• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University College London Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
London School of Economics and Political Science Featured Masters Courses
"communication" AND "scie…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Communication Sciences)

We have 1,461 Masters Degrees (Communication Sciences)

  • "communication" AND "sciences" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 1,461
Order by 
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

Read less
Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

Read less
A unique qualification. No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. Read more

A unique qualification

No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. It is a unique qualification in New Zealand.

Massey’s Master of Communication will deepen your understanding of communication practice.

This is a unique qualification in New Zealand. You do not have to have a background in communication to complete this degree.

Our students come from a wide range of disciplines including arts, social sciences, law, education, design or health services. You may have found yourself in a work role with a communication aspect and you want better insights into the principles and practice of communication.

The Master of Communication will help you to advance your career and to understand better how to manage your role’s communication aspects.

Internationally-recognised

Massey University’s business and management studies ranks in the top 250 (by QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) rankings). We are also ranked in the top 150 universities worldwide for business administration programmes by the ShanghaiRanking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects.

Do communication research in a context relevant to you

The research project in this masters enables you to focus on a real-world communication challenge and combine different communication research approaches to develop a novel solution. You can draw on research approaches from public relations, expressive arts, communication management, marketing, linguistics, media studies or journalism studies, or create a bespoke research approach that includes supervision from a related discipline such as Maori studies, international relations or evaluation studies. Your learning will focus on practical, relevant outcomes for your career.

There are also opportunities to collaborate on a shared transdisciplinary research project with students and co-supervisors from the disciplines you may be working with in your job - such as quality management, emergency management or human resource management.. This will build your understanding of the practical connections between communication and related organisational functions.

You will graduate with an excellent grasp of research, analysis and problem-solving and know how to apply your knowledge to make a difference in your workplaces and community.

What will you learn

In the first segment of the programme you focus on studying the field of communication and its possibilities. This covers the history and theory of communication across different scholarly traditions (from both humanities and business) and industries.

In the second you choose a personalised experience from both ‘heartland’ courses relevant to your discipline - for instance advanced journalism issues, technology and cultural change, linguistics, media practice, advanced public relations or advanced marketing - and ‘sister disciplines’ such as quality management.

In the third segment of your programme you work on a research project of your choice that is relevant to your industry and discipline. For details see the ‘Planning’ area at the top right of this page.

Become a master, faster

The Master of Communication is 180 credits. This means that you can complete this qualification in three semesters of full-time study. We offer research supervision in the summer semester if you want to really fast-track your completion. If you study part-time the qualification usually takes between 2.5 and five years.

Multi-disciplinary

Massey offers you access to world-leading communication expertise across a broad range of specialisations, including media, humanities, business, organisational studies, social sciences, critical thinking and management. Massey’s Master of Communication enables you to pursue either organisational or creative approaches to communication, or combine these to become a well-rounded communication specialist.

A specialist communication university

We have the longest-running communication programme in New Zealand, the largest numbers of students in any university communication programme and the most options for communication-related study. Massey University’s graduates have a long-standing reputation for excellence in both theory and practice.

Our lecturers come from both academic and industry backgrounds, giving you the best of both worlds.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Communication will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Our experts are there to guide but you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.

Careers

Whether you are currently in a communication role, in a position that has a communication dimension, or would like to work in communications at a senior level, the Master of Communication can help you take your career to the next level.



Read less
A unique qualification. No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. Read more

A unique qualification

No matter what industry you work in, this multi-disciplinary degree will give you in-depth understanding of communication principles and skills. It is a unique qualification in New Zealand.

Massey’s Master of Communication will deepen your understanding of communication practice.

This is a unique qualification in New Zealand. You do not have to have a background in communication to complete this degree.

Our students come from a wide range of disciplines including arts, social sciences, law, education, design or health services. You may have found yourself in a work role with a communication aspect and you want better insights into the principles and practice of communication.

The Master of Communication will help you to advance your career and to understand better how to manage your role’s communication aspects.

Internationally-recognised

Massey University’s business and management studies ranks in the top 250 (by QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) rankings). We are also ranked in the top 150 universities worldwide for business administration programmes by the ShanghaiRanking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects.

Do communication research in a context relevant to you

The research project in this masters enables you to focus on a real-world communication challenge and combine different communication research approaches to develop a novel solution. You can draw on research approaches from public relations, expressive arts, communication management, marketing, linguistics, media studies or journalism studies, or create a bespoke research approach that includes supervision from a related discipline such as Maori studies, international relations or evaluation studies. Your learning will focus on practical, relevant outcomes for your career.

There are also opportunities to collaborate on a shared transdisciplinary research project with students and co-supervisors from the disciplines you may be working with in your job - such as quality management, emergency management or human resource management.. This will build your understanding of the practical connections between communication and related organisational functions.

You will graduate with an excellent grasp of research, analysis and problem-solving and know how to apply your knowledge to make a difference in your workplaces and community.

What will you learn

In the first segment of the programme you focus on studying the field of communication and its possibilities. This covers the history and theory of communication across different scholarly traditions (from both humanities and business) and industries.

In the second you choose a personalised experience from both ‘heartland’ courses relevant to your discipline - for instance advanced journalism issues, technology and cultural change, linguistics, media practice, advanced public relations or advanced marketing - and ‘sister disciplines’ such as quality management.

In the third segment of your programme you work on a research project of your choice that is relevant to your industry and discipline. For details see the ‘Planning’ area at the top right of this page.

Become a master, faster

The Master of Communication is 180 credits. This means that you can complete this qualification in three semesters of full-time study. We offer research supervision in the summer semester if you want to really fast-track your completion. If you study part-time the qualification usually takes between 2.5 and five years.

Multi-disciplinary

Massey offers you access to world-leading communication expertise across a broad range of specialisations, including media, humanities, business, organisational studies, social sciences, critical thinking and management. Massey’s Master of Communication enables you to pursue either organisational or creative approaches to communication, or combine these to become a well-rounded communication specialist.

A specialist communication university

We have the longest-running communication programme in New Zealand, the largest numbers of students in any university communication programme and the most options for communication-related study. Massey University’s graduates have a long-standing reputation for excellence in both theory and practice.

Our lecturers come from both academic and industry backgrounds, giving you the best of both worlds.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Communication will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Our experts are there to guide but you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



Read less
The one year MSc program offers four tracks. Business Communication and Digital Media. Communication Design. New Media Design. Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

The one year MSc program offers four tracks:

  • Business Communication and Digital Media
  • Communication Design
  • New Media Design
  • Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Besides the 1 year Master, also a two- year Master is offered:

  • Research Master in Language and Communication

The MSc in Communication and Information Sciences offers a unique program in which you learn about how people acquire and transfer information and how new means of communication can be used creatively and innovatively. The approach taken at Tilburg University is unique in the sense that the broad concept of communication is examined from many perspectives, including those of linguistics, cognitive and social psychology, computational modeling and document design.

This program is intended for highly talented and motivated students with a keen sense of intellectual curiosity and intellectual ambition. In this Master’s program, you will encounter state-of-the-art research in the broad interdisciplinary field of communication. The point of departure is natural communication: how is information transferred from one person to another? For what purpose? You will participate in a wide range of courses such as communication strategies, non-verbal communication and computer vision. This unique combination of approaches and research traditions will enable you to work as a communication expert, and answer questions such as:

•What is the best way to present information to an audience?

•How do people communicate within an organization?

•How can you influence people's behavior through language?

You take a particular interest in language and you are seeking to broaden and deepen your academic knowledge. You are interested in the many different aspects of communication such as the effect that words can have, how people produce language, and linguistic phenomena such as metaphors, and the stories behind them.

This one-year MSc program offers four different specializations: Business Communication & Digital Media, Communication Design, New Media Design and Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence.  

Career Prospects Communication and Information Sciences

After completing your MSc program in Communication and Information Sciences, a broad range of career paths in business, research and education will be open to you. You will be able to analyze and consult on internal and external communications. With a Master's degree, you can start your career as a scientific researcher in this field. And remember that these opportunities are worldwide because your studies are internationally-oriented.



Read less
The Master in International Communication (MIC) is an ambitious double degree programme for those who aspire to an international career as a communication practitioner in senior managerial or consultancy positions, responsible for the external and internal communication of an organisation. Read more
The Master in International Communication (MIC) is an ambitious double degree programme for those who aspire to an international career as a communication practitioner in senior managerial or consultancy positions, responsible for the external and internal communication of an organisation.

Four universities across Europe, all specialising in communication and public relations in international professional contexts, have joined forces to create this unique joint programme offering you the full benefit of their collective expertise and international networks. This consortium consists of:

• The Netherlands: Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen
• The United Kingdom: Leeds Beckett University
• Italy: IULM University, Milan
• Lithuania: Vilnius University

The MIC offers you the opportunity to study at two universities and graduate with two Master’s degrees and the Geert Hofstede Consortium certificate. The programme starts each September and consists of three semesters (90 European credits). During the first semester you will study at one of the consortium universities, and for your second semester you will study at one of the other consortium universities. During the third semester, you will write your dissertation under the supervision of these two universities.

Career Focused

How is the career perspective built into the MIC programme? Throughout your study, you will analyse and solve real corporate communication problems provided by companies and governmental and non-governmental organisations. While acquiring the necessary expertise, you will at the same time acquire the knowledge and skills you need to be able to work within an international, complex and ever-changing business context. In doing so, you will not only be achieving an academic milestone, you will also be building your business network and complementing your résumé with work experiences.

MIC Curriculum Overview

Semester 1: Core Programme (30 European credits)
The first semester introduces you to the full breadth of the profession. What are the roles and responsibilities of the communication professional in an organisation from a strategic perspective? Which main functional areas are there? How does culture influence communication? What is the relationship between the organisation and its international and intercultural environment? You will complete this semester at one of the consortium universities of your choice.

Semester 2: Specialisations (30 European credits)
During the second semester you will complete a number of specialisations from another consortium universities of your choice. The specialisations are, by definition, in tune with what is happening in the professional field and can change according. The specialisations include:

Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands
• Intercultural Management
• International marketing communication
• International public affairs & corporate communication

IULM International University of Languages and Media, Milan, Italy
• Development and communication
• Public affairs and advocacy
• Social responsibility and communication

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, The United Kingdom
• Public relations skills
• Communication audits
• Digital communication management

Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania
• International crisis communication management
• Innovative methods in corporate communication
• Media and sustainable development

Semester 3: The Graduation Project (30 European credits)
The graduation Project consists of a master’s dissertation and a personal development portfolio. You must demonstrate mastery of those competences required to obtain the title Master in International Communication. You will choose a professional role and analytically solve a problem for an outside client or stakeholders (working in-house or as a consultant). The result of this project will be based on applied research and the use of an appropriate methodology. Every problem requires a solution from an international or intercultural perspective. The dissertation is completed under the supervision of two universities.

MIC graduate profile

As a graduate of the Master in International Communication you will be an interculturally competent communication professional able to work in a global context. You will be able to anticipate changes and develop, implement and manage sustainable and innovative solutions to communication issues. As a graduate, you will have the skills and knowledge needed to work at managerial or consultancy level.

Career Prospects

Based on the MIC Alumni Evaluation conducted in 2015, 91.6% of the MIC graduates have found a job within a year after graduating. Graduates have found jobs as Communications manager, Communications consultant, Director of communication and external relations, Image and communications manager, Marketing & communications executive, Content and media manager, Social media research officer, Senior international relations officer, Events officer and Project manager. Companies where our graduates have found positions include Google, Edelman PR, Ogilvy Group, Walt Disney, Hewlett Packard, IBM, ABN-Amro bank and governmental institutions.

Admission requirements

• Previous study in one of the following fields: communication, humanities, social sciences, business, management. Extensive work experience may also be considered.
• English language requirements: IELTS: 6.5, no subscores below 5.5 or TOEFL: 90 (internet). IELTS or TOEFL must not be older than two years.

The MIC is a fully accredited programme.

For more information about admission and application visit: http://www.hanzegroningen.eu/mic or http://www.masterinternationalcommunication.eu

Read less
In the Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences master’s programme you are trained at the leading edge of drug-design and fundamental research of new drugs, optimization of existing drugs, and personalised medicine. Read more

In the Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences master’s programme you are trained at the leading edge of drug-design and fundamental research of new drugs, optimization of existing drugs, and personalised medicine.

Specialisations

What does this master’s programme entail?

Despite major advances in drug-research, many common diseases such as cancers, neurological diseases, cardiovascular disease and other auto-immune diseases, lack effective treatment, or are found incurable. You are trained for a scientific career in drug research and development. Depending on your interest, you can choose from seven specialisations to further extend your scientific training and theoretical background.

Read more about our Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences programme.

Why study Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences at Leiden University?

  • The programme is offered by the Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (LACDR) – one of the world leading academic pharmaceutical research groups.
  • We offer you a research-oriented programme in which you can specialize in different areas in the wide spectrum of drug research; from Analytical BioSciences, Biopharmaceutics, Drug Delivery Technology, Medicinal Chemistry to Pharmacology, and Toxicology.
  • The programme offers flexibility and tailoring to meet your individual scientific interests and career aspirations.

Find more reasons to study Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences at Leiden University.

Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences: the right master’s programme for you?

The master’s programme of Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences (BPS) aims to train you in the research area of bio-pharmaceutical sciences and drug research in such a way that you have extensive knowledge and hands-on experience to be able to work independently as a scientific researcher. Moreover, you have a wide range of other career opportunities bio-pharmaceutical industry, science communication, and education.



Read less
The master's Communication, Health and Life Sciences in Wageningen trains academics to understand, facilitate and drive societal change in complex societal settings related to life science or health issues. Read more

The master's Communication, Health and Life Sciences in Wageningen trains academics to understand, facilitate and drive societal change in complex societal settings related to life science or health issues.

What makes the master's unique?

  • Unique focus on life sciences, health and their interaction with complex societal challenges.
  • Learn to build bridges between science and society, science and health professionals and experts and citizens.

Study programme

During the master's Communication, Health and Life Sciences students learn to understand the role of communication in addressing complex social challenges and opportunities regarding life science and health issues from various perspectives. Learn more about the full study programme.

Specialisations

There are two specialisations that students can choose from:

  1. Communication in Innovation in which you study the role of communication in social change with several fields of the life sciences, including nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production.
  2. Health and Society in which students become context-sensitive experts in the domains of science and health promotion.

Your future career

The master Communication, Health and Life Sciences aims to deliver professionals who understand complex processes of communication and change, and are able to apply these insights to enhance societal problem solving and innovation in areas related to life science or health issues. Read the stories of our alumni.

Related programmes:

MSc International Development Studies

MSc Development and Rural Innovation

MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies



Read less
In this programme you are trained in interdisciplinary approaches to address scientific and societal challenges in the field of (bio)medical sciences. Read more

In this programme you are trained in interdisciplinary approaches to address scientific and societal challenges in the field of (bio)medical sciences. The research in our master programme Biomedical Sciences is related to the maintenance of health and prevention of disease. You will acquire a skill set suitable for a wide range of career opportunities not only in (biomedical) research, but also in industry, policy making and communication/education.

Specialisations

What does this master’s programme entail?

The first, common, master year provides you with a solid background inBiomedical Sciences via compulsory and elective courses and a research internship. The interdisciplinary character of the first year offers you great opportunities to address health and disease-related issues from various directions. The second master year is dedicated to one of the above mentioned specialisations.

Five reasons to choose the Master Biomedical Sciences at Leiden University

  • The flexibility of our programme allows you to follow your individual interests in the order that suits you best;
  • You will have the opportunity to specialise in different areas of research or to zero in on management, communication or education;
  • You will enjoy small-group teaching, traineeships, an international classroom and high-quality courses on subjects at the frontiers of science;
  • Biomedical Sciences is taught at the Leiden University Medical Center, which is a modern institution where research, education and patient care with a high quality profile and a strong scientific orientation are combined;
  • Our alumni have very good job opportunities.


Read less
The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment. Read more

The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment.

The programme comprises six compulsory modules and two optional modules covering a wide range of disciplines. These offer numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

It is ideal for marketing and communications professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, languages or business disciplines wanting to deepen their insight into marketing across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The overall purpose of the programme is to:

  • Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of communication and marketing communication
  • Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
  • Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of (Marketing) Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:

  • Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the (inter)cultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
  • Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
  • Impart the knowledge and skills of communication and marketing necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (human resource management, advertising, international marketing), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
  • Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Communication

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to-face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of models of consensus-generation, agenda-setting, opinion-formation and communicative interaction
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and concerns involved in strategic communication, in marketing communication and intercultural communication
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and content and methods of the marketing function, both within corporations and as a service industry
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of marketing with particular reference to international case studies
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation (this would involve the collection, analysis and manipulation of data of diverse kinds from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, an awareness of the (dis)advantages of each frame and/or method and, consideration of the ethical issues involved in data collection and storage relative to the (sub) cultures examined)

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
  • Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
  • Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills

  • Demonstrate an ability to create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
  • Demonstrate the capacity to evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement marketing communication policies

Key / transferable skills

  • Demonstrate the capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • Demonstrate an ability to manage learning self-critically

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods. Read more

The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods.

You will take six compulsory modules, two optional modules and write a dissertation where you have the opportunity to specialise according to your personal interests. The programme includes numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

The programme is ideal for business professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, English language or business disciplines who would like to deepen their insight into business across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Career prospects

This degree will prepare you for a career in the areas of communication and intercultural consultancy, particularly, though not exclusively, where the use of English is required.

More specifically, the programme will appeal if you are seeking to work in multinational and international business, in particular in the fields of intercultural training, human resource management, and communication and marketing.

It will provide valuable preparation for careers in government overseas agencies and international diplomatic organisations, the voluntary sector, local government community initiatives and business consultancies, as well as in the communication industries.

Many of our graduates go on to find employment in a wide range of international organisations and businesses; others choose to take research degrees in their subject.

Academic support

As a student of the School of Literature and Languages, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics. You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

The business component of the programme will also allow you to benefit from the close affiliation with the Surrey Business School, a leading provider of internationally recognised postgraduate vocational management degrees.

The School has strong links with industry and has established a number of high-profile partnerships with multinational organisations. You will be supported by a team of international staff with a wealth of global experience and specialist expertise.

English language support for all

Programmes available to all students include:

  • Oral Skills
  • Academic Listening
  • Contemporary British Society
  • Pronunciation
  • Critical Thinking
  • Legal English
  • Academic Reading and Note-Taking
  • Grammar Revision
  • Essay Writing
  • Essay Writing for Native English Speakers
  • Thesis / Dissertation Writing

Educational aims of the programme

The overall purpose of the programme is to:

  • Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary socio-cultural contexts
  • Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
  • Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of Intercultural Communication

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

Students will be able to demonstrate:

  • A critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to- face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
  • A critical awareness of the issues and concerns involved in mediated and non-mediated intercultural communication
  • A comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
  • A detailed understanding of business organisations, their management challenges, and the changing external environment in which they operate

Intellectual / cognitive skills

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
  • Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
  • Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills

Students will have the skills to:

  • Create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
  • Evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement communication policies

Key / transferable skills

Students will be able to demonstrate:

  • The capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • An ability to manage learning self-critically

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Learn more about opportunities that might be available for this particular programme by using our student exchanges search tool.

Professional recognition

Surrey Business School is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).



Read less
The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more

The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of speech and hearing research, and their technological applications.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules and then have the opportunity to specialise in speech and hearing sciences. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
  • Development of Speech Perception and Production
  • Intermediate Phonetics
  • Experimental Phonetics
  • Phonetic Theory

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Options include:

  • Deafness, Cognition and Language
  • Second Language Speech Learning
  • Web Programming for Psychology and Language Sciences
  • Stuttering
  • Advanced topics in Speech Perception
  • Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from the Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Early Stage Researcher, UCL and studying PhD in Linguistics, Karl-Franzens-Universitハt Graz (University of Graz)

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. Read more
Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. The course covers understanding how cultures and human behaviour reflexively interconnect.

Changing social conditions and circumstances require new ways of dealing with people, and fresh ways of interacting and communicating with people of other cultures.

There is an urgent need to improve our knowledge and understanding of the processes and issues involved in cross-cultural communication, and to discover how such knowledge can be effectively applied in everyday experiences.

What this means in practice is that we need to develop our knowledge of why and how communication 'works' and how and why it sometimes does not 'work'.

The course answers questions including how cultural background impacts upon successful communication and how language, thought, and behaviour are interrelated.

The Cross-Cultural Communication (CCC) MA is relevant if you wish to study communication, language and culture. It will also suit anyone intending to work, or are already working, in international and cross-cultural environments where communication is an essential aspect of that work, as for example:
-Communications consultants
-Interpreters
-Social workers
-International sales representatives
-Journalists
-Medical and healthcare professionals
-Humanitarian aid staff
-Teachers
-Local government officials

The course is theoretically, practically and research oriented, and allows selection of one of six specialist pathways.

Our CCC courses are the only ones in the world to offer such a broad range of specialisms. This unique combination of expertise in cross-cultural communication and an additional area provides our graduates with enhanced employability in the competitive global marketplace.

We have an international student cohort, with up to 35 countries represented. Former students identify this as one of the main strengths of the course, as they are regularly working with peers from a wide range of national, linguistic and professional backgrounds. This provides everyone with an opportunity to develop their interpersonal and intercultural skills while studying.

Through the research portfolio, you are equipped with the analytical and theoretical skills required to understand and analyse communication in a wide range of settings. You learn about research in communication and cross-cultural communication from a range of perspectives, including:
-Social psychology
-Communication studies
-Intercultural communication studies
-Ethnography
-Discourse studies

The course has received praise from external examiners and the University's Internal Subject Review committee for the emphasis on teaching and assessing empirical, data-driven research. You receive training on the practical, theoretical and methodological skills required to conduct research relevant to the field of cross-cultural communication. This includes the various ways of collecting and analysing empirical data:
-Ethnographic observation
-Research interviews
-Questionnaire-based statistical analysis
-Discourse analysis

Delivery

Modules are delivered through a range of means, including:
-Lectures
-Seminars
-Workshops
-Group projects

Each module tends to last one semester. Some optional modules are taught in short, intensive blocks and/or on occasional weekends.

Work experience

You are encouraged to apply your research interests to real world case studies, particularly of international organisations or workplaces with which you have a connection.

For example, your empirical project submitted in research file three can be in connection with voluntary work (for a charity or NGO) or an internship, arranged over the summer towards the end of the course.

As a part time student you can conduct a research project of relevance to your employer and/or industry.

Pathway

The Cross-Cultural Communication MA has six specialist pathways:
-Applied Linguistics
-Education
-International Management
-International Marketing
-Media
-International Relations

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

Read less
Advance your career. Today’s rapidly changing work environment requires employees to complement their dynamic and flexible skills with a deep understanding of theory and practice. Read more

Advance your career

Today’s rapidly changing work environment requires employees to complement their dynamic and flexible skills with a deep understanding of theory and practice. The Master of Communication (Professional) at Bond allows graduates to differentiate themselves by complimenting previously acquired knowledge with problem-solving skills, a high level of written communication, and a professional portfolio.

Our students can advance into the next chapter of their career by graduating sooner with Bond’s accelerated degrees.

Graduate with a professional portfolio

The Master of Communication (Professional) at Bond, equips graduates with a deeper understanding of theory and practice, necessary for advancement in the communication industry. Graduates of the program are required to submit a Professional Portfolio that details their research and experience in their respective area. This portfolio ensure graduates can articulate their practical and theoretical expertise, develop their strategic thinking skills, and reflection capabilities.

About the program

The Master of Communication (Professional) allows students to further their careers in Communication by equipping them with an appropriate mix of theory and practice suited to industry, culminating with a professional segment comprising a professional portfolio, field project and field project report. The Master of Communication (Professional) provides an ideal balance of theoretical knowledge, practical skills, problem solving abilities, interpersonal skills and a high level of written communication. At the end of the degree, candidates will have a professional portfolio detailing their research and practical expertise in their chosen vocational area. The program duration is 4 semesters and 20 weeks (92 weeks).

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Communication (Professional) - Program Structure and Sequencing

Master of Communication (Professional) comprises 13 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Foundation subjects (6)

Dissertation/Portfolio (2)

Electives (2)

  • Student must choose two (2) subjects from the FSD list of available postgraduate subjects. Students can choose to undertake further minor dissertations/portfolios as electives if desired.

Professional

* Please note that the Professional Portfolio subject can only be commenced once all coursework subjects have been completed.

Available research topics for Dissertation / Portfolio

Please refer to Master of Communication for a full list of available research topics.

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.



Read less
The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more

The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two specialisation modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
  • Intermediate Phonetics
  • Neurobiology of Speech Processing
  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Possible options are listed below:

  • Conversation Analysis
  • Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
  • Deafness - Cognition and Language
  • Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
  • Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
  • Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability

This MSc is full of opportunities for students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem-solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X