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Masters Degrees (Communication Science)

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If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Read more

MSc Applied Communication Science

If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Not only in the Netherlands, but in the whole world!

Programme summary

In this programme students learn to analyse and critically reflect on the role of communication in complex dynamic processes. They also learn to design communication strategies and programmes that are relevant to societal problem solving and innovation.

Specialisations

There are two specialisations that students can choose from:

Communication in Innovation
Students learn to analyse and strategically apply communication to deal with current societal issues, problems and challenges in life science domains such as nature conservation, nutrition and health, water management, environment and food production. Our students are trained to adopt an integrative approach that involves social science and technical innovations, fulfilling an intermediary role to enhance multidisciplinarity and interactive cooperation.

Communication is a basic element of change. Complex processes of change involve different perspectives and perceptions of the various people involved. Societal processes like climate change, poverty, disease or ecological degradation require appropriate solutions that integrate insights from all kinds of disciplines and stakeholders. Opportunities for enhancing mutual understanding and collaboration between science disciplines and society are explored. Special attention is paid to everyday life situations and how people actively deal with common issues related to the domains of the life sciences. There are no pre-defined thesis tracks.

Students compile their own thesis tracks by choosing, besides the compulsory communication science courses, a combination of closely linked courses; including a minor in a life sciences domain. An internship introduces students to professional practice. The major thesis allows them to become experts in a specific area within communication that is closely linked to their personal interests and future career.

In the thesis track of their choice, students link Communication Science to, for example, Nature Conservation, Nutrition and Health, Animal Production Systems, Ecology and Environment, Forestry and Rural Development, Land Use Planning, Organic Agriculture, Product Design and Quality Management, Food Technology or Water Management.

Health and Society
More information on this specialisation is available here: http://www.findamasters.com/search/masters-degree/i883d5908c20425/msc-health-and-society-specialisation

Your future career

Graduates are specialised in building bridges between various stakeholders, such as governments and citizens or laymen and experts. They work for communication consultancy organisations, government departments, hospitals, development agencies, commercial organisations, media and institutes of knowledge. Career prospects are: communication consultant (advising organisations on how to improve their communication processes); policymaker (formulating policy in cooperation with groups in society); process facilitator (managing conflict, negotiation and change); communication manager (organising internal and external communication processes of an organisation); project manager (managing the communication and collaboration between parties throughout the entire project lifespan); journalist (making scientific knowledge accessible to a broader public); communication researcher (making a systematic analysis of a communication issue).

Alumna Bette Harms.
"At 'International Union for Conservation of Nature' (IUCN) I am part of a booming platform called 'Leaders for Nature' where over twenty multinationals meet and learn to incorporate natural capital into their core business processes. I am the coordinator of the Leaders for Nature Academy where I develop and deliver training models to our network members. In my daily job I actively seek to develop cooperation between Non Governmental Organisations (NGO's), the government and private sector. The Master Applied Communication Science has given me the capacity to translate ecology into valuable and understandable knowledge for a range of professionals working in the private sector."

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. Read more
Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career.

Developed by academic staff from The University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the programme will feature masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in print, broadcast and online journalism, museums and science centres, public policy and advocacy, specialist public relations and editorial services, project and event management, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

Aims

Science communication deals with the communication of scientific ideas, practices and issues to diverse audiences. Students on this programme will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?
The course considers these questions among others through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and feeds the discussion back into its approach to practical skills.

Special features

This programme provides a framework that enables to students to enhance their academic and 'real world' learning at the same time. By bringing practitioners into the classroom, and enabling students to participate in the many forms of science communication that are happening in Manchester, students gain a good sense of the range of science communication activity, and of the personal, intellectual and professional skills that will support them as they set off in their careers.

Applicants may informally request from the Course Director, or may be sent, examples of study materials to enable them to test their ability to engage effectively with the course.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements, for individual students and for groups. Students will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, with professional literatures, and with mass media products about science, technology and medicine. Students will learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events. Participation and volunteering will be encouraged so that students can further their own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Coursework and assessment

All modules are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. Students should expect assessments, which are written and spoken, and use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

Students may choose their own topic or medium for the many of the assessments. There is a small taught element which is assessed through a formal exam. Assessed work also includes a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional.
The final assessment piece is a substantial piece of original research (the dissertation).

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for students interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering who are seeking to work in journalism, science policy, science publishing, medical, environmental and other related campaigning and advocacy groups, public relations in the public and private sectors, museums and science centres, science festivals, or other public engagement fields. It also provides an appropriate grounding for PhD-level research in science communication studies.

Past MSc graduates who took our former science communication pathway in History of Science, Technology and Medicine have gone on to a wide range of relevant posts, including:
-Public Engagement Officer, Centre for Life, Newcastle
-Senior Policy Analyst, Department of Energy and Climate Change
-Director, Scientia Scripta (science-focused copywriting agency)
-Assistant Curator of Technology and Engineering, Science Museum
-Education Assistant, Catalyst Science Centre, Widnes
-Junior Consultant, Six Degrees PR
-Technical Author, Calrec Audio
-Researcher, Pioneer Productions (TV)

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. Read more

The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is being driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for science to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy decisions. Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between science and various stakeholder groups and ever more creative methodologies for science engagement are being explored.

Our part-time online distance learning programme provides an opportunity to gain a formal qualification in science communication without having to leave your job or move to a different location. You may elect to begin with the Post-Graduate Certificate in the first instance and then decide to study for a Diploma and/or a Master’s degree. You will engage with other students from around the world, from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and you will enjoy a rich learning experience while studying on the programme.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement methodologies and issues. In the process, you will develop critical thinking and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice. Your learning in individual courses is transferable, ensuring interconnection across the programme, thus providing opportunities for deeper learning and for the application of key principles in different contexts.

The programme attracts students from across the globe, from a range of academic and professional backgrounds and provides a formal qualification for those working in science communication and public engagement or a conversion route for those interested in moving into this field.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

The programme can be studied to PG Certificate, PG Diploma or Masters level – if you are interested, in a formal qualification in science communication then sign up for our Post Graduate Certificate. You can then opt to continue to the Diploma and the Masters degree.

Year 1 (Certificate) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Introduction to Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science and Society A
  • Science and Society B
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science
  • Science Education
  • The Role of Social Media in Science Communication

Year 2 (Diploma) - courses currently on offer include:

  • Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
  • Science, Policy and Practice
  • Science and the Media
  • Effective Exhibit and Programme Development
  • Creative Arts in Science Engagement
  • Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science

Year 3 (Masters)

Dissertation project.

Career opportunities

To address the need for effective science communication and public engagement with science, there has been a significant rise in opportunities available for professionals with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and public.

These roles can be found in, for example, Higher Education Institutions, Research Centres, Museums, Science Centres, Learned Societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making. Examples of specific roles are engagement managers, information and education officers, policy and knowledge brokers, in addition to the traditional science communicator role.



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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Our MSc Science Communication course is an excellent opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, our MSc programme gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course combines a solid theoretical background with practical skill development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs. Visiting specialists also help you understand what they are looking for in future employees.

Introductory modules provide a broad theoretical foundation in issues such as the rationale for public engagement with science, understanding the audience, the role of the media in society, communication theory and models of informal learning. You'll then have the opportunity to specialise by choosing from modules that cover practical skills related to taking science directly to the public, as well as new approaches to science communication such as digital media. This allows you to hone your practical skills and develop a portfolio that shows your expertise as a science communicator. In the final year, you may choose to further develop your portfolio, for example by mounting a practical science communication project, or take on a more theoretical or research-based project, perhaps with an external science communication organisation.

Modules

You will take the following three modules:
• Science and Society
• Science, the Public and Media

You then choose two from these three modules:
• Science on Air and on Screen
• Science in Public Spaces
• Writing Science

Format

Unlike most Master's courses in this area, the MSc Science Communication addresses the needs of working students. There are short, intensive teaching blocks of three to five days, and you can expect to attend three teaching sessions for each 30 credit module.

If you study this programme part-time, you'll take two 30 credit modules each for two academic years. It's possible to complete the part-time course in two years by finishing your project during the summer of the second year, or you may prefer to take a third year. Full-time students take four taught modules and complete the project in 14 months.

Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, tutorials and mentoring.

Assessment

The modules are assessed in a variety of ways, to reflect the theoretical concepts, knowledge and practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations all of which you can use to attract prospective employers. The ability to evaluate your own work and others' is critical to success in the workplace, and several assessments are designed to help you acquire these skills.

Careers / Further study

Science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, we'll encourage you to develop the professional skills to help you secure employment or research positions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This two-year master’s programme Computer Science offers stimulating, significant and innovative research at an internationally renowned institute and combines theoretical, experimental and applied approaches. Read more

This two-year master’s programme Computer Science offers stimulating, significant and innovative research at an internationally renowned institute and combines theoretical, experimental and applied approaches.

What does this master’s programme entail?

The two-year master’s programme in Computer Science offers six specialisations which combine excellent theoretical teaching with possibilities for applied work with industrial relevance. This is achieved by intensive collaboration with companies at the Leiden Centre of Data Science. Course themes include topics such as Evolutionary Algorithms, Neural Networks, Databases and Data Mining, Swarm-Based Computation, Bayesian Networks, Multimedia Systems, Embedded Systems and Software, Advanced Compilers and Architectures, Bio-Modeling and Petri Nets.

Read more about our Computer Science programme.

Why study Computer Science at Leiden University?

  • Interdisciplinary research opportunities as well as industrial applications provide you with exciting possibilities. The industrial application areas and interdisciplinary activities include, among others: Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, Medicine, Pharma, Physics, Engineering Applications, Logistics Applications, Energy and Utility related Applications and Financial Applications.
  • You will benefit from our diverse collaborations and the possibilities for internships and projects with our partners such as BMW, ING and Strukton.
  • You have ample of opportunities to assemble your own study path: an individually tailored programme will be designed for each student.

Find more reasons to choose Computer Science at Leiden University.

Computer Science: the right master’s programme for you?

The programme is open for students with an internationally recognized bachelor’s degree in computer science or equivalent. You will be trained as an independent researcher, equipped with the necessary skills to advance your career as a computer scientist.

Read more about the entry requirements for Computer Science.

Specialisations



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The cell is the building block of life, the smallest unit with the molecular characteristics of living systems. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms of the biomolecular and biochemical processes in the cell can lead to better medicines, new methods for combating diseases. Read more

The cell is the building block of life, the smallest unit with the molecular characteristics of living systems. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms of the biomolecular and biochemical processes in the cell can lead to better medicines, new methods for combating diseases.

What does this master’s programme entail?

The basis of the two-year master’s programme in Life Science and Technology is formed by research carried out in the life sciences and chemistry groups of the Leiden Institute of Chemistry (LIC). Researchers take a science-based approach in finding tailored solutions for complex societal problems as encountered in personalized medicine, systems biology and sustainable use of biological sources. Starting from day one, and during the whole master programme you are a member of a research team in the LIC. Guided by a personal mentor, the student assembles a tailor-made educational programme for optimal training to become a life sciences professional.

Read more about our Life Science and Technology programme.

Why study Life Science and Technology at Leiden University?

  • You can design your own tailor-made programme adjusted to your own interests and ambitions related to Life Sciences, biomedicine and Chemical Biology.
  • You have the possibility to be part of research training projects within the Faculty of Science, Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Erasmus Medical Center or abroad.
  • You will receive personal guidance by a mentor of choice, who is a member of one of our international and young research groups.

Find more reasons to study Life Science and Technology at Leiden University.

Life Science and Technology: the right master’s programme for you?

If you are interested in Life Science and you are looking for a programme with ample of opportunities to assemble your own study path, our Life Science and Technology programme is the right choice. The programme addresses societal problems on a molecular and cellular level. You can also choose a specialisation where you combine one year of Life Science and Technology research with one year of training in business, communication or education.

Read more about the entry requirements for Life Science and Technology.

Specialisations



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The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. Read more

The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. The text below is for information only.

The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:

-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education

-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education

-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1

-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)

-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Bilingualism

-Citizenship education

-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition

-Discourse Analysis

-Education and social justice

-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice

-Intercultural communication in education

-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading

-Motivation in education

-Teaching and assessing speaking skills

-Teaching and assessing writing skills

-Teaching and learning in schools

-Teaching World English

-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2

-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Approaches to English teaching

-Contemporary issues in teaching

-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse

-Developmental Psycholinguistics

-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language

-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication

-Psychology of language and language learning

-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis

-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education

-Teaching English for academic purposes

-The practice of English language teaching

-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3

Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:

-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)

-An exam in Research Methods in Education

-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit

-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.



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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. Read more
This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. The course will show you how to balance the excitement of scientific discovery and development of innovative delivery methods with an accurate representation of the facts and data that underpin it.

The taught aspects of the course combine practical skills of science journalism, medical writing and SciArt, (the interdisciplinary study of science and art), with theoretical learning about the history and philosophy of science and the study of science communication as an academic discipline.

You will also have the opportunity to work on live science communication projects with external organisations. The programme will give you the necessary analytical and communication skills to be a successful science communicator – in person as well as in writing.

Features and benefits of the course

-A course run by internationally-recognised science communication experts and practitioners.
-An innovative mix of taught and hands-on classes, seminars and workshops that enable students to develop their own skills as science communicators.
-Support and expertise in helping students to build up a portfolio of science communication activities
-Specialisms offered in a range of science communication areas including medical writing, journalism and SciArt.
-Opportunities to work with external organisations to develop genuine and effective science communication strategies.
-A personalised and supportive network designed to enhance your employment prospects.

Assessment details

Assessment on this programme will be innovative, stimulating, focussed and above all relevant to your studies. It will take into account your knowledge and employability prospects, with presentations, portfolios and live projects all contributing to ensuring that you have a useful and varied body of work to present to potential employers upon graduation.

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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.
- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.
- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.
- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.
- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Quality label

This programme was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:
- Scientific research career (academia)
The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career
Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More
Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science
For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:
- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.
- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.
- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

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