practitioners that is unrivalled in the UK
-Gain work experience with nationally significant public and private organisations
-Develop skills and knowledge essential for varied archaeological careers and research
-Learn from leading figures in archaeological research and fieldwork
-Receive close personal mentoring from experienced, well-connected staff

The MA in Field Archaeology is a flexible course, devised to meet demand for professional training in the UK and worldwide. It will give you a thorough knowledge of how, and why, archaeological fieldwork has arrived at its current state and acquaint you with the key methods employed in modern fieldwork, analysis and dissemination. It will enable you to think strategically about project design and tactically about project implementation.

Who is it for?
The course aims to ground you in European, and particularly UK, archaeology, so it is well suited to graduates of Archaeology. However, graduates in History, Geography and related disciplines often bring complementary perspectives that are greatly valued by both teachers and students. Also lessons and perspectives from Europe are relevant to archaeological fieldwork contexts worldwide. Individuals with some practical experience who wish to develop their careers by advancing their appreciation of the wider context of archaeology will also benefit from this course.

What can it lead to?
The MA in Field Archaeology aims to turn out not just archaeological practitioners, but leaders and creative thinkers with the imagination to advance the discipline, as well as their own careers. Some of our graduates go on to become project officers, curators and managers in the heritage industry. Others progress to further study, including doctoral research.

Placement

MA Field Archaeology students have a unique opportunity to gain practical work experience in a professional field environment with one of the many leading archaeological organisations based in and around York. You will work alongside experienced professionals on projects that enable you to gain new skills, as well as put into use those skills gained during your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of organising archaeological fieldwork and interpreting results within a professional environment.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of data gathering or analysis as developed in one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
During your placements you will get involved with one or more of the following:
-Develop a practical understanding of how archaeological fieldwork is planned and carried out in an integrated way.
-Gain detailed knowledge of how ecofactual or artefactual assemblages might be identified, quantified, analysed and interpreted.
-Become familiar with the ways in which field archaeology is organised and administered, and of the pressures it is subject to, working with a local government organisation or national organisation with offices in York.

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations providing placements vary from year to year, according to availability, those regularly offering such opportunities include City of York Council, the Portable Antiquities Scheme, the York Archaeological Trust, AOC Archaeology and various other commercial archaeology units.

Careers

By the end of your MA in Field Archaeology you will have:
-Developed an awareness of the organisational and legislative context within which fieldwork operates in the UK
gained a detailed knowledge of the varied techniques of site evaluation used today
-Become aware of the practicalities, and problems, of implementing archaeological projects and understood the implications of this for strategy and project design
-Grasped the processes of analysing stratigraphic, spatial, artefactual and palaeoecological material, the objectives of this work, and how it is managed
-Surveyed the range of mechanisms for synthesising, archiving and disseminating the evidence generated by fieldwork
-Developed your understanding of how the profession operates in “the real world”, through work placements and field visits
-Developed your ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner, through writing essays and producing projects
-Undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within field archaeology
-Developed your presentational skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse topics

The practical skills and theoretical knowledge gained on the course are applicable to a wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees or take up managerial positions working for museum, conservation and archaeological services and for local councils, national authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Others have set up their own archaeological businesses, both within the UK and in other countries. Some of the organisations now employing our students include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-Natural England
-Commercial archaeological units
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-National Park services
-UK and overseas museum services
-Local Authorities
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-Churches Conservation Trust

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Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology. The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. Read more
Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology

Why choose this course?

The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. The Archaeology department in York was established as the first in the UK to specialise in medieval archaeology, and that legacy is evident today in the department’s concentration of medieval archaeologists. Their specialisms cover the entire medieval period, from the post-Roman era to early modern times.
-Study in the heartland of medieval archaeology in Europe
-Learn from leading archaeologists, specialising in every aspect of the Middle Ages
-Immerse yourself in the medieval community at the Centre for Medieval Studies
-Gain volunteering and work experience in the heritage sector
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive careers advice from knowledgeable staff with valuable contacts in the academic and heritage sectors

What does the course cover?
The course focuses on the artefacts, landscapes, buildings and social, cultural and environmental contexts of medieval Britain and Western Europe. It covers the period from the end of the Roman Empire to the Reformation, and explores themes such settlement, trade and economy, religion, buildings and artefacts, social structure, ethnicity and identity, conquest and cultural contact, and methodological and theoretical approaches.

The flexible modular structure of the course means you can tailor your MA to suit your interests and goals. There is an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying the medieval period from a material perspective. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, history, art history or anthropology, but our students do come from a wide variety of academic backgrounds.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Our students have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

Careers

The MA in Medieval Archaeology enables you to:
-Study a broad range of issues in medieval archaeology at a general level
-Explore selected topics in detail, which may be drawn from both the early and later medieval periods
-Relate general research principles and skills to your studies of medieval archaeology in particular
-Develop an ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner
-Undertake a piece of independent research on a topic within the field of medieval archaeology
-Develop written communication skills through essays and your dissertation
-Develop presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers and a short lecture on your dissertation topic

The skills and knowledge gained on the course are applicable to wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-British Museum
-Church of England
-Churches Conservation Trust
-Jorvik Viking Centre

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Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. Read more

Overview

Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. The overwhelming response gained from our students is one of satisfaction, enjoyment and fulfilment. We have brought together a good balance of men and women, older and younger students, historic environment professionals and those with a personal or community interest in the subject. We have had some great field experiences and outstanding seminars. Although the coursework requires a solid commitment from you over two years, the course atmosphere is informal and friendly, and we aim to support every student with ideas, guidance and encouragement.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-applied-landscape-archaeology

What the course offers

The MSc in Applied Landscape Archaeology is a part-time modular course over two years, leading to an Oxford University Postgraduate Degree in Archaeology. Students become fully matriculated members of Oxford University during their period of registration, and therefore also become a member of a college. The course is designed for the needs of students who wish to study part-time and this includes those who are in full-time employment. Those with a personal or professional interest in landscape archaeology are welcome to apply.

Landscape Archaeology is an increasingly popular and widely-understood concept. Using a multi-period systematic approach, it is concerned with understanding past human impacts on the resources, topography and environment of the whole landscape, from uplands to coasts, and from farmed landscapes to urban/industrial areas.

Many methods of research are being developed in landscape archaeology, including geophysical survey, digital mapping and remote-sensing techniques such as LiDAR. These take their place alongside fieldwalking, historic landscape analysis, aerial photography and selective excavation to provide an effective armoury of techniques for the researcher. Skills such as survey and resource assessment are becoming essential for anyone involved in the management of the historic environment. Effecive communication and presentation of the value and potential of the historic landscape is vital in the world of planning, tourism, outreach and education.

The course involves a combination of academic study and field practice - survey and geophysics form a central theme, and we enjoy the support of Bartington Instruments Ltd for this.

This course is designed to appeal to those who already have experience of studying archaeology (or a closely-related subject) at undergraduate degree or diploma level and who wish to expand their academic, practical and professional skills in landscape archaeology. With a strong (but not exclusive) emphasis on the archaeology of Britain, it focuses on the applications of research methods in varying landscape situations. The course format is flexible and enables students to pursue their own research interests leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

College affiliation

All students studying for a degree (including the DPhil) must be a member of a college. A number of Oxford colleges accept applications from part-time postgraduates whereas others do not: please consult the graduate prospectus or enquire with individual colleges. The majority of part-time DPhil students in Archaeology have chosen to apply to Kellogg College and most of the tutors and lecturers are members of the College. Kellogg is dedicated to graduate part-time students and has developed a unique expertise in attending to the intellectual, social, IT and welfare needs of part-time, mature graduate students. If a college choice is not specified on your application, it will be automatically sent to Kellogg if places are still available there.

Course structure

The course is divided into two one-year modules, Year A and Year B, which are run in alternate academic years (from October to September):

Year B begins in October 2015
Year A begins in October 2016

All students attend both modules, but they may be done in any order depending on year of admission. Because the course is modular there is no advantage to one combination over the other. Students normally study two consecutive modules and this is regarded as the best way to experience the course. However, in exceptional cases, regulations permit a student to intermit between modules (by permission of the Board of Studies only).

Both one-year modules have one core paper and two advanced papers spread over three terms.

Year A:

- Core Paper: Method and Theory in Landscape Archaeology
- Advanced Paper (Artefacts and Ecofacts in the Landscape)
- Advanced Paper (Archaeological Prospection)

Year B:
- Core Paper: Managing Historic Landscapes in the 21st Century
- Advanced Paper (Digital Landscapes)
- Advanced Paper (Reading the Historic Landscape)
- Field Training Week

Instead of one advanced paper, students may choose to opt for a ‘flexi-placement’ comprising at least 14 days spread over approximately one year to be spent working at an organisation which is involved in an aspect of landscape archaeology. The Course Director will supply details of these.

The dissertation (15,000 words) is the student’s own project which develops throughout the course and is submitted at the end of the second module. It can be based on a piece of fieldwork, or a methodological or artefactual study. Each student will be assigned a tutor who will supervise their dissertation. A dissertation workshop is held each year to help students work together on this essential course element.

In addition, once every two years (in late June - early July of Year B) a compulsory field survey training week will take place. Each student will also have a series of tutorials with the course director and tutors; these may take place in person or on-line.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-applied-landscape-archaeology/

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Our long-established MA in Landscape Archaeology is one of the most successful in Britain. Read more

About the course

Our long-established MA in Landscape Archaeology is one of the most successful in Britain. Throughout this programme, you will explore the ways in which human beings have acted upon landscape and environments, the ways in which nature has acted upon humanity, and the ways in which human perceptions of the natural world have influenced their actions. You will choose between a Research Track, incorporating a dissertation, or a Professional Track, which includes a work placement.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Both Research and Professional Tracks: Landscapes in archaeology: methods and perspectives; Landscape Survey Project; Reinventing Archaeology.

Research Track: Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation, Dissertation.

Professional Track: Heritage, Place and Community; Work Placement.

Indicative optional modules

Both Research and Professional Tracks: Mediterranean Landscapes; GIS for Archaeologists; Dynamic Landscapes: Investigating ancient environments.

Research Track: Heritage, Place and Community Heritage.

Professional Track: History and Identity.

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This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman/early Christian period through their material remains. Read more

Programme description

This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman/early Christian period through their material remains.

The programme focuses on the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined: not just the archaeology of Greece and Rome but also areas of the Near East and north-western Europe.

Should your interests lie in a field that overlaps a related subject area, you’ll appreciate our interdisciplinary approach, which allows you to draw on the experience of staff throughout the School.

By choosing this degree, you’ll have access to the expertise of our academics who are all passionate about the classical period and its art, social history and archaeology.

By choosing courses of interest to them, each student’s programme will be different, and a further element of personalisation is provided in the choice of dissertation topic.

Classical Archaeology students also attend the weekly Classics Research Seminars, and form their own subsection of a lively graduate community in Classics.

Programme structure

We offer a modular range of courses, which has been designed to reflect the research interests of our lecturers and help you develop a particular topic of interest for your dissertation.

There is one required training course in classical research methods and skills that runs across the two teaching semester (20 credits). This course is specially designed for classicists and aims to introduce you to areas of the discipline beyond your own specialities and to help you with the practical skills of finding and presenting information; it also equips you with the independent skills you need to complete your dissertation.

In addition, you will choose five courses from a list of options (each 20 credits). These enable you to work with increasing independence on advanced scholarship and prepare you for the final stage of the Masters, the dissertation (60 credits). At least three of your five options courses should be selected from the core Classical Archaeology modules but Greek or Latin or Ancient History courses can also be taken.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

provide students with the intellectual background, training and support necessary for the conduct and critical assessment of research in Classical Art and Archaeology
provide students with advanced knowledge of and competency in a specific area of Classics
familiarise students with various methods used in the study of Classical Art and Archaeology and enable them to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged
equip students with knowledge of Greek and/or Roman artefacts and their interpretation through study of original objects and monuments and careful analysis of secondary literature
develop and test the ability of students to formulate and sustain a substantial piece of research in Classical Art and Archaeology

Career opportunities

After graduating, you will have the knowledge and skills in research methodologies that will put you in a good position to pursue doctoral research in classics or a related field, and ultimately an academic career.

Museum work, cultural heritage and education also present a range of professional options that require a degree such as this.

The learning, organisational and leadership skills you gain from your studies will give you a vital edge in impressing any potential employer.

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If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. Read more
If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. We are lucky in the West Country to have prehistoric Dartmoor on our doorstep, where the recent Whitehorse Hill burial was uncovered. Exeter itself is a city built on Roman foundations and the nearby Ipplepen dig is shedding further light on Romano-British history. The Anglo-Saxons too were active in our part of the world and we have excellent interdisciplinary ties with the History Department and Centre for Medieval Studies. In the past there have been opportunities for Exeter students to participate in fieldwork and outreach activities in as diverse locations as Argentina, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, South Dakota and Texas. In some cases, fieldwork may consist of archaeological work in a museum rather than excavation.

The MA Archaeology programme is flexible, so you can choose the modules that interest you – including those on Experimental Archaeology, Human Osteoarchaeology and Zooarchaeology. If you’re interested in going on to doctoral study then our MA will give you the right training and our academic staff will be happy to support you through the process of funding applications.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study called 'modules' .

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer within our other Masters, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology; Funerary Osteoarchaeology and Musculo-skeletal Anatomy

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Learning and teaching

Most of our teaching is done collaboratively in small groups because we feel this is the best way to help you develop. Your classes will be a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops where you will learn the methodology and practical skills you need. We have a range of specialist equipment and excellent facilities including laboratories, kiln room, and spaces for experimental archaeology.

Research areas

Our research at Exeter is world-leading and all our academic staff are actively engaged in both Britain and further afield. We are particularly unique for our expertise in the fields of Bioarchaeology and Experimental Archaeology. Our interests run from early prehistory through to the post-medieval period. Our geographic specialisations include the Americas, the British Isles, Europe, South Asia and North Africa.

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The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. Read more
The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We make full use of our rich archaeological landscape with regular study trips and fieldwork.

Newcastle University has a long and distinguished history of archaeology, including:
-Prehistoric
-Greek
-Roman
-Late Antique
-Western Medieval
-Byzantine
-Historical Archaeology

We have access to some of the finest collections of archaeological artefacts in Great Britain in the on-campus Great North Museum: Hancock.

We provide quality teaching in small groups. This means you'll reach a level of familiarity with artefacts that most students can only dream of.

We have a range of period-based, practical and theoretical modules available. Our modules will give you an understanding of the interpretive approaches that archaeologists adopt. They will also help you understand the methodologies and sources available during your investigations.

You can develop a range of advanced practical skills in:
-Artefact analysis, including metallography and use-wear analysis
-Archaeological surveying, including topographical, buildings and geophysical survey
-Database and archive use
-Geographical information systems (GIS)
-Ancient languages

You'll join a vibrant archaeology community at Newcastle. You'll receive specialist teaching from leading academics in subjects of their research expertise.

Throughout the course you'll have opportunities to engage and learn about our innovative research. We have an extensive programme of invited speakers organised by our research groups. Our Postgraduate Forum also has a seminar series, annual conference and e-journal.

The Archaeology MA provides you with outstanding skills and the ability to enter a range of professions. You will gain advanced skills in literacy, research and project management. You could also choose to continue your academic career with a PhD in archaeology.

Fieldtrips

The North East has an outstanding prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We take full advantage of this through regular study trips and fieldwork. You can also take optional modules with field trips to:
-Rome
-Athens

The tuition of these trips is included in your course fees. If you select a module with an overseas trip you should budget about £450 to cover your flights and accommodation.

Delivery

All campus-based teaching takes place during the working week. Some field trips take place during holidays and weekends, depending on the modules taken.

Contact and independent study times vary depending on the module and time of year.

Semesters one and two: You typically attend between 6 - 15 hours of teaching per week. The remaining hours of a standard week are for independent study.

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The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*, but is also available with a term in Rome: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/308/roman-history-and-archaeology-with-a-term-in-rome

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/307/roman-history-and-archaeology#!overview

Course detail

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

The Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

Purpose

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

Format and assessment

In your first term, the focus is on research skills in both Roman history and in archaeology to provide the foundation from which you may develop as a postgraduate researcher. Your second term is focussed on specialist modules that directly engage with research conducted in the Department. You also have the opportunity to engage with our postgraduate community that comes together with our staff at our research seminar series to which we invite leading speakers from across the UK and Europe.

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, classics was ranked 2nd for research impact and in the top 20 for research intensity, research power, research quality and research output in the UK.
- An impressive 97% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The MA Landscape Management and Environmental Archaeology programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'. Read more
The MA Landscape Management and Environmental Archaeology programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'.

Course Overview

The MA programme is taught within the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, and seeks to embed the student experience into a range of landscapes, both wild and managed, and environments within Wales where unique and particular landscapes are encountered. Many, but by no means all, employment opportunities are focused on the conservation, preservation, exploitation or manipulation of the natural resources.

Industries based on tourism, cultural heritage and sustainability, to name a few, are prime destinations within Wales (and beyond) for graduates from this programme of study. Integral to this is an understanding of what archaeological evidence survives, and what methods and techniques can be used to explore and explain both past and present human relationships to these landscapes and environments. As part of this scheme students undertake a minimum of four weeks voluntary experience with a host organisation as a work placement. This gives students direct experience of a relevant working environment and has proved beneficial to students, the host organisations and the School of Archaeology History and Anthropology. When in a work placement students make a contribution to the objectives of the host organisation.

Along with the emphasis on ‘employability’, students engage in a rigorous academic training grounded in the discipline that is Archaeology. Students are schooled in the concepts and practices required to undertake good academic research. Field and laboratory experiences underpinned with both legal and theoretical frameworks are core attributes of this scheme. Core staff teaching the scheme are actively engaged with a wide range of professional bodies, undertaking contract research, acting as advisors, or are recognised specialists in their field.

Such staff operate at the crossing point of archaeology as an academic discipline and industry and community. The programme benefits considerably from the experience and expertise of UWLAS (University of Wales, Lampeter Archaeological Services) which provides a professional consultancy service across a range of areas including dendrochronology, pollen analysis, archaeozoology, quaternary stratigraphy, soils and sediments analysis.

Modules

-British Landscape and Environmental Field Class
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Methods
-Work Placement
-Dissertation

Key Features

Draws upon a range of expertise in the School. Our lecturers are active within the consultancy world of environmental archaeology which gives the programme a strongly vocational tilt. Extremely good record of finding students who have completed the course employment opportunities many within the sector.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has a good record of matching students to the needs and requirement of the labour market.

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Memorial University’s Department of Archaeology includes archaeologists and bioarchaeologists whose interests span the ancient, precontact and historical records of the New and Old Worlds. Read more
Memorial University’s Department of Archaeology includes archaeologists and bioarchaeologists whose interests span the ancient, precontact and historical records of the New and Old Worlds. The Department has particular strengths in the study of the North Atlantic region, and maintains active field research programs in Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador. We are interested in the analysis of biological and cultural materials, theory, archaeological science and the history of archaeology. Since awarding our first MA in Archaeology in 1973 our graduate program has steadily expanded. We introduced a doctoral program in 2001, and now have a thriving community of graduate students working on a range of historical, indigenous and bioarchaeological projects.

Archaeology at Memorial has an international reputation due to the strong research profiles of its faculty members and students and its vibrant teaching programs. Students have access to state of the art in-house laboratory facilities and collections, and to a wide range of equipment and expertise in other departments that is sustained by faculty cross-appointments and cooperative research programs. We provide students with the opportunity and support to develop strong field-, lab- and theory-based research projects of their own, and to join a community of scholars with an abiding curiosity about the material cultural and biological records of the human past.

The MA degree is offered in archaeology and bioarchaeology. It involves coursework and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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The MPhil takes two years (full time). If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests. Read more
The MPhil takes two years (full time).

If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests. We have some funded PhDs via Research Councils such as NERC and the AHRC. Also, we hope to be able to advertise individual funded PhDs, with pre-defined subject areas, each year - please watch our front page for details.

Facilities

The graduate study building provides room for reading and quiet reflection. It is dedicated solely to providing facilities for postgraduate research, with individual/shared carrels, a suite of computers, and shared workspace for sorting material or laying out illustrations. The building has been designed to provide an attractive yet effective atmosphere for study and writing. It also aims to create an environment which brings together postgraduate researchers in a friendly and communal way.

A group of CAD machines, with digitising tablets and printers, is available, as is a range of state-of-the-art survey and geophysical equipment. Cameras can be borrowed, and there are the necessary facilities and equipment for illustration. Laboratories are available for use, including the new BioArch laboratories for biomolecular archaeology and excellent reference collections exist for environmental archaeology and conservation of materials.

Support

All research students have a supportive structure of supervision, with a main supervisor and two other members of staff who follow progress, are available for advice, and sit on the student's Thesis Advisory Panel.

Research community

Research seminars are run within the Department and at the Centres for Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies, and in the Department of Biology. Numerous special interest research groups also hold meetings and conferences at King's Manor, and this allows research students to keep in touch with latest developments in their field.

Careers

All of the postgraduate Archaeology courses at York have a strong focus on employability. We aim to equip students with highly valued specialist and transferable skills, in a range of archaeological disciplines. The courses provide students with a deep understanding of relevant theories and principles, alongside extensive practical experience and access to the latest technologies and systems.

Postgraduates from our Masters’ courses have gone on to a wide range of careers in the archaeology sector and in heritage-related organisations across the UK and abroad, including:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Heritage consultancies
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-York Civic Trust
-The Science Museum Group
-The Royal Mint Museum
-Heritage Malta
-New South Wales Government
-Highland Council

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This degree will provide you with a strong foundation in the more advanced theory and methods as well as period-based and thematic specialisms. Read more
This degree will provide you with a strong foundation in the more advanced theory and methods as well as period-based and thematic specialisms. You may also acquire more practical skills in areas of archaeological science, as well as those necessary for independent research in archaeology.

You will have the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the potential and limitations of different forms of archaeological evidence. You will deepen your understanding of the themes and periods of the past and engage more critically with current archaeological issues and debates. Teaching will combine seminars, presentations and projects and well as lectures, encouraging you to play an active role in your learning and developing your skills for independent study. You will be assessed through various forms of coursework and a dissertation. During your time here, you will have access to more one-to-one contact with staff than you would have had at undergraduate level and you are encouraged to actively participate in and contribute to our vibrant graduate community.

This Masters degree develops your research and analytical skills, providing you with an excellent foundation for further study or career progression. There is also the option of doing an extended dissertation, giving you more research experience if you are considering going on to undertake PhD research.

We have internationally recognised strengths in research and teaching in all fields of archaeology, with research strengths in prehistory, Classical/Roman studies, medieval as well as historical archaeology, and the theory and practice of landscape archaeology.

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The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. The programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'.

Course Overview

The MRes programme is taught within the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, and seeks to embed the student experience into a range of landscapes, both wild and managed, and environments within Wales where unique and particular landscapes are encountered. Many, but by no means all, employment opportunities are focused on the conservation, preservation, exploitation or manipulation of the natural resources.

Industries based on tourism, cultural heritage and sustainability, to name a few, are prime destinations within Wales (and beyond) for graduates from this programme of study. Integral to this is an understanding of what archaeological evidence survives, and what methods and techniques can be used to explore and explain both past and present human relationships to these landscapes and environments.

Along with the emphasis on ‘employability’, students engage in a rigorous academic training grounded in the discipline that is Archaeology which comes to a head in the Dissertation of between 25,000 and 30,000 words. Students are schooled in the concepts and practices required to undertake good academic research. Field and laboratory experiences underpinned with both legal and theoretical frameworks are core attributes of this scheme.

Core staff teaching the scheme are actively engaged with a wide range of professional bodies, undertaking contract research, acting as advisors, or are recognised specialists in their field. Such staff operate at the crossing point of archaeology as an academic discipline and industry and community. The programme benefits considerably from the experience and expertise of UWLAS (University of Wales, Lampeter Archaeological Services) which provides a professional consultancy service across a range of areas including dendrochronology, pollen analysis, archaeozoology, quaternary stratigraphy, soils and sediments analysis.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-British Landscape and Environmental Field Class (40 credits)
-Research Methodologies (compulsory)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Methods
-Work Placement
-Dissertation

Key Features

Draws upon a range of expertise in the School. Our lecturers are active within the consultancy world of environmental archaeology which gives the programme a strongly vocational tilt. Extremely good record of finding students who have completed the course employment opportunities many within the sector.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has a good record of matching students to the needs and requirement of the labour market.

Read less
This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. Read more

About the course

This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. This course combines the strengths of both departments, whilst actively forging close links with the heritage sector within our region, nationally and overseas. These links with industry form an integral feature of your studies, providing you with the opportunity to apply the principles you learn to real world situations.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, History and Identity; Heritage, Place and Community; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Introduction to the Creative and Cultural Industries; Cultural Marketing; Managing Museums and Cultural Heritage Sites; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Landscapes in Archaeology: methods and perspectives; Accounting and Financial Management; Fundraising Management: sponsorship, philanthropy and the state; Critical Theories and Concepts in the Cultural and Creative Industries; Managing Creative Brands.

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