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This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Mobile telephony is reaching saturation in the most technologically advanced countries and is rapidly becoming the main telecommunications infrastructure in the rest of the world. Read more
Mobile telephony is reaching saturation in the most technologically advanced countries and is rapidly becoming the main telecommunications infrastructure in the rest of the world.

This programme gives you a thorough understanding of the engineering aspects of this rapidly developing field, as well as new emerging systems for the support of broadband mobile Internet.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

We have a wide range of testbeds available for projects, including wireless networking, wireless sensors, satellite networking, and security testbeds, future internet testbed and cloud infrastructure.

We also have a wide range of software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, Matlab, C, C++ and various system simulators. Some projects can offer the opportunity to work with industry.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems C
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & -Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile and satellite communications
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and satellite communications
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. Read more
The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. In addition, the Master’s programme provides you with the skills necessary to conduct independent philosophical analyses through both spoken and written media.

Philosophy graduates have been employed in a wide range of positions. Most of them work as researchers and teachers at institutions of higher education, general upper secondary schools and other educational institutions. Others serve in very different positions, often in jobs focusing less on a narrow field of specialisation and more on understanding broader issues, such as in communications as well as administration and planning duties.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Philosophy deals with the most fundamental and universal questions about the world and people’s place in it. Central topics include knowledge, reality, the mind, meaning, truth, science, society, action, value, and right and wrong. In Finland, philosophy has traditionally been divided into theoretical philosophy, and practical philosophy. The contents of the degree follow this division. The study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction represents a tradition in which this division does not exist. The degree programme in philosophy covers all central areas of philosophy. In addition to the general studies shared by all, you can specialise in a specific field of philosophy.

If you are particularly interested in social phenomena and wish to complete a Master of Social Sciences degree, choose practical philosophy or the equivalent content in philosophy in Swedish. If you are interested in other areas of philosophy, it is recommended that you complete a Master of Arts degree. During the course of studies in practical philosophy, you will explore basic issues of human activity and society, as well as common philosophical dilemmas in the field of social sciences.

Theoretical philosophy focuses on the traditional core questions of philosophy, which pertain to the structure of reality, the nature and possibility of knowledge, the relationship of language and the mind to reality, and the rules of competent deduction. It encompasses logic, metaphysics, epistemology, the history of philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, and philosophy of the mind. Metaphysics studies the fundamental nature of existence. Epistemology examines the general criteria for the justification or rationality of knowledge or belief. The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of theoretical and practical philosophy from antiquity to the present day. The particular focus of the philosophy of science is scientific knowledge, deduction and explanation. Logic examines the rules of formally competent deduction, formal languages and the philosophical applications of logical conceptual analysis. Research in the philosophy of language focuses on the relationship between language and reality as well as the nature of linguistic meaning and language use, while the philosophy of mind investigates the nature of mental states and events as well as their relationship with the brain and reality.

Practical philosophy studies the conceptual foundations of morality and society. The studies concentrate on conceptual issues related to norms, values and ideologies as well as on how various normative claims can be justified. Applied ethics examines concrete moral problems in the light of theories of normative ethics.

The philosophy of social science studies the principles of concept and theory formation as well as their epistemological and logical foundations. It also explores the nature and development of the social sciences, the special methods of mathematics and logic they apply, social ontology, and the relationship of the social sciences to society at large.

In addition to examining the fields described above, the study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction analyses the problem of the Enlightenment, contemporary philosophical criticism and the tradition of Socratic philosophy in which fundamental issues of knowledge, existence and morality are viewed as conceptually inseparable.

The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of philosophy, from antiquity to the present day.

The studies consist of lectures, seminars, book examinations, end-of-course examinations, essays, theses and brief presentations. The discipline also has several active research seminars, which allow you to follow the latest trends in international research. You should contact potential supervisors when you are selecting your thesis topic.

Selection of the Major

Students admitted to the Master’s Programme in Philosophy graduate with a Master of Arts or Master of Social Sciences degree. The study tracks in theoretical philosophy (and philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction) as well as practical philosophy correspond to the above degrees. In other words, the following three study tracks are offered:
-Theoretical philosophy
-Practical philosophy
-Philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction

When applying for the programme, you must inform us which degree you wish to pursue and which study track you wish to select. You can freely change your study track within the Master’s programme, but to graduate you must complete all the studies required for a single study track.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s degree is 120 credits, comprising:
-Advanced studies (60–110 credits), including a Master’s thesis (30 credits) and other studies in the discipline.
-Professional skills studies (5–15 credits), which can consist of a traineeship, a professional skills project or other studies that develop your professional skills.
-Elective studies (max. 55 credits).

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme trains researchers and subject teachers of philosophy for general upper secondary education. Studies in philosophy prepare you for all professions that require critical and exact thinking and the ability to write clearly and convincingly. The fundamental nature of the discipline and its capacity to provide both an all-round foundation and diverse opportunities for specialisation form an excellent basis for employment in a wide range of positions. Previous philosophy graduates have found employment in education, administration, communication and the commercial sector. According to a recent survey, 93% of American employers felt that the ability to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than a candidate’s major subject. A suitable combination of expertise in philosophy and other areas enables you to work in a wide range of intellectually challenging jobs.

Internationalization

Studying philosophy at the University of Helsinki provides excellent opportunities for gaining international experience:
-The most common option is to become an exchange student at one of the Faculty’s or University’s partner institutions abroad. You can complete part of your degree studies at a university outside of Finland. The philosophy disciplines have several Erasmus and Nordplus exchange agreements with European universities.
-Another option is to complete a traineeship abroad.
-You can help international students as a peer tutor.
-You can be involved in the international activities of the subject organisations or the University’s Student Union.
-You can also improve your language skills and cultural knowledge by participating in the language courses of the University of Helsinki Language Centre.
-A bilingual degree (in Finnish and Swedish) provides you with access to the Nordic job market.

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At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering. Read more
At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MSc Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering students and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies in the selected pathway, with enhanced project, as well as training in transferable skills including business awareness and management.

We offer numerous Electronic Engineering MScs in more specialised fields of study, from space engineering to mobile communications systems, and if you wish to specialise in one of these pathways you can adjust your course accordingly.

The advanced taught technical content is in sub-disciplines of electronic engineering closely aligned with the internationally-leading research conducted in the four research centres of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. Each student will undertake one short course, following which they will be provided with distance learning material in order to study for the subsequent assessment. The students may be assessed for either one or two modules from the short course they undertake.

Typically a student would complete two modules and therefore up to two short courses within the space of year, though they are at liberty to study for more modules if they have the time. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-IP Networking Protocols and Technologies
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communication
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Spacecraft System Design
-Satellite Communications
-Internet of Things
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VDHL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-60-Credit Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resource
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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We are placing ever greater demands on the Internet, and traditional telecommunication infrastructures are migrating to Internet-based architectures and protocols. Read more
We are placing ever greater demands on the Internet, and traditional telecommunication infrastructures are migrating to Internet-based architectures and protocols.

This programme benefits from the research that experts in our 5G Innovation Centre are undertaking to lead the world in the race to the next generation of communications networks.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions.

Some of our students undertaking their project are able to work on one of our wide range of testbeds, such as internet technologies, wireless networking, network management and control, and internet-of-things (IoT) applications.

We also have specialist software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, and various system simulators.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Object Oriented Design and C++ (+Lab)
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Internet of Things
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking Compulsory
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Mobile Communications B
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin communications, networks and software
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of communications, networks and software and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within communications, networks and software
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The Department's taught postgraduate programmes are designed to enhance the student's technical knowledge in the topics within electronic and electrical engineering that he/she has chosen to study, and to contribute to the Specific Learning Outcomes set down by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (which is the Professional Engineering body for electronic and electrical engineering) and to the General Learning Outcomes applicable to all university graduates.

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Workshop and laboratory skills. Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Relevant part of: Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Surrey is one of very few institutions with the expertise and facilities to give you hands-on experience in RF and microwave devices, backed and informed by pioneering research in wireless communications, space technology, advanced gigahertz and terahertz microwave technologies. Read more
Surrey is one of very few institutions with the expertise and facilities to give you hands-on experience in RF and microwave devices, backed and informed by pioneering research in wireless communications, space technology, advanced gigahertz and terahertz microwave technologies.

This programme emphasises radio and microwave communications in 5G and beyond.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme addresses the great shortage of skilled radio frequency (RF) and microwave engineers, and the growing demand for conceptually new wireless systems.

You will learn about a range of modern theories and techniques, accompanied by topics on wireless frequencies and sizes of RF and microwave devices.

This ranges from the lowest frequencies used in radio frequency identification (RFID) systems through to systems used at mm wave frequencies that can have applications in satellite communication systems and fifth generation wireless communication systems.

Theoretical concepts established in lectures are complemented by practical implementation in laboratory sessions, with direct experience of industry-standard computer-aided design (CAD) software.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Antennas and Propagation
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Standard Project

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

We provide solid academic support through the taught modules and into the project period. You will be assigned a personal tutor with whom you can discuss both academic and general issues related to the programme.

When you move into the project phase of the programme, you will be assigned a project supervisor who you will meet, usually on a weekly basis, to discuss the progress of your project.

The individual taught modules also feature strong academic support, usually through a tutorial programme. All of the RF and microwave modules have tutorial sheets to support the lectures.

Although completing the tutorials is not part of the formal assessment, you have the option of using the tutorials to receive individual feedback on your progress in the modules.

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

The combined facilities of the RF teaching laboratories and the Advanced Technology Institute provide MSc students with an exceptionally wide range of modern fabrication and measurement equipment.

Furthermore a wide variety of RF test and measurement facilities are available through Surrey Space Centre and the 5G Innovation Centre, which also involve work in the RF and microwave engineering domain.

Equipment includes access to CAD design tools, anechoic chamber, spectrum analysers, network analysers, wideband channel sounder, circuit etching and circuit testing.

INDUSTRIAL AND OVERSEAS LINKS

The 5G Innovation Centre and Advanced Technology Institute within the Department have a range of active links with industry, both in the UK and overseas. During the past few years we have had students taking the MSc through the part-time route and completing their projects in industry.

Examples of industrial projects range from looking at new microwave measurement techniques at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), to antenna design and construction at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

We have also sent students overseas to complete their projects, funded through the Erasmus scheme, which is a European programme that provides full financial support for students completing their project work at one of our partner universities in mainland Europe.

Students taking advantage of this opportunity not only enhance their CVs with a European perspective, but also produce excellent project dissertations.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Surrey’s satellite and space technology programmes are renowned internationally, and our graduates are held in equally high regard. Read more
Surrey’s satellite and space technology programmes are renowned internationally, and our graduates are held in equally high regard.

The Masters in Satellite Communications Engineering is a leader in Europe in equipping students with the necessary background to enter the satellite industry or to continue on to a research degree.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our Masters programme in Satellite Communications Engineering is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary skills required for careers in the satellite and space industries.

We have an exceptional concentration of academic staff experienced in the satellite area, in addition to well-established contacts with all the major satellite manufacturers, operators and service providers.

Industry participates in the MSc programme in both lecturing and projects, and facilitates excellent engagement for our students. Graduation from this programme will therefore make you very attractive to the relevant space-related industries that employ over 6,500 people in the UK alone.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Space Dynamics & Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Principles of Telecommunications & Packet Networks
-Satellite Communications Fundamentals
-RF Systems & Circuit Design
-Data & Internet Networking
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation & Control
-Launch Vehicles & Propulsion
-Network & Service Management & Control
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Standard Project

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPORT

Through consistent investment, we have built up an impressive infrastructure to support our students and researchers. The University of Surrey hosts Surrey Space Centre – a unique facility comprising academics and engineers from our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

Our mission control centre was designed and developed by students to support international CubeSat operations as part of the GENSO network, and it also supports the development of the University’s own educational satellites.

Our teaching laboratories provide ‘hands-on’ experience of satellite design and construction through the use of EyasSAT nano-satellite kits. They also house meteorological satellite receiving stations for the live reception of satellite weather images.

Elsewhere, our fully equipped RF lab has network analyser, signal and satellite link simulators. The Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment, and roof-mounted antennas to communicating live with satellites.

A security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation. We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including Matlab, and you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house.

Satellite Communications Engineering students can also make use of SatNEX, a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications supported by ESA; a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe. This is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by partners.

Our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, is situated close by on the Surrey Research Park and provides ready access to satellite production and industrial facilities. In addition, we have a strategic relationship with EADS Airbus Europe-wide and several other major communications companies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). The programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin satellite communications engineering.
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within satellite communications engineering.
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. Read more
Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. It is increasingly important that developments in science, medicine and technology are effectively communicated so as to allow individuals to have an informed opinion on controversial issues.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/93/science-communication-society

Course detail

The Kent MSc in Science, Communication and Society gives experienced, practical, professional and critical perspectives on science communication. Students will explore how journalists, documentary makers, lobbyists, museum curators, politicians and government research bodies enter into scientific dialogue with the public. The course evaluates different strategies for tailoring science to particular audiences, and is illustrated by specific historical examples and present day issues and controversies. It provides training in practical transferable skills pivotal to communicating science across a range of professional settings, making appropriate use traditional modes of communication alongside current and developing technologies.

Purpose

It is intended primarily, though not exclusively, for the following:

• Science graduates intending to pursue a career in media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Practising scientists wanting a career change into media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Continuing professional development for scientists or teachers of science;
• Humanities graduates with an interest in history of science, technology or medicine.

Format and assessment

The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences, a leading school in teaching, research and science communication, and the School of History, which has a dedicated research centre in the History of the Sciences. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Two core modules have a case study-driven approach to science communication, learning from key scientific moments in history and from science communicators who work in a variety of different professions (eg, media, politics, education, journalism).

Two optional modules allow you to specialise in a particular area relevant to science communication, based on your interests and experience, focusing on either practical/scientific or humanities-based approaches to the study of science communication. An extended research project allows you to take a practical approach to science communication, or to do in-depth research on a historical or contemporary episode in science.

In some cases, these projects may be undertaken in conjunction with external partners, such as Research Councils, charities and NGOs.

You can opt to take only the core modules, resulting in a postgraduate certificate, or to take the compulsory plus two optional modules, leading to a postgraduate diploma.

Continuous assessment throughout the year is diverse, innovative and context-driven, from short pieces of writing to longer essays, and from the development and evaluation of science communication activities to mock professional reports and grant applications. The aim of each assessment is not only to monitor understanding, but also to integrate information across modules and give you practical experience in a range of transferable skills for future employability.

Careers

The opportunities for careers in science communication are significant as professional science organisations recognise the increasing importance of public engagement. Graduates of this MSc bring together skills drawn from both sciences and humanities, and the programme is designed to build a portfolio of outputs that can be used in subsequent applications, including blogs, funding applications and the development of specific science communication events. Graduates from the programme have moved into roles in museums, medical writing agencies, research funding councils, public engagement roles in professional science organisations, as well as PhD positions in science communication.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/93

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

Read less
Surrey is a world leader in satellite communications, broadcasting, terrestrial mobile networks and the Internet. essential components of communication and information infrastructures. Read more
Surrey is a world leader in satellite communications, broadcasting, terrestrial mobile networks and the Internet: essential components of communication and information infrastructures.

This has allowed us to create a Masters programme in this burgeoning field that is delivered by academics and researchers with extensive theoretical expertise and practical experience.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Mobile communications provide terrestrial coverage in densely populated areas, while satellite communications enable wireless communication in regions where mobile networking is not cost-effective. The programme gives you an in-depth understanding of the engineering aspects of these important current and future technologies.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Gideon Ewa.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Satellite Communications Fundamentals
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Networking and Service Management & Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-60-Credit Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile and satellite communications
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and satellite communications
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our MSc in Mobile Media Communications is offered by a department recognised for its internationally-leading research in multimedia signal processing and machine learning. Read more
Our MSc in Mobile Media Communications is offered by a department recognised for its internationally-leading research in multimedia signal processing and machine learning.

If you are interested in these fields, and want to receive up-to-date training in emerging technologies, our programme will equip you with the skills and knowledge highly valued by industry.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Internet of Things
-EEE3007 Data and Internet Networking
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Image and Video Compression
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile media communications
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile media communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and media communications
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s. Read more
Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s.

Since then, our sustained programme of building complete satellites, performing mission planning, working with international launch agencies and providing in-orbit operations has kept us at the forefront of the space revolution –utilising new advances in technology to decrease the cost of space exploration.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our Masters in Space Engineering programme is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary knowledge and skills required for a career working with space technology and its applications.

Surrey students have access to all aspects of the design and delivery of spacecraft and payloads, and as a result are very attractive to employers in space-related industries.

As we develop and execute complete space missions, from initial concept to hardware design, manufacturing and testing, to in orbit operations (controlled by our ground station at the Surrey Space Centre), you will have the chance to be involved in, and gain experience of, real space missions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Space Avionics
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin space engineering.
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within space engineering.
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Read more
Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Perhaps you will develop algorithms for utilising genome data in medicine or optimise bus routes using positioning data. Do you wonder about all the things that can be automated? Or would you like to dig deeper and become a researcher?

In the Master’s programme in computer science you can become an expert in a wide range of fields. You will have access to the focus areas of research in computer science at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, distributed or networked systems, and software engineering. You will gain lasting professional skills for specialist, design, or managerial posts in the corporate world, or for research and doctoral education, since the Master’s programme in computer science gives you the aptitude for both independent working and multidisciplinary teamwork.

This education will give you:
-The ability to advance your knowledge in the different areas of computer science.
-The skill to seek, assess, and analyse scientific information in your own area of expertise, and apply the methods of the field in an ethical and sustainable way.
-The ability to act as expert in the field, and to develop the practices and methods of your field in cooperation with specialists from other fields.
-Oral and written communication skills in an international work environment.

The quality teaching within the computer science programme at the University of Helsinki has been highlighted repeatedly in national and international teaching assessments. The student-centred, in-depth learning gives you a solid basis for life-long learning. Studying at the leading research unit for computer science in Finland offers you constant interaction with current research and insight into the development patterns in the field.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

In future, we will increasingly be using intelligent tools, consisting of networked hardware, software, services, and data. They will work based on intelligent, learning algorithms, data streams carried by communication protocols, and global infrastructures.

Within the Algorithms sub-programme, you will study effective algorithms and their application within other disciplines and in corporate life. Future IT systems will contain more and more intelligent components, the function of which will be based on complex mathematical models created automatically with the aid of machine-learning methods. The problems to be solved are computationally challenging, and the ever increasing amounts of data will create their own challenges when it comes to the efficiency of the algorithms needed.

The Networking and services sub-programme educates you to become an expert and strategic leader in the design and management of new global infrastructures. The infrastructures include Internet technologies in fixed networks and mobile environments, as well as the information and service networks built on top of them. Focus areas include the theory, data security, and trust within distributed systems, interactive systems, and the adaptability of services in a changing environment.

The Software systems sub-programme introduces you to the design and implementation of advanced software. The development of a shared software framework or platform for several software products is very demanding both technically and from the development project viewpoint. Developing such software requires technical skills, but also team- and project work, quality assurance, and communication. Within this sub-programme, you can specialise in software engineering, software technology, or information management, and study the current research questions in these areas in depth.

Selection of the Major

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for computer science are:
-Algorithms
-Networking and services
-Software systems

You can select any of these programmes according to your preferences at the beginning of your studies. The sub-programme determines which courses you should take.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits, which can be completed in two years, in accordance with an approved personal study plan. The degree includes:
-80 credits of advanced courses, including shared courses within the programme, courses within the programme which support the thesis topic, the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu), 30 credits.
-40 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes. The other courses can include a work-orientation period.

Career Prospects

The employment outlook within the field is excellent. Masters of computer science find varied positions within the ICT field, both as employees and entrepreneurs. The nature of the education is also geared towards giving you an aptitude for managerial posts. All the sub-programmes provide the qualifications to find employment in a wide variety of jobs.

Software-system graduates often start their careers as software developers and designers, while network graduates often start with software at the infrastructure level (such as data communications, computation, or data entry). The skills learned in the algorithms sub-programme enable you to work on challenging tasks in various fields.

As a graduate you can find employment within small or large corporations as well as organisations in the private, public, or third sector. Due to the global nature of the field, you can find employment anywhere in the world. Taking modules from other education programmes will help you apply your computer science skills in other areas. Many jobs are based on these combinations.

Thanks to its strong scientific basis, the degree is also an excellent springboard to a doctoral programme.

Internationalization

There is a very international atmosphere within the programme, as nearly a third of the students come from abroad, and the advanced courses are instructed by international researchers.

In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science offer you many opportunities for international activities:
-Instruction in English within other education programmes.
-International tasks within the students’ organisations or union.
-Language courses at the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

You can also get information and counselling about independent international experience, such as:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeships abroad.

Computer science at the University of Helsinki is a popular exchange location, especially from Germany. Some 5-10 students come annually; exchange students have come from 14 countries in recent years. The students in the department have taken exchange periods in 16 countries in the past few years.

Research Focus

There are several multidisciplinary research projects under way at the Faculty of Science, which are being carried out in cooperation with the research institutes on the science campus and with other faculties, universities, and corporations. The role of computer science within these projects is to develop the basic methods of the discipline in strategic areas and to collaborate in depth with other disciplines.

The sub-programmes within the Master’s programme cover a considerable part of the strategic focus areas of computer science research at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, data analysis and machine learning, networking and services, software systems, bioinformatics, and data science.

Computer science is part of three Finnish Academy centres of excellence: for computational inference, inversion problems, and cancer genetics. These units represent the collaboration between computer science and other disciplines.

Computer science has coordinated the long-lived Algodan centre of excellence, which has been the basis for many current research groups.

Read less
The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken and technology-mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies. Read more
The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken and technology-mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies.

Recognising this need, this programme is one of the few in the UK that combine translation and interpreting to provide you with the skills and competence you need to perform both tasks professionally.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme combines translation and interpreting studies with a strong focus on technology. It is tailored to meet current market demands and responds to the contemporary concerns of the language industry.

Language-specific translation modules cover specialised translation in domains such as business, finance, science, technology and law. The interpreting modules offer intensive language-specific practice in consecutive interpreting (traditional and short) and dialogue interpreting for business and public service contexts.

The practice-based components of the programme, which include valuable simulations of real-life scenarios, are complemented by modules highlighting different aspects of the profession.

You will practise with the latest computer-assisted translation software and use cutting-edge videoconferencing systems for remote interpreting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

All programmes operate on a 15 credit modular structure over two semesters. All taught modules are semester based and are worth 15 credits, which is indicative of 150 hours of learning, comprised of student contact, private study and assessment.

The MA Translation and Interpreting is studied over one year (full-time mode) or two years (part-time mode). On successful completion of the programme, you will be awarded a Master’s degree in Translation and Interpreting and can then enter the professional translation and interpreting market.

Language-specific options are paired with English and are subject to demand. If you are a native speaker of English, you can take up to two Specialist Translation or Consecutive and Dialogue Interpreting options (in another language).

If you are not a native speaker of English, you will normally take one Translation option and one Interpreting option (in your mother tongue paired with English).

You can also choose one ab initio language if you wish to expand your portfolio of translation languages. Options ending in ‘I’ in semester 1 must be taken in conjunction with modules ending in ‘II’ in semester 2. Each module provides 15 credits, totalling 120 credits in all.

TEACHING STAFF

Experienced academic staff with excellent research records will help you to develop a broad understanding of the current and future challenges of translation and interpreting, while professional translators and interpreters bring their real-world experience and standards, and up-to-date knowledge of the translation and interpreting market into the classroom.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

In addition to enjoying regular contact with professional translators and interpreters in your practice-based modules, you will benefit from course components that specifically address the business and wider industry aspects of the profession.

Further insights into the industry will be provided by external guest speakers we invite to our Translation Studies seminars. These include professional translators, interpreters, subtitlers and audio describers; professionals working in public services, companies and international organisations; representatives of professional translator/interpreter associations as well as translation/interpreting researchers.

In line with our aim to offer professionally relevant programmes, we have forged close links with the main professional bodies, i.e. the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL).

You can join these bodies as a student member during the course and then become a full member after graduation.

In addition, we work closely with many professional language service providers and are a member of the European Language Industry Association (ELIA), which gives you the possibility to apply for a work placement with various translation and interpreting companies that are members of ELIA.

The Centre for Translation Studies has also been granted free access to Memsource software to help further student's education.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Thanks to our continued emphasis on professional development, you will be well-equipped to begin work as freelancers or as language service providers and project managers at international organisations, government bodies, universities and private companies.

We also regularly have students who decide to stay on to study for a PhD and pursue an academic career in Translation and Interpreting Studies.

WHAT MAKES THE PROGRAMME SPECIAL?

The MA programme combines translation and inter­preting studies with a strong focus on technology. It is tailored to meet current market demands and to respond to the contemporary concerns of the language and translation/interpreting industry. You will acquire the practical knowledge, organisational and project management skills necessary to perform translation and interpreting tasks effectively.

Language-specific translation modules cover specialised translation in domains such as business, finance, science, technology and law.

The interpreting modules offer intensive language-specific practice in consecutive interpreting (traditional and short) and dialogue interpreting in a wide range of private and public sector domains (from institutional/diplomatic to business to public service encounters).

The practice-based components of the programme are complemented by background lectures, which will help you to understand the major principles of translation and interpreting, and provide you with a conceptual and methodological framework for analysing, discussing and justifying translation-related decisions.

Our strong emphasis on the use of translation and interpreting technologies will allow you to work hands-on with the latest computer-assisted translation software, state-of-the-art corpus tools and resources, and cutting-edge videoconferencing systems for remote interpreting.

You will have opportunities to immerse yourself in simulations of real-life scenarios and acquire hands-on experience that is invaluable to become a fully-fledged professional language service provider.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The growing complexity of international communication, involving written, spoken as well as technically mediated communication, increasingly requires combined competencies.

Recognising this need, the programme unites translation and interpreting studies, providing students with the skills and the flexibility to perform both tasks professionally in a business context.

The programme relates issues of translation and interpreting to contemporary discourse in corporate and institutional contexts and prepares students for private and public sector employment including corporate business, public services and NGOs.

The programme combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, translation and interpreting with opportunities for application and practice – with the aim of enabling students to:
-Perform relevant translation and interpreting tasks
-Reflect on their own practice, using scholarly and professional writing on relevant aspects of translation and interpreting
-Transfer the acquired skills and knowledge to novel and unpredictable situations of translation and interpreting

Translation and interpreting are rapidly changing due to the impact of globalisation, social change and new technologies. The programme will provide students with insights into recent developments and related research – with the aim of enabling the students to:
-Develop a broad understanding of current and future challenges of translation and interpreting
-Apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate professional practice in the light of current and future requirements
-Have the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area of translation or interpreting

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles that underpin translation and interpreting, as different yet interrelated activities
-Demonstrate a good understanding of theoretical issues relevant to translation and interpreting
-Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the areas of translation and interpreting in relation to general as well as more specific socio-political issues
-Demonstrate an understanding of translation and interpreting in the context of both globalisation and the contact between different individuals, social groups and (local) institutions
-Demonstrate an understanding of advanced translation techniques in relation to specialised subject fields
-Demonstrate an understanding of advanced interpreting skills and preparation techniques

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Critically evaluate scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the activities of translation and interpreting
-Strategically retrieve information crucial for the communication situation at hand and efficiently relay the message in the written or oral mode
-Conduct conceptual and advanced terminological research related to specific tasks
-Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study

Professional practical skills
-Produce high-quality translations in a variety of genres which are appropriate to their context
-Orally present mediated messages in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Confidently deal with interpreting tasks under simulated conditions, especially developing stamina and problem solving techniques under conditions of time and cognitive pressure
-Acquire a sound knowledge of the structures, procedures, code of conduct as well as the professional terminology pertinent to the area
-Function professionally in all situations
-Monitor levels of engagement and impartiality in translation and interpreting situations
-Acquire review/evaluation skills for translation and interpreting purposes
-Combine translation and interpreting skills in a market where flexibility and a varied professional portfolio is an advantage

Key/transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting independent research, and the speedy and efficient processing of complex information in English and another language
-Collaborate by working in small teams to achieve a common goal
-Develop knowledge in specialised subject areas and command of terminology
-Organise, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high professional standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity
-Understand the main techniques of translating and interpreting, and transfer those to novel and unplanned situations
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Manage learning self-critically
-Exercise initiative and personal responsibility

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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