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The School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography offers a postgraduate distance-learning course in Tropical Forestry, which is aimed specifically at international students who have been awarded a scholarship by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC). Read more
The School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography offers a postgraduate distance-learning course in Tropical Forestry, which is aimed specifically at international students who have been awarded a scholarship by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC). We have secured CSC scholarships for 2017 entry. Up to 10 scholarships are available for applicants from the following developing commonwealth countries to study for our MSc Tropical Forestry by distance learning:

Bangladesh, Botswana, Cameroon, Ghana, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

The scholarships are worth over £12,000 to cover tuition fees plus a generous bursary to enable scholars to attend a study tour which will be held overseas in July/August 2019. A small study grant is also available to help scholars with internet, computing and other distance learning study costs.These scholarships are will only available for entrants who are able to start the course in September 2017.

Overview
The Tropical Forestry MSc represents a natural addition to our highly successful and well-respected MSc Forestry, MSc Environmental Forestry and MSc Agroforestry degree courses.

The course provides part-time students from across the world with training in the management of forest resources, understanding of the scientific, academic and practical principles which underpin forest management, forest measurement and forest ecosystem function and the interrelationships between government, industry and communities’ forests and associated land-use.

The Tropical Forestry MSc is part-time and is completed in three years. It builds on the existing links and strengths of the highly successful forestry masters programmes in SENRGY: MSc Sustainable Forest Management (SUFONAMA), MSc Sustainable Tropical Forestry (SUTROFOR) and Forest and Nature for Society (FONASO). These programmes were developed by European Masters consortiums and funded by the EU Erasmus Mundus programme.

Our distance-learning course is designed to provide students with training in the subject of tropical forestry, understanding of the scientific, academic and practical principles which underpin forest conservation, protection and management and forest ecosystem function and the interrelationships between government, industry and communities’ forests and associated land-use. Suitable applicants include individuals working in forestry/forest-related industries/natural resource management, particularly in the fields of planning, regulation, policy, monitoring and environmental protection. The course is also suited to individuals working in forestry education who wish to further their knowledge and expertise in order to improve their teaching.

The course, which is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters, is designed to provide students with detailed knowledge of direct relevance to professionals working in the field of Tropical Forestry. Key course modules cover the increasing importance of social issues in forest management, the complex challenges and multiple benefits of well-managed agroforestry systems and the sustainable use of non-timber forest products. Modules in inventory, assessment and monitoring look at other significant issues surrounding the sustainable management of global forest resources. The course also includes a compulsory 14-day study tour to a country with notable tropical forest resources in July/August 2019.

In line with our internal quality assurance procedures, some small revisions have been made to the MSc Tropical Forestry course structure for September 2017 entrants.

What Will I Study?
DDL-4202 Silviculture (20)
DDL-4004 Agroforestry Systems & Practice (20)
DDL-4205 Forest Inventory, Assessment & Monitoring (20)
DDL-4206 Sustainable use of NTFPs (20)
DDL-4201 Social Issues in Forest Management (20)
DDL-4545 Tropical Forestry Study Tour (20)*
DDL-4999 Distance learning Dissertation (60)

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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-development/

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Overview

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Skills and Careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
Community Centre based youth worker
Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong
Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.

We have many alumni who have gone on to teaching at university themselves. One of our former students who is now a senior lecturer fed back:

“Studying on the Applied Anthropology, Youth and Community Work Masters provided me with an experience and opportunity to validate 20 years of practice and to consider a wide range of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives. Immediately this impacted on my ability to better articulate a more nuanced and evidence-based understanding of the context that surrounds practice. Before completing the MA I was promoted to a management post, overseeing six trainee community development posts, and three senior workers (the obvious impact of the course on my work was specifically highlighted during post-interview feedback)... It is clear to me that the course delivered positive outcomes in terms of career progression.”

Students from the past recommend the programme to others and recognise the combination of disciplines as unique:

“Put simply, I honestly believe I would not have got any of my three jobs since completing the course in 2003 without the MA. This is mostly reputation. The course has a cachet amongst managers in the voluntary sector, and the assumption is that students are able not only to do development work but also to do it in the right way, with values and processes embedded.”

Placements

Placement experiences and networks developed while on the programme often produce new job opportunities. As one recent graduate explained:

“I actually managed to find paid employment as a result of making a good impression during my second placement. My third placement was a job that I was able to progress effectively in and was a real step up in terms of experience and responsibility. I eventually became a line manager there, and was working on a payment by results programme, which really reflected the new political climate. It also made for a very interesting and topical research essay that I scored really well on. I know that employers look upon my CV and applications favourably due to the fact that I have an MA in Community and Youth Work from Goldsmiths.”

Funding

This programme is now eligible for a Commonwealth Council scholarship, which provides full tuition fees, living cost, airfares and allowances to one postgraduate Masters student from a developing commonwealth country. The scholarship is jointly funded by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC) and Goldsmiths.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/international/financial-info/international-scholarships/csc-shared-scholarship/

For further information on funding, please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/

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This fully accredited MSc programme from the Centre for Environmental and Health Engineering is highly popular and relevant to the needs of future engineers, scientists and professionals in the environmental-health, water, pollution-control, waste-management and environmental sectors. Read more
This fully accredited MSc programme from the Centre for Environmental and Health Engineering is highly popular and relevant to the needs of future engineers, scientists and professionals in the environmental-health, water, pollution-control, waste-management and environmental sectors.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This MSc attracts UK and overseas graduates who wish to take advantage of the considerable global interest in water, wastewater, sanitation and waste to develop their careers.

Many graduates from the programme go on to work for consultancies, water utilities, contractors, relief agencies, regulatory bodies and international organisations.

Graduates from the programme also have the potential to progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

In the past, scholarship students have been accepted from a range of schemes, including: Foreign Office and British Council Chevening, World Bank, Commonwealth, Thames Water, Commonwealth Shared Scholarships, and the Royal Academy of Engineering, together with students from numerous overseas national schemes.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Environmental Health
-Water Treatment
-Wastewater Treatment
-Applied Chemistry & Microbiology
-Pollution Control
-Groundwater Control
-Regulation & Management
-European Study Tour
-Water Resources
-Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to provide graduates with:
-A comprehensive and robust understanding of key areas of water and environmental engineering
-Skills that will enable students to explore, critically assess and evaluate problems and produce systematic and coherent solutions integrating core engineering science with practical applications both independently and within a team structure
-An understanding of how this knowledge can be articulated around sustainable development practices
-A sound base for enhanced communication skills both oral and written
-A pathway that will prepare graduates for successful careers in the field including, where appropriate, progression to Chartered Engineer status

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

Knowledge and understanding
-The fundamental principles underpinning the key topics covered in the subject area
-Investigation and research techniques which provide a sound base for critical evaluation, selection and use of a wide range of scientific, technical and management processes relevant to the field
-The multidisciplinary nature of the subject area and its underlying principles and the importance of developing integrated approaches to solving complex problems
-The importance of identifying emerging trends to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and propose new alternative application and methodological approaches relevant to the student’ s research interests
-Management, organisation and communication skills including problem definition, project and experimental design, time management, decision making processes, independent and team work, knowledge transfer via written and oral presentations

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-An integrated and multidisciplinary approach to solving complex problems using professional judgment taking into consideration the engineering, economic, social and environmental impacts
-The ability to critically evaluate outcomes and accurately assess and report on own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
-The ability to formulate, conduct and write-up a systematic and coherent research programme topic demonstrating in-depth knowledge and high level of problem solving skills

Professional practical skills
-Critical review of the scientific literature for effective justification and support of results and decisions
Acquisition of the necessary skills to collect as well as generate data via laboratory experiments or computer-based programmes
-Critical analysis of results/recommendations and their presentation in a concise and logical manner
-Preparation of technical reports and presentation of work to an informed audience
-Awareness of difficulties and ethical issues likely to arise in professional practice and an ability to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, industry professionals, institutional professionals and others

Key/transferable skills
-Critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of complex information and data
-Communication and knowledge transfer through oral presentations and written reports
-Selection and use of appropriate advanced research methods
-Integrated and multidisciplinary approach to problem solving
-Time and resource management
-Effective use of a range of communication and technology tools aimed at different audiences
-Effective learning and working, both independently and as a part of a team

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This programme provides non-economics graduates a solid grounding in policy analysis, economic growth and economic development. You will develop a thorough understanding of the main models related to economic growth and development and of the economics of transition from less developed to developed status. Read more
This programme provides non-economics graduates a solid grounding in policy analysis, economic growth and economic development. You will develop a thorough understanding of the main models related to economic growth and development and of the economics of transition from less developed to developed status.

Why this programme

◾You will be taught by leaders in the field, many of whom have worked with international and government organisations including the IMF, World Bank, UN, Commonwealth Secretariat and central banks.
◾You will have the opportunity to enhance your learning by taking courses in other subjects at the University such as economic & social history and Central & East European studies.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and four optional courses and complete a substantial independent piece of work, normally in the form of a dissertation.

Core courses
◾Growth and development
◾Development policy.

Sample optional courses
◾Aid and development
◾Basic econometrics
◾Behavioural economics: theory and applications
◾Challenges in international policies
◾Economics of inequality and deprivation
◾Environmental economics
◾Financial institutions and markets in developing countries
◾Foreign direct investment and development
◾Human rights and global politics
◾IMF World Bank and economic growth
◾International security and global politics
◾International trade
◾Policies for sustainability and development
◾Project planning, appraisal and implementation
◾The law and economics of sovereign debt regulation
◾Theory and principles of sustainability.

If you have little or no economics you are strongly recommended to take the non-credit introductory course to economics offered before semester one begins.

Career prospects

The staff in this programme have been research collaborators in, and consultants to, a number of international and government organisations around the world as well as in private sector institutions. These include the IMF, World Bank, United Nations agencies, the Commonwealth Secretariat, government ministries and numerous central banks. By arranging practitioner talks, in which representatives of potential employers give presentations on career opportunities, students are able to benefit from some of these links.

As a graduate you can progress to successful careers in international organisations, government ministries, academia, research institutions, banks and other financial institutions. Companies which have employed our graduates include The British Council, The Royal Bank of Scotland, IBM, and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Our dedicated College of Social Sciences Employability Officer works with students to enhance their employability.

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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures. Read more

Overview

Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures.

You’ll develop your understanding of research in literary studies through a core module, but then choose from optional modules which look at the histories, contexts, structures and language that give postcolonial and colonial texts their uniqueness.

We focus on literature, but the programme also introduces you to other forms of cultural production such as music and cinema – and you’ll think about the relationships between literary studies and disciplines such as geography, anthropology and history. Supported by our Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you’ll gain a cross-disciplinary insight into how writers from around the world have engaged with issues such as identity, place, independence, development and race among many others.

The University of Leeds was the first UK university to establish ‘Commonwealth Literature’ as an academic discipline at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We’re still leading the way in research and teaching, supported by the expertise of staff within and outside of the cross-disciplinary Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with access to extensive resources for your research and placing literature and culture in their historical and political context. Microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers, parliamentary papers relating to the British Empire, US government and presidential files, the Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and British documents on the end of empire, foreign affairs and policy overseas are just some of the resources at your fingertips. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to explore your interests and gain key skills.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

You’ll take one core module in your first semester, introducing you to the challenges, methods and approaches used in researching literature and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also choose one of our optional modules, before studying another two in your second semester.

You can choose all of your modules from within postcolonial literary and cultural studies, but you also have the option to expand your studies by choosing one from those available across the School of English, from the early medieval period to contemporary literature.

By the end of the programme, you’ll demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve developed when you submit your dissertation or research project on a postcolonial literary or cultural topic of your choice.

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This intensive programme in Russian Language for graduates in other subjects who already possess basic proficiency in Russian but require a more extensive grounding in the language specifically for the purpose of conducting social scientific research dealing with Russia and/or the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Read more
This intensive programme in Russian Language for graduates in other subjects who already possess basic proficiency in Russian but require a more extensive grounding in the language specifically for the purpose of conducting social scientific research dealing with Russia and/or the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS).

Why this programme

◾Overall the programme is designed to enable students to acquire sufficient linguistic knowledge and translating skills to be able to read and retrieve information from a variety of texts in the original language, including those related to social sciences, and to deepen their existing knowledge of Russian realia.
◾It uses online and distance resources as well as classroom teaching and includes a period of study at a language school in Russia.

Programme structure

The Diploma provides a substantial programme in Russian Language for graduates who already possess basic proficiency in Russian but require a more extensive grounding in the language specifically for the purposes of conducting social scientific research dealing with Russia and / or the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States).

This programme provides students with blended (class room and distance) intermediate-level Russian language tuition over 2 semesters of study. Students will also benefit from a dedicated period of study abroad at a partner institution in the Russian Federation or other country where Russian is spoken as part of the Certificate Course in Russian for Social Scientists.

Core courses
◾Certificate course in Russian for Social Scientists
◾Analysis of Russian Social Science Text
◾Intermediate Russian Language

The content of this programme combines three layers – linguistic, cultural and socio-political which gives the student multifaceted language skills and knowledge about the country and the people. These skills are to be developed through a variety of different learning activities and assessment tasks: classroom sessions, elements of distance learning, interactive Moodle exercises and self-study.

Career prospects

Those who have completed the course have gone into teaching, commerce, financial services, translating, postgraduate study and other occupations.

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Audiology offers a balance between technology and working with people. This degree provides you with skills in assessment strategies, rehabilitation and habilitation of the hearing impaired and the non-medical management of hearing impairment. Read more

Overview

Audiology offers a balance between technology and working with people. This degree provides you with skills in assessment strategies, rehabilitation and habilitation of the hearing impaired and the non-medical management of hearing impairment.

It also provides training in research design with an optional project and an awareness of client management strategies. Clinical training is provided as a formal part of the program with cooperation from audiological institutions.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-clinical-audiology

Key benefits

- Utilises the Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic and the Australian Hearing Hub This offers students access to state-of-the-art research facilities and the ability to work alongside industry experts
- This program gives you practical experience in a range of clinical placements including the Macquarie Speech and Hearing Clinic, hospitals, government agencies, and community and not for profit organisations
- Allows you to learn from a wide variety of guest lecturers who are experts in their fields;
- Gives you access to the world’s first child magnetoencephalography facility.

Suitable for

This program is suitable if you have:
- Good communication skills
- Credit average in a relevant undergraduate degree
- An interest in pursuing a career in a health area

Please note
Commonwealth Supported Places
The Faculty of Human Sciences offers a limited number of merit-based Commonwealth Supported Places (CSP) for this program for domestic students. Places will be granted according to academic merit and awarded to the most highly ranked applicants who have been granted a firm offer. Students do not need to apply separately for this.

The Faculty may also allocate 50% of the available CSPs to two targeted equity areas that will benefit the students and the profession to help overcome shortages in professional health workers in regional and remote locations and in Indigenous health care settings. The equity groups targeted will be:

* Regional or remotely disadvantaged non-indigenous applicants

* Indigenous Australian applicants

To apply for an 'equity' CSP place, please complete the Equity CSP application when completing your application.

Work experience requirements

No work experience is required. It is recommended that you should observe some Audiological settings for a better understanding of the profession of Audiology.

English language requirements

IELTS of 7.0 overall with minimum 7.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements.

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

- Accreditation
During the course, you will complete a minimum of 250 clinical experience hours as defined by the professional body, Audiology Australia. This criterion accompanied with satisfaction of the core knowledge and competencies permits admission to Audiology Australia.

- Career Opportunities
With an aging population and advances in hearing device technology, audiology is a rapidly growing profession.
There are a range of employment opportunities for an audiologist including working in:
- Private practices, hospitals, medical centres
- Hearing and speech clinics
- Schools, universities, and community outreach settings

This degree is a recognised qualification in a number of countries and you may be able to travel and work overseas. There is currently a very strong demand for qualified audiologists both in Australia and overseas.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-clinical-audiology

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At the graduate level, the Chemistry Department features a research-based Master of Science degree. After completion of core coursework in the major sub-disciplines, students in the Chemistry M.S. Read more
At the graduate level, the Chemistry Department features a research-based Master of Science degree. After completion of core coursework in the major sub-disciplines, students in the Chemistry M.S. program have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of research experiences, including environmental, organic synthesis, natural product isolation, computational and theoretical, analytical, nanomaterials, catalysis, polymers, biochemistry, and chemical education. The research experience is considerably enhanced by MTSU’s new 250,000-square-foot science building and upgraded instrumentation. Talented undergraduates also have the opportunity to participate in a new Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s (ABM) program which enables them to complete a bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years. Graduates find employment in a wide range of areas as well as continuing their education in high-quality doctoral and/or professional programs. The department also participates in three interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs (Molecular Biosciences, Computational Science, and Math and Science Education).

Career

Jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics are projected to grow 13 percent by 2022. Chemistry graduates with advanced degrees will particularly find better job opportunities with pharmaceutical and biotech companies. MTSU's state-of-the-art science building offers both large and small lab spaces so faculty can pursue research projects with both graduate and undergraduate students. A memorandum of understanding between the university and Oak Ridge National Laboratory also has been renewed three times. Some potential professional pursuits:

Analytical chemist
Biochemist
Biomedical engineer
Chemical engineer
Chemist
Chemistry teacher
Food scientist
Forensic scientist
Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) specialist
Materials scientist
Molecular informatics specialist
Organic chemist
Patent attorney
Product development/design
Professor/educator
Research assistant/associate
Researcher
Sales/marketing – scientific equipment/pharmaceuticals

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Abbott Pharmaceutical
Aegis
Albany Molecular Research
ALCOA
Bedford County School System
Belcher Pharmaceutical
California public school system
Commonwealth Technologies
Eli Lilly Inc.
Garratt Callahan
Google
Harcross Chemicals
Hewlett-Packard
Kyzen Corp.
Lipscomb University
L. King High School
Mead Johnson
Merck Pharmaceutical
Metro-Nashville Public Schools
Middle Tennessee State University
Nissan
Novartis Pharmaceuticals
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Palm Corp.
Pellissippi State Community College
Purdue University
Rutherford County Schools
Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals
Specialized Assays
Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Sylvan Learning
TBI Crime Laboratory
Tennessee Department of Health
Tennessee Dept. of Environment & Pollution Control
Tennessee Dept. of Health Lab Services
Test America
University of Cincinnati
Vanderbilt Drug Discovery Program
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Varian
Vi-Jon Laboratories
Williamson County Schools
Wilson County Schools

Doctoral/professional programs where alumni have been accepted include:

Arizona State University
Colorado State University
Florida State University
Loyola Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago
Michigan State University
Middle Tennessee State University
Niger Life University
Ohio State University
Rutgers University
Syracuse University
University of Alabama
University of British Columbia
University of Buffalo
University of Louisville
University of New Hampshire
University of New Mexico
University of Notre Dame
University of South Carolina
University of Tennessee-Knoxville
University of Tennessee-Memphis
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School
University of Utah
University of Vermont
University of Wyoming
Vanderbilt University
Virginia Commonwealth University
Wright State University

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The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

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The MSc in Clinical Dermatology is designed specifically for doctors with a special interest in dermatology after gaining at least one year of general medical experience. Read more
The MSc in Clinical Dermatology is designed specifically for doctors with a special interest in dermatology after gaining at least one year of general medical experience.

The course aims to give a firm grounding in the fundamentals of clinical and scientific dermatology, with priority given to clinical instruction but also an emphasis on the scientific content of dermatology.

It is particularly suitable for overseas medical graduates, but is also appropriate as an additional course to contribute to any dermatology specialist training programme. Most students are self-funded, though some obtain awards from the British Council, respective Governments, Commonwealth Universities Scholarships and employers.

The MSc comprises seven modules delivered using face-to-face teaching at the Welsh Institute of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff, UK.

Distinctive features:

• Weekly observational clinical placements in local dermatology centres.
• Lectures from international guest speakers.
• Skills workshops, including practical skin surgery sessions.

The course is also accredited by Hong Kong College of Family Physicians and Hong Kong Medical Association.

Structure

The MSc is a full-time course, consisting of two stages.  It involves attending daily teaching sessions, Monday to Friday, and some Saturdays.

Stage 1 is the teaching stage. It lasts for eight months, and consists of six 20-credit modules, totalling 120 credits, at Level 7.

Stage 2, the dissertation stage, lasts for a further four months, to a total of one academic year, and will include a dissertation of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a combined total of 180 credits at Level 7 to complete the MSc programme.

You may leave the course after successfully completing 60 credits with a Postgraduate Certificate, or after successfully completing 120 credits with a Postgraduate Diploma. 

The dissertation is based on a literature-review and normally not more than 20,000 words supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject and should include the results of your period of project work. The dissertation is worth 60 credits and is weighted 50% for the purpose of calculating your final mark.

A practical skills module runs throughout the duration of Stage 1 of the course. This is supported by significant patient interaction. You will be allocated to the Dermatology Day Treatment Unit for a 1 – 2 week period for practical clinical experience. You will be required to attend regular general outpatient dermatology clinics in Cardiff and the surrounding area. There are also day visits to other dermatology centres in Wales.

Core modules:

Introduction to Dermatology: Evidence-Based Dermatology, Immunology and Biology of the Skin
Disorders Presenting in the Skin and Mucous Membranes
Environment and the Skin
Practical Skills
Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases
Skin Cancer and Surgical Interventions in Dermatology
Dissertation: Clinical Dermatology

Teaching

The course is delivered via:

Lectures.
Workshops.
Self-directed learning.
Journal clubs.
Clinical attachments.

All course tutors are doctors, other health care professionals, and scientists, who collectively have a wealth of experience and skills in dermatology. To take advantage of this valuable resource, the course promotes collaborative small group work with an emphasis on a problem-based approach to the study of dermatology. Didactic methods such as the lecture format are also utilised on the programme. There is emphasis on clinical teaching in the form of demonstrations in clinics, on the Dermatology Day Care Treatment Centre, in clinical workshops and interactive clinical tutorials.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a combination of written work, presentations, objective structured questions, mini clinical exams and a dissertation.

Students are not required to be called for a viva voce examination.

Career Prospects

Some graduates of this course have pursued a career as academic lecturers and consultant dermatologists while some of our international graduates have gone on to work in private practice or high governmental positions in their own countries.

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Explore the legal issues and pertinent regulatory principles in trade relationships and the broad spectrum of related services. At its core, international trade law concerns the regulation of the sale and transaction of goods. Read more
Explore the legal issues and pertinent regulatory principles in trade relationships and the broad spectrum of related services.

At its core, international trade law concerns the regulation of the sale and transaction of goods. On our course, we ensure that you develop specialist knowledge of business and commercial law within the international context. You study topics including:
-Financing international trade
-Foreign direct investment
-Legal analysis and writing
-The sale contract
-The carriage contract

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for law.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Participate in mooting competitions to develop your skills, particularly important if you hope to become a barrister
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
-Take advantage of networking opportunities throughout the year with visiting law firms

Your future

Our School of Law graduates have gone on to a wide variety of careers in international and intergovernmental organisations or employment with governments across the world, in commerce and banking, in non-governmental organisations and, as might be expected, in the legal profession and the judiciary.

During the year, we hold a careers session for our students in which we reflect upon our own careers and how they have been built as well as those from former students. We are always available to discuss career options and if you are interested in a particular area of the law, we can link you up with the relevant alumni to offer advice.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: LLM International Trade Law
-International Trade Finance Law
-Carriage of Goods By Sea
-Foundation Essay for International Trade Law
-International Sale of Goods
-European Union Law and Human Rights (optional)
-Legal Research and the English Legal System (optional)
-Approaches to Legal Theory (optional)
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution I (optional)
-Public International Trade Law (optional)
-Legal Aspects of Electronic Commercial Transactions (optional)
-Marine Insurance I (optional)
-Maritime Law and Wet Shipping (optional)
-International Financial Law (optional)
-Cybercrime (optional)
-Data Protection (optional)
-Freedom of Expression, Privacy and the Media (optional)
-The Legal Order of the European Union (optional)
-EU Private International Law (optional)
-The Economics of the European Union (optional)
-The Enlargement of the European Union (optional)
-Foundation Essay for Europen Union Commercial Law (optional)
-EU Company Law (optional)
-International Commercial and Business Law: Models, Principles and Tools (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights.
-Business and Human Rights
-Work-Based Project
-Contemporary Issues in Human Rights and Cultural Diversity (optional)

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This distinctive masters in Disaster Healthcare is the only course of its kind and is aimed at experienced healthcare professionals working in the humanitarian field, or those who aspire to do so. Read more
This distinctive masters in Disaster Healthcare is the only course of its kind and is aimed at experienced healthcare professionals working in the humanitarian field, or those who aspire to do so.

A key element of this disaster healthcare degree is its strong international and trans-cultural focus. This degree involves studying via distance learning, plus an annual two-week residential Summer School at the beginning of the course.

You will study the key areas of theory and practice that are relevant to healthcare in complex humanitarian disasters, from resilience and response to mitigation and recovery. The course will prepare you to provide high quality care to vulnerable populations in conflict zones, and disaster emergencies through humanitarian assistance. You will also develop your knowledge on how to reduce disaster risks and improve public health.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/319-msc-disaster-healthcare-online-delivery

What you will study

Modules

Year One:
- Summer School (14 days attendance required).
- Personal Preparation for Disasters
- Principles and Concepts in Disasters
- Protecting Public Health in Disasters

You can exit the course in year one with a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert).

Year Two:
- Professional Development for Disaster
- Evidence-based Practice in Disasters
- Promoting Public Health

You can exit the course in year two with a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip).

Year Three:
- Professional Practice in Disasters
- Researching and Evaluating Disasters

Learning and teaching methods

Each year begins with a two week residential summer school in either the UK or in Finland. Summer School includes a week of simulation exercises in the field followed by a week of classes to introduce the forthcoming modules.

The remainder of the year involves studying online learning materials, engagement in online discussions and exercises, and self-directed study.

The final year includes a 12 week placement in either disaster response, humanitarian assistance of disaster risk reduction.

You will be taught by an international teaching faculty from a range of backgrounds with field expertise in disaster and emergency response, public health, and humanitarian assistance.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Graduates find work with national healthcare providers, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and inter-government organisations.

Some of our graduates have taken up key posts with the International Federation of Red Cross (IFRC) and Red Crescent Societies, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Department of Health, the armed forces and with NGOs in Sudan, Iraq, Angola and Afghanistan.

Assessment methods

Modules will be assessed throughout the course using essays, research proposals and field work study. Field placements scheduled for August/ September form a central and compulsory feature of the course structure.

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The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice. Read more
The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of research-active historians – internationally renowned scholars who publish in their areas of expertise.

- The History field at Oxford Brookes is recognised as a centre of academic excellence in both teaching and research.

- We include all aspects of our research interests in the History MA course, teaching modules and supervising dissertations that reflect our specialist subjects.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to go on to PhD research and will also be of interest to graduates wishing to pursue advanced study in History.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Ms Poppy Hoole ().

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, discussion groups, workshops and individual tutorials as well as historiographical and bibliographical presentations.

Classes are held in the evenings (except where indicated), and the sessions run from 6.30pm to 9.00pm.

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study.

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Shorter courses in History are also available: the postgraduate diploma and the postgraduate certificate. It is possible to transfer between these and the MA course.

Specialist facilities

Students have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

The city is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to an even wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in History have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government; the civil service and at GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from the 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research.

Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study. You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods.

Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of medicine
- History of fascism
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards.

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities including organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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