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Masters Degrees (Comics)

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Our unique MLitt in Comics Studies examines comics from the point of view of critical analysis (in terms of genre, style, formal properties and history) and also provides training in the creative aspects of comics production. Read more
Our unique MLitt in Comics Studies examines comics from the point of view of critical analysis (in terms of genre, style, formal properties and history) and also provides training in the creative aspects of comics production. The course leads to excellent employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the field of comics - either creatively or in the production industry.

English at Dundee has a strong record in the annual Guardian league tables for teaching. Its highest ever rating was No. 1 in the UK and the latest (2010) places it in the UK top twenty with 95% student satisfaction rating for teaching.

Why study Comics Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt in Comics Studies is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and Dundee is one of only a handful of institutions in the world offering the opportunity to study comics at postgraduate level. Our programme has grown out of the expertise of the course leader, Dr Chris Murray, who researches comics, organises major comics conferences, and co-edits one of the few peer-reviewed journals in this expanding field.

"I thoroughly enjoyed studying Comics this year, you have given me a real love and understanding of the medium"
Current student, 2011

Close links with industry experts

The city of Dundee is a recognised powerhouse of comics production. It is home to DC Thomson & Co Ltd, who produce iconic titles such as the Beano, Dandy, Commando, Starblazer and Bunty. Drawing on such expertise, we can offer workshops with industry professionals and even the possibility of a placement with DC Thomson.

Aims of the Programme

This course will provide you with an understanding of the comics medium and the comics industry, and their relation to different genres, national cultures, and various media. You will be encouraged to think critically about these ideas, and to appreciate the importance of relating critical close analysis of style and form to theory, context, politics and history.

This course will also be of benefit to anyone who hopes to work in the popular media or publishing.

"We have our own dedicated Comics Studio in the Tower Building where we can work on our projects and coursework throughout the year, with drawing tables, computers, and scanners."
Read Kirsten's blog

Postgraduate culture

The English department provides a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, a postgraduate website, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference held in Dundee. There are also several activities related to Comics Studies, with an annual Comics Day as part of the Literary Festival. The Comics Day has attracted world famous industry professionals, including writers such as Warren Ellis and Pat Mills, artists such as Alan Davis, Rian Hughes, Hunt Emerson, and editors like Dez Skinn.

The Dundee Comics Society holds regular talks by comics writers and artists. Dundee is also the home of D-Con, an annual Manga festival. The journal Studies in Comics is edited from within the programme, and the University library has a good selection of comics and graphic novels.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

Assessment

The assessment methods used in this course include weekly journals, presentations, research essays, and dissertations. Some of the option modules include assessment of creative work accompanied by reflective essays. Dissertations are supervised on a one-to-one basis to ensure continuity, and this will provide you with the opportunity to work on an area of comics study of your own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

Programme Content

There are two teaching semesters, from September to December and from January to March. You will study the core modules below, plus your choice of optional modules

From April onwards, you will write a dissertation in English Studies or Creative Writing.

All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Core Modules
Critical Approaches to Comics and Graphic Novels
International Comics Culture
Optional modules from a list such as the one below:

Creating Comics
Digital Comics
Comics and Film
Science Fiction Comics
Autobiographix: Documentary and Autobiographical Comics
Dissertation

English Studies or Creative Writing

Careers

This course offers good employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the field of comics, either creatively or in the industry from a production point of view. You will also meet many industry professionals during the course, and have the chance to make valuable connections. Students taking this programme may also choose to pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing. An understanding of comics cuts across publishing, computer games, the internet, television, and film.

Additionally, the high levels of analysis, problem-solving abilities and the presentational and communication skills that you will develop on this course are highly valued by employers.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Our Masters in Comics and Graphic Novels is the only course of its kind in the UK, and Dundee is one of only a handful of institutions in the world offering the opportunity to study comics at postgraduate level. Read more
Our Masters in Comics and Graphic Novels is the only course of its kind in the UK, and Dundee is one of only a handful of institutions in the world offering the opportunity to study comics at postgraduate level. Our expert staff are involved in making comics, researching comics, organising major comics conferences, and co-editing peer-reviewed journals in this expanding field.

Aims of the Course

This course will provide you with an understanding of the comics medium and the comics industry, and their relation to different genres, national cultures, and various media. You will be encouraged to think critically about these ideas, and to appreciate the importance of relating critical close analysis of style and form to theory, context, politics and history.

You can also practice creating comics from script writing to thumbnails, pencils, inks, lettering, colouring and production methods.

These analytical and creative skills, combined with assessments that test presentational and communication skills and problem solving abilities, are essential in the workplace. The fact that the course is interdisciplinary in its approach (looking at writing and visual culture together) means that we foster creativity and ingenuity in developing critical approaches to the work.‌

How you will be taught

The MLitt is led by Dr Chris Murray with the MDes led by Phillip Vaughan.

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: small group teaching, one-to-one teaching, supervised study, seminars, tutorials, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, workshops, practical classes and demonstrations.

How you will be assessed

The assessment methods used in this course include weekly journals, presentations, research essays, dissertations and projects. Some of the option modules include assessment of creative work accompanied by reflective essays.

Dissertations and projects are supervised on a one-to-one basis to ensure continuity, and this will provide you with the opportunity to work on an area of comics study or creation of your own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

There are two teaching semesters, from September to December and from January to March. You'll study the core modules below, plus your choice of optional modules

From April onwards, you'll write your dissertation or produce your major project.

Core Modules for MLitt

Critical Approaches to Comics and Graphic Novels
International Comics Cultures
Dissertation

Core Modules for MDes

Creating Comics
Comics Production
Major Project

Optional modules (shared between both courses):

Critical Approaches to Comics and Graphic Novels
International Comics Cultures
Creating Comics
Comics Production
Comics and Film
Science Fiction Comics
Autobiographix: Documentary and Autobiographical Comics

Employability

This course offers good employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the field of comics, either critically or creatively. You will also meet many industry professionals during the course, and have the chance to make valuable connections.

Students taking this programme may also choose to pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing. An understanding of comics cuts across publishing, computer games, the internet, television, and film.

You'll have networking opportunities throughout the course, you'll meet with industry professionals and there will be opportunities to attend and organise major comic conventions. There are also opportunities for internships.

Additionally, the high levels of analysis, problem-solving abilities and the presentational and communication skills that you will develop on this course are highly valued by employers.

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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These modules enable you to develop specialist expertise in a topic new to you or perhaps refresh your knowledge in a topic that is familiar but which you studied long ago. Read more
These modules enable you to develop specialist expertise in a topic new to you or perhaps refresh your knowledge in a topic that is familiar but which you studied long ago. Perhaps you already work in the area but need to understand its foundations.

The stand-alone modules are taken from our wide range of Masters degrees, you will study alongside our Masters students, and belong to our postgraduate community.

Why Dundee?

Our academic staff offer postgraduate modules in their specialist areas, so you are taught by experts in the field.
For example, our Comics Studies modules are taught by Dr Chris Murray, who researches comics, organises major comics conferences, and co-edits one of the few peer-reviewed journals in this expanding field. Our Global Historians provide modules covering the history of many Global Empires, and as well as the history of Scotland. The European Institute for Security & Justice run our International Security modules.

Modules available

For full details of the modules currently available, please visit the Humanities website.

How you will be taught

Most modules are taught via one face to face class each week, some have fortnightly classes. The format of the classes varies depending on the subject and class size.

How you will be assessed

We use a range of coursework assignments, including presentations, essays and course journals to assess our postgraduate modules. There are no exams.

Progression

These modules form part of our postgraduate portfolio. You can continue from a single module to a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or Masters (MLitt), by combining relevant modules.

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The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

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Science fiction is a very popular genre across a range of media and a deep understanding of it will provide good employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the creative industries. Read more
Science fiction is a very popular genre across a range of media and a deep understanding of it will provide good employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the creative industries. This course gives you the opportunity to study science fiction literature, films and comics at postgraduate level.

Why study Science Fiction at Dundee?

This new degree programme is designed to provide you with an understanding of the genre of science fiction and its relationship to different genres, national cultures, and media. Over the course of the year you will extend your strategies for the analysis and interpretation of science fiction texts as well as your familiarity with their historical and stylistic development. You will be encouraged to articulate independent critical responses to science fiction across a range of periods and media.

The programme is inherently interdisciplinary in its approach, and will foster creativity and ingenuity in developing critical approaches to the work.

Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre

The MLitt will also benefit from the close relationship between the University and Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre (DCA), which includes a cinema and runs a programme of screenings, talks and events related to the course.

Who should study this course?

The programme will be of great benefit to anyone interested in a job in the popular media and publishing, popular science journalism, museums of science.

Postgraduate culture

The English department provides a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, a postgraduate website, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference held in Dundee.

"The English department at Dundee were incredibly supportive in many ways and I left with terrific memories. From performances with the JOOT Theatre Company, through being encouraged to explore my own research interests, to one of the most nourishing environments in which to attend and participate in conferences, it really was a brilliant place in which to learn and develop whether you intended to continue to study or move on to the job market."
Karen Graham, former postgraduate student in the English department

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by the English team, based in the School of Humanities. The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars, presentations, talks by invited speakers, discussion groups, lectures, workshops, practical classes and demonstrations. You will also find a range of activities - including screenings at the DCA, seminars and workshops by professionals (writers and actors) and scholars, and a series of talks, conferences and relevant activities - to complement the Science Fiction MLitt degree.

Assessment

The assessment methods used in this course include weekly journals, presentations, research essays, and dissertations. Some of the option modules include assessment of creative work accompanied by reflective essays. Dissertations are supervised on a one-to-one basis to ensure continuity, and this will provide you with the opportunity to work on an area of science-fiction study of your own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

Programme Content

There are two teaching semesters, from September to December and from January to March. During each of these semesters, you will study these core modules plus an option module.

From April onwards, you will write a dissertation in English Studies.

All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Core Modules

Science Fiction - Issues and Approaches
New Wave and Contemporary Science Fiction
Option Modules

Science Fiction Film
Science Fiction Comics
Scientific Romance
Difference in Science Fiction

Careers

Graduates will gain a high degree of knowledge and expertise about an important area of literature, art, media, and popular culture, and will explore the relationship between these fields in a highly critical and interdisciplinary way.

Students taking this programme may pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing. An understanding of science fiction extends across publishing, computer games, the internet, television, and film. Students will meet with industry professionals in this course.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Are you a fan of fantasy fiction? Or are you simply curious as to why the fantastic can be found all around us in the twenty-first century, from videogames and films to poetry, songs, television, novel series, and so-called 'mainstream' fiction? This programme allows you to engage with one of the most vibrant literary genres of the last two centuries - and a major cultural phenomenon of our time. Read more
Are you a fan of fantasy fiction? Or are you simply curious as to why the fantastic can be found all around us in the twenty-first century, from videogames and films to poetry, songs, television, novel series, and so-called 'mainstream' fiction? This programme allows you to engage with one of the most vibrant literary genres of the last two centuries - and a major cultural phenomenon of our time.

Why this programme

◾You will be supported by a friendly, internationally acclaimed team of scholars working in all areas of the arts, from literature and comics to film, TV, history of art and modern languages.
◾You will have access to world class libraries, museums and teaching/research facilities. And there will be the opportunity to immerse yourself in the vibrant cultural scene of Glasgow itself, which attracts major fantasy-related conventions and is famous throughout the world for its musical, artistic, technological and literary energy.

Programme structure

The programme involves core and optional taught sessions, followed by a period of research and writing over the summer when you will undertake supervised independent work on a special topic of your choice, researching, planning and writing a 15,000 word dissertation.

You will take a research training course which will prepare you both to work on your dissertation and to develop a proposal and funding applications for a PhD, should you choose to pursue research at doctoral level.

You will have the opportunity to meet and learn from visiting scholars, writers and publishers from the UK, Europe and the United States. And you will form part of the dynamic graduate/research community of the School of Critical Studies and the College of Arts.

The programme is made up of three components:
◾Core course: taught over two ten-week teaching periods, from October to December and January to March.
◾Optional courses: also taught in ten-week blocks. Full-time students usually study one topic course in each semester.
◾A dissertation: written during the final phase of the course, from April to September.

Core Course

Part 1 introduces you to the history of fantasy literature in English and its attendant theories from c. 1780 to 1950. As well as charting the early history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fantasies where these had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to the most influential critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic.

Part 2 investigates the history of fantasy literature in English from 1950 to the present. It will also consider the unprecedented spread of fantasy in recent decades through comics, films and the new media, and delve into the critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic that have emerged since the 1950s.

Optional Courses

You may choose from the available optional courses offered by any of the Masters programmes in the School of Critical Studies. You may also opt for courses from other Masters programmes in the College of Arts (subject to approval by the relevant convener). One course can be taken at Honours level. Examples of possible options include:
◾Animation
◾Children's Literature And Literacies: Critical Enquiry
◾Core Structures Of Scottish Culture
◾Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline)
◾Decadence And The Modern
◾Finn in Gaelic Literature
◾Magical Narratives: Imagination, Fantasy and the Creation of Worlds
◾Modern Everyday
◾Neovictorianism
◾Religion, Theology and Culture Directed Study
◾Science Fiction

For further information, contact the convener.

Dissertation

The topic normally arises out of the work of the taught sessions, but the choice is very much open to your own initiative. The only restrictions are that the topic should be capable of serious scholarly treatment, and that adequate supervision is available. Your supervisor will help you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology.

In addition, you will attend seminars in the School Research Training Programme and the College of Arts Graduate School Research Training Course. Topics include:
◾Use of library resources
◾Advanced humanities computing
◾Research skills and research management.

Career prospects

The critical and analytic skills you develop and the ability to conduct rigorous independent study make this programme an ideal step towards an academic career.

Graduates from English Literature have also gone on to careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching and the media.

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This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure. Read more
This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure.

You will focus on understanding how texts are constructed using a range of narrative models and how this aspect of your subject knowledge can be employed in the primary classroom to develop children's abilities to read a range of texts.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgcert-education-childrens-literature/

Why choose this course?

- There is a strong focus on applied classroom practice

- You will be taught by an experienced team of colleagues researching and teaching in the area of children's literature

- You will explore a variety of texts currently available, including classic texts, comics, novels in verse form, literature in translation and interactive texts.

This course in detail

The three modules are:

- Reading for pleasure in the primary classroom
(7 sessions in the Autumn term)

Grounded in reader response theory, the focus of this module is to enhance your skills as a teacher of reading in its broadest sense. With an excellent range of high quality texts at the module's heart, you will explore how to read picture books, novels, poetry and interactive texts across the primary ages. By the end of the module, you will have the tools to support children in being able to talk critically and comprehensively about texts and have the knowledge to build a community of successful, lifelong readers.

- Children's literature through the ages: from classic texts to interactive texts and their use in the classroom
(7 sessions in the Spring term)

The profile of children's books has undergone an unparalleled change compared to other fields of literature. From its early days of didactic and moralistic undertones pre-18th century, to the present day where stories are not just written for pleasure but actively encourage children to question the ideologies that surround them, this genre's journey has been fascinating and, arguably, the most diverse. This module will begin with studying some of the early classics and end with children's stories in today's multimedia world. Through a range of theoretical perspectives such as feminism, marxism and post-modernism, this module will explore a range of texts including: classics, novels in verse, literature in translation, apps, traditional tales and comics.

- Investigating practice
(3 workshops and tutorial support in the Summer term)

You will develop an inquiry related to your own practice which can then be assessed through either a report or a portfolio of work. This might include the development of pedagogical approaches or curriculum materials, or investigations into the achievement levels or the opportunities provided for particular groups of learners. It could also include the development of professional practice through shadowing others or engaging in collaborative work across organisations.

The inquiry will be supported by a personal tutor. Group seminars and workshops will provide guidance on the development of methodological tools for the inquiry and enable you to share the stages of project development with other members of the group. You will be allocated a personal tutor for this assignment who will signpost you to relevant academic theory and research and support material.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly, the modules available may vary from those shown here.

Attendance pattern

This course takes place on Wednesday evenings 5.00pm - 8.00pm at the Harcourt Hill Campus.

How this course helps you develop

The PGCertificate aims to develop reflective practitioners at master's level.

Careers

Your learning on the course may lead to better prospects for career advancement and students frequently change role / direction as a result of developing new understandings and skills from their work on the course.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants.

You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression.

Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices.

It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market.

Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

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-On the MA Illustration degree you will develop your professional skills as an Illustrator. -You will work with design professionals of international standing. Read more
-On the MA Illustration degree you will develop your professional skills as an Illustrator
-You will work with design professionals of international standing
-This masters degree gives you the opportunity to work in professional and industrial contexts
-There is the opportunity to spend a semester in Germany at the prestigious Hochschule Mannheim as part of your course

Why choose this course?

MA Illustration is a Masters award within the MA Art and Design programme at the School of Creative Arts. Within the programme there is strong emphasis on professional practice and the real-world applications of art and design. You will develop key research skills and gain a good understanding of the work of other practitioners in your field.

The aim of the postgraduate programme is to equip you with the skills, knowledge and understanding required to practice at an advanced level, to foster your creativity and enhance your employment opportunities. You will work alongside artists and designers who are involved with a wide variety of media and forms. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which also includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned artists work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

The MA Illustration degree is designed to develop your imaginative, creative and technical potential as an illustrator. It provides an opportunity for you to examine a range of media in the fields of illustration, including the role of image-making in new and traditional media, and illustration's relationships with fine art and digital media.

This masters degree gives you an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge and skills in the use of narrative storytelling and its relationship to illustration, as well as illustrative conventions in children's and adult literature, comics and other media. We encourage you to develop the entrepreneurial and commercial skills necessary to help develop your work to its full potential and to equip you with the practical and intellectual skills to thrive as a practicing artist. Through working alongside artists and designers on other postgraduate courses you will explore the possibilities for the illustrator today, questioning conventions and refining the direction of your practice.

Our staff are experienced in research and professional practice, and you will also benefit from contributions from visiting designers and professionals, as well as from involvement with our international exhibitions programme. The course also has close links with a wide range of industry partners.

Careers

Particular emphasis is given to providing you with the skills necessary to further your career an illustrator. The course is designed to help you understand and work within the contemporary industrial environment and particular attention is given to helping you acquire entrepreneurial skills.

Teaching methods

This course is designed to help you develop your practice and give you the skills recovery to further your career in industry both in the UK and abroad. The course includes practice based modules where you will explore and develop your work as an illustrator. It also contains course or research skills, entrepreneurialism and professional practice. The final part of the course enables you to complete a major project.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Enterprise and Context
-Discourse / Reflection: Art and Design
-Major Study: Illustration
-Practice 1: Art and Design
-Practice 2: Art and Design
-Research and Enquiry

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This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. Read more

Why take this course?

This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. It offers a range of political, industry-based, and text-based approaches to media and its communication strategies as well as opportunities for you to develop your own interests through the dissertation, industry study, screenwriting project or work placement project.

The degree is taught by a team of experienced lecturers who have researched and published in their specialist areas, and who bring those specialisms to their teaching sessions. This course will enable you to become multi-skilled and knowledgeable in ways that employers are now demanding and will prepare you to apply for jobs in areas such as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, the course is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Produce screenplays for film and television while working with a specialist tutor
Be involved in and contribute to our dynamic research culture through your film/TV dissertation
Engage with our researchers and published experts, many of whom have international reputations

What opportunities might ti lead to?

The skills you will develop on this course can prepare you for roles within the media and other creative industries, in particular the film and television industries. Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
Media

Module Details

You will develop a wide range of skills throughout the course such as applying theoretical approaches and using critical skills in close analysis and reading of key film and television texts. All units on this course focus on both film and television, but your final research project can cover both media or specialise in one of these two areas.

Here are the units you will study:

Research Methods (30 credits): This unit covers how to carry out research in film archives, how to do a literature search in film and television, and how to produce a thesis which is well structured and methodologically rigorous.

Media Contexts (30 credits): Investigate the ways in which a wide range of media texts communicate meaning. This unit will use a range of media texts as examples, including film, television, magazines, newspapers, fiction, graphic novels and comics. Theoretical approaches to all these contexts for interpreting and understanding media texts will form an important part of this unit.

Media Politics (30 credits): You will research and explore the various ways in which media reflects and represents political issues and identities.

Media Cultures and Industries (30 credits): You will explore a range of media industries and cultures including audience and fan cultures; film and television industry structures and policies; digital cultures and the scriptwriting industry.

Options to choose from include:

Short screenwriting project (30 credits): A self-directed practical writing project developing a short piece of drama for either film or television.

Industry study (30 credits): An opportunity to engage in an individual study of a media industry.

Short dissertation (30 credits) or Dissertation (60 credits): You will research and write a thesis focused on a defined research topic and/or question.

Programme Assessment

Your learning experience will not only cover the theory of these two media forms but you will also be given the opportunity to produce your own screenplays for film and TV. This is designed to develop more applied skills that will complement the theoretical components of the course.

Assessment is predominantly essay based in order to help you develop advanced research and analysis skills. Some units also involve individual oral presentations, so you can develop presentation skills at a higher level and engage in stimulating, sophisticated academic debates in your seminars.

Student Destinations

This course will enable you to become multi-skilled in ways that employers are now demanding and will help prepare you to apply for jobs in such areas as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, it is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work or research at PhD level.

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The MLitt in Film Studies will expand your appreciation of the medium in terms of its history, formal properties, and its relationships with other art forms. Read more
The MLitt in Film Studies will expand your appreciation of the medium in terms of its history, formal properties, and its relationships with other art forms. There is a particular focus on authorship and adaptation, as well as the transition from script to screen, drawing on an extensive collection of unpublished script material.

Why study Film Studies at Dundee?

This is one of over ten degree pathways offered in the Masters Programme in Humanities with Specialisation. Students on the Programme take some common modules, and are able to draw upon the research culture of the School of Humanities.

Film has been called the art form of the Twentieth Century, and continues to be a major force in contemporary culture. However, it remains in creative interaction with older arts. Above all, literature and film have been involved in a mutually enriching relationship since the birth of cinema in 1895. Moreover, films are often derived from literary sources, and literary texts increasingly draw on the cinematic devices. Film adaptations can extend or alter our perceptions of fiction or drama, but film also has its own language and styles, which range from the avant-garde to the popular, from aesthetic experiment to pulp commodities.

Interdisciplinary studies

This programme is inherently interdisciplinary in its approach (looking at film in relation to literature, art history and music, television and popular culture). Students are encouraged to think critically about these ideas, and to appreciate the importance of relating critical close analysis of style and form to theory, context, politics and history. These analytical skills, combined with assessment that tests presentational and communication skills and problem solving abilities, are essential in the workplace.

What's so good about Film Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
The School of Humanities at Dundee is a centre of research excellence. Postgraduate students join a vigorous research culture led by world-leading scholars. In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, workshops, practical classes and demonstrations. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on an area of film study of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

You will study one core module, various options and a dissertation.

Approaches to Film Studies: Theory, Criticism and Archives
English Studies Dissertation
Plus optional modules, from a list such as the one below:

Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The Cinema of John Huston: Adaptation and Authorship
Two British Auteurs: Ken Russell and John Boorman
The Writer-Director in American Film
Joyce and the Cinema
Comics and Film
Film and Theatre
The Literature of Hollywood

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Graduates will gain a high degree of knowledge and expertise about cinema, literature, art, media, and popular culture, and will explore the relationship between these fields in a highly critical and interdisciplinary way. Students taking this programme may pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing.

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants. You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression. Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Research led teaching

This course draws upon both the School of Humanities and Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design's (DJCAD) diverse, unique and internationally acclaimed research. In the RAE (Research Assessment Exercise) DJCAD was rated as the top institution in Scotland for research in art and design, and one of the best in the whole of the UK.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices. It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Students should have interdisciplinary backgrounds at undergraduate level, and have demonstrated work in both creative (e.g. studio) and academic areas. For example, you may have an honours degree in English, Film Studies or Philosophy and have engaged in creative practices such as photography, video, drawing, sculpture, or painting on your own. Other students may have dual honours degrees or have taken our Art, Philosophy and Contemporary Practices BA.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

The start date is September each year and the course lasts 12 months full-time.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities
Or

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market. Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

Read less
This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Read more

Why take this course?

This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Through a negotiated project you will be encouraged to define your role as a creative practitioner in a broad social, political and historical context. This MA would suit graduates from arts based courses but also professionals returning to education to complete ‘unfinished creative business’.

The staff team has a wealth of experience with internationally renowned practitioners in the field of artist’s books and zines, practice-based PhDs and printmaking. The course benefits from an extensive dedicated collection of artists’ books and zines located within the illustration studios. You will consider the question “what is illustration?” and seek to redefine and cross boundaries. A strong social awareness ethos underpins the course enabling you to develop a unique voice within the creative industries.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Reflect on and challenge your illustration practice through a mix of lectures, seminars, group critiques, themed events, short projects, workshops and individual tutorials.
Engage with high profile visiting lecturers alongside the University’s dedicated careers department to build your Professional Practice skills.
Develop your existing skills through specialist workshops which could include print workshops, Adobe workshops that could lead to Adobe Certified Associate status, laser cutting and 3D printing, photography, collage and drawing.
Explore themes such as, narrative and sequential illustration, humour and satire, ethical and social positioning of the artist, and exploring literary sources for inspiration, limited edition publications, small presses and artists’ books.
Discuss the social responsibility of the illustrator as a cultural producer.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will provide you with the practical skills necessary to compete in a commercial arena and rhetorical skills to enable you to promote your work.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Art director
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Toy and character designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

Module Details

This course will help you learn independently through practice-based study, culminating in a self-defined project, with a reflective report. You will also position your work in relation to what is happening at the forefront of the subject area, with particular focus on social, political and social issues.

Here are the units you will study:

Proposal: This unit is about designing an independent practice-based project that will form the basis of your body of work. You will research a theme related to your practice and develop an independent programme of study outlining research and development.

Illustration Major Project: You will produce a resolved body of work responding to and reflecting on your initial MA proposal. This will consist of critical diary/blog, media experiments, sketchbooks and final artwork(s). It could take a variety of forms, e.g. artists book, print sequences, children’s books, comics and zines, animation etc.

A Question of Research: This unit provides an introduction to debates and research methods relevant for creative practitioners and your application to a pertinent research question. It also encourages self reflection on the research process.

Contextual Research in Illustration – You will use a variety of forms/techniques to communicate your research into your practice and the reverse. It will consist of three elements that build upon each other: a verbal presentation - sharing research and development; Illustration major project reflective document - evidencing methodology through to resolution; and a final project statement with accompanying digital portfolio of images.

Programme Assessment

You will receive guidance and supervision throughout the programme that encourages independent learning. There will be regular contact teaching time including group tutorials, 1-1 tutorials and workshops but we also aim for you to engage in the wider studio culture that develops within the subject area along side the undergraduate students in illustration.

During the final stage of the course in the summer term the learning becomes more independent and self-managed, making your timetable more flexible.

You will be assessed after the submission of your work for each unit. We also present structured feedback to ensure your project development on the right track.

Student Destinations

We anticipate that once you have completed this degree the scope of your opportunities within the creative industries will have widened giving you the rhetorical skills to enable you to effectively promote your work. You will have consolidated or repositioned your practice as a creative individual giving you a competitive edge in the commercial arena as an illustrator/artist. Alternatively, for those who wish to continue studying, there is always the option of progressing to doctoral level in your specialised area of illustration.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Children’s book author/illustrator
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Educational, heritage or medical illustratort
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

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Media is all around us and pervades our lives. Whether it's online content, television, print journalism, radio or PR, we can now instantly access media from wherever we are in the world. Read more
Media is all around us and pervades our lives. Whether it's online content, television, print journalism, radio or PR, we can now instantly access media from wherever we are in the world.

Media and place are at the heart of your course and we are dedicated to developing your understanding of media in all of its forms. You will explore the different uses of media and its spatial and cultural influences.

You'll enhance your knowledge of fast-evolving issues, including changing audiences, citizen journalism and the relationship between different media.

Our passion for media means we are dedicated to providing a learning environment which meets your interests and aspirations. Whether it's advanced media theory, increasing footfall at a local art gallery orwriting content for a website, your modules, assessments and major project can often be personalised.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/media_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will graduate with the expertise to understand media and different audiences. You will have developed your talents in writing for media, with the awareness to respond to spatial, cultural and technological change. Roles in PR, advertising, marketing, social media, branding, television and radio will be available to you, while starting your own business, PhD research or a career as a university lecturer will also be options.

- Marketing Executive
- Senior Journalist
- Media Planner
- Public Relations Executive

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

There are opportunities to take part in visits to a range of destinations such as Yorkshire Sculpture Park - studying the history of it as a place, changing use of land and community development through culture - and the BBC in Salford, focusing on the relation between the corporation and local area.

At the end of each year you will attend a summer school which is dedicated to helping you consolidate your learning. It is an opportunity to benefit from the expertise of our academics, professional tutors, guest experts and your peers in a more informal setting, discussing and presenting a range of media issues.

Depending on the option modules you choose to specialise in, you may also benefit from access to our video equipment, edit suites and audio software.

Core Modules

Researching Culture
An introduction to key skills invaluable to your study, such as research enterprise, working with sources, interdisciplinary approaches to research, digital literacy and communication.

Understanding Media & Place
Explore the geography of media by studying the relationship between media and place through case studies, particularly from the north of the UK.

Major Project
Tailor your course by undertaking a major project in an area of interest to you. You'll study independently, but have the full support of your tutor when you need it.

Media Passions
Explore passions and fan relationships to media and culture.

Adaptations
Examine adaptation in the broadest sense. Not merely of literature to film, for example, but of stage plays to radio, comics to video games and cover versions of original songs.

Option Modules

European Cities & Culture
Consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Leisure & Cultural Spaces
Examine the importance of leisure and cultural spaces through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Digital Communications Management
Take a look at digital communication technologies and social media to understand the effects on media, business (corporate communication and corporate reputation) and society.

Online Journalism
In a media world that is increasingly reliant on online media platforms, develop your own online work as well as developing awareness of some of the implications presented by electronic and online media for journalists.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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