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The M.S. in College Student Affairs is designed to prepare students for the expanded roles and responsibilities of student affairs professionals in today's diverse college and university educational environments. Read more

The M.S. in College Student Affairs is designed to prepare students for the expanded roles and responsibilities of student affairs professionals in today's diverse college and university educational environments. Students will learn and experience the practical application of the knowledge base and skill sets of student affairs administration and conflict analysis and resolution in higher education organizational settings. The program is designed for students who are interested in a career in student affairs, and for those currently working in student affairs who seek to advance their own personal knowledge and professional credentials. The M.S. program consists of a 15 course (45 credits) sequence that places emphasis on two core concentrations, Conflict Analysis and Resolution and Student Affairs in Higher Education.

* Students in DCAR who are counting a concentration in Organizations and Schools using College Student Personnel Administration courses towards their degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution will not be able to complete the M.S. in College Student Affairs as an additional degree.

Program Formats

The M.S. program is offered in both residential and distance learning formats. The flexible distance learning formats allow mid career working adults and those unable to attend the residential program, to study college student affairs in a creative, rigorous, and structured fashion. Students enrolled in the distance learning program participate in Residential Institutes on the Fort Lauderdale campus twice per year, as well as online Web-based courses. Each RI is 5 days long. Currently the RIs are held in February and late September or October. Please visit the Residential Institute page for current information.

Students may enroll full or part time, taking six to nine credit hours per term. Students who enroll in 3 courses per term can expect to complete the program in five terms. Part-time students can expect to complete the program in three years. Summer attendance is mandatory.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

The following courses are required for the master's program in College Student Affairs.

Courses

  • CSPA 5001 The 21st Century College Student
  • CSPA 5002 Current Issues and Trends in Higher Education
  • CSPA 5003 The College Student and the Law
  • CSPA 5004 Administration in College Student Affairs Work
  • CSPA 5005 College Student Affairs and the Greater University
  • CSPA 5006 Student and Adult Development in College
  • CSPA 5040 Human Factors
  • CSPA 5100 Mediation Theory and Practice
  • CSPA 5200 Research Design and Program Evaluation
  • CSPA 6000 Organizational Conflict: Theory and Practice
  • CSPA 6140 Facilitation Theory and Practice
  • CSPA 6130 Practicum I
  • CSPA 6160 Practicum II
  • CSPA 6300 Applied Research & Assessment in Student Affairs I
  • CSPA 6330 Applied Research & Assessment in Student Affairs II

Practicum

To complete the M.S. in College Student Affairs, students must complete a total of 130 hours of practicum. Students are responsible for documenting practicum hours, and must have these hours verified and signed by an on-site supervisor. The practicum experience is designed to provide students with an experiential opportunity to utilize student affairs theory and practice within a diversity of professional settings. Students will have the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts within a practical framework.

Students complete two practicums during their course of study. Practicum I offers students the opportunity to explore a breadth of student affairs functions and gain exposure, knowledge and experience in the variety of programs and services that make up a college/university division of student affairs: residential life, housing, career services, student union, student activities, leadership development, recreation and wellness, volunteer services, special events, judicial programs and the office of the dean of students.

Practicum II will offer students the opportunity to gain in-depth exposure, knowledge and experience in a selected area of specialization in student affairs that supports their professional goals and prepares them to work in a professional student affairs position. Practicum II has a specific focus on career development in the College Student Affairs profession. Practicum experiences may take place at Nova Southeastern University or another college or university.

Some practicum sites require a background check before the practicum placement can begin. Generally the background check is at the student's expense and should be done as soon as possible before the practicum term.

Examinations & Evaluations

In addition to successfully completing all course work, and obtaining the required practicum hours discussed above, students must pass a comprehensive examination to be awarded the M.S. in College Student Affairs. When a student has completed all coursework and practicum hours, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the comprehensive examination. The comprehensive exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work and the practicum experience. The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.

The comprehensive exam is offered three times a year: in January, May and August. The exam has two sections; students must answer two questions from each section.



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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings. Read more
The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings.

To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. Leaders in higher education need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings, and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, students are often able to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study without compromising the professional standards of either program.

Successful completion of the dual-degree programs results in two degrees: a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) and a Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration.

The MPA-MSAA Dual Degree Program

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) and Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) programs both are housed within the College of Community and Public Affairs and are considered professional terminal degrees. By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, the MPA-MSAA dual degree program allows students to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study, without compromising the professional standards of either program. The 42-credit hour MPA program and the 45-credit hour MS in Student Affairs Administration program can be completed as part of a 66-credit hour program (rather than 87 credit hours required to complete the two programs without the benefit of the dual degree structure).
The MPA-MSAA dual degree will prepare students for administrative positions in college and university settings. The MSAA program provides specialized training for students desiring to work in student affairs offices, while the MPA provides the knowledge and skills necessary for management. To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. This requires the study of organizational and student development theory as well as gaining hands-on experience in at least one student services office. Leaders in higher education also need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Letters of recommendation (see details below)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

You must also meet the following program-specific requirements:
MPA:
- Two letters of recommendation
Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as professors, work supervisors, and professionals from organizations where the applicant has served as a volunteer or in another capacity. When evaluating the letters of recommendation, the admissions committee looks for evidence of academic achievement, community involvement, and personal characteristics that suggests the applicant has the capacity to foster an institutional culture that advances democratic administration and governance.

- Personal statement
The personal statement should be no more than 500 words or two (2) double-spaced, typed pages and should answer the question,"Why do I want an MPA?" You may wish to describe your reasons for pursuing graduate studies in public administration, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee. In the personal statement, the committee assesses the student's commitment to public and/or nonprofit administration as well as his/her ability to communicate in writing.

- Significant work experience (5 or more years in the public and/or nonprofit sectors) can earn applicants a positive adjustment to their admissions scores. However, the lack of work experience does not result in a penalty.

MS:
- Personal statements should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Three letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
*By signing the above document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
*Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

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The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Read more
The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Students who participate in the certificate program will have exposure to theory, research, and practice related to the professoriate and to teaching and learning in higher education. The intent of the Graduate Certificate is to assist professionals in responding to the increasingly complex and diversifying social and cultural contexts for adult learners. Students who complete the Certificate will have it listed on their transcripts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/hea/college-teaching-certificate/

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is designed to help you:

- Clarify your goals related to student learning

- Develop knowledge of and skills for using effective instructional methods

- Improve your capacity for assessing student learning

- Understand the characteristics of the United States professoriate and what it means to be a member of it.

Course Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching involves coursework in The United States Professoriate and in College and University Teaching. Moreover, students take an elective related to a specific area of interest. Finally, students participate in a mentored teaching experience. The coursework is as follows:

- AHE 603 College and University Teaching. This is an intensive graduate seminar that provides an overview of the issues, principles, and practices associated with effective college teaching. Topics include learning and diversity; teaching models and strategies including assessment; teacher and student behaviors and learning outcomes; and instructional improvement strategies.

- AHE 602 Problems in Higher Education: The United States Professoriate. In this seminar the student studies the current issues and trends related to higher education. Students will examine the history of the professoriate and then focus on recent trends in regard to such matters as expectations about teaching and research, the growth of non-tenure track lines, diversity, and the various institutional types and forms of public and private control.

- Elective. Students will select an elective related to college teaching, such as AHE 607 Student Development Theory 1, AHE 610 Academic Cultures and Learning in Academe, or AHE 644 Academic Program Development and Evaluation in Higher Education. Upon prior approval by the program director of the Teaching Certificate program, a student may elect a college-teaching related course offered by another program at The University of Alabama. To be used as an elective, a course must have a clear focus on college teaching and likely be focused on teaching within a specific discipline. Several examples are PY 695 Teaching of Psychology Practicum, BER 672 Teaching Educational Research, and BEP 672 Teaching Educational Psychology. Any of these would be an acceptable substitute for the elective.

- AHE 688 Mentored Teaching in Higher Education. In this course students are immersed in a mentored experiential learning opportunity to develop competency and mastery in course construction and delivery in the higher education environment.

- Total Hours: 12

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) degree program is ideally suited for those who wish to pursue careers in higher education. Read more

Program Overview

The Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) degree program is ideally suited for those who wish to pursue careers in higher education. Potential higher education roles include academic advising, admissions and enrollment management, career development and placement, financial aid, health services, judicial affairs, leadership development, multicultural affairs, non-traditional and commuter student services, residential life, services for students with disabilities, student activities, and student development and involvement.

Explore Student Affairs Administration: https://www.binghamton.edu/student-affairs-administration/index.html

Coupled with sufficient professional experience, the MSAA may also serve as the foundation for students wishing to become deans of students or vice presidents for student affairs.

The MSAA degree program is grounded in both student development theory and the concept of theory-to-practice-to-theory. Thus, an underlying goal of the program is to prepare professionals who have working knowledge of how student development theory is used in practice, and how practice serves to inform future theory development. A secondary goal of the proposed program is to prepare administrative leaders and personnel who are comfortable working with people of diverse backgrounds in positions that require decision-makers to respond to department/unit situations while taking into consideration how their decisions impact other systems (i.e. departments and/or divisions) within the institution.

Curriculum

The curriculum for the MSAA degree program was designed to meet the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Professional Preparation Commission Standards.

Required Core Courses Include:
Introduction to Student Personnel Services
College Student Development: Theory, Research and Practice
Culture of the American College Student
Organization and Administration of Higher Education
Law in Higher Education

Explore the complete curriculum online: https://www.binghamton.edu/student-affairs-administration/curriculum/index.html

Admissions Materials:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee

- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended

- Two letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- Personal statement (2-3 pages), which should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)

- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
* By signing the document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
* Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The focus of the program is on preparing graduate students to work as educators, practitioners and policy-makers in student affairs, student services and higher education. Read more
The focus of the program is on preparing graduate students to work as educators, practitioners and policy-makers in student affairs, student services and higher education. The program will help students comprehend, analyze and meet the changing needs and wants of the current college student. Students will learn how to use interpersonal skills and strategic interventions, especially as they relate to issues of equity and access, which lead to success for ALL students. Employing an Action Research Methodology, graduates of this program will be prepared to analyze current higher education practices and policies and create programs, services and interventions that generate positive impact and student success. Students will have an opportunity to complete two internships in the field.

The program is aligned with the CAS (Council on the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education) Standards and the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competencies.

Course Structure and Content

The program is a 42-credit program that can be completed in 2 years. Students have the option of earning a certificate in either Sustainability or Educational Technology as part of the HEPSA Program.

Students will have two internship classes and opportunities totaling 500 hours in the field. Internship 1 will focus on developing the interpersonal, listening and referral skills necessary for work in the field of higher education and student affairs. Internship 2 will focus on developing an understanding of strategic planning and institutional structure as well as planning for and creating policy changes.

All students in their first semester will take a course on Critical Action Research where they will have an opportunity to pose a question about student affairs/higher education that they would like to understand. Throughout their program they will answer that question through their course work. The capstone project will result in a publishable thesis answering that question. This process will help to position students as experts on their topic of interest as they move in to a professional or new role.

Modules include:

• The Sustainable Campus
• Issues of Power and Privilege in Higher Education Policy and Student Affairs
• Applications and Implications of Technology in Student Affairs
• Program Evaluation and Assessment
• Theories of College Student Identity Development
• Law, Policy and Equity in Higher Education and Student Affairs
• Resource Management in Student Affairs and Higher Education
• Transformative Leadership in Higher Education and Student Affairs

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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric. Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations. Read more

Literature

The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric.

Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations.

Graduate students in our Department not only have the opportunity to learn in an engaging environment but also to teach in one as well. Beginning in their first (for PhD candidates) and second (for MA candidates) years, they gain valuable classroom experience in composition classes, literature surveys, and courses they design themselves. Our program's scholarly and pedagogical preparation, as well as our detailed attention to professional placement, has enabled students to develop careers as teachers, scholars, publishers and editors.

Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies

"Bringing the Globe to Alabama"

The Strode Program is a privately endowed program to promote the study of English literature from Skelton to Milton. The endowment provides for lectures and residencies by distinguished scholars and fellowships for graduate study at the University of Alabama in the field of English Renaissance Literature.

Hudson Strode served on the University of Alabama faculty from 1916 to 1963. He was a prolific author and celebrated teacher of Shakespeare and of creative writing. The Strode program was endowed by Professor Strode and his wife, Thérèse.

Focus: The Graduate Student

The intellectual work and educational activities sponsored by the Strode Program, from fellowships to lecture series, from the Strode Seminar to summer research awards, converge upon a single focus: the graduate student. We have a lively and talented group of students specializing in English Renaissance literature in preparation for careers in colleges and universities, or for other professional or personal goals. The faculty is committed not only to teaching students but also to mentoring them, fostering a community of future scholars.

Our students have won departmental and college awards for teaching and they have won university-wide fellowships for dissertation research. A recent Ph.D. received the College of Arts and Sciences annual award for best dissertation. Topics treated in the dissertations produced by our students are diverse—from readings of Spenser which deploy the theories of Derrida and Lacan to studies of the representation of female sexuality which draw upon seventeenth-century London court records; from adaptations of Shakespeare for teen films to performance criticism of regional and university theatrical productions. Essays written by our students—on Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, on the agency of the letter in Hamlet, on class conflict in Coriolanus, on Leo Africanus and early modern imperialism, and on queer kinship in The Merchant of Venice—have appeared in Early Modern Literary Studies, English Literary History, English Literary Renaissance, Studies in English Literature, and Shakespeare, among other journals and essay collections.

We have an excellent record of placing Ph.D.s in tenure-track professorships. In the past ten years, 100% of our Ph.D. graduates who went on the academic job market eventually landed tenure-track jobs. Recent graduates have joined the faculty at Cornell College, High Point University, Mercer University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Xavier University, and Youngstown State University. M.A. students have matriculated to Ph.D. programs at Emory, Northwestern, Rutgers, University of California, University of Georgia, University of Oxford, University of Tennessee, and University of Washington, to name a few. Other M.A. students have gone on to law school, library school, the Peace Corps, high school teaching, or other opportunities.

Composition and Rhetoric

The graduate curriculum in CRES (Composition, Rhetoric, and English Studies) provides a solid foundation in English studies with a particular focus on the teaching of writing and studies in language, literacy, and rhetoric. The doctoral program is designed for those seeking academic positions as composition specialists (researchers, teachers, or administrators) in postsecondary English departments that emphasize writing instruction. The MA program is ideal for those who wish to do community college teaching or administrative work, and for students wishing to continue on to the PhD.

The graduate curriculum provides core courses in composition-rhetoric as well as elective opportunities in literature, linguistics, communication studies, education, and interdisciplinary areas such as gender and race. CRES students have opportunities to teach first-year writing, technical writing, and sophomore literature surveys. We also offer opportunities for writing center work and writing program administration.

Our graduates have obtained tenure-track positions at community colleges and four-year institutions such as Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte, NC), Shelton State Community College (Tuscaloosa, AL), North Carolina Wesleyan College (Rocky Mount, NC), Judson College (Marion, AL), Charlotte School of Law (NC), Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL), the University of Houston, Itawamba Community College (Fulton, MS), Chattanooga State Community College (TN), Hinds Community College (Jackson, Mississippi), Marion Military Institute (Marion, AL), Louisiana Tech, Murray State (KY), the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Texas-El Paso, Alabama A&M, St. Louis Community College (Meramec Campus), LaGrange College (GA), East Tennessee State, the University of South Alabama, Eastern Illinois University, and the University of North Alabama.

Application to all graduate programs offered by the Department of English is made through the University of Alabama Graduate School online application, which can be accessed by following the link on the English Department's Admissions page.

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The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

-to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
-to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
-to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning. It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.
You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III

This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:
Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

The aim of Physical Education is to develop physical competence so that all children are able to move efficiently, effectively and safely and understand what they are doing. The outcome, physical literacy, is as essential as literacy and numeracy to ensure the holistic educational development of young people in our society.

The PGCE Secondary Physical Education course at Brunel University London has a long standing national reputation for high quality teacher education in our subject area. The course is very popular, drawing on outstanding expertise and experience in this field from both academic and school staff. Many of our alumni have gone on to become school leaders, not only within Physical Education, but also as members of senior management teams in school at an early stage in their career because of the high standards and expectations we have for our student teachers. We retain very close links with our community of Physical Education alumni and many of them go on to be mentors for our student teachers, are involved in selection and recruitment of the next generation of PE teachers from Brunel or contribute to aspects of teaching on the programme where they have specific expertise.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list.

The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006. We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.
We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Community and Primary Healthcare Practice at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Community and Primary Healthcare Practice at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course provides a flexible opportunity for practitioners wishing to enhance their leadership, research and educational expertise within community and primary and public healthcare practice.

Key Features of Community and Primary Healthcare Practice

Performance:

- a new course designed to help practitioners develop their role in community, primary care and public health practice.

Teaching and Employability:

- closely linked to current Welsh Government and Department of Health policy, practice and services

- students are encouraged to explore and reflect on their own community and primary healthcare practice with the potential for contribution to the development of innovative, cross-disciplinary research outputs

- the course enhances career development and promotion opportunities for successful students

- students are supported in clinical practice by an experienced and prepared mentor

To ensure that our communities are strong and sustainable, it is important to continue to improve the health and well-being of our population.

The government’s investment in public health and primary care emphasises the importance of good leadership and the need for innovative practice.

Community practitioners are vital to improving the health of the population as they are committed to working with individuals, families and communities within the public health agenda.

Their expertise in public health allows them to have insight into how social and environmental factors can influence the health and well-being of people in society.

The Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course helps practitioners to develop their role in protecting, promoting and improving public health.

The Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course uses a range of teaching and learning methods which offer a variety of opportunities. Teaching is carried out through formal taught sessions and discussion groups/seminars using action-based learning approaches.

The degree in Community and Primary Healthcare Practice offers the option for students to engage in a work-based learning module as part of the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma programmes.

Course Structure

The Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course is a modular postgraduate course consisting of 180 credits at level M.

The course is offered on a part-time basis with completion typically within three years.

Assessment

Community and Primary Healthcare Practice students are assessed throughout their coursework (e.g. written assignments such as research projects and essays and seminar presentations) and a dissertation of approximately 20,000 words.

Work Placements

The MSc Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course offers students the option to engage in a work-based learning module. This requires an arrangement between the student, personal tutor and practice facilitator and as such will require collaboration with the NHS Health Boards and/or independent healthcare sector to ensure adequate support and supervision in the workplace.

Existing partnerships are well established and this programme will suit current arrangements.

Modules

Modules on the Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course may include:

Continuing Your Professional Development in Community and Primary Health Care Practice

Working in Community and Primary Health Care Practice

Working in Community and Primary Mental Health Care Practice

Working with Individuals, Families & Communities in Primary Health Care Practice

Foundations in Research

Additional Support

Pastoral support is offered by personal tutors and the Swansea University student support and health services are recommended to students and stipulated in student handbooks.

Blackboard has a dedicated tab for student services which provides money advice, information about wellbeing services, equal opportunities and accommodation issues.

In cases where students have personal or any other kind of problems that they would prefer not to discuss with College lecturers, they are able to talk with a Student Counsellor.

Similarly, if lecturers feel that the concern the student has expressed is better discussed with the Student Counsellor, they will suggest to the student that he or she make an appointment for an interview.

Staff Expertise

The Community and Primary Healthcare Practice course sits within the Department of Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences.

The community and public health team is well-qualified and experienced. It comprises one professor and four lecturers. Members of the team are registered with the:

Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)

Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and the Community Practitioners and Health Visitor Association (CPHVA)

Queen's Nursing Institute

All academic members of the team hold a Master’s degree and/or a Doctorate.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, Community and Primary Healthcare Practice students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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A four-field approach is taken in the M.A. program, embracing Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology. Read more
A four-field approach is taken in the M.A. program, embracing Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology.

Visit the website: http://anthropology.ua.edu/programs/graduate-programs/masters-degree/

Course detail

Each student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. All students are required to complete satisfactorily a core curriculum composed of one graduate course in at least three of the four fields of anthropology:

- ANT 501 (Anthropological Linguistics);
- ANT 625 (Survey of the History of Archaeology);
- ANT 636 (Social Structure) or ANT 641 (Culture);
- and, ANT 670 (Principles of Physical Anthropology).

Additionally, a seminar in Research Methodology (ANT 600) is required.

These four core courses should be taken during the student’s first year in residence. Remaining credit hours are based on coursework in the student’s area of interest, and thesis hours for students taking the thesis option (see below).

Format and assessment

There are then three options for completing the degree. In a thesis option, the student writes a thesis based on original research. In the research paper option, the student either submits a paper for publication or presents a paper at a national meeting. In the non-thesis options, the student completes additional coursework. Any student interested in study beyond the master’s level should only take the thesis or research paper options.

All students must take and pass comprehensive examinations on their knowledge of the field of anthropology. The student will take three-hour written exams in at least three of the four subdisciplines. The selection of the three areas will be made in collaboration with the faculty advisor. All anthropology faculty will participate in composing the exam questions. The examinations are evaluated by the entire faculty of the department, and performance on the exam is certified by the student’s committee.

Admission

Entering students must provide evidence of having taken introductory-level courses in each of the four fields before taking the graduate courses. A student who has not had an introductory course may be required to take or audit the appropriate undergraduate course before enrolling in the graduate course.

Each student is required to demonstrate competency in either a foreign language or research skill (especially statistics).

How to apply: How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

Student Financial Aid provides comprehensive information and services regarding opportunities to finance the cost of education at The University of Alabama. We recognize that financial assistance is an important key to helping reach your educational and career goals. The financial aid staff is dedicated to making the financial aid process as straightforward as possible. Visit the website to find out more: http://financialaid.ua.edu/

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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