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Masters Degrees (Communications For Development)

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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Learn about global development from a heterodox economics perspective, and gain the skills to work in economic and development policy and practice. Read more

Learn about global development from a heterodox economics perspective, and gain the skills to work in economic and development policy and practice.

This course addresses the contemporary challenges of global development, utilising core economic concepts, theories and methods. Rooted in real-world practical and policy challenges, the course is founded on Bath’s longstanding engagement in international development and applied economic analysis. It uses innovative learning approaches to promote in-depth investigation of cases and issues, drawing links across global, regional, national and local scales. We offer you the opportunity of a placement-based research project, providing hands-on experience to complement campus-based learning.

The course is ideal if you’re a recent graduate who wants to pursue a career in international development as an economic analyst. It is also suitable if you’re an established professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical understanding of international development from an economics and broader social science perspective.

You will leave the course with:

  • in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary global development issues
  • a critical understanding of economic theory and development policy and practice, including from the perspective of heterodox and social economics
  • practical skills in research, policy analysis and communications, and their application in the field of international development
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

We encourage diversity of intake, in experience, qualifications and interests, to stimulate the richness of experience and learning.

Graduate prospects

Our courses provide an excellent grounding for careers in international development, humanitarian action and working for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South. They provide the core skills required in a range of policy, communication, advocacy, research and programmatic roles.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high-profile organisations including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK’s Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK’s Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while some have stayed in academia to complete doctoral studies.

Join our webinar

Join our webinar on Wednesday 31 January 2018 at 12:00-13.00 GMT.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

  • course structure and content
  • teaching and assessment
  • studying with the University of Bath

There will also be an opportunity to put your questions to our staff.

Register for the webinar.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Economics for development

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Global political economy
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Residential
  • Seminar
  • Thesis
  • Work-based placement
  • Written examination
  • Other


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This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking for an opportunity to explore the impact of media and communications on international policy and within sociological context.

The course will appeal to students with a general interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

Communication is integral to development programmes. At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent.

Development is taken as a contested concept that translates into courses for advocating democratic forms of participation, policy initiatives and training activities in media and communications sectors in different geographical regions.

The International Communications and Development MA provides you with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding and critically assessing the role of communications for and in development projects.

It also gives you a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.

On the course you will develop an ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and nongovernmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

Core modules
-Democratisation and Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
-Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
-Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy SGM309 (15 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication SGM308 (15 credits)
-Celebrity SGM314 (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics IPM104 (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (IPM119) (15 credits)
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches IPM116 (30 credits)
-Evaluation Politics and Advocacy AMM420 (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime SGM301 (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (SGM303) (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics SGM305 (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds SGM304 (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in the civil service, broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies. Recent graduate positions include; Fundraising and Communications Officer at Alone in London, Communications Specialist at Government Division of Health and Social Services and Civil Servant at Seoul Metropolitan Government.

Jessica Perrin who recently graduated with an MA in International Communications and Development is now Head of NGOs at Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

As a student on the MSc in Communications Engineering, you will be provided with an in-depth understanding of the technology and architecture of computer communications, photonics and telecommunication networks, wireless telecommunications and related wireless information technologies.

Key Features of MSc in Communications Engineering

The practical knowledge and skills you will gain as a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course include being presented with the essential element of modern optical communication systems based on single mode optical fibres from the core to the access, evaluating bandwidth-rich contemporary approaches.

The MSc Communications Engineering course also covers advanced networking topics including network performance and network security. This is supported with some practical knowledge and skills for project and business management principles.

As a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course, you will also be introduced to technologies underlying the compressions and transmission of digital video over networking platforms, gain knowledge on the channel models and associated impairments that typically limit the performance of wireless systems, and learn to design optimum digital communication receivers for some basic communications channel models.

The MSc in Communications Engineering is modular in structure. Communications Engineering students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students on the Communications Engineering course must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time MSc in Communications Engineering Delivery mode:

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Communications Engineering scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Communications Engineering programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Communications Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

RF and Microwave

Signals and Systems

Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Nanophotonics

Micro and Nano Electro-Mechnical Systems

Lasers and applications

Wireless Communications

Digital Communications

Optical Communications

Optical Networks

Communication Skills for Research Engineers

Research Dissertation

MSc Dissertation - Communications Engineering

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching which benefit students on the MSc in Communications Engineering course. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

This discipline has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students.

Careers

The MSc Communications Engineering is suitable for those who have a career interest in the field of communication systems, which has been fundamentally changing the whole world in virtually every aspect, and would like to gain lasting career skills and in-depth knowledge to carry out development projects and advanced research in the area of communication systems.

Communications Engineering graduates can seek employment in wireless communication systems and network administration, and mobile applications development.

Student Quotes

“I was fascinated by the natural beauty of Swansea before I came here. Swansea University is near the beach so you can walk around the beach at any time. This Master’s is very useful to enhance your ability and enrich your principle of the academic knowledge.”

Zhang Daping, MSc Communication Systems (now Communications Engineering)

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.



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Education for Sustainability (EfS) is a distance learning postgraduate course at Masters level delivered by a team of experts. Read more
Education for Sustainability (EfS) is a distance learning postgraduate course at Masters level delivered by a team of experts. The course provides personal and professional development for those interested, or already engaged, in paving the way for a more sustainable world by way of understanding, educating or promoting sustainability. The unique structure of distance learning enables international students to gain a globally recognised qualification from the UK.

Although many of our students are educators or NGO educational, training or campaigning staff, we also draw students from many other backgrounds, including health, media, business, government, botanical and zoological work.

6 reasons to study here

1. Comprehensive resources: our online resources and library will ensure you have the most up to date research.
2. Great staff: a number of experienced and research active academics to support your learning.
3. Track record: a unique and dynamic course established for over two deades in respionse to our changing world.
4. Career transforming: alumni of this course have used it to gain promotion or change careers.
5. Distance learning: the flexibility to study this course anywhere in the world.
6. Growing popularity: sustainability is a growing focus for countries globally, so this will equip you with vital skills.

Our passion for a sustainable future

Developed in partnership with the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Oxfam and the EU, the course draws on the expertise of environmental and development NGOs as well as the educational community. It deals with the theory and practice of sustainability and enables you to explore and expand the role that EfS can play in educational, social, political and economic change.

Internationally recognised

Since its launch in 1994 this internationally recognised and innovative award has embraced and promoted diversity and inclusion. Our roots lie in the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio, Brazil, and EfS, the first ever masters programme of this kind, provides a dynamic interface between theory and practice in EfS and promotes the integration of environmental and development concerns in the emerging concept of sustainability while emphasising the importance of education's role in building a sustainable world.

The EfS course at LSBU has been instrumental in the development of LSBU as a United Nations Regional Centre of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development. It offers many unique qualities that will enhance your international experience and introduce you to like-minded professionals making a difference around the world.

Modules

All modules make use of case studies and readings from a range of global regions and are designed to be applicable to any type of educational or country context.

• An Introduction to education for sustainability
• Values and participation in EFS; from local to global
• Leadership, learning and climate change: the sustainability revolution
• Theory and perspectives on environment and development
• Science and culture in education for sustainability
• Researching education for Sustainability
• Dissertation (MSc only)

Teaching and learning

We aim to help you become an effective agent for positive change in learning and education relevant for sustainability. We do so by enquiring into the kind of learning for change in personal, social and ecological spheres that is needed to help understand, develop and promote sustainability. When you complete our programme, you will have achieved the personal and professional development required to be an effective agent for change.

Flexible study options

The course may be studied either full-time at LSBU, or part-time by distance/flexible learning. The part-time distance learning mode is particularly suitable if you are living overseas or working or who find it difficult to attend a traditional course. Students studying part-time by distance/flexible learning based in their home country are not required to apply for a visa. It is also possible to start by signing on for a short course (two modules). Many students start with the short course and then decide to continue for a further award.

Course structure

Sessions are delivered through distance learning and web activities with optional - Monthly Saturday day schools Fast Track - Monthly Saturday day schools.

Learning resources

In an emerging field like EfS the interface between theory and practice is even more important. Theory informs practice and practice in turn nourishes theory. That's why our course materials undergo continuous review and updating. Networking is an essential element for us to consolidate our premier position as a theory-practice interface in EfS. The Blackboard e-learning system used by our programme's provides a platform for students and tutors to learn, discuss and debate various aspects related to EfS, regardless of their location.

You'll receive all the materials they need for independent study within a set timescale, which includes:

• A Study Guide to introduce the key themes, debates and theories
• A Course Reader with specialist key texts
• Supplementary material (e.g. additional written material or DVD)
• Access to the EFS blackboard website for online learning opportunities

Assessments

All assessment is through written coursework. For example, essay writing, report writing, programme design or research studies.

Professional links

The London Regional Centre of Expertise EFS (RCE) is hosted by London South Bank University and closely linked with the EFS programme. Partners are drawn from a wide range of organisations including conservation groups, development education centres, universities and colleges, ethical business organisations, community groups. This provides opportunities for placements and projects as well as the chance to be part of a global learning space with over 130 RCEs. The centre is accredited by the UN University Institute for Advanced Study of Sustainability and also hosts seminars and conferences. The programme is enriched by EFS expert tutors who are practitioners in the field.

The programme runs an annual conference with recognised key note speakers in the field of EFS.

Employability

Employers have found that the programme has enabled students to develop and enhance work practices in the light of current theories and debates. This has led to a number of organisations sponsoring their staff to do the programme as a means of capacity building and staff development. Many EFS graduates have gone onto gain promotion, career advancement or have made use of the course to change their career direction.

Sustainability skills are an important career asset in the 21st century and this qualification has been recognised by employers, such as news media, National Environment Management Agencies, government ministries, schools, environmental and development NGOs. EFS graduates have gone onto gain promotion, career advancement or have made use of the course to change their lives or career direction. Examples of graduate jobs include education adviser UNICEF, Director of Communications, Transition Town volunteer organiser, Environmental News editor, education director botanic gardens, curriculum manager, schools’ inspector.

The quality of the course has been endorsed by the UK Commonwealth Scholarship Commission which has awarded over 100 of scholarships. A number of organisations, such as World Wide Fund for Nature and Oxfam have also sponsored their staff to do the programme as a means of capacity building and staff development.

The course provides the following transferable skills, which are valued by employers:

• Effective communication
• Ability to apply theory to practice
• Understanding and managing change
• Problem solving and strategic planning
• Critical thinking
• Holistic thinking
• Curriculum leadership skills.

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Branding is one of the most important aspects of marketing. This course is designed for those seeking to develop a specialist understanding of brand management and communications. Read more
Branding is one of the most important aspects of marketing. This course is designed for those seeking to develop a specialist understanding of brand management and communications. If you want to kick-start a career in one of these exciting fields, this is the course for you.

Communications contribute to the competitive advantage of a business through differentiation and building brand value and equity. This degree will introduce you to the various tools businesses use - including advertising, promotion and PR to communicate with target markets.

The degree develops your knowledge of both the theory and practice of marketing at an advanced level. It will provide you with an in-depth and critical understanding of research methodologies, as well as marketing communications planning and strategy.

You will critically analyse real world branding and develop a marketing communications strategy for a real client. This will provide you with the commercial marketing experience that employers are looking for.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available for this course. Please click the link below for more information.
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/fees-and-finance/postgraduate/index.aspx

Course structure

The course is organised into three-hour blocks of teaching and seminar activities, which are based on specialist reading, research and case studies. Modules are assessed through essays, reports, group work, presentations and examinations.

All of our Marketing MSc courses share six core modules (Moving to Masters, Critical Developments in Marketing Theory and Practice, Marketing Planning and Strategy, Marketing Research I: quantitative methods, Marketing Research II: qualitative methods, and a dissertation).

This specialist route includes one subject-specific module (Branding and Communications), but also shares a range of optional modules which enable you to tailor the course to your interests and career aspirations.

In the final phase of the course, you will complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a marketing topic of your choice, which will require you to make recommendations for real-life marketing practice. Throughout your dissertation, you will receive support from a supervisor who will help to guide you in your research.

Syllabus

All students will study six core modules including a masters transition module and a dissertation. You will also choose an option module to study. This will allow you to specialise in the areas of the course that interest you the most.

Modules:

Moving to Masters
Critical Developments in Marketing Theory and Practice
Marketing Planning and Strategy
Marketing Research I: Quantitative Methods
Marketing Research II: Qualitative Methods
Branding and Communications
Dissertation

One from:

International Marketing
Social Marketing
Behavioural Economics
Digital Marketing
New Product Development

For more information please see the website

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/marketing-branding-and-communications-msc-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Chartered Institute of Marketing

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM), the world's largest organisation for professional marketers. The CIM have awarded the course Multiple Award Pathway status, which means that you will have a number of exemptions from CIM qualifications.

CIM qualifications are highly sought after by employers and – alongside our Marketing MSc – will ensure that you are equipped with the best education for a successful marketing career.

CIM membership:

You will be entitled to free CIM affiliate-level membership, giving you access to a range of benefits and services. CIM membership is a clear demonstration of your commitment to ongoing professional development.

Membership benefits include:

• The Marketer – the members' magazine
• Studying Member e-news
• Learning Zone website – study resources
• Marketing library and online archive resources

Professional Certificate in Marketing

The course consists of four units, two of which will be exempted:

• Marketing Essentials (exempt)
• Marketing Information and Research (exempt)
• Assessing the Marketing Environment
• Stakeholder Marketing

Professional Diploma in Marketing

The course consists of four units, two of which will be exempted:

• Marketing Planning Process (exempt)
• Delivering Customer Value through Marketing (exempt)
• Managing Marketing
• Project Management in Marketing

Diploma in Digital Marketing

This course consists of three units, one of which will be exempted:

• Marketing and Consumer Behaviour (exempt)
• Digital Marketing Essentials
• Digital Marketing Planning

Teaching excellence

Course tutors have worked in industry prior to joining and continue to consult for corporate firms, enabling them to feed the latest developments in the commercial world into the course. They are also active researchers and this knowledge and experience is used to help develop an advanced knowledge of the latest marketing theory.

Industry representatives advise on the content and development of the course and contribute to teaching as guest lecturers. These talks help bring classroom theory to life by sharing real-world case studies, results and pitfalls.

Students learn a range of transferable skills, such as research skills, presentation skills, working in groups and dealing with conflict. These skills are much sought after in today's highly competitive job market.

Class sizes are small enough for there to be a personal and friendly atmosphere where staff know students by name and can closely monitor their progress.

Careers and employability

A Marketing (Branding and Communications) MSc from Brighton Business School will help you to specialise and stand out in today's competitive job market. It will equip you with both the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for a successful career.

The course has been designed for people wanting a successful and rewarding career in sectors including advertising, branding, communications, digital marketing, direct marketing, event management, public relations and sales.

The course is also ideal preparation for continuing your study at MPhil or PhD level or working as a professional researcher in marketing.
Previous graduates have started successful careers with the following companies:

• Product Manager for Astra Zeneca, Milan
• Brand manager for Campari, Switzerland
• Account Executive for Blaze Communications, UK
• Marketing Manager for Mitchells and Butlers, UK
• Marketing Manager for Cartier, Taiwan
• Brand Manager for L'Oreal, Greece

Links with industry:

"Our students engage with industry through work placements, projects and guest speakers. This close link with industry often provides our students with opportunities to get a job. This is what the business school is all about." - Aidan Berry, Director of Brighton Business School

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Well-crafted communications strategies are central to the positioning of international organizations, national governments, and the diverse range of actors composing civil society. Read more
Well-crafted communications strategies are central to the positioning of international organizations, national governments, and the diverse range of actors composing civil society. As civil society's importance grows globally, understanding its dynamics is increasingly central for anyone who wishes to intervene on its terrain.

The optional development communications track within the Master of Arts in Global Communications (MAGC) explores how civil society actors use communication to achieve their goals. A cutting edge curriculum offers a combination of practical branding, PR, production, and social media courses complemented by crucial theoretical and analytical courses treating actual cases.

Theoretical foundation for broad understanding

This track is designed for both professionals seeking broader academic training and new students seeking a range of specific training and broad understanding. Students study specific issues of global civil society relating to broad categories of freedom and expression, advocacy, governance, and the rule of law. The theoretical part of this degree examines issues of power, political and institutional agency, discourse, and mediated communication. Current trends in governance, non-state and civil society organization will be studied.

Hands-on training for practical application

In addition to equipping students with new or expanded communications skills, the hands-on practical courses and modules enable students to think critically, on the basis of case studies, about interaction between the State, private business, and the third sector. Themes studied include both internal and external communication in organizations.

Practica have been run outside France in Morocco and India. Students will gain insight into communication between NGO members, within the NGO world and civil society, between NGOs, donors and governments, and between NGOs and the corporate world.

Structure of the specialized track

The program requirements for the MA in Global Communications, Development Communications Track are as follows:
-Four mandatory core courses (16 credits)
-Two core options - theory courses (8 credits)
-Two core options - practical courses (8 credits)
-Two elective courses from all Global Communications and International Affairs course offerings (8 credits)
-Internship or Thesis (8 credits)

Coursework and Research Masters

The MA in in Global Communications, Development Communications Track is a 48 credit Coursework and Research Masters that can be completed in one calendar year. The length of the internship or thesis may vary, however—many students choose to take additional time for these components. Coursework and Research Masters at AUP open up international horizons and enable career-transition through an extensive range of classes blending theory and practice. Students develop precision in their problem-solving skills through challenging hands-on modules and the choice of an internship or a personalized research project.

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The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. Read more
The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. The course will provide you with a unique blend of theory and practice teaching, aimed at deepening your knowledge of the history of communications within the development process of emerging economies. It will critically evaluate the impact of international and regional institutions from a critical political economic perspective. Teaching by academic staff, guest lecturers and other carefully selected staff from development organisations will provide you with an overview of the policies, actions and impact of state and non-state institutions within the area of communication media and development.

A distinctive feature is its emphasis on the practical role of communication media in development. You will participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme, offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. As part of the work experience module, students participate in an extensive NGOs and media seminar series featuring experts and panel discussions. The work placement programme is in line with the University of Westminster’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner.

The course team is led by Dr Winston Mano and includes Professor Daya Thussu, Professor Christian Fuchs, Professor David Gauntlett, Professor Naomi Sakr, Dr Anthony McNicholas, Dr Xin Xin, Dr Anastasia Kavada, Dr Maria Michalis, Dr Roza Tsagarousianou, Dr Tarik Sabry, Paul Majendie, Geoffrey Davies and Michaela O’Brien. Visiting Lecturers include Jackie Davies, founder and Director of the Communication and Development Network (C4D) (http://www.c4d.org), a community of professionals working in communication for development. As a peer network the C4D Network is aimed at communication for development practitioners plus allied development workers, donors, academics and communication experts from the BBC, UN and major development organisations. The joining criterion is an engagement in communication for development - either professionally or through academia. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Semester one core modules
-DISSERTATION
-THEORIES OF COMMUNICATION
-THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

Option modules
-APPROACHES TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
-GLOBAL MEDIA
-MEDIA PRODUCTION SKILLS
-POLITICAL ANALYSIS OF COMMUNICATIONS POLICY
-POLITICAL ECONOMY OF COMMUNICATION
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: MIGRATION, RACE, ETHNICITY
-TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION POLICY

Semester two core modules
-MEDIA WORK EXPERIENCE
-POLITICAL ECONOMY OF COMMUNICATION

Option modules
-APPROACHES TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH
-MEDIA BUSINESS STRATEGY
-MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND CENSORSHIP
-PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS
-POLICIES FOR DIGITAL CONVERGENCE
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: SEXUALITY, AGE, DISABILITY
-REPORTING FAITH
-SOCIOLOGY OF NEWS

Associated Careers

The Media and Development MA is suitable for you if you would value an opportunity to be able to reflect critically on the role of media in the process of development and learn practical skills. The course will be of interest to you if you have a background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organisations, and a range of international business organisations, while at the same time providing appropriate preparation for those seeking employment in such fields or, indeed, wanting to prepare for further studies for higher a higher degree, including a PhD.

While the majority of our graduates will return to more senior posts with improved skills, knowledge and qualifications gained from their year with us, we would expect them to apply for jobs at development organisations such as Internews, BBC Media Action, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid, WACC, OneWorld and War on Want.

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Corporate communication is an increasingly important strategic issue for organisations and expertise in this area offers excellent opportunities for career progression. Read more
Corporate communication is an increasingly important strategic issue for organisations and expertise in this area offers excellent opportunities for career progression. You will learn about the latest communication trends, keeping you up to date with changing industry standards and practices.
As a communications manager or leader wanting to maximise your professional performance and career opportunities in this dynamic sector, you will develop specialist knowledge and hone your strategic skills to improve the performance of your organisation.

Delivered part-time, usually on six Friday and Saturday blocks over one year, you will have minimal disruption to your professional schedule and can combine work with study.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: twice as many of our staff - 220 - were entered into the research assessment for 2014 compared to the number entered in 2008.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/corporatecomms_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your modules focus on the challenges practitioners face in their professional work and career development, ensuring you will be able to apply your learning to your work straight away. On completion, you will be able to apply critical analysis and research skills in either a business, public or non-profit sector environment.

- Communications Officer
- Communications Manager
- Head of Communications
- Strategic Brand Planner

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Leeds Business School has been at the forefront of development in public relations education, both nationally and internationally, since 1990. Your course is delivered by lecturers within our Public Relations & Communications Subject Group which includes 15 academic staff teaching across 10 undergraduate, postgraduate and professional courses.

If you have already gained the CIPR Diploma you will be exempt from the core modules Stakeholder and Employee Communications, Corporate Social Responsibility & Communication, and Issues & Crisis Public Relations, and will follow a fast track route to a masters degree.

Academic staff within the group have contributed chapters to the best-selling textbook 'Exploring Public Relations' edited by Professor Ralph Tench and Liz Yeomans.

As a communications professional with a track record including time as the Communications Manager at Rolls-Royce, this course was a natural choice for Annalie Brown: "The course was right for me and it helped that I was exempt from some modules due to having the CIPR Diploma already."

At Leeds Business School we're dedicated to supporting your professional development - that's why we offer a guest lecture programme. Past speakers include the CEO of the London Stock Exchange, Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, past Chair and President of the Academy of Marketing, Chief Executive of the British Bankers Association, the Chief Economist of Yorkshire Bank and the Editor of Cosmopolitan. To see our full programme and to register for a lecture click here (http://www.leedsmet.ac.uk/guestspeakers).

Core Modules

Corporate Social Responsibility & Communication
Explore the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), including the issues of maximising profit and the need for sustainable development, environmental integrity and ethical business practices.

Digital Communication Management
Gain an understanding of the changing landscape in digital communication and develop the tools for managing personal and corporate reputation.

Issues & Crisis Public Relations
Study the theories and practicalities of crisis management within the public and private sectors across the world. You'll learn to identify issues and how to prepare for and manage crises

Marketing Communications Strategy
Gain an understanding of the way in which marketing communications strategy melds with branding principles.

Specialist Public Relations
Investigate specialist areas of strategic PR and corporate communications including public affairs, social marketing and arts marketing.

Stakeholder Relations & Employee Communications
Analyse internal communication as a means of stakeholder management and investigate the power of different organisational environments, cultures and leadership styles that influence corporate communications.

Dissertation
You will carry out an in-depth research project in a subject that is appropriate to the course and of particular interest to you.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- The Rose Bowl
The Rose Bowl has impressive teaching spaces, auditoriums, conference facilities and an outstanding local reputation as a business hub. The Rose Bowl puts our students at the centre of a dynamic business community.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Institute for Media and Creative Industries. The. Institute for Media and Creative Industries. is actively engaged in various research projects that aim to benefit communities and organisations across the world. Read more

Institute for Media and Creative Industries

The Institute for Media and Creative Industries is actively engaged in various research projects that aim to benefit communities and organisations across the world. We are a multi-disciplinary academic community, with commanding knowledge and expertise of the media and related industries, including the music, press, film, television, social media, arts and tourism industries.

The Institute for Media and Creative Industries attracts graduate research students and world-leading faculty. We collaborate across the University, and externally with a range of UK and international academics, practitioners and research centres. This helps to ensure our impact on academia, industry, institutions, civil society, professionals, and policy-makers at both national and international levels.

London is one of the world’s principal hubs for media and communication and is the primary destination for many national and international agencies operating in the media and creative industries.

For more information, see our programme page for Global Communication and Development MA

This programme

Our Global Communication and Development MA investigates the debates surrounding communications and cultural policies for democracy, equality, and the economy, focusing on diverse markets such as Latin America, South Africa and Asia.

The programme will develop your understanding of communications and development in a changing global context. You will consider major traditions, theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to the analysis of global communications and development.

You will learn how to interpret, evaluate and apply advanced knowledge of communications and development in an innovative way. This will provide you with the ability to critically analyse current research and advanced scholarship about globalisation, communications and development.

Your personal development

Enterprise Through the Curriculum is an intrinsic element of every master’s programme at Loughborough University London and has been carefully designed to give students the best possible chance of securing their dream role. From employability profiling to live group projects set by a business or organisation, and from site visits to organisation-based dissertation opportunities, Loughborough University London is the first of its kind to develop a suite of activities and support that is positioned as the underpinning of every student’s experience.

Future career prospects

Graduates from our Global Communication and Development programme are highly-qualified to work in a variety of communication and development roles across a range of sectors, including tourism, the media and the government.

Teaching of global communication trends means graduates of this programme will be well placed to influence communications and practices in roles across the world, especially in the Global South.

Our Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking a PhD programme in media or a creative discipline.

Speak to a programme specialist

If you'd like to know more about this programme, you can request an email or telephone call from an academic responsible for the teaching of this programme.

Complete the contact request form

Scholarships for 2018 entry

Our ambition is to inspire high achieving students from all backgrounds, to benefit from our outstanding teaching and cutting edge research facilities.

Inspiring Success Scholarship

The Inspiring Success Scholarship offers 100% off the full cost of tuition fees for selected unemployed and underemployed graduates, who obtained GCSE or A-level (or equivalent) qualifications from Hackney, Tower Hamlets, Newham or Waltham Forest.

East London Community Scholarship

The East London Community Scholarship offers 50% off the full cost of tuition fees for students who obtained GCSE or A-level (or equivalent) qualifications from Barking and Dagenham, Greenwich, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets or Waltham Forest.

Excellence scholarship

The Excellence scholarship automatically awards high-achieving students 20% off the full cost of our master’s tuition fees, regardless of their full-time programme or nationality. To be eligible for this scholarship, students must have an upper-second class degree or equivalent qualification recognised by Loughborough University.

Alumni Bursary

The Alumni Bursary automatically awards graduates of Loughborough University 10% off the full cost of our master's tuition fees, regardless of their full-time programme or nationality.

Further details about the full range of scholarships we offer are available on our website.



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Unprecedented change in communications and media content, forms, technology and policy in the last decade has wide-ranging implications for business, politics, public administration and everyday life. Read more
Unprecedented change in communications and media content, forms, technology and policy in the last decade has wide-ranging implications for business, politics, public administration and everyday life. The Master of Communications and Media Studies builds your understanding of changing global contexts of media and communication practices. You will gain a critically informed understanding of key issues affecting the global communications industry focusing on the challenges posed by the emergence of digital media, globalisation and increasing levels of cross-cultural exchange. Industry engagement through guest speakers, internships, and opportunities for site visits in Australia and abroad will enhance your knowledge and professional competency.

As the most established program of its type in Australia, the Master of Communications and Media Studies has built up a long record of success. Ranked No.19 in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject for 2014, the program draws strongly on specialist expertise and focuses on fostering industry ready graduates.

The course is particularly relevant to those employed or seeking employment in communications and media industries (for instance, electronic journalism, policy formulation, public relations, or tourism marketing), as well as those who wish to expand their expertise for teaching purposes or further study.

You will be introduced to the latest developments and research in communications and media – including in social and online media – always with a view to "real world" application. Study units feature guest professional speakers in conjunction with industry focussed field trips to media outlets in Sydney, Melbourne and Shanghai.

In the Master of Communications and Media Studies course, you will have the opportunity to undertake industry internships in Australia and overseas. For example, students in our program have recently completed internships with the United Nations in New York and with Shandong Television in China.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/communications-and-media-studies-a6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced communications and media studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced communications and media studies
These studies will introduce you to communications and media studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of communications and media studies practice and research to further your understanding of communications and media systems both locally and globally. Studies focus on the challenges posed by the emergence of digital media, globalisation and increasing levels of cross-cultural exchange.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/communications-and-media-studies-a6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Global organisations are realising that their corporate communications and marketing functions need to work closely to communicate with stakeholders. Read more

Global organisations are realising that their corporate communications and marketing functions need to work closely to communicate with stakeholders. This growing interdependence has partly been driven by the impact of online communications on organisational reputation.

This course recognises this industry shift and explores the drivers and dynamics of modern corporate communications and its relationship with marketing and public relations. You focus on stakeholder management, global marketing, brand management, reputation management, media relations and social media.

Taught by researchers who combine their professional experience with the latest research expertise, you’ll examine key theories and concepts and gain the practical professional skills employers are looking for.

You’ll benefit from our corporate connections, as senior figures working in the sector regularly visit to offer a practitioner’s view during guest lectures. Many also provide case studies and practical projects.

Academic excellence

The Marketing division at Leeds University Business School is one the leading centres of research in marketing in Europe. As part of our research, we engage with companies, senior executives and academics across the globe.

Our research makes an important contribution to your learning on the programme; our academics bring their world-leading expertise to you in the classroom. The Global and Strategic Marketing Research Centre (GLOSMARC) is the Business School’s established and esteemed centre of excellence for scholarly research work.

Course content

The course provides you with an essential foundation in communications theory, marketing strategy and public relations practice.

You’ll explore the history and theory of corporate communications, connecting communications to overall corporate strategy. Alongside this, you’ll study the latest thinking in important areas of marketing such as international marketing, marketing strategy and marketing research, as well as understanding how organisations manage their brands and identities, marketing communications and key priorities such as sustainability.

During the Public Relations in Practice module, you’ll work alongside classmates in interactive workshops that focus on the practical applications of some key PR tools and techniques. You’ll cover essential skills such as campaign planning, personal communication skills, influencing techniques and writing for PR.

In addition, you’ll choose from a selection of optional modules that allow you to focus on a topic that matches your interests and career plans.

In the final semester you will apply your skills and knowledge to either a research dissertation or a practical consultancy project. Our consultancy projects give you the opportunity to work with a live business situation, make links with industry and gain work experience that can be exceptionally rewarding.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll study nine compulsory modules, plus either a dissertation or consultancy project.

  • Corporate Communications and Reputation Management 15 credits
  • Corporate Communications Strategy 15 credits
  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability 15 credits
  • Brand Management and Corporate Identity 15 credits
  • Public Relations in Practice 15 credits
  • Marketing Research 15 credits
  • Marketing Communications 15 credits
  • Global Marketing 15 credits
  • Marketing Strategy 15 credits

Optional modules

You’ll also choose one optional module.

  • Creative Public Relations 15 credits
  • Internal Communications and Change Management 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Direct, Digital and Interactive Marketing 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Corporate Communications, Marketing and Public Relations MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods so you can benefit from the expertise of our academics, including lectures, workshops, seminars, simulations and tutorials. Company case studies provide an opportunity to put your learning into practice.

Independent study is also vital for this course, allowing you to prepare for taught classes and sharpen your own research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

Graduates have a rounded and reflective approach to communications strategy and practice. Many become effective communications professionals, either in internal corporate and marketing communications roles or in PR, digital and social media agencies.

Links with industry

A number of senior figures from the world of corporate communications, marketing and public relations are invited to deliver guest lectures, providing a practitioner's view of the latest industry developments.

Recent contributors include: Sainsburys, Creative Concern, Ikea UK & IE, Sustainly, Marks and Spencer, Search Laboratory, Twentysix and Brand 24.

Careers support

We help you to achieve your career ambitions by providing professional development support as part of the course.

Our dedicated professional development tutor provides you with tailored academic and careers support. They help you to develop essential skills to successfully progress through the course, and also the professional skills you need to gain employment in your future career.

You can expect advice and guidance with your career choices, help in identifying and applying for jobs, as well as one-to-one coaching for interpersonal skills.

Read more about our Careers and professional development support.



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Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions. Read more

Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions.

Some of our students undertaking their project are able to work on one of our wide range of testbeds, such as internet technologies, wireless networking, network management and control, and internet-of-things (IoT) applications.

We also have specialist software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, and various system simulators.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Efthymios Bliatis.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months or part-time from 24 to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme 

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:

  • Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
  • Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
  • Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
  • Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
  • Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
  • Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:

  • Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin communications, networks and software
  • Be able to analyse problems within the field of communications, networks and software and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
  • Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
  • Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within communications, networks and software
  • Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
  • Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
  • Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
  • Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Facilities, equipment and support

We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including:

  • Matlab/Simulink, C, C++ and up-to-date toolboxes, systemsview, OPNET and NS2/3 (you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house, including 3GPP, BGAN, DVB-S2-RCS, GSM, UMTS, DVB-SH, WCDMA, GPRS, WiMAX, LTE, HSPA and HSDPA)
  • Our Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment and roof-mounted antennas to pick up satellites (a security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation)
  • A fully equipped RF lab with network analyser, signal and satellite link simulations
  • A small anechoic chamber for antenna measurements (a wideband MIMO channel sounder is available for propagation measurements)
  • SatNEX is a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications, and a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe (this is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by our partners)
  • A fully equipped UHF/VHF satellite ground-station facility is located on campus, which is being expanded to S-band and is supported by the ESA GENSO project (at present, the station tracks amateur satellites and CubeSats)
  • Our wide coverage experimental wireless network test-bed is based on IPv4, and IPv6 for testing new networking protocols for mobility, handover, security, cognitive radio and networking can be carried out (most networking protocol projects use this test-bed, with the help of PhD students and staff)
  • We are the only university in the UK that has an IP-Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) test-bed for developing and experimenting with advanced mobile/wireless services/applications – you can use this to carry out your services and application-based projects for mobile multimedia, such as multi-mode user interface, service mobility, service discovery and social networking services
  • Our wireless sensor test-bed is unique; advanced routing protocols, middleware architectures, air interface and networking protocols for wireless sensor networks can be developed and tested

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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MSc ICTs for Development will train you to become an information-and-communications-technology-for-development (ICT4D) champion who possesses the necessary technical and contextual skills to lead ICT4D projects such as telecentres, ICT-enabled microenterprise, public service kiosks and e-government initiatives to completion. Read more

MSc ICTs for Development will train you to become an information-and-communications-technology-for-development (ICT4D) champion who possesses the necessary technical and contextual skills to lead ICT4D projects such as telecentres, ICT-enabled microenterprise, public service kiosks and e-government initiatives to completion.

This course satisfies the pressing need for ICT4D champions; in recent years there has been - and continues to be - a massive expansion in the number of ICT4D projects in developing and transitional economies, with a skills shortage resulting in a high project failure rate.

By taking this course, you will benefit from The University of Manchester's world-leading Centre for Development Informatics and gain:

  • conceptual frameworks to understand the process of socio-economic development and the role of information and of ICTs in the development process
  • new knowledge and skills to help in the effective planning, development, implementation and management of ICT4D initiatives .

A range of optional modules provides an opportunity to satisfy specialist ICT4D champion knowledge and skill requirements, while the overseas field visits that we offer will enable you to build up your real-world experience at no additional cost.

Informal enquiries, prior to applications, are welcomed. Please contact our programme director, Prof Richard Heeks (  )

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is included in the programme fee. In addition, participants may undertake research visits to organisations applying information systems in practice in the UK. Fieldcourses may be scheduled at any point during the twelve-month period of the degree programme and this may include during University vacations. Successful applicants are expected to be available to attend.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. The Global Development Institute (GDI) cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. GDI will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

  • Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The programme is designed for those applying, or seeking to apply, information and communication technologies in pursuit of socio-economic development goals. It will include those who have, or plan to have:

  • direct design and implementation responsibilities and/or
  • project managerial responsibilities and/or
  • broader strategic or policy-related responsibilities.

Typical participants include:

  • Early-career professionals who have found themselves involved with ICT4D projects and want a period to reflect, learn and broaden their impact and career horizons.
  • Technical staff involved with ICT4D projects who wish to add systems, managerial and development skills to their portfolio.
  • Computing graduates who wish to make ethical use of their skills but lack the necessary understanding of systems and development.

The programme is relevant to those with career trajectories in the NGO and public sectors, and in the private sector given the private sector's increasing involvement with ICT4D projects. It is particularly intended for those who will be working in or with transitional and developing economies.



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Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. Read more

About the course

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars.

On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline.

The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It is suited for those interested in critically assessing the policies and practices of international development and humanitarian assistance to war-affected regions from an anthropological perspective.

It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development).

It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

You will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Anthropology of International Development
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Optional

Dept. of Social Sciences, Media and Communications (Anthropology)
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Dept of Politics, History and Law
Globalisation
Dept of Clinical Sciences
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Young Lives in the Global South
International Development, Children and Youth
Brunel Law School
Minority and Indigenous Rights
The United Nations Human Rights Regime
Theory and Practice of Human Rights
The Migrant, the State and the Law
Brunel Business School
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Anthropology of International Development
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Year 2

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Special Features

While its approach is anthropological, this degree offers genuine multi-disciplinary possibilities by drawing on modules from Politics, Health Sciences, Law and Business.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the multiplicity of issues arising from critical shifts in global policy across the following key themes:

The ways in which economic anthropologists have enhanced our understandings of livelihoods in ways that are dramatically different to dominant approaches in economics.
The hazards and limitations of relying solely upon biomedical interventions to alleviate suffering and sickness.
The ostensibly positive relationship between education and development, and the role of education as a vehicle for eradicating illiteracy and lowering fertility and mortality rates.

An exploration of such themes together will make it possible for students to think and engage in new and critical ways about the relationship between anthropology and development.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay and practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise). A final dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based on fieldwork in the UK or abroad, is also required. There are no examinations.

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