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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field. Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. Read more
The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field.

Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. You will gain in-depth knowledge of recent developments, including the laws and regulatory frameworks applicable. We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and teach units accredited by the Professional Standards Board for Patent and Trade Marks Attorneys to satisfy the knowledge requirements for registration as a Patent Attorney or Trade Marks Attorney.

This one-year course is designed for non-law graduates and is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne. Our course provides you with the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work as well as meet your personal commitments.

The course offers choice from a broad range of intellectual property, communications law areas, or you can select from across the range of Master's law elective units. Our specialist units cover areas such as copyright, international trade law, competition law, law of the Internet, and cybercrime—to name a few. You will gain a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws regulating intellectual property regimes and the broader fields of communications and technology, and develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this complex and dynamic field.

You will investigate contemporary issues in law, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives. The course also enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Intellectual property and communications law knowledge and Part B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Intellectual Property and communications law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of Intellectual property and communications law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of intellectual property and communications law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to intellectual property and communications law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support work in this field. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3S3 (minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the LLM Computer and Communications Law studied by presence in London and the LLM studied by Distance Learning.

Programme

Structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

You will need to gain 180 credits for the LLM, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Distance learning
Increasingly we all face more pressures in our business lives and finding the time to attend courses can be very difficult. Distance learning is the solution to your training needs; it allows you the full benefits of studying for a recognised UK university qualification whilst still in full-time employment using this freedom and flexibility to your advantage.

You can set the pace at which you learn and decide when, where and how long you want to study for.

This programme is delivered via our web-based virtual learning environment (VLE). All written assignments are submitted through the e-learning system. You are encouraged to interact with teaching staff and other students in online discussion forums, join group activities and be part of the student community.

Modules and Dissertations
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.
◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the LLM in Computer and Communications Law programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

Read less
The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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The importance of communication and information in modern society has grown exponentially in recent times. The LLM in Computer and Communication Law programme allows students the opportunity to gain expertise in the legal regimes governing the supply and use of computer and communications technology. Read more
The importance of communication and information in modern society has grown exponentially in recent times. The LLM in Computer and Communication Law programme allows students the opportunity to gain expertise in the legal regimes governing the supply and use of computer and communications technology. Through the examination of the complex issues concerning national and international law and policy relating to computer and communications technology student will learn to analyse how computer and communications technology has affected the application of traditional legal principles.

We also offer an LLM in Computer and Communications Law by Distance Learning.

Taught modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Computer and Communications Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Computer and Communications Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM, which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM350 Electronic Disclosure in Legal Disputes (sem 1)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)

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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

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Under the programme, students must complete four compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered primarily through small group seminars. Read more

Under the programme, students must complete four compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered primarily through small group seminars. Attendance is mandatory for these seminars, which have been chosen as the primary means of delivering material to students due to the advanced nature of the course. Small group seminars encourage participation and the development of communications skills. They also allow students to benefit from close contact with the academics teaching on the programme, many of which are also experienced practitioners and consultants in their respective fields of expertise.

The compulsory modules ensure that students develop an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of international law and governance and become familiar with current debates in the field.

Optional modules then allow students to explore particular aspects of international law and governance, such as aspects of international and regional law, international dispute settlement, international human rights, international humanitarian law and international economic law, in greater depth.

The completion of optional modules, together with the dissertation, allow for development of students’ subject specific knowledge as the programme progresses. The development of the students’ skills is achieved mainly through the combination of the compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law, taught in Michaelmas term, and the students’ pursuit of the dissertation, supervision for which begins at the start of Epiphany term. Through these modules, students can practise their skills intensely, whilst continuing to acquire a deeper level of specialised knowledge on their chosen topic. 

An important objective of the LLM in International Law and Governance programme is to provide students with skills that will enable them to thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature, and cases, and to research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions. Students will also learn to clearly present their findings both orally and in writing to international legal specialists, to participate actively in academic debate, and to apply this advanced academic knowledge in public international law in a professional context.

As such, an LLM in International Law and Governance will provide students with an excellent foundation to pursue an international law career, whether it is in legal practice, employment in international institutions, or employment in non-governmental organisations. The LLM qualification will also be an excellent vehicle for the further development of research skills and, as such, also offers entry into further postgraduate study and, in particular, doctoral research.

Core modules

  • Fundamentals in International Law (unless a similar module has already been studied)
  • Fundamental Issues of International Legal Governance
  • Applied Research Methods in Law
  • Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words).

Optional modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.

  • Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
  • Comparative and Transnational Law
  • Global Environmental Law
  • Global Financial Law
  • Global Institutions
  • International Co-operation in Criminal Matters in Europe
  • International Counter Terrorism: Theory and Practice
  • International Investment Law
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • International Protection of Human Rights
  • International Trade Law & Policy
  • International Perspectives on Law and Gender
  • Introduction to International Criminal Justice
  • Introduction to European Union Law
  • Law of Oil and Gas Contracts
  • Law of the Sea

Course Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which they will apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. The dissertation is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including Law and Global Justice at Durham, the Human Rights Centre, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and the Durham European Law Institute.



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Goal of the pro­gramme. As economic life is affected by globalisation, it is important for successful business law professionals to have extensive knowledge of international business law. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

As economic life is affected by globalisation, it is important for successful business law professionals to have extensive knowledge of international business law. The MDP in International Business Law (IBL) is a two-year research-oriented Master´s programme where you will become an internationally-oriented business law professional well-qualified for a career in legal practice and academia.

In the IBL programme you will be able to

  • Increase and deepen your knowledge and understanding of business law, including contract law, company law, IP law, competition law and commercial dispute resolution
  • Further develop your analytical, legal argumentation and communications skills
  • Develop research skills and business law knowledge in order to continue your studies in a PhD programme
  • Study in an international and multicultural environment with students and staff from all over the world
  • Network with potential employers and other potential future colleagues in the field of international business law

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website: http://www.helsinki.fi/en/programmes/master/international-business-law

Pro­gramme con­tents

The International Business Law (IBL) programme offers you the possibility to learn more about business related subjects such as contract and consumer law, commercial law (including company law, securities markets law, competition law and IP law) and commercial dispute resolution from an international point of view.

In the IBL programme you will learn by participating in lecture courses and case study courses as well as by writing seminar papers, presenting your work and completing a research seminar while writing your Master’s thesis. Depending on the courses you take, you will either be studying more independently or you will be involved in group work.

In addition to regular courses and seminars, you have the possibility to participate in Moot Court Competition or Helsinki Law Clinic courses to gain practical experience, network and meet potential employers. We encourage you to seize career opportunities already during your studies. Especially during your second year the year-long research seminar is conducted in such a way that you can work or do an internship during the semesters.



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Community care law and the law relating to people with mental health problems affect virtually every person in the UK at some time in their lives. Read more
Community care law and the law relating to people with mental health problems affect virtually every person in the UK at some time in their lives. Despite the fundamental importance of the law in these fields, its study has been largely neglected by University Master’s programmes.

The LLM Social Care Law addresses this omission by focusing on community care and mental health law, policy and practice in England and Wales.

The programme explores the origins of the law in both fields: the growth of the asylum and the development of the Poor Law and critically analyses the current legal regimes as well as the policy, research and theoretical socio-legal contexts in which these legal regimes exist.

Distinctive features

The LLM Social Care Law course:

• provides you with a general appreciation of current issues in specific areas of law, both domestic and international;
• stimulates a critical approach to evaluation of current and proposed regulation and cultivates independent and original thought;
• enables you to undertake in-depth research and demonstrate advanced knowledge in specific areas of law;
• provides opportunities to attend human rights-based conferences and seminars run by the Centre for Health and Social Care Law.

The LLM Social Care Law course is very flexible and offers a wide range of modules providing you with the ability to customise the course to meet your own professional and/or employment needs or interests.

Structure

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study and in two years by part-time study.

You must select at least two of your four taught modules and complete the dissertation in the area of Social Care Law and you may select up to two modules from those listed in any other LLM programme or from a combination of LLM programmes.

The programme is delivered in two stages. Stage One (the taught component) comprises four 30-credit modules. Stage Two comprises the dissertation.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-care-law-llm

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-care-law-llm-part-time

Teaching

Study for an LLM is intensive and challenging and it is important that you take full advantage of the teaching that is provided in order to succeed. Attendance at classes and dissertation supervisions is compulsory and we will expect you to be well prepared.

Our teaching is very flexible and your modules may be delivered through seminars or a combination of lectures and seminars. Other teaching methods include the online use of discussion boards, self-access study packs and formative quizzes and activities.

Modules may be diverse in content to cater for the fact that for some LLM programmes there may be a high proportion of international students or students with previous qualifications other than in law. Modules are typically led by experienced staff actively engaged in research relevant to their subject area.

Assessment

The School of Law and Politics makes use of both formative and summative assessment.

Formative assessments do not count towards your degree but are designed to give you the opportunity to practice for your summative assessments and enable you and your tutors to assess your progress in your modules. Formative assessments will normally involve written coursework or a class test or may comprise individual student presentations.

Summative assessments count towards your degree. Your marks in these assessments count towards your formal progression from Stage One (taught modules) to Stage Two (the Dissertation), and towards the determination of your final award. Summative assessments in Stage One will vary by module but will typically involve written coursework (5,000 word essays), unseen examinations or pre-release examinations. The Dissertation (up to 15,000 words) comprises the Stage Two summative assessment.

Career Prospects

A law degree doesn’t restrict graduates to careers within the legal profession. Our law graduates enter professions as diverse as finance, sales and marketing, digital communications and recruitment.

We are committed to extending extracurricular opportunities, helping to enhance your CV in a competitive graduate job market. We work in partnership with lawyers, charities and voluntary organisations to give you the opportunity to practise and extend their skills and we run several Pro Bono schemes and provide advice to members of the community on different legal issues.

Upon successfully completing the LLM programme you may have the opportunity to continue your legal study through the School’s PhD programme or through the Centre for Professional Legal Studies professional programmes (the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course).

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This programme focuses on key conceptual and practical issues in commercial law and business transactions. Read more

This programme focuses on key conceptual and practical issues in commercial law and business transactions. It is developed to provide a commercial context for career progression in national and international law firms or relevant government departments. It combines traditional study of commercial law and cutting-edge aspects of corporate and commercial law with hands-on practical experience.

The programme is innovative in that it combines the study of aspects of commercial law with a more contextual and critical appreciation of key current debates in corruption, corporate governance and responsibility, corporate crime, and the study of law and development.

Graduates of this programme go on to academic careers, apply their LLM practically as lawyers and solicitors, or take their knowledge of law into international business or consultancy work.

Programme structure

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that all modules described are optional and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

  • Corporate Governance
  • Corporate Law
  • International Carriage of Goods by Sea
  • International Trade Law
  • Law of the World Trade Organisation
  • Intellectual Property
  • International Investment Protection
  • Banking Law
  • Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

  • To enable students to understand and evaluate key contemporary debates in law, concerning a wide area of law from European to International Justice.
  • To enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of law.
  • To deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of law and dispute resolution both in an International, national and a European sphere.
  • To enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding of law.
  • To provide students with the skills necessary to design and complete a dissertation on a specialist topic, including: formulating research questions; selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis (where appropriate); conducting a literature review; and presenting research according to scholarly conventions.

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Critical awareness of contemporary debates in the study law.
  • In-depth understanding of international, European and local structures of dispute resolution and formal regulation.
  • Detailed knowledge and understanding of eight sub-fields of law
  • Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within law
  • Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of law

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
  • Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
  • Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
  • Make sound judgements on basis of incomplete evidence
  • Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
  • Construct reasoned argument
  • Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills

  • Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
  • Carry out an advanced literature search
  • Form effective arguments
  • Organise workload to meet deadlines
  • Formulate research questions
  • Design and conduct a research project
  • Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate and present ideas effectively
  • Reason critically
  • Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
  • Organise and plan own work
  • Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
  • Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
  • Deploy a range of relevant research skills
  • Make decisions in complex situations
  • Take responsibility for own learning

Global Opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The LLM International Business and Corporate Law uses the globalised economy as the context for an in-depth study of corporate law. Read more

The LLM International Business and Corporate Law uses the globalised economy as the context for an in-depth study of corporate law. It enables you gain a coherent international and European perspective on corporate and business law, and to examine the strengths and weaknesses of UK corporate law in the global context. Combining core and elective modules, you can explore a wide range of globally and commercially significant issues while developing specialist expertise. The degree is taught by the research-active academics based in our prestigious Law School and offers you the opportunity to engage with teaching staff who are working at the forefront of international research.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

There are two pathways for the LLM, both of which enable you to pursue your own interests:

  • Studying five elective modules and completing a 20,000 word dissertation
  • Studying six elective modules and completing a 15,000 word dissertation

Your core modules are Corporations in International Business Law and the LLM Dissertation. The module in Corporations in International Business Law uses the globalised economy as the context for an in-depth study of corporate law. You will have the opportunity to examine the strengths and weaknesses of UK corporate law as judged against international standards. Strong links to practitioners will inform your insights.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the legal and academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant legal material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

We pride ourselves on the choice and breadth of elective modules available, offering you access to sought-after expertise in highly-relevant and growing fields such as Intellectual Property Law, European Union Law, The Law of International Organisations and Institutions, Contracts and Companies, and International Environmental Law.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate research relating to international business and corporate law; skills which are highly prized by employers in the UK with international commercial interests, and by international corporations. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost in any sector. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.

Please note: there’s an option for Law graduates to study this programme with a January start. For more information about this please contact us at .



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The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business. Read more

The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business.

Our intellectual property (IP) experts will take you through the economic, social and philosophical aspects of IP law development and encourage you to critically analyse the current legal framework. You will gain advanced knowledge in IP law and concomitant policy, and learn about national and international grant, enforcement and defence of intellectual property rights on a multi-jurisdictional basis.

With research expertise in important industry sectors such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology, our teaching staff offer strong links to the wider IP profession. Contentious issues in intellectual property are connected to developments in high-tech sectors as well as the arts and popular culture, so the course has appeal to a wide range of backgrounds and IP-related careers.

Special features

Our award-winning careers service offers you all year round dedicated postgraduate support including employability sessions, and advice for those aspiring to a PhD and career in academia.

Teaching and learning

We use various teaching methods across the course to enable you to participate in debate and hone the analytical and reasoning skills vital to legal and business professionals.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

This LLM has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the elective units chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The LLM Intellectual Property Law has three core course units: Trade Mark Law and Policy ; Patent Law and Policy ; and Copyright Law and Policy . These core course units constitute 75 credits of the 120 taught credits required for the course.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's course offers training for a professional career in IP law in a range of industries, such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology sectors. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in IP law.



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Well-crafted communications strategies are central to the positioning of international organizations, national governments, and the diverse range of actors composing civil society. Read more
Well-crafted communications strategies are central to the positioning of international organizations, national governments, and the diverse range of actors composing civil society. As civil society's importance grows globally, understanding its dynamics is increasingly central for anyone who wishes to intervene on its terrain.

The optional development communications track within the Master of Arts in Global Communications (MAGC) explores how civil society actors use communication to achieve their goals. A cutting edge curriculum offers a combination of practical branding, PR, production, and social media courses complemented by crucial theoretical and analytical courses treating actual cases.

Theoretical foundation for broad understanding

This track is designed for both professionals seeking broader academic training and new students seeking a range of specific training and broad understanding. Students study specific issues of global civil society relating to broad categories of freedom and expression, advocacy, governance, and the rule of law. The theoretical part of this degree examines issues of power, political and institutional agency, discourse, and mediated communication. Current trends in governance, non-state and civil society organization will be studied.

Hands-on training for practical application

In addition to equipping students with new or expanded communications skills, the hands-on practical courses and modules enable students to think critically, on the basis of case studies, about interaction between the State, private business, and the third sector. Themes studied include both internal and external communication in organizations.

Practica have been run outside France in Morocco and India. Students will gain insight into communication between NGO members, within the NGO world and civil society, between NGOs, donors and governments, and between NGOs and the corporate world.

Structure of the specialized track

The program requirements for the MA in Global Communications, Development Communications Track are as follows:
-Four mandatory core courses (16 credits)
-Two core options - theory courses (8 credits)
-Two core options - practical courses (8 credits)
-Two elective courses from all Global Communications and International Affairs course offerings (8 credits)
-Internship or Thesis (8 credits)

Coursework and Research Masters

The MA in in Global Communications, Development Communications Track is a 48 credit Coursework and Research Masters that can be completed in one calendar year. The length of the internship or thesis may vary, however—many students choose to take additional time for these components. Coursework and Research Masters at AUP open up international horizons and enable career-transition through an extensive range of classes blending theory and practice. Students develop precision in their problem-solving skills through challenging hands-on modules and the choice of an internship or a personalized research project.

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Would you like to gain an in-depth understanding of the structure of the international legal system, its relationship with national law, and the sources… Read more

Would you like to gain an in-depth understanding of the structure of the international legal system, its relationship with national law, and the sources and subjects of international law? This fascinating Masters degree combines core and elective modules, enabling you to explore a wide range of globally-significant contemporary issues such as how the law applies to diverse areas such as the environment, territory and the use of force.

The degree is taught by the research-active academics based in our prestigious Law School and offers you the opportunity to engage with teaching staff who are working at the forefront of this specialised legal field.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

There are two pathways for the LLM, both of which enable you to pursue your own interests:

  • Studying five modules and completing a 20,000 word dissertation
  • Studying six modules and completing a 15,000 word dissertation

Your core modules are International Law and the LLM Dissertation. The module in International Law unveils the diverse rules, laws and customs governing inter-state relationships and provides you with an introduction to this highly-relevant legal area. You will build upon its foundation by selecting modules specialising in specific areas of international law.

We pride ourselves on the choice and breadth of those modules, offering you access to sought-after expertise in high-demand areas and growing fields such as International Criminal Law, European Union Law, The Law of International Organisations and Institutions, Law and Global Health, and International Environmental Law.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the legal and academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant legal material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate research relating to international law; skills which are highly prized by employers in the UK with international interests, and by businesses and organisations based overseas. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost in any sector. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.



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The LLM International Human Rights Law is your opportunity to explore the way that international law is used to protect human rights and enables you to gain expertise in a distinct yet relatively broad specialism. Read more

The LLM International Human Rights Law is your opportunity to explore the way that international law is used to protect human rights and enables you to gain expertise in a distinct yet relatively broad specialism. You will combine core and elective modules to gain an international perspective on this highly-relevant field of law. The degree is taught by the research-active academics based in our prestigious Law School and offers you the opportunity to engage with teaching staff who are working at the forefront of International Human Rights research.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

There are two pathways for the LLM, both of which enable you to pursue your own interests:

  • Studying five modules and completing a 20,000 word dissertation
  • Studying six modules and completing a 15,000 word dissertation

Your core modules are International Law, International Human Rights Law and the LLM Dissertation. The modules in International Law and International Human Rights Law will address key questions such as how international laws protect, govern and define your human rights and inter-state relationships. You will evaluate the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights protected through international instruments and explore the way that international law is used to shape the world in which we live.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the legal and academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant legal material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

We pride ourselves on the choice and breadth of elective modules available, offering you access to sought-after expertise in high-demand areas and growing fields such as The Rights of Peoples, Law and Global Health, International Terrorism and the Law, Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights, and International Environmental Law.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate research relating to international human rights law; skills which are highly prized by employers both here in the UK and overseas. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost in any sector. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.



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