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This flexible, part-time Masters level programme for practising primary care and community pharmacists is evidence based with a problem-solving, practice-orientated approach. Read more
This flexible, part-time Masters level programme for practising primary care and community pharmacists is evidence based with a problem-solving, practice-orientated approach. A full blend of flexible work-based learning supported through web-based learning resources, online discussion and face-to-face learning events creates a rich learning environment. Choosing a Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma, MSc or CPD option will help improve your professional status, developing your career prospects.

Designed with extensive input of a multi-professional team, Bath’s programme reflects the latest developments and challenges. It offers flexibility allowing you to tailor study to suit your situation, with a choice of specialised qualifications in Clinical Pharmacy Practice or Prescribing and Therapeutics enabling you to practise as an Independent Prescriber.

Programme features

- Choice of awards reflecting your area of professional interest
- Study at your own pace with minimal time away from work
- Excellent support and learner networks with a user-friendly virtual learning environment
- Increased professional expertise and status with enhanced career prospects
- Support in meeting CPD requirements of the GPhC and professional development in line with the RPS Faculty frameworks

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/clin-phar-prac-prim-care-and-comm/

Pathways

- Clinical Pharmacy Practice (Primary Care)
- Prescribing & Therapeutics

You can study combinations of units to accumulate credit toward a named award.

Course information

Information about available units and the programme structure can be found in our postgraduate programme brochure (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/clin-phar-prac-prim-care-and-comm/bath-diploma-course-guide-2015.pdf).

Programme descriptions can be found in the University’s online programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/other.html).

Our research

Research in our Department is centred around a number of focused areas or themes. To find out more, please see our:
- Departmental research webpages (http://www.bath.ac.uk/pharmacy/research/)

Our research staff and students are also involved in a number of formal Research Centres and networks:

Bath Inflammation/Rheumatology Research Network (BIRD)
Cancer Research at Bath ([email protected])
Centre for Extremophile Research
Centre for Mathematical Biology
Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM)
Inter-Departmental Infection and Immunity Network
Neuroscience Network at University of Bath (NNUB)
ReMedDes

Find out about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/pharmacy/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/index.html

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This distinctive programme allows you to think about the critical and creative relationships between film, photography and the media, while developing your skills to produce projects of your own. Read more

This distinctive programme allows you to think about the critical and creative relationships between film, photography and the media, while developing your skills to produce projects of your own.

A major independent project sits at the heart of the course, supported by modules that put your practice into the context of contemporary debates. You’ll explore the different critical approaches to the making and consumption of photography and film, allowing them to inform the short film and photography projects you’ll work on.

It’s a flexible programme which allows you to choose from a range of optional modules to focus on topics that suit your own creative and critical interests. You could study cultural policy, international film industries, film and TV writing, feminism in the media and more.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers and practitioners in the field, and our cutting edge research will inform all your teaching.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

The whole programme is based around a major independent project. You can choose to complete a dissertation and take classes developing your knowledge of research methods to support your work. Alternatively, you can complete a short film or photography project that you’ll exhibit at the end of the programme.

The modules you study throughout the year give you the theoretical and contextual knowledge you need to inform your project, as well as developing your skills in filmmaking and photography.

You’ll study two core modules. One will explore the links between photographic creativity, optical science and the nature of cinema and allow you to work on a short film project. The other will look at the historical development of photographic practice, contemporary issues and debates.

Alongside these modules you’ll choose from a range of options to focus on topics that interest you, from film industries around the world to new media, cultural policy, communication and development, television narrative and more.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Final Independent Project 60 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Cultural Policy: Models and Debates 30 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • Writing for Film and Television 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Film, Photography and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Film, Photography and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use learning methods that reflect the diversity of the programme, including workshops, lectures, seminars, group learning, tutorials and film screenings. Independent study is also a vital element of the programme, since it allows you to develop your skills and explore your creativity in practical work.

Assessment

We also use different methods of assessment, some of which will depend on the modules you choose. These are likely to include portfolios of practical work, group and individual projects and reports, essays, literature reviews, case studies, presentations, scripts and commentaries.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a broad base of knowledge and skills across two important forms of communication. It will also equip you with cultural awareness and advanced skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This diverse programme addresses the cultural, social, political and economic questions in media and communications. Taught by leading researchers in the field, you’ll gain an insight into the complexities of the global media landscape. Read more

This diverse programme addresses the cultural, social, political and economic questions in media and communications. Taught by leading researchers in the field, you’ll gain an insight into the complexities of the global media landscape.

If you’re already working in the communications and media industries, or want to deepen your understanding of the role communication plays in society, then this programme offers a multidisciplinary approach to the complex relationships between media and communications, people and organisations in global societies.

Core modules will give you the theoretical background to examine areas such as representation, media and power, the public sphere and audiences. You’ll explore how these principles relate to topical issues. Then you’ll focus on aspects of the subject that interest you, when you choose optional modules on topics such as the international film industry, public relations, communication in development contexts, or political communication.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll study two core modules that lay the foundations of the programme, exploring theoretical approaches to communication and media. One of these will consider issues such as de-westernising media and communication studies, interpersonal communication, media and power and the concept of the public sphere. You’ll then use these theories to take a critical approach to real-world issues, as well as developing your own perspectives on topics that interest you.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Critical Issues in Media and Communication 30 credits
  • Media and Communication Theory 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

Please see the website for a list of the optional modules available

For more information on typical modules, read Communication and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Communication and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We use various methods to assess your progress, depending on the modules you choose. These could include essays, presentations, project work and reports, case studies and in-course assessment of your contribution to group tasks.

Career opportunities

You'll gain diverse and in-depth subject knowledge from this programme, as well as sophisticated skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication. You’ll also develop stronger cultural and critical awareness of the world around you. All of this is very attractive to employers.

Graduates have gone into a wide range of careers that reflect the breadth of the discipline, including communications advisors, public relations practitioners, media executives, and corporate managers. The programme also offers an excellent foundation for PhD study.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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This programme combines the practice of journalism with theoretical perspectives, allowing you to think critically about journalism in a global context. Read more

This programme combines the practice of journalism with theoretical perspectives, allowing you to think critically about journalism in a global context.

Core modules will introduce you to different theories and approaches in international journalism, using research and case studies to consider the economic, cultural, social and political implications of journalistic practice. You’ll write news stories and gain an awareness of issues such as regulation and ethics.

At the same time, you’ll choose from a range of optional modules – you could study multimedia journalism, communication and development or identity in the media among others.

Our students have included people with little experience of journalism as well as experienced editors, journalists and bloggers looking for a new perspective on their work. Guided by leading researchers in the field, and focusing on contemporary practice, you’ll be well equipped to become an expert in your field.Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Core modules will lay the foundations for your understanding of the theory and ongoing research in the world of global journalism, and how journalism shapes – and is shaped by – global political, social, economic and cultural issues. Then you’ll explore how this affects journalistic practice, considering issues like regulation and ethics as you build skills in news research and writing.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Journalism Theory and Research 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • The Reporting of Politics 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We also use different forms of assessment including essays, exams, news stories and reports. Optional modules may also use methods such as case studies and source analysis, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a wide range of knowledge, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis and communication that will serve you well in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a range of careers. These have included national and international journalism, as well as public relations roles for government, international and not-for-profit organisations.

You’ll also be well prepared to continue with research in this rapidly evolving field at PhD level and in an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. Read more

The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. This programme will give you an insight into both aspects of the media industries, as you analyse their cultural and economic dimensions.

You’ll explore the full range of media production, from individual bloggers to huge corporations. Taking an international approach, you’ll study the development of contemporary media to understand current trends. It’s a truly interdisciplinary programme, drawing on communication and cultural studies, economics, anthropology, business and management studies, sociology, politics, law, literature, art history and music.

Guided by leading researchers in the field, many of whom are involved in our Media Industries Research Centre, you’ll gain an insight into how television, film, music, online media, newspapers, magazines and advertising are produced, and what it’s like to work in each industry.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll develop your knowledge of the full range of media industries through core modules that run in each semester.

You’ll be introduced to issues and debates in media studies as well as the impacts of developments such as digitalisation and marketisation. Then you’ll explore the organisational dynamics of industries such as television, film, music, digital media, newspapers, magazines and advertising to consider what it’s like to work in them.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

Alongside the compulsory modules, you’ll be able to tailor the programme to suit your own interests by selecting from a range of optional modules on topics such as television narrative, identity and media, political communication, cultural policy, international film industries and public relations, among others.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • The Media Industries 30 credits
  • Media Production Analysis 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Cultural Policy: Models and Debates 30 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We use different methods to assess your progress, depending on the modules you choose. These are likely to include essays, video or photography work, presentations or project work and reports.

Career opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a variety of careers in the management and production of media content, both in the UK and worldwide. You’ll also be equipped to work in communications in broader contexts such as communications and media policy, PR or other cultural and creative industries.

You’ll also be well placed to pursue your research at PhD level, and even pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication. Read more

Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication.

Core modules will introduce you to political communication in established and emerging democracies worldwide, exploring the ethics and power dynamics at play. You’ll ask questions around media freedom, the responsibilities of journalists, ‘spin doctors’, the impact of emerging technologies and whether elections really are decided on TV.

You’ll also tailor the programme to suit your personal and career interests, choosing from optional modules on topics such as digital media, PR and the role of the media in democratisation. Supported by our Media Industries Research Centre, leading researchers and experienced practitioners, you’ll be well equipped for a career in this challenging field.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study two core modules that cover the foundations of the programme, exploring the role of communications in contemporary politics.

You’ll look at different models of contemporary democracy and compare the relations between political actors, the media and citizens. From there you’ll move onto recent innovations sparked by cultural, technological and political change. With this in mind, you’ll then design a political campaign that incorporates some of these developments.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments also take different forms so you can develop diverse skills. These are likely to include essays and exams as well as group presentations, projects and reports, as well as campaign analyses and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme isn’t a practical training course, but it does give you an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of political communication – a sector which is constantly growing.

Our graduates have entered a wide range of related careers in political journalism, government communications, communications analysis and advisory roles for political parties. Others have gone on to work for international organisations and pressure groups.

You’ll also be prepared to continue with further research at PhD level and pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. Read more

Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. It shapes how we see the world around us. This programme examines the social, political, cultural and economic functions and consequences of PR.

Core modules explore theoretical perspectives applied to PR within communication and cultural studies, and introduce you to its role as a cultural intermediary. You’ll learn to deconstruct the strategies and tactics of PR campaigns and understand how they affect both the organisations that use them and their social and cultural contexts.

You can also tailor this programme to suit you: you’ll choose from optional modules to gain specialist knowledge of topics such as new media, political communication, photography or communication and development. This isn’t a practical training course – instead it offers an insight into the way PR changes how we live, work and relate to each other.Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

The programme is based around two core modules that develop your understanding of PR and its role in contemporary society. You’ll think about PR as a cultural force, exploring theories and research in the field to apply them to different PR campaigns. As you investigate the relationships between PR, the media, politics and commerce, you’ll consider PR practices as they relate to other communications functions like branding, and advertising.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • The Reporting of Politics 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessment methods may vary depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include essays, case analyses, group projects and reports. Optional modules may even use literature reviews, campaign reports or even video and photography projects.

Career opportunities

This is not a practical training course, but it gives you a real insight into the construction, influence and impact of PR in a range of contexts.

You’ll also acquire or refine high-level skills in areas such as research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication, as well as having good cultural, political and critical awareness.

You’ll be well prepared for a career in PR or public affairs in a wide range of sectors, working in-house for large or small organisations or in an agency context. There are also opportunities for PR professionals in specialist sectors such as finance or the non-profit sector.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. Read more

Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. This programme interrogates the impact of digital technologies on individuals and society, and provides you with the skills and knowledge to be able to think critically and creatively about new media.

Working both individually and in teams, you will learn about diverse digital media techniques and processes, including coding and hacking, web design, mapping and visualisation, scraping and mining, interactive narratives, animation, digital ethnography, action research, prototyping and iterative design, representation, and more. Through an applied, hands-on approach, you will gain an understanding of the social, cultural and economic roles of new media, and explore what it is like to work in the new media industries.

With a range of optional modules to choose from, you will also be able to expand your knowledge into areas such as multimedia journalism, cinema and photography, political and promotional communication, feminism and the media, and many more. Taught by expert practitioners and researchers, you will gain the knowledge and skills to thrive in this dynamic, fast-paced sector.Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Depending on your previous experience, you may need to take the module New Media Production Skills to develop your knowledge of visual design software, HTML, CSS, PHP, WordPress, Javascript and animation. The module isn’t assessed so it will appear in your transcript, but won’t count towards your classification.

In each semester you’ll study core modules that build your knowledge of new media contexts and practice. You’ll consider the relationship between new media and contemporary culture and the interactive forms and practices that are emerging. Then you’ll gain practical production, project management and critical skills and respond to new media briefs in collaborative projects.

You’ll then have the chance to broaden your approach with your choice of optional modules, from photography and cinematics to political communication, television narratives and public relations in society.

To demonstrate the skills you’ve gained, you’ll also undertake a major independent project. You can choose to submit a dissertation and take classes on research methods throughout the year, or you can work on a sustained, practical new media project with a written element.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • New Media Cultures 30 credits
  • New Media Practices 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • New Media Production Skills 10 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study (New Media) 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • New Media Independent Project 60 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught in a mixture of practical workshops, lectures and small group seminars which allow you to discuss your reading and present some of your research to other students. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, allowing you to practice your skills and deepen your knowledge.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include practical projects, essays, reports, group and individual presentations and case studies among others.

Career opportunities

This programme is still relatively new, and digital media are rapidly growing, evolving and expanding.

People with high-level production and project management skills in new media will be in high demand for decades to come, and this programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to thrive in a wide – and rapidly expanding – range of careers in new media practice.

These could include digital marketing, animation, web design and development, social media, analytics, PR and consultancy among others. You’ll also be well prepared for future research in this young and fast-changing field.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• A writing sample, preferably a recent essay written showing evidence of scholarly research and writing. For applicants who have significant work experience, a substantial piece of workplace writing may be substituted.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Arts program in English and Communication challenges students to develop integrated competencies in the highly sought skills of reading, writing, and speaking. The program focuses attention on the many uses of language and on the nature of language itself. It requires students to become familiar with the connections between the written and the spoken word, and with the varied ways that language is shaped to serve aesthetic, social, and practical ends. By fostering research and analytic skills, the program prepares students for a variety of career opportunities. Program Start Dates: Fall.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours

GECD 601, Introduction to Research Methods .......................3 credits
GECD 606, Thesis Workshop .............................................3 credits
Electives .....................................................................21 credits (Students will select, with prior advisor approval, seven grad- uate English and Communication courses; at least 12 credit hours must be completed at the 600 level. Nine credit hours may be taken at the 500 level in any courses with LITR, COMP, or COMM designators.)
GECD 690, Thesis .........................................................9 credits

Uniqueness of Program

The MA English and Communication program is home to scholars of literature, rhetoric, speech communication, composition, and linguistics, making it unique within the SUNY system. It best serves students who wish to study in more than one of these disciplines. Students’ thesis projects can be rooted in one of these disciplines, or they may cross or blur disciplinary boundaries. A comprehensive approach to these distinct, yet related, fields defines the core graduate experience at Potsdam, making our program ideal for a variety of purposes. We also take a lot of pride in providing personalized attention, professional/academic achievement, unique program design, and flexible course scheduling. Graduates of our program have obtained positions as faculty at community colleges; editors and publishers of speeches, documents, and multimedia; and employees for business, governmental agencies, and/or the corporate world in a multitude of capacities.

Testimonials

“The program helped me grow as a writer, critical reader/thinker, and oral presenter. It prepared me to work as a professional and taught me a lot about how to interact with students and provide meaningful feedback.” —Becca Jewell

“The program nurtures a longer-term project focus, as compared to semester-based projects. I thoroughly enjoyed the freedom to design my own projects and the unpredictable, yet focused, discussions during class.” —Josh Clark

“I gained a better understanding of the world and an enhanced ability to analyze, synthesize, and critically think. In my view, studies like these prepare us to understand, analyze, dissect, and influence the academic and non-academic conversations that define our politics, work environments, and society at large.” —Adam Bulizak

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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

This program prepares students for technology leadership and management positions in business and organizations in private industry, the military, social service agencies, K-12 schools and higher education. For students holding an Initial certification, this degree program leads to recommendation for an additional New York certification as an Educational Technology Specialist. The program meets the standards established by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) and is NCATE certified. This program is also available for non K-12 students who are not seeking certification. Program start date: Summer, Fall, Spring.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours

IT 614, Technology in Education .........................................3 credits
IT 625, History and Philosophy of Technology Utilization ...........3 credits
IT 635, Research and Theory on Comm and Performance ............3 credits
IT 647, Technology Coaching ..............................................3 credits
IT 651, Systematic Design for Performance Improvement ............3 credits
IT 654, Program Evaluation ...............................................3 credits
IT 657, Practicum in Technology ..........................................3 credits

Four electives focusing on web development, literacy, program- ming and authoring, and technology utilization: 12 credit hours

Culminating Experience: 3 credit hours

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Success Story

In the Fall 2012 semester, as part of a multimedia class for the MSED Educational Technology Specialist program, Trevor Dugan, Class of 2014, developed an app called PuzzleTopple. The app was published a year later and is available on both iOS and Android. Since the launch, the app has gone global, with 17,000 downloads in the Singapore region and over 25,000 downloads worldwide on iOS alone.

Uniqueness of Program

A teaching certificate is not required to enter this program; however, for those students who enter the program with an existing New York State teaching certificate, this degree may lead to an additional New York State certification.

Employment Diversity

Graduates of the program have obtained positions in, but not limited to, elementary education, secondary education, higher education, technology start-ups, and consulting firms.

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in English is designed to meet the teacher education regulations of the New York State Education Department, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) stan- dards, the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), as well as Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. The program leads to Initial/Professional Adolescence Education, English (Grades 7-12) certification. This program is nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 549, Adol Lit and Teaching of Reading/Literacy .............3 credits
GRED 550, Intro to Teaching ELA, Grades 7-12 ....................3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 582, Teaching Writing/Lang/Comm, Grades 7-12 ..........3 credits
GRED 584, Teaching Literature and Literacy, Grades 7-12 ........3 credits
GRED 588, Practicum I, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools..............2 credits
GRED 589, Practicum II, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools ............2 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 671, Dev Prof Portfolio: Culminating Experience ...........3 credits
GRED 677, Development and Learning in Adolescence .............3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Education elective ........................................................3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. If the psychology requirement is fulfilled through un- dergraduate course work, a second education elective shall be taken.

Full or conditional admission is available.

Testimonial

“I made the tough decision to apply for graduate school after a fruitful career in social work because I desperately needed a change. After this epiphany, I resigned from my position, and soon after applied to the MST program at SUNY Potsdam. As it turned out, it was a decision that not only changed my life, but altered the course of my family’s as well. The MST program prepared me for teaching in ways that I couldn't have imagined, and continues to mold me into the teacher I am well on my way to becoming.” —Johnny Dundon

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

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