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Masters Degrees (Communication International)

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK and combine the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. Read more
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK and combine the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. We’ve successfully trained over 300 graduates who have left equipped for a range of careers in communication and intercultural consultancy, many within government overseas agencies, international diplomatic organisations and business consultancies.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods.

You will take six compulsory modules, two optional modules and write a dissertation where you have the opportunity to specialise according to your personal interests. The programme includes numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

The programme is ideal for business professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, English language or business disciplines who would like to deepen their insight into business across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research Methods
-Organisational Behaviour
-International Business Management
-Intercultural Communication for Business Purposes
-Teaching Intercultural Communication
-Interpersonal Communication
-Global Diversity in Language and Communication
-Theories of Professional Communication
-Identity: Marketing and Communication in Practice
-Globalisation: Theories, Discourses and Practices
-The Language of Advertising
-Organisations and Written Communication
-Dissertation

CAREER PROSPECTS

This degree will prepare you for a career in the areas of communication and intercultural consultancy, particularly, though not exclusively, where the use of English is required.

More specifically, the programme will appeal if you are seeking to work in multinational and international business, in particular in the fields of intercultural training, human resource management, and communication and marketing.

It will provide valuable preparation for careers in government overseas agencies and international diplomatic organisations, the voluntary sector, local government community initiatives and business consultancies, as well as in the communication industries.

Many of our graduates go on to find employment in a wide range of international organisations and businesses; others choose to take research degrees in their subject.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

As a student of the School of English and Languages, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics. You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

The business component of the programme will also allow you to benefit from the close affiliation with the Surrey Business School, a leading provider of internationally recognised postgraduate vocational management degrees.

The School has strong links with industry and has established a number of high-profile partnerships with multinational organisations. You will be supported by a team of international staff with a wealth of global experience and specialist expertise. Programmes available to all students include:
-Oral Skills
-Academic Listening
-Contemporary British Society
-Pronunciation
-Critical Thinking
-Legal English
-Academic Reading and Note-Taking
-Grammar Revision
-Essay Writing
-Essay Writing for Native English Speakers
-Thesis / Dissertation Writing

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overall purpose of the programme is to:
-Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary socio-cultural contexts
-Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area ofIntercultural Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:
-Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the intercultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
-Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
-Impart the knowledge and skills of intercultural communication and international business necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (intercultural training, human resource management, government local/overseas agencies and agencies for international co-operation, business consultancies), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
-Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Intercultural Communication

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-A critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to- face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
-A critical awareness of the issues and concerns involved in mediated and non-mediated intercultural communication
-A comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
-A detailed understanding of business organisations, their management challenges, and the changing external environment in which they operate

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
-Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
-Evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement communication policies

Key / transferable skills
-The capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
-An ability to manage learning self-critically

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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In this double degree you will learn the essentials of media communication, cultural studies and policy development in the increasingly globalised world whilst focusing on international issues and developing important international relations skills. Read more

Overview

In this double degree you will learn the essentials of media communication, cultural studies and policy development in the increasingly globalised world whilst focusing on international issues and developing important international relations skills.

The research project component of the degree can help prepare students for higher level tertiary study.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/doublemaster/master-of-international-communication-with-the-degree-of-master-of-international-relations

Key benefits

- Breadth and international focus: develop a solid grounding in international communication and international relations through study in media communication, international relations and cultural studies

- Flexibility: study elective units from a range of communications and international relations disciplines; have the option of evening classes to help balance work requirements

- Coaching in academic and essay-writing skills is provided within the program

- Gain credit towards the degree and develop career opportunities by completing one of the international internship programs especially designed for Masters students in an approved institution in Australia or overseas

- Access to leading academics in the fields of international relations theory, democratisation, human rights, globalisation, security studies, regionalisation, and global political economy

Suitable for

This degree is suitable for people who wish to work in international organisations. A mixture of core units and electives will provide you with specialised knowledge and skills in the field of international communication and international relations.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

- Career Opportunities
The course will be an important milestone in the career paths of a variety of individuals including diplomats and international civil servants, policy makers, development specialists, international business people, media managers and international journalists.

Employers
- diplomatic service agencies
- federal and local government
- global media industry
- international non-government organisations
- multinational corporations
- public sector
- United Nations

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/doublemaster/master-of-international-communication-with-the-degree-of-master-of-international-relations

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The Master in International Communication (MIC) is an ambitious double degree programme for those who aspire to an international career as a communication practitioner in senior managerial or consultancy positions, responsible for the external and internal communication of an organisation. Read more
The Master in International Communication (MIC) is an ambitious double degree programme for those who aspire to an international career as a communication practitioner in senior managerial or consultancy positions, responsible for the external and internal communication of an organisation.

Four universities across Europe, all specialising in communication and public relations in international professional contexts, have joined forces to create this unique joint programme offering you the full benefit of their collective expertise and international networks. This consortium consists of:

• The Netherlands: Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen
• The United Kingdom: Leeds Beckett University
• Italy: IULM University, Milan
• Lithuania: Vilnius University

The MIC offers you the opportunity to study at two universities and graduate with two Master’s degrees and the Geert Hofstede Consortium certificate. The programme starts each September and consists of three semesters (90 European credits). During the first semester you will study at one of the consortium universities, and for your second semester you will study at one of the other consortium universities. During the third semester, you will write your dissertation under the supervision of these two universities.

Career Focused

How is the career perspective built into the MIC programme? Throughout your study, you will analyse and solve real corporate communication problems provided by companies and governmental and non-governmental organisations. While acquiring the necessary expertise, you will at the same time acquire the knowledge and skills you need to be able to work within an international, complex and ever-changing business context. In doing so, you will not only be achieving an academic milestone, you will also be building your business network and complementing your résumé with work experiences.

MIC Curriculum Overview

Semester 1: Core Programme (30 European credits)
The first semester introduces you to the full breadth of the profession. What are the roles and responsibilities of the communication professional in an organisation from a strategic perspective? Which main functional areas are there? How does culture influence communication? What is the relationship between the organisation and its international and intercultural environment? You will complete this semester at one of the consortium universities of your choice.

Semester 2: Specialisations (30 European credits)
During the second semester you will complete a number of specialisations from another consortium universities of your choice. The specialisations are, by definition, in tune with what is happening in the professional field and can change according. The specialisations include:

Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands
• Intercultural Management
• International marketing communication
• International public affairs & corporate communication

IULM International University of Languages and Media, Milan, Italy
• Development and communication
• Public affairs and advocacy
• Social responsibility and communication

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, The United Kingdom
• Public relations skills
• Communication audits
• Digital communication management

Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania
• International crisis communication management
• Innovative methods in corporate communication
• Media and sustainable development

Semester 3: The Graduation Project (30 European credits)
The graduation Project consists of a master’s dissertation and a personal development portfolio. You must demonstrate mastery of those competences required to obtain the title Master in International Communication. You will choose a professional role and analytically solve a problem for an outside client or stakeholders (working in-house or as a consultant). The result of this project will be based on applied research and the use of an appropriate methodology. Every problem requires a solution from an international or intercultural perspective. The dissertation is completed under the supervision of two universities.

MIC graduate profile

As a graduate of the Master in International Communication you will be an interculturally competent communication professional able to work in a global context. You will be able to anticipate changes and develop, implement and manage sustainable and innovative solutions to communication issues. As a graduate, you will have the skills and knowledge needed to work at managerial or consultancy level.

Career Prospects

Based on the MIC Alumni Evaluation conducted in 2015, 91.6% of the MIC graduates have found a job within a year after graduating. Graduates have found jobs as Communications manager, Communications consultant, Director of communication and external relations, Image and communications manager, Marketing & communications executive, Content and media manager, Social media research officer, Senior international relations officer, Events officer and Project manager. Companies where our graduates have found positions include Google, Edelman PR, Ogilvy Group, Walt Disney, Hewlett Packard, IBM, ABN-Amro bank and governmental institutions.

Admission requirements

• Previous study in one of the following fields: communication, humanities, social sciences, business, management. Extensive work experience may also be considered.
• English language requirements: IELTS: 6.5, no subscores below 5.5 or TOEFL: 90 (internet). IELTS or TOEFL must not be older than two years.

The MIC is a fully accredited programme.

For more information about admission and application visit: http://www.hanzegroningen.eu/mic or http://www.masterinternationalcommunication.eu

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation allows international law and international relations to inform each other. It covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law, international humanitarian law and international relations. It provides a detailed understanding of the role, potential and limitations of public international law in international affairs. Its interdisciplinary approach is particularly suited to those involved with, or hoping to work for, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, foreign affairs departments and international law firms.

Students studying International Law with International Relations are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at Kent. These include workshops, trips to international courts and tribunals, and guest lecture series.

Students taking this specialisation can choose to spend one term at our Canterbury campus and one at our Brussels centre (returning to their primary location to complete the dissertation) under our split-site option for this programme. The split site option is charged at a different rate. Please see under Fees below for more information.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Think Kent: International Law with International Relations

There is no universally agreed precise legal, technical or political definition of either the boundaries separating airspace from outer space or of the term ‘outer space’ itself. Yet two separate legal regimes exist for the regulation of these two environments. In this lecture, Dr Gbenga Oduntan, Senior Lecturer in International Commercial Law at the University of Kent, critiques the leading theories that have been postulated to solve this problem, and proposes an original solution regarding the spatial demarcation boundary point issue in air and space law.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. The double specialisation International Law with International Relations is slightly different to the other LLM Specialisations offered at the Kent Law School. International Relations is a ‘minor’ stream which is only available when combined with the International Law ‘major’ stream. For the award of a degree titled ‘Master of Laws in International Law with International Relations’ you should study at least three modules from the International Law stream together with your dissertation. You must then choose two modules from the International Relations ‘minor’ stream. The remaining module can be chosen from any of the other law modules offered on the LLM.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW814 Public International Law

LW844 Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW922 Labour Rights in a Global Economy

LW925 Cultural Heritage Law

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Develop the media communication, international relations and cultural studies skills you need for an international communications career. Read more

Overview

Develop the media communication, international relations and cultural studies skills you need for an international communications career.

You will learn about such topics as:
- global news production
- international public relations
- issues in global media

and be able to choose from a range of subjects such as:
- corporate writing
- digital audio/radio production
- interactive communication (which covers web design and new media).

The Master of International Communication is built on the research strengths of our academic staff. It examines the evolution of communication theories and strategies in response to modernisation and social changes.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-international-communication

Key benefits

- Gain practical experience through an optional internship
- Access to the research strengths of our academic staff
- Examines current problems and situations in international communications
- Can be combined with the Master of International Business or the Master of International Relations

Suitable for

Those who wish to work in cross-cultural environments where many multinational organisations operate. These include corporations, NGOs and media organisations operating in the international arena.

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Bachelor degree in any discipline (completed 10+ years prior) and work experience in a relevant area.

- 1 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Honours, Graduate Diploma, Masters (coursework), or Higher Degree Research in a relevant discipline;
Work experience in a relevant area.

- Relevant disciplines
Media, Communications, International Relations, International Studies (non-languages), Political Science or International Relations or Policy Studies, History, Sociology, Law, Communications and Media Studies, International Business.

- Relevant areas
International communications, volunteer work including advisory, advocacy, consultancy, representation, analysis, research, management in public service, community, government relations, political and social, international or professional bodies, organisations, institutes or associations.

Relevant work experience in Public diplomacy, public relations, public policy, communications policy, communications strategy, media strategy, international relations, media policy, media writing.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements.

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

- Career Opportunities
This degree prepares postgraduates for careers in media, public affairs, corporate communication, development, diplomacy and policy arenas. It is an important milestone in the career paths of a variety of individuals including diplomats and international civil servants, policy makers, development specialists, international business people, project managers, media/communication managers and international journalists.

- Employers
Postgraduates who have completed the Master of International Communication have been employed in various parts of the world in the following areas:
- academia
- global media industry
- international development
- marketing
- non-government sector
- public affairs
- public relations industry
- public sector

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-international-communication

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Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations. Read more
Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations.

You will master key skills in political science that enable you to explore the links between local, national and international structures, and critically evaluate key contemporary debates in the field of international relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MSc International Relations programme is offered via two pathways. The International Relations pathway examines key issues in the contemporary international system and processes of global governance.

Secondly, the innovative International Intervention pathway deepens your understanding of this complex area and includes a placement option, allowing you to spend three months working in international politics.

There are a set of common compulsory modules for all pathways, in addition to two compulsory modules for your chosen pathway, and three optional modules from a range of international or European politics topics.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation or placement. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research
-Research in Practice
-Theories of International Relations
-Dissertation
-Placement
-Key Issues in International Relations
-Politics of International Intervention I
-Politics of International Intervention II
-Global Governance
-Critical Studies on Security and Terrorism
-International Political Economy
-International Security and Defence
-European Social Dimension
-EU External Relations
-EU and Neighbourhood
-International Trade
-Extractive Industries and Society: Problems and Policies
-Extractive Industries and Society: Case Studies
-Environmental Management, Development and Sustainability
-EU Counter-Terrorism Law
-International Human Rights Law
-Law of international organizations
-Law of Armed Conflict Optional
-Institutional Architecture of EU

CAREER PROSPECTS

Our MSc programme in International Relations is a great stepping stone in your career development, whatever your plans.

Through its assessed, three-month placement, the International Intervention pathway offers an excellent opportunity to enhance a wide range of transferable skills and build personal networks which will significantly enhance your employment opportunities upon graduation.

Students from the School have gone on to a wide range of employment choices. These include working for international organisations, national and local government, lobby groups and non-governmental organisations, as well as private businesses and media organisations.

We also offer doctoral supervision in a wide range of political subjects for talented students who wish to continue their studies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of international relations, concerning global governance and/or terrorism and security and international intervention
-Deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of international relations, including theoretical developments in the sub-fields of terrorism and security and international intervention
-Enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take three programme compulsory modules, two pathway compulsory modules specific to their pathway (International Relations, International Intervention, Terrorism and Security), and two further modules from a list of optional modules particular to their pathway
-Provide students, with the opportunity, through the International Intervention pathway, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into International Intervention but will also develop a broad array of transferable skills – such skills include self-management and development; managing tasks; communicating effectively and clearly; working with and relating to others; the application of specialist knowledge; the application of initiative and reflecting on one’s own learning outcomes)

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-Critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of international politics, particularly in relation to the international system and global governance, differing forms of intervention in response to poverty, humanitarian crisis, abuses of human rights, state failure and armed conflict
-In-depth understanding of international structures of governance and their impact on regional, national and local structures; and of theories of international relations
-Detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of international politics, for example development and humanitarian assistance; peace-making; peace-keeping and peace- building; use of international legal institutions and processes; and coercive military intervention to secure regime change
-Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within international politics
-Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
-Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
-Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
-Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
-Construct reasoned argument
-Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills
-Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
-Carry out an advanced literature search
-Form effective arguments
-Organise own workload to meet deadlines
-Formulate research questions
-Design and conduct a research project, selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis
-Design and pilot questionnaires
-Design and conduct interviews
-Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
-Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
-Organise and plan their own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
-Deploy a range of relevant research skills
-Make decisions in complex situations
-Take responsibility for their own learning

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. Read more
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School.

We’ve successfully trained over 300 graduates who have left to work successfully in a wide variety of multinational and international organisations, particularly in the fields of advertising, international management, media and public relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment.

The programme comprises six compulsory modules and two optional modules covering a wide range of disciplines. These offer numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

It is ideal for marketing and communications professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, languages or business disciplines wanting to deepen their insight into marketing across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research Methods
-Marketing
-International Marketing Management
-Marketing Communications
-Strategy
-Interpersonal Communication
-Global Diversity in Language and Communication
-Professional Communication
-Identity: Marketing and Communication in Practice
-Globalisation: Theories, Discourses and Practices
-The Language of Advertising
-Organisations and Written Communication
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overall purpose of the programme is to:
-Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of communication and marketing communication
-Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of (Marketing) Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:
-Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the (inter)cultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
-Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
-Impart the knowledge and skills of communication and marketing necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (human resource management, advertising, international marketing), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
-Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Communication

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to-face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of models of consensus-generation, agenda-setting, opinion-formation and communicative interaction
-Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and concerns involved in strategic communication, in marketing communication and intercultural communication
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and content and methods of the marketing function, both within corporations and as a service industry
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of marketing with particular reference to international case studies
-Demonstrate an appreciation of the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation (this would involve the collection, analysis and manipulation of data of diverse kinds from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, an awareness of the (dis)advantages of each frame and/or method and, consideration of the ethical issues involved in data collection and storage relative to the (sub) cultures examined)

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
-Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
-Demonstrate the capacity to evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement marketing communication policies

Key / transferable skills
-Demonstrate the capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
-Demonstrate an ability to manage learning self-critically

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Relations is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Relations is The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Founded in 1997, the Bush School is ranked in the top 12 percent of the 266 graduate public affairs schools in the USA, according to rankings published in U.S. News & World Report. Located in College Station, Texas, the School’s programmes are housed in the Robert H. and Judy Ley Allen Building, which is part of the George Bush Presidential Library Center on the West Campus of Texas A&M. This location affords students access to the archival holdings of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, invitation to numerous events hosted by the George Bush Foundation at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center, and inclusion in the many activities of the Texas A&M community. Texas A&M is the sixth-largest university in the USA with 50,000 students. It holds membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, one of only 61 institutions with this distinction.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Civil Society and International Development
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• War, Technology and Culture
• State of Africa
• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• Development Studies
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and
Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA

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