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Masters Degrees (Communication For Development)

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Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this. Read more
Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this.

The ICT for Development (ICT4D) specialism is a strand within the established and highly successful MSc Practising Sustainable Development. It is offered jointly by the Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) Group and the UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway, University of London.

This ICT4D Masters strand takes a global perspective on sustainable development and the role of ICTs; placed at the interface of research and practice, it is designed for those who want to launch or further their careers as development practitioners or scholars. It combines cutting-edge teaching on ICT4D with rigorous training in the broader field of sustainable development, to provide a well-rounded perspective on current and future development challenges. This degree extends knowledge, develops key skills and optimises career prospects.

The course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Master’s degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscpgdippsdict4d.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This is an intellectually exciting and inspiring course, drawing on both physical and social sciences, which attracts a diverse, international group of students.

- Our teaching staff are leading international experts and have wide experience in different developing regions and economies in transition, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, East Asia and South-East Asia.

- You will benefit from small group learning and an intense but friendly atmosphere, and will receive individual mentoring and career advice from our staff (both from your personal tutor and a dissertation supervisor).

- You will receive an internationally renowned University of London degree, giving you a solid foundation for a career in the field of development and/or environment.

- The course will provide you with training in the skills needed to research and assess ICT for development. These include research design, project development, geographic information systems, remote sensing, participatory methods, project analysis and evaluation.

Department research and industry highlights

The UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway is an interdisciplinary centre involving staff in Geography, Management, Computer Science and Earth Sciences. One of the world leaders in its field, with 17 affiliated staff and 18 PhD students, it is a vibrant research community embedded in both the College and the international ICT4D Collective of ICT4D practitioners. It has excellent links with NGOs, businesses and international organisations. Friendly and diverse, it is an exciting place to study and network with other ICT4D experts.

The Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) group consists of over 20 research-active staff, 35 PhD students and 50 Master’s students on four MSc programmes. We are committed to conducting collaborative research which seeks to understand and contribute to addressing problems of social inequality, environmental destruction and injustice. The breadth of its members’ research places it in an ideal position to contribute to theoretical and policy debates on key challenges facing Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean today.

Course content and structure

The course is divided into three compulsory elements; theory, policy and practice; research training; and a dissertation. Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Sustainability, Development and Governance
This course will equip students with a detailed understanding of the development of sustainable development as a discourse. Students will explore key sustainability issues such as climate change, globalisation, and human responses with an emphasis on the emergence of environmental governance as a means to pursue sustainability.

Technology and Development
This course provides you with an introduction to the role of technology in development, focusing particularly on mobile phone and computer technologies. The course combines an understanding of key theoretical debates and how technologies have been applied in diverse sectors such as health and education. The course also includes training in the use of GIS (geographical information systems) within a development context.

ICT4D
This course gives you the opportunity to develop deeper understandings of cutting-edge applications of ICT4D research and practice. Topics covered include environmental change and Green ICT, open development and subversive forms of technology use, and logics of inclusion and exclusion in ICT programmes. You will also examine project planning, monitoring and evaluation in the field of ICT4D.

Participatory Research
This course combines detailed understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of participatory research and methods with practical experience of using different participatory research techniques. These include participatory diagramming, participatory video and participatory environmental monitoring.

Research Training
You will be provided with training in a range of methods to enable you to plan, carry out and complete a piece of research. There are three modules in this element:
- Social Research Methods Training - provides a range of social science methods for field research and analysis.
- Quantitative Methods for Graduates - provides basic statistical concepts and procedures used in empirical research.
- Development and Environment Research Training - provides guidance for planning, developing and undertaking research in a development and environment context.

Dissertation (MSc only)
The dissertation is of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, on a topic of your choice which has been approved by the supervisor. It requires both secondary and primary research, and the demonstration of originality in integrating theoretical and practical research methods in tackling a particular problem. You will be encouraged to carry out your dissertation in collaboration with an organisation in the field of development and environment.

Community Volunteer Project
You will undertake an independent volunteer project which will give you practical experience in gaining sustainability related work experience in a non-for profit organisation. The project will enhance your employability whilst and provide an opportunity to gain practical experience of third sector organisational objectives, cultures and practices.

Elective course units:
Sustainability, Development and Society
You will develop a detailed understanding of key social / environmental relationships incorporating contemporary issues in the geographies of sustainability. These will include 'risk society', sustainable cities, and the impacts of corporate sector activities on the environment. You will also understand the challenges to sustainable development at household and community levels, with a focus on community-based approaches to sustainable development.

Business Ethics and Enterprise
The aim of the course is to equip students with the moral frameworks and critical abilities necessary to understand the role of business in society from an ethical perspective. The course will cover different types of business including large publicly traded multinationals, small and medium sized enterprises, social enterprises and family firms. Students will be expected to understand the different issues in these organizational types and to articulate moral arguments from a range of different perspectives.

International Sustainability Management
This course provides participants with an understanding of how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) informs sustainability management issues in large, transnational organisations. It will focus on issues such as consumption and sustainability as dichotomised between the apparently incompatible tensions of economic and environmental interests.

Other courses Geopolitics and Security / PIR / Management / Computer Science

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an understanding at an advanced level of the relationships between, and complexities of, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development and ICT4D

- an understanding at an advanced level of how the key issues in sustainable development theory and ICT4D influence policy and impact on practice

- the ability to critically analyse complex or contradictory areas of knowledge in aspects of sustainable development.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Past students of the MSc Practising Sustainable Development are now employed by international development and/or environment agencies, national government in their countries, national programmes and implementing agencies, higher education institutions, consultancies, private sector businesses, social enterprises and NGOs; as environmental and development policy-makers, managers, workers, activists, teachers and researchers. Many of our alumni are also currently undertaking doctoral programmes in the UK and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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About the course. -Multidisciplinary learning about the theory and practice of communication in development. -Work with practitioners and academics to gain practical skills in designing communication strategies and media interventions. Read more
About the course:
-Multidisciplinary learning about the theory and practice of communication in development
-Work with practitioners and academics to gain practical skills in designing communication strategies and media interventions
-Develop research skills for communication activities in development
-Supportive learning in a diverse, international environment
-In-class support in career building, networking and taking the next steps after graduation

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Concepts and practices of communication
-Participatory interventions in development
-Theories and practices of development
-Addressing poverty and inequality
-Gender and development

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.
Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae

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We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme. - Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice. Read more

Overview

We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme:
- Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice.

- Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy) incorporating the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Advanced Pharmacy Framework

- Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn) allows health professionals to choose from our range of modules to create their own pathway

Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice:
NHS England has recently announced their intention to invest £15 million pounds to pilot patient facing roles for clinical pharmacists in GP practices. This is a clear sign of that pharmacists are recognised as health professionals who are able to support patients in the management of long term conditions e.g. by optimising medicines. These roles offer exciting opportunities for pharmacists to develop in this area of practice. . If you wish to work in general practice, it is likely that you will need to be working towards or hold a postgraduate pharmacy qualification that includes Independent Prescribing.
Our new postgraduate pathway 'Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice' allows you to combine your choice of modules from across our Community Pharmacy, Advanced Professional Practice and Prescribing Studies programmes (including the Independent Prescribing course) to meet your own personal learning needs whilst working towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters award.

Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
The Pharmacy pathway is compatible with the emerging agenda for Advanced and Specialist Practice within the Pharmacy profession and supports the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Faculty Professional Recognition Scheme. Pharmacists who follow this pathway will incorporate the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) within their Advanced Professional Practice award and be able to demonstrate competency in all six competency clusters of the framework, ie:
- Expert Professional Practice
- Collaborative Working Relationships
- Leadership
- Management
- Education, Training and Development
- Research and Evaluation

Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn):
Increasing numbers of pharmacists and other health professionals have a career portfolio that crosses the traditional boundaries of community practice, primary care and secondary care and need a programme of continuing professional development that can meet their specific personal professional development needs.
The Open learn pathway of the APP programme is designed to allow pharmacists and other health professionals, particularly medical and non-medical prescribers working in primary care, choice and flexibility in their progression to Certificate, Diploma and Masters awards to meet their specific professional development needs and advance their professional practice. Pharmacists can choose modules from across the Department of Medicines Management/School of Pharmacy postgraduate programmes’ portfolio, including Community Pharmacy and Clinical (Hospital) Pharmacy.
Pharmacists, medical and nonmedical prescribers can choose modules from the Prescribing Studies programme, including the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists, and also modules provided by other Schools within the Faculty of Health, and other Faculties within the University, subject to meeting the specific entry criteria required for individual modules.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/advancedprofessionalpracticepharmacy/

Course Aims

Keele's Pg Advanced Professional Practice Programme aims to:
- Equip you with the clinical and professional knowledge base and skills that you have identified as necessary to fulfil and advance your professional practice

- Provide you with a learning programme that meets your personal professional development needs and that will help you apply your knowledge and skills in daily practice

- Encourage you to develop the self-discipline of private study, self-directed learning and reflective practice that will be continued beyond Keele's Programme in your Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

In addition, you will develop valuable practical skills including written and oral communication, and the ability to design a project, collect, analyse and interpret data.

Course Content

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice):
For the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ pathway you may combine modules from our Prescribing Studies programme, Community Pharmacy programme and Advanced Professional Practice programme to meet your learning needs. A total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
This pathway links to all the clusters of the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) You will study modules to allow you to develop in all six clusters of the APF: Expert Professional Practice; Collaborative Working Relationships; Leadership; Management; Education, Training and Development; and Research and Evaluation.

The modules you will study are as follows (more detail about individual modules can be found in the Postgraduate Modules pages):

Year 1 (Certificate Year)
- Advanced Practice Development (30) 30 credits (Continuous module during Years 1 and 2)
- Competency Frameworks for the Advanced Practitioner 15 credits
- Building Working Relationships for the Advanced Practitioner (30) 30 credits

Year 2 (Diploma Year)
- Researching and Evaluating Your Practice 15 credits
- Education Theory and Practice for Health Professionals 15 credits
- Business and Financial Management 15 credits

Year 3 (Master’s year)
- Advanced Practice Development 15 credits
- Independent Learning Project 45 credits

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn)
For the ‘Open Learn’ pathway, a total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The 15 credit Advanced Practice Development module is compulsory, after that you may chose modules from across our programmes to meet your individual learning needs. A maximum of 30 credits per level of award is permitted from any one programme source for Certificate and Diploma awards. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Our Postgraduate Modules pages will provide you with more information about the modules you can choose from.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is designed principally for distance-learning. We provide mainly online distance-learning materials so that you can study where and when it is most convenient for you. Our methods of delivery allow us to revise and update the course quickly to meet your changing needs as a pharmacist.

Students on the 'Pharmacy' Pathway will be required to attend Keele for occasional face to face study days. Students on the 'Open Learn' pathway maybe required to attend Keele, depending on their module choices.

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is fully supported by a team of experienced, friendly, and approachable academic, administrative and technical staff based at Keele. You’re not on your own! And, don’t forget the network of other pharmacists on the course whom you can contact.

You will require the equivalent of 1-2 days (approximately 10-15 hours) each week to complete your course. Remember that the online nature of our course materials, and the fact that a good proportion of the assessed work focuses on your daily practice, means that you can integrate study and work.

Assessment is entirely by coursework for the Certificate, Diploma and MSc courses. A variety of assessment methods are used such as Practice-Based Assignments that will assess your knowledge, problem-solving skills, and data interpretation skills in relation to application of knowledge to practice, patient care and medicines management. Case Presentations assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. An Audit Project, Practice-Based Assignments, Project Protocol Development and the Independent Study Project Report assess ‘thinking’ and practical skills, and your ability to plan, conduct and report on an investigation. They also assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. Your Reflective Portfolio also assesses your ability to relate theory to practice, and self evaluation of, and reflection on, your own performance and CPD needs.

The nature of the assessments develops your written and oral communication skills. Practical skills and key life/transferable skills are assessed within the methods described above. Each method of assessment is supported by clear criteria for marking; these are explained in the relevant Course Handbooks. The minimum pass mark is 50%.

The summative assessment is supported by a variety of formative assessment activities that include online discussions, formative feedback on elements of the reflective portfolio, contributions to study days and feedback on draft proposals.

Additional Costs

For all programmes you will need regular access to a computer, email and the internet. However apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for our postgraduate programmes, with the exception of those listed below.

Some modules may require that you attend a Webinar. You may find it beneficial to purchase a headset to participate in webinars, however this is not essential if your computer has a built in microphone and speakers.

Some modules may require that you travel to Keele for a study day. There will be additional travel and accommodation costs (if required) to attend any face to face study days.

Study Days

Students on the Pharmacy Pathway will be required to attend Keele for some face to face study days. For further information please contact Bev Oakden.

Students who incorporate the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course into the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ award will be required to attend Keele for some study days. For further information please refer to the ‘Independent Prescribing’ section of our website.

Whilst the majority of our modules are delivered at a distance, a small number may require attendance at Keele. Please contact Bev Oakden or Amanda Salt to discuss your choice of modules and any attendance requirements.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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Education for Sustainability (EfS) offers postgraduate courses from Continued Professional Development to Masters level. They provide personal and professional development for anyone involved in communicating sustainability, whatever the context. Read more
Education for Sustainability (EfS) offers postgraduate courses from Continued Professional Development to Masters level. They provide personal and professional development for anyone involved in communicating sustainability, whatever the context.

This course is designed for anyone interested in paving the way for a more sustainable world by way of understanding, educating or promoting sustainability. Although most of our students, present and past, are educators, teachers and NGO educational, training or campaigning staff we also draw students from many other backgrounds, such as, health, media, business, government, botanic and zoological work.

Our passion for a sustainable future

Developed in collaboration with World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Oxfam and the EU, It draws on the expertise of environmental and development NGOs as well as the academic and educational communities. It deals with the theory and practice of Education for Sustainability and enables you to explore and expand the role that EfS can play in educational, social, political and economic change.

Internationally recognised

As an internationally recognised pioneer in the field of EfS, we welcome and thrive on diversity and inclusion while offering a range of qualifications with flexible study modes, including distance learning. Since our launch in 1994, we have continued to grow steadily as a dynamic interface between theory and practice in EfS, both within and outside the UK. The EfS courses at LSBU offer many unique qualities that will enhance your international experience. The existence of the programme at LSBU has been instrumental in the development of LSBU as a United Nations Regional Centre of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development.

Our roots lie in the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio, Brazil. There, a commitment was made to integrate environmental and development concerns in the emerging concept of sustainability while emphasising the importance of education's role in building a sustainable world. In response to this a group of development and environmental organisations – with the financial contributions from WWF-UK, Oxfam and the EU – got together with LSBU and the eventual result was our EfS programme, the first ever masters programme of this kind.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/education-sustainability-msc

Modules

All modules make use of case studies and readings from a range of global regions and are designed to be applicable to any type of educational or country context.
- An Introduction to education for sustainability
- Values and participation in EFS; from local to global
- Leadership, learning and climate change: the sustainability revolution
- Theory and perspectives on environment and development
- Science and culture in education for sustainability
- Researching education for Sustainability
- Dissertation (MSc only)

Employability

Employers have found that the programme has enabled students to develop and enhance work practices in the light of current theories and debates. This has led to a number of organisations sponsoring their staff to do the programme as a means of capacity building and staff development. Many EFS graduates have gone onto gain promotion, career advancement or have made use of the course to change their career direction.

The course provides the following transferable skills, which are valued by employers:
- Effective communication
- Ability to apply theory to practice
- Understanding and managing change
- Problem solving and strategic planning
- Critical thinking
- Holistic thinking
- Curriculum leadership skills.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The programme retains close links with experts and practitioners in the field, many of whom are EFS tutors, and the programme is greatly enriched by their contribution. The programme also continues to work closely with a range of NGOs on research and development projects.

The programme runs an annual conference with recognised key note speakers in the field of EFS. Recent contributors include:
- Ann Finlayson, education commissioner, UK Sustainable Development Commission;
- Dr Mae-Wan Ho, director, Institute of Science in Society;
- Alan Simpson, MP;
- Professor Stephen Sterling;
- Professor Charles Hopkins, Unesco Chair in ESD York University, Toronto;
- Dr Dorcas Otieno Director Regional centre of expertise in ESD, Nairobi, Kenya.

Teaching and learning

We aim to help you become an effective agent for positive change in learning and education relevant for sustainability. We do so by enquiring into the kind of learning for change in personal, social and ecological spheres that is needed to help understand, develop and promote sustainability. When you complete our programme, you will have achieved the personal and professional development required to be an effective agent for change.

Flexible study options

The course may be studied either full-time at LSBU, or part-time by distance/flexible learning. The part-time distance learning mode is particularly suitable if you are living overseas or working or who find it difficult to attend a traditional course. Students studying part-time by distance/flexible learning based in their home country are not required to apply for a visa. It is also possible to start by signing on for a short course (two modules). Many students start with the short course and then decide to continue for a further award.

Course structure

Sessions are delivered through distance learning and web activities with optional - Monthly Saturday day schools Fast Track - Monthly Saturday day schools.

Learning resources

In an emerging field like EfS the interface between theory and practice is even more important. Theory informs practice and practice in turn nourishes theory. That's why our course materials undergo continuous review and updating. Networking is an essential element for us to consolidate our premier position as a theory-practice interface in EfS. The Blackboard e-learning system used by our programme's provides a platform for students and tutors to learn, discuss and debate various aspects related to EfS, regardless of their location.

You'll receive all the materials they need for independent study within a set timescale, which includes:
- a Study Guide to introduce the key themes, debates and theories
- a Course Reader with specialist key texts
- supplementary material (e.g. additional written material or DVD)
- access to the EFS blackboard website for online learning opportunities

Assessments

All assessment is through written coursework. For example, essay writing, report writing, programme design or research studies.

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This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking for an opportunity to explore the impact of media and communications on international policy and within sociological context.

The course will appeal to students with a general interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

Communication is integral to development programmes. At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent.

Development is taken as a contested concept that translates into courses for advocating democratic forms of participation, policy initiatives and training activities in media and communications sectors in different geographical regions.

The International Communications and Development MA provides you with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding and critically assessing the role of communications for and in development projects.

It also gives you a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.

On the course you will develop an ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and nongovernmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

Core modules
-Democratisation and Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
-Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
-Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy SGM309 (15 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication SGM308 (15 credits)
-Celebrity SGM314 (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics IPM104 (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (IPM119) (15 credits)
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches IPM116 (30 credits)
-Evaluation Politics and Advocacy AMM420 (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime SGM301 (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (SGM303) (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics SGM305 (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds SGM304 (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in the civil service, broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies. Recent graduate positions include; Fundraising and Communications Officer at Alone in London, Communications Specialist at Government Division of Health and Social Services and Civil Servant at Seoul Metropolitan Government.

Jessica Perrin who recently graduated with an MA in International Communications and Development is now Head of NGOs at Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Read more
Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Besides using the internet and mobile phones for interpersonal communication; businesses, banking, transportation systems, TV and radio broadcasts and smart power grids rely on advanced communication technology.

In a constant and rapidly evolving field, you as a communication engineer will be needed to design and build the systems of the future.

Programme aim

Society today is firmly rooted in electronic communication systems, and it is hard to imagine life without them.

Global systems such as TV, radio, the Internet and wired and mobile telephones have a fundamental impact on the way we live and work.

In the near future, we will see rapid development of e.g.

- sensor network communication,
- algorithms to decrease energy consumption of communication networks,
- tele-presence systems that reduce the need for transportation of people,
- communication as it becomes an increasingly prominent aspect of vehicles and transportation,
- many more areas.

Exactly what the future will bring is unknown, but some things are almost certain: there will still be advanced communication systems - some of them will be different from what the world knows today and communication engineers will be needed to develop and maintain them.

Programme description

Global communication systems have not only changed the world but are also advancing at an exceptional rate. Future communication systems will form the foundation for a sustainable and intelligent society where people and equipment can be connected anywhere, any time – with anything. A high degree of connectivity will be a key enabler for new innovative technologies and applications that can benefit from information sharing.

Evolving technologies are e.g. 5G mobile communications, machine communications, fibre optical links and networks, and sensor network communication, with emerging new applications such as remote and assisted medical diagnosis and treatment, traffic and vehicle safety, environmental monitoring, maximizing efficiency and reliability in smart grid infrastructure, and tele-presence systems that reduce the need for energy consuming transportation of people.

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential.

Besides the fundamentals in communication engineering we focus on e.g. random signal analysis, stochastic methods for digital modulation and coding, applications of digital signal processing, optical fibres and lasers and information theory and coding.

The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge in systems that apply on a global scale gives you a toolbox and a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communication technologies.

Who should apply

You should apply if you find the future outlook for communication engineers interesting, and have the following skills at a bachelor’s level: signals and systems theory (including linear systems and transforms), mathematical analysis (including probability and linear algebra) and basic programming. Basic knowledge in data communications is recommended but not required.

Why apply

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential, where mathematics and signal processing are important tools. The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge prepares students with a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communications.

Educational methods

The pedagogical structure of the programme is targeted towards learning system design processes as practiced in the communication industry. In general, the educational methods are based on what are expected from engineering graduates in an industrial environment, with specific emphasis on building and refining problem-solving skills, team work and presentation skills. Certain emphasis is placed on solving complex tasks by defining subtasks and interfaces, performing these subtasks independently, and assembling the results. All courses in the program are permeated by the principles of sustainable development. You get the opportunity to interact with the industry via guest lectures and study visits. Finally, the Master’s Thesis gives you training in individual research, project planning, documentation and presentation. It can be carried out at the University, industry or another university/research institute.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The full-time Development and Human Rights course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in (part one) and then a dissertation over the summer (part two).

Development and Human Rights students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of their choosing.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Read more

MSc Applied Communication Science

If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Not only in the Netherlands, but in the whole world!

Programme summary

In this programme students learn to analyse and critically reflect on the role of communication in complex dynamic processes. They also learn to design communication strategies and programmes that are relevant to societal problem solving and innovation.

Specialisations

There are two specialisations that students can choose from:

Communication in Innovation
Students learn to analyse and strategically apply communication to deal with current societal issues, problems and challenges in life science domains such as nature conservation, nutrition and health, water management, environment and food production. Our students are trained to adopt an integrative approach that involves social science and technical innovations, fulfilling an intermediary role to enhance multidisciplinarity and interactive cooperation.

Communication is a basic element of change. Complex processes of change involve different perspectives and perceptions of the various people involved. Societal processes like climate change, poverty, disease or ecological degradation require appropriate solutions that integrate insights from all kinds of disciplines and stakeholders. Opportunities for enhancing mutual understanding and collaboration between science disciplines and society are explored. Special attention is paid to everyday life situations and how people actively deal with common issues related to the domains of the life sciences. There are no pre-defined thesis tracks.

Students compile their own thesis tracks by choosing, besides the compulsory communication science courses, a combination of closely linked courses; including a minor in a life sciences domain. An internship introduces students to professional practice. The major thesis allows them to become experts in a specific area within communication that is closely linked to their personal interests and future career.

In the thesis track of their choice, students link Communication Science to, for example, Nature Conservation, Nutrition and Health, Animal Production Systems, Ecology and Environment, Forestry and Rural Development, Land Use Planning, Organic Agriculture, Product Design and Quality Management, Food Technology or Water Management.

Health and Society
More information on this specialisation is available here: http://www.findamasters.com/search/masters-degree/i883d5908c20425/msc-health-and-society-specialisation

Your future career

Graduates are specialised in building bridges between various stakeholders, such as governments and citizens or laymen and experts. They work for communication consultancy organisations, government departments, hospitals, development agencies, commercial organisations, media and institutes of knowledge. Career prospects are: communication consultant (advising organisations on how to improve their communication processes); policymaker (formulating policy in cooperation with groups in society); process facilitator (managing conflict, negotiation and change); communication manager (organising internal and external communication processes of an organisation); project manager (managing the communication and collaboration between parties throughout the entire project lifespan); journalist (making scientific knowledge accessible to a broader public); communication researcher (making a systematic analysis of a communication issue).

Alumna Bette Harms.
"At 'International Union for Conservation of Nature' (IUCN) I am part of a booming platform called 'Leaders for Nature' where over twenty multinationals meet and learn to incorporate natural capital into their core business processes. I am the coordinator of the Leaders for Nature Academy where I develop and deliver training models to our network members. In my daily job I actively seek to develop cooperation between Non Governmental Organisations (NGO's), the government and private sector. The Master Applied Communication Science has given me the capacity to translate ecology into valuable and understandable knowledge for a range of professionals working in the private sector."

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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