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The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Read more
The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is a 12-credit (4-course) sequence designed to help graduate students in a variety of professional settings and disciplines who seek to enhance their understanding of teaching and learning issues for adult learners, particularly at institutions of higher education. Students who participate in the certificate program will have exposure to theory, research, and practice related to the professoriate and to teaching and learning in higher education. The intent of the Graduate Certificate is to assist professionals in responding to the increasingly complex and diversifying social and cultural contexts for adult learners. Students who complete the Certificate will have it listed on their transcripts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/hea/college-teaching-certificate/

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching is designed to help you:

- Clarify your goals related to student learning

- Develop knowledge of and skills for using effective instructional methods

- Improve your capacity for assessing student learning

- Understand the characteristics of the United States professoriate and what it means to be a member of it.

Course Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in College Teaching involves coursework in The United States Professoriate and in College and University Teaching. Moreover, students take an elective related to a specific area of interest. Finally, students participate in a mentored teaching experience. The coursework is as follows:

- AHE 603 College and University Teaching. This is an intensive graduate seminar that provides an overview of the issues, principles, and practices associated with effective college teaching. Topics include learning and diversity; teaching models and strategies including assessment; teacher and student behaviors and learning outcomes; and instructional improvement strategies.

- AHE 602 Problems in Higher Education: The United States Professoriate. In this seminar the student studies the current issues and trends related to higher education. Students will examine the history of the professoriate and then focus on recent trends in regard to such matters as expectations about teaching and research, the growth of non-tenure track lines, diversity, and the various institutional types and forms of public and private control.

- Elective. Students will select an elective related to college teaching, such as AHE 607 Student Development Theory 1, AHE 610 Academic Cultures and Learning in Academe, or AHE 644 Academic Program Development and Evaluation in Higher Education. Upon prior approval by the program director of the Teaching Certificate program, a student may elect a college-teaching related course offered by another program at The University of Alabama. To be used as an elective, a course must have a clear focus on college teaching and likely be focused on teaching within a specific discipline. Several examples are PY 695 Teaching of Psychology Practicum, BER 672 Teaching Educational Research, and BEP 672 Teaching Educational Psychology. Any of these would be an acceptable substitute for the elective.

- AHE 688 Mentored Teaching in Higher Education. In this course students are immersed in a mentored experiential learning opportunity to develop competency and mastery in course construction and delivery in the higher education environment.

- Total Hours: 12

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This course is taught by our partner colleges. You can choose to study at Sussex Coast College Hastings, Sussex Downs College in Lewes or Eastbourne, Brighton Metropolitan College, or Northbrook Metropolitan College in Worthing. Read more
This course is taught by our partner colleges. You can choose to study at Sussex Coast College Hastings, Sussex Downs College in Lewes or Eastbourne, Brighton Metropolitan College, or Northbrook Metropolitan College in Worthing.

Upon successful completion, you will receive a either a PGCE or a Certificate in Education from the University of Brighton. Benefits of studying at a University of Brighton partner college include access to specialist facilities and knowledge, and being able to study locally whilst working towards a university qualification.

Find out more at:

Sussex Coast College Hastings
http://www.sussexcoast.ac.uk/courses/teacher-training/765-degree/3649-pgce-prof-gce-cert-ed-further-education-and-training.html

Sussex Downs College
http://eprospectus.sussexdowns.ac.uk/Default.aspx?ng=PublicProspectus&na=ReloadCourseList&m=41&state=QUICKSEARCH$true%7CXSEARCH$&state=Further+Education+and+Training+PGCE/Cert

Brighton Metropolitan College, or Northbrook Metropolitan College
http://www.ccb.ac.uk/public/courses/teacher-training

Northbrook Metropolitan College
https://www.northbrook.ac.uk/courses/adults/teaching/

The 1 year full-time version of this course is taught at the university's Falmer campus.

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The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric. Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations. Read more

Literature

The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric.

Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations.

Graduate students in our Department not only have the opportunity to learn in an engaging environment but also to teach in one as well. Beginning in their first (for PhD candidates) and second (for MA candidates) years, they gain valuable classroom experience in composition classes, literature surveys, and courses they design themselves. Our program's scholarly and pedagogical preparation, as well as our detailed attention to professional placement, has enabled students to develop careers as teachers, scholars, publishers and editors.

Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies

"Bringing the Globe to Alabama"

The Strode Program is a privately endowed program to promote the study of English literature from Skelton to Milton. The endowment provides for lectures and residencies by distinguished scholars and fellowships for graduate study at the University of Alabama in the field of English Renaissance Literature.

Hudson Strode served on the University of Alabama faculty from 1916 to 1963. He was a prolific author and celebrated teacher of Shakespeare and of creative writing. The Strode program was endowed by Professor Strode and his wife, Thérèse.

Focus: The Graduate Student

The intellectual work and educational activities sponsored by the Strode Program, from fellowships to lecture series, from the Strode Seminar to summer research awards, converge upon a single focus: the graduate student. We have a lively and talented group of students specializing in English Renaissance literature in preparation for careers in colleges and universities, or for other professional or personal goals. The faculty is committed not only to teaching students but also to mentoring them, fostering a community of future scholars.

Our students have won departmental and college awards for teaching and they have won university-wide fellowships for dissertation research. A recent Ph.D. received the College of Arts and Sciences annual award for best dissertation. Topics treated in the dissertations produced by our students are diverse—from readings of Spenser which deploy the theories of Derrida and Lacan to studies of the representation of female sexuality which draw upon seventeenth-century London court records; from adaptations of Shakespeare for teen films to performance criticism of regional and university theatrical productions. Essays written by our students—on Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, on the agency of the letter in Hamlet, on class conflict in Coriolanus, on Leo Africanus and early modern imperialism, and on queer kinship in The Merchant of Venice—have appeared in Early Modern Literary Studies, English Literary History, English Literary Renaissance, Studies in English Literature, and Shakespeare, among other journals and essay collections.

We have an excellent record of placing Ph.D.s in tenure-track professorships. In the past ten years, 100% of our Ph.D. graduates who went on the academic job market eventually landed tenure-track jobs. Recent graduates have joined the faculty at Cornell College, High Point University, Mercer University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Xavier University, and Youngstown State University. M.A. students have matriculated to Ph.D. programs at Emory, Northwestern, Rutgers, University of California, University of Georgia, University of Oxford, University of Tennessee, and University of Washington, to name a few. Other M.A. students have gone on to law school, library school, the Peace Corps, high school teaching, or other opportunities.

Composition and Rhetoric

The graduate curriculum in CRES (Composition, Rhetoric, and English Studies) provides a solid foundation in English studies with a particular focus on the teaching of writing and studies in language, literacy, and rhetoric. The doctoral program is designed for those seeking academic positions as composition specialists (researchers, teachers, or administrators) in postsecondary English departments that emphasize writing instruction. The MA program is ideal for those who wish to do community college teaching or administrative work, and for students wishing to continue on to the PhD.

The graduate curriculum provides core courses in composition-rhetoric as well as elective opportunities in literature, linguistics, communication studies, education, and interdisciplinary areas such as gender and race. CRES students have opportunities to teach first-year writing, technical writing, and sophomore literature surveys. We also offer opportunities for writing center work and writing program administration.

Our graduates have obtained tenure-track positions at community colleges and four-year institutions such as Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte, NC), Shelton State Community College (Tuscaloosa, AL), North Carolina Wesleyan College (Rocky Mount, NC), Judson College (Marion, AL), Charlotte School of Law (NC), Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL), the University of Houston, Itawamba Community College (Fulton, MS), Chattanooga State Community College (TN), Hinds Community College (Jackson, Mississippi), Marion Military Institute (Marion, AL), Louisiana Tech, Murray State (KY), the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Texas-El Paso, Alabama A&M, St. Louis Community College (Meramec Campus), LaGrange College (GA), East Tennessee State, the University of South Alabama, Eastern Illinois University, and the University of North Alabama.

Application to all graduate programs offered by the Department of English is made through the University of Alabama Graduate School online application, which can be accessed by following the link on the English Department's Admissions page.

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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Read more
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This programme aims to provide students with a sound background in social research design and the most up-to-date training in methods of data collection and analysis. The combination of core modules and short courses on more advanced topics provides maximum flexibility for taught postgraduate and research students throughout their study.

The core elements of the programme are delivered by staff across the entire College, many of whom are engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields. Students will benefit by undertaking the modules with others from different departments within the School of Government and Society, eg, Political Science and International Studies; the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; the Institute for Applied Social Studies; and within the wider College. Students will also receive training on more discipline-specific research elements, as well as dissertation supervision, provided by individual departments. On completion of this MA, many students continue their PhD studies or pursue a career in research in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Programme content
Term 1:

Introduction to Social Research (20)
Research Design (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Information Skills for Social Sciences
University Programme of Skills Training (as necessary)
Dissertation-related preparation
Term 2:

Social Research Methods I (20)
Social Research Methods II (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Summer Term:

Four Short courses (10)
Dissertation (60)
All students registered on the MA in Social Research will take:

1) Four core modules:

Introduction to Social Science Research (20 credits)
Research Design (20 credits)
Social Research Methods I (20 credits)
Social Research Methods II (20 credits)


2) Four elective modules (10 credits each) from the short course programme below
3) A 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits)

Short courses
All short courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These short courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These short courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to to so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Short course programmes
From Multiple linear to Logistic regression
Narrative Research
Analyzing Hierarchical and Panel Data
Visual Research Methods
Linguistic Ethnography
Documentary Research in Education, History and the Social Sciences
Researching Disability
Approaches to Research on Discourse
Policy Evaluation
Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis (using NVivo)
Secondary Research Data Analysis in Social Research
Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Social Science
Overseas Research
Q Methodology – A Systematic Approach for Interpretive Research Design
Activity Theory and its research applications
Some courses have pre-requisites, eg, to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis and Narrative Research; you will need to have passed Data Analysis (20 credits module) or equivalent. For the latter, you will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

Please be aware that some of these courses run on the same dates. Make sure you have not picked courses that clash with each other. For further details or to sign up for these short courses, please email the course names, your name, student ID and your programme to |.

Skills and attributes gained
Students will have acquired a solid foundation of a broad range of research methods that are widely used in the social sciences and will have developed:

A sound understanding of the methodological debates
An overview of the philosophy of social science and how this informs research design, methods chosen of data collection and analysis
An ability to use a range of research techniques appropriate to their subject area
Competence in the representation and presentation of information and data
An ability to communicate research findings effectively to a wider range of audiences
An appreciation of the potential use and impact of their research within and beyond academia
An ability to engage with relevant users at all points in the research process, from devising and shaping research questions through to enhancing practice
Learning and teaching
Students are expected to engage in high-level discussion during all sessions. Teaching will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and computer workshops. Some fieldwork involving primary data collection is required where appropriate.

Careers
Many students go on to do a PhD after completing this MA. Others have followed a career in local authorities, government departments, health authorities, management consultancy, media, the voluntary sector and so on.

Assessment
All core modules are assessed by a 4000-word essay or report. On most short courses, a 3000-report is usually required. The dissertation length is 14,000 words and students are expected to utilise the knowledge and skills they learned from the taught elements in this programme.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at one of our on-campus open days (Friday 13 November 2015 and Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Further Education and Teaching PGCE provides a formal teaching qualification for people working, or wishing to work, in the further education sector. Read more
The Further Education and Teaching PGCE provides a formal teaching qualification for people working, or wishing to work, in the further education sector. This could include a college of further education, a sixth form college or an organisation such as a private training company.

The programme has an excellent reputation and in 2007 we became the first post-compulsory teacher education provider in the country to be awarded an Ofsted Grade 1.

The programme is delivered through a partnership stretching across East and West Sussex that includes full-time courses at the University of Brighton (Falmer campus) and Northbrook Metropolitan College, and part-time courses at Brighton Metropolitan College, Sussex Downs College in Lewes and Eastbourne and Sussex Coast College in Hastings.

If you already hold a degree, it is anticipated that you will graduate with a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE), and there may also be an opportunity to gain masters-level credits. Applicants without a first degree will graduate with a Certificate in Education.

Course structure

Students who opt for the part-time route must be working in the post-16 sector, and are normally expected to continue teaching for at least 50 hours per academic year for the duration of the course.

For the part-time in-service route you will be required to attend one half-day session per week during college term times, in addition to your regular teaching commitments. The full-time route is aimed at those who are not currently teaching and is a combination of taught sessions at the university and a teaching placement at an appropriate institution.

The full-time route is taught on our Falmer campus. The part-time route takes place at our partner colleges; Sussex Coast College Hastings, Sussex Downs College (Lewes and Eastbourne) and Brighton Metropolitan College.

Areas of study

The programme is delivered through seven modules on generic teaching and learning issues relevant to the post-compulsory sector, and reflecting the key areas identified in the new standards. It is endorsed under the Equipping our Teachers regulations 2007 originally managed by the Standards Verification UK (SVUK) but now under the control of the Institute for Learning (IfL). It meets the new Professional Standards for Teachers, Trainers and Tutors in the Lifelong Learning (post-compulsory) sector.

Syllabus

• Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector
• Planning and Enabling Learning in the Lifelong Learning Sector
• Theories and Principles for Planning and Enabling Learning
• Enabling Learning and Assessment
• Curriculum Design for Inclusive Practice
• Action Learning for Subject Specialist Pedagogy
• Professional Development and Wider Professional Practice
• An introduction to teaching, learning and assessment in Education and Training
• Contemporary Issues in Education and Training
• Teaching Practice in Education and Training
• Reflective Practice in Education and Training
• Action Research to Support Subject Pedagogy

Careers and employability

The course is part of the university's continuing professional development provision, designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of teachers and others involved in training or development, whether professional or voluntary.

Credit-rated routes to the various awards enable students to build from certificate-level through diploma, first degree, postgraduate certificate and postgraduate diploma to masters level.

The teachers we train are:

• highly committed to their pupils’ learning and ambitious in what they want to help them achieve
• inquisitive, critically reflective and motivated to keep learning and improving their own practice
• quick to adapt to different learning contexts and confident to challenge inequalities
• an asset to the profession, willing to share their knowledge and experience and to collaborate with others
• well-prepared for the realities of teaching, with the confidence, resilience and skills to be innovative, to take risks and be creative.

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The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings. Read more
The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings.

To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. Leaders in higher education need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings, and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, students are often able to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study without compromising the professional standards of either program.

Successful completion of the dual-degree programs results in two degrees: a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) and a Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration.

The MPA-MSAA Dual Degree Program

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) and Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) programs both are housed within the College of Community and Public Affairs and are considered professional terminal degrees. By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, the MPA-MSAA dual degree program allows students to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study, without compromising the professional standards of either program. The 42-credit hour MPA program and the 45-credit hour MS in Student Affairs Administration program can be completed as part of a 66-credit hour program (rather than 87 credit hours required to complete the two programs without the benefit of the dual degree structure).
The MPA-MSAA dual degree will prepare students for administrative positions in college and university settings. The MSAA program provides specialized training for students desiring to work in student affairs offices, while the MPA provides the knowledge and skills necessary for management. To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. This requires the study of organizational and student development theory as well as gaining hands-on experience in at least one student services office. Leaders in higher education also need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Letters of recommendation (see details below)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

You must also meet the following program-specific requirements:
MPA:
- Two letters of recommendation
Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as professors, work supervisors, and professionals from organizations where the applicant has served as a volunteer or in another capacity. When evaluating the letters of recommendation, the admissions committee looks for evidence of academic achievement, community involvement, and personal characteristics that suggests the applicant has the capacity to foster an institutional culture that advances democratic administration and governance.

- Personal statement
The personal statement should be no more than 500 words or two (2) double-spaced, typed pages and should answer the question,"Why do I want an MPA?" You may wish to describe your reasons for pursuing graduate studies in public administration, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee. In the personal statement, the committee assesses the student's commitment to public and/or nonprofit administration as well as his/her ability to communicate in writing.

- Significant work experience (5 or more years in the public and/or nonprofit sectors) can earn applicants a positive adjustment to their admissions scores. However, the lack of work experience does not result in a penalty.

MS:
- Personal statements should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Three letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
*By signing the above document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
*Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

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The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Read more
The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Equivalent to the traditional PhD, the DProf in Professional Practice is an innovative blend of taught modules and research projects which investigates the students own sphere of professional practice and workplace.

Studying for a DProf is a truly challenging and deeply rewarding experience, and Swansea University provides an excellent environment in which to pursue your research studies in Professional Practice.

Key Features of DProf in Professional Practice

A research degree in Professional Practice gives you the chance to pursue a research project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career, boost employment prospects outside academia, or enhance your existing skill set.

The Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is the equivalent of a PhD, but differs in that it incorporates a training element along with three, theme-based, research projects which are focused on your own practice and workplace. This means you do not need to take time out of work to upgrade your qualifications.

Key features of the Professional Practice DProf include:

- Two compulsory research training modules of 30 credits each: ‘Introduction to Work-based Research in Professional Practice’ and ‘Planning Work-based Research’.
- A focus on identifying, planning, implementing and evaluating three work-based research projects.
- Pursuing research in Professional Practice which is of relevance to your workplace and role.
- An environment in which you can develop and enhance transferable skills such as problem solving, independent thinking, project management, and critical thinking.
- The support of two academic supervisors throughout your studies in Professional Practice.
- The availability of structured training, interdisciplinary seminars, dedicated research facilities and software from both the College and University.
- Support from a dynamic community of research staff and students each pursuing their own lines of research.

The most recent UK-wide assessment of the quality of research in HEI’s (the Research Assessment Exercise 2008), revealed that 70% of the research carried out by the College was of international or world-leading quality. With our research into the health disciplines demonstrating outstanding quality in originality, significance and rigour, students can be assured that they will be immersed in the dynamic and supportive research culture needed for their studies including the DProf in Professional Practice.

The DProf in Professional Practice is only offered on a part-time basis lasting six years in duration, and is open only to UK based students.

Drawing on cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the healthcare, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS. Our researchers are continually working to tackle the challenges facing the health and social care system across the full range of areas, from biomedical studies, service organisation, workforce practices and public health through to policy and ethics.

Currently Professional Practice students are looking at effecting change in an elderly rehabilitation service, creating, implementing and evaluating an equitable lymphoedema service in Wales.

Facilities

Professional Practice students benefit from the College of Human and Health Sciences' state-of-the-art facilities including:

- Simulated clinical practice facilities and bioscience practice rooms, for realistic workplace experiences.
- Specialised psychology laboratories hosting a sleep laboratory; computer controlled visual and auditory displays for work on perception, attention, memory and language; an eye movement laboratory; fMRI brain scanner; EEG facilities and a nutrition laboratory.

We also have access to many different facilities and further equipment at organisations that we work closely with, such as the NHS.

Other resources include:

- Service Users and Carers Group which can help in providing essential advice or improving engagement between your research project and the user community.
- Structured training programmes, interdisciplinary seminars from worldwide speakers, dedicated research/study facilities and specialist analytical software.

As well as being immersed in the vibrant research community of the College and its research groups, you will also be able to access wider support and advice through the research networks staff are involved in, such as,

- Wales Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience
- Older Person and Ageing Network Cymru (OPAN):
- Welsh Health Economic Support Service (WHESS):

Research

Delivering high quality research is a key step in enhancing the health, social and economic well-being of all sections of society. It is essential that decisions on policy and practice are informed by the latest research findings and evidence available if we hope to improve organisational effectiveness and sustainability, social welfare and cohesion, and quality of life.

Through our cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the health care, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well-placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS and Local Authorities.

Our research is delivered through discipline focused research centres. In doing so, we have secured funding from a number of prestigious collaborators and funding bodies in recent years such as the Welsh Government, NHS Wales, Public Health Wales; European Union; Amgen Europe; Ministry of Defence; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; British Medical Association; National Institute for Social Care and Health Research; Astrazeneca; and the Wellcome Trust. These collaborations have been crucial in ensuring research informs, and is informed by, the wider healthcare environment.

Student Profile

Meet Wendy Mashlan, Doctorate in Professional Practice: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/media/Wendy%20Mashlan.pdf

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The Master of Arts in Teaching. (MAT) Program at Bard College is a graduate teacher education program leading to a master's degree and teacher certification in grades 7-12. Read more

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Program at Bard College is a graduate teacher education program leading to a master's degree and teacher certification in grades 7-12. The core of the program is an integrated curriculum combining graduate coursework in the discipline with graduate coursework in education and student teaching internships in New York State public schools. The program can be completed in one-year (full-time) or two-years (part-time).

The BardMAT offers degrees and certification in English/literature, history/ social studies, biology, mathematics, or Spanish language.



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MRes in Cancer Biology. Imperial College London. Dept of Histopathology. COURSE CODE. A3CB. http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/. Read more
MRes in Cancer Biology
Imperial College London
Dept of Histopathology
COURSE CODE: A3CB
http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/

Imperial College is ranked in the top five universities of the world, according to the 2007 Times Higher Education Supplement league tables.

This MRes is a 1-year full-time postgraduate course run by the Faculty of Medicine, Dept of Oncology at the Hammersmith Hospital Campus of Imperial College London.

This course is designed both for BSc graduates with a suitable first degree in subjects such as Life Sciences or Biomedical Sciences and clinicians specializing in cancer related fields including medical or clinical oncology wishing to undertake a research degree to further their career in academic medicine.

Course objectives:
1) To provide science or medical graduates with an excellent introduction to the cellular and molecular biological basis of cancer.
2) To enable students to experience some of the most technologically advanced and diverse approaches currently being applied in the broad field of cancer biology through two independent 19-week research projects within the Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College.
3) To introduce students to the research environment, develop the experimental expertise required to embark on an independent research career and provide training in key transferable skills including bioinformatics, and grant writing.
4) To facilitate interactions between clinical and non-clinical scientists, enabling the cross-fertilisation of ideas and approaches bringing about greater understanding and future productive collaboration between scientists with differing backgrounds.

Structure of the MRes in Cancer Biology:
The course comprises an initial eight week taught component in which the cellular and molecular basis of cancer biology are covered plus an introduction to the clinical and pathological aspects of carcinogenesis. Within this period will also be a series of workshops covering key transferable skills such as statistics, bioinformatics and grant writing. This is followed by two separate 19-week research placements in the Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London.


Career opportunities:
The course is primarily designed to prepare students for an academic or industrial research career, with those students successfully completing the course ideally placed to apply for fellowships and register for a Ph.D.

Entrance requirements:
Applications are welcomed from candidates with a first degree in an appropriate medical or science subject. Candidates are normally expected to hold a good first degree (upper second class or better) from a UK university or an equivalent qualification if obtained outside the UK. In line with Imperial College policy, students for whom English is not their first language will be expected to pass the British council IELTS test at grade 6.0 or above, with a score of 5 or above I each component. An alternative is the TOEFL Internet Based Test (minimal score of 90 overall, with required scores of 20 in Speaking and 24 in Writing).

To apply for a place, go to
https://apply.embark.com/grad/imperial/
For application forms & information regarding course fees:
The Registry, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ

Places are extremely limited

For informal enquiries please see the course website below or contact the Course Organizer Dr Ernesto Yague at

http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/

Valuing diversity and committed to equality of opportunity
-----------------------------------------------
Home, EU and Overseas applicants hoping to start this course in October 2014 are eligible to apply for the Imperial Faculty of Medicine Master’s Degree Scholarships. This scheme offers a variety of awards, including full tuition payment and a generous stipend. For more information, please visit our website: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/prospectivestudents/mastersdegreescholarships/

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Global Innovation Design (GID) is a joint Master's programme between the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. It is a unique, transnational Master’s design initiative that brings together three major centres of design, culture, enterprise and industry. Read more

Global Innovation Design (GID) is a joint Master's programme between the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. It is a unique, transnational Master’s design initiative that brings together three major centres of design, culture, enterprise and industry: Europe, North America and Asia. 

GID is a multidisciplinary, multicultural and multinational design programme awarding both an MA from the Royal College of Art and an MSc from Imperial College London to graduates. GID offers an engaging global curriculum and provides powerful cultural experiences crafted to nurture innovators and designers who are prepared to take on the changing needs of enterprise in the twenty-first century. 

GID international partners include Pratt Institute (New York), Keio University (Tokyo), Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) and Tsinghua University (Beijing). Each of these distinctive institutions brings unique expertise and complementary approaches to design, engineering, business and cultural sensitivity, within the context of internationally oriented design innovation. 

The GID vision is to foster a transformative postgraduate experience that is unparalleled in the world, one that cultivates internationally oriented innovation and design leaders who can tackle complex problems and deliver positive social, environmental, economic and cultural change.

The GID ethos is to cultivate activated people, designers and leaders who are capable of making change in the world. Designers on the Global Innovation Design Master's programme will be expected to generate creative directions that other designers and innovators will follow.

The programme is full time and runs over a period of two calendar years. GID Master's candidates on the joint RCA/Imperial College programme begin their course in London for two terms developing their visions and a body of work which will be thematically and regionally developed throughout the next year and a half.

They have the opportunity to study on the New York/Tokyo route or the Beijing/Singapore route during their first and second years. They then return to London for the final two terms of their graduation year. Graduates from the programme are expected to be central to innovation leadership in the twenty-first century. 

Philosophically, GID challenges designers to ask who they are and what is most important to them; as authors of material culture they are asked what kind of world do they wish to create, and what contributions will they make. Global Innovation Designers create transformational culture. At the centre of the programme is the knowledge that transformational culture is engendered by objects and experiences that are the embodiment of the robustly beautiful and the exquisitely functional combined.

The GID Master's programme offers:

  • a double Master's: MA Royal College of Art and MSc Imperial College London – students are fully enrolled at both institutions
  • programme includes study at world renowned institutions: route one, Keio University in Tokyo and the Pratt Institute in New York, and route 2, Tsinghua University in Beijing and Nanyang Technical University in Singapore
  • the first two terms of the first year are in London, where designers participate in the GID London Core
  • a diverse and international mix of students
  • teaching staff who are highly experienced practitioners and work professionally in their field
  • potential enterprise and commercialisation support through the InnovationRCA incubator
  • leadership skills for design-related enterprises operating in international environments
  • high-level graduate destinations: RCA and Imperial alumni work in international corporations, global consultancies as well as new self-started commercial enterprises

London – Tokyo – New York

Study on the Tokyo/New York route route gives access to Keio University, well known for physical computing and social design interventions, as well as Pratt Institute, renowned for a tradition of excellence in industrial design. 

London – Beijing – Singapore

Study on the Beijing/Singapore route gives access to Tsinghua University, China's number one institution with world class design labs and studios, as well as Nanyang Technical University's School of Art, Design, and Media whose cutting edge programmes in new media and cultural and social design innovation situate it as a leader in emerging Asian and Global design.

At Tsinghua University, London-based students will benefit from studying at the top University in China, gaining first-hand experience of the culture of China and designing with both new and traditional materials in the context of emerging Asian design.

At Nanyang Technical University, London-based students will be exposed to a rich and varied Pan-Asian community. NTU offers world-class communication and video production instruction with cultural understanding at the core. NTU is expert in the practice of “value transmigration”, how to translate a culturally specific artefact into a viable product-service-system in a new cultural context.



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Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we. But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we. Read more

Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we.

But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we.

Then join us in this innovative new postgraduate programme from Schumacher College in collaboration with the School of Architecture, Design and Environment at Plymouth University, the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, the Dartington Hall Trust and surrounding communities.

Ecological Design Thinking

Never has there been a more important time for a new approach for engaging with the challenging situations we face from the local to the global levels. In a rapidly changing dynamic situation, solutions rarely remain optimal for very long and continuous active participation is a necessary ingredient for success. Growing resilience in individuals and communities is the way to keep going despite the continuous change around us.

Our programme in Ecological Design Thinking embraces and explores this complex world of interactions with lively engagement and an optimistic approach. It offers powerful, practical and ecology-centred skills and knowledge to apply to a diverse range of practices from design, education and business to the more specific roles of leadership, management and consultancy.

The Ecological Design Thinking programme is trans-disciplinary, insightful and universal in its application; pragmatic and integrative in its operation. It brings together theoretical and practical discourses on ecologically inspired design, with methods of design thinking that are merged with the latest developments in anthropology, psychology and socio- political economics. It aims to create a novel ground for change makers at the forefront of our transition to sustainable societies.

Ecologically inspired design includes the study of ecological worldviews, systems dynamics and applied complexity theory alongside the philosophies and practices of permaculture and biomimetic design.

Design thinking is a well-established participatory technique grounded in the empathic understanding of the feelings, experiences and emotions of others. It engages people in lively conversations, visually stimulated interactions and playful prototyping. It frames problems as opportunities, forms insights and generates creative and collaborative solutions in complex situations.

The Ecological Design thinking programme aims to provide a nourishing environment for participants by incorporating short-courses led by internationally recognised thinkers, place-making projects in collaboration with the Dartington Hall Trust, the home of Schumacher College, and short placements offered by external partner organisations.

This programme is the fourth radical postgraduate programme developed at Schumacher College and contributes to and enhance the College’s ongoing collaborative inquiry into sustainable living – a live and networked inquiry of practice underway around the world by the College’s 20,000 alumni and others.

Who is this course for?

We would be delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to develop your understanding of a practice that is of great importance to all of our futures. We encourage applications from community practitioners and activists as well as planners, educators, architects, politicians and policy makers. You do not necessarily need a first degree in design to apply for this course. You only need to be enthusiastic, resilient and committed.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-design new approaches to the way we live that are socially just and ecologically sustainable. We are looking for those prepared to take risks and stand on the cutting-edge of new practices in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in a diverse mix of cultural experience and age that allows for rich peer- to- peer learning.

You Will Learn

  • The foundation of an ecological worldview through subjects such as ecology, deep ecology, systems thinking, complexity science and Gaia theory.
  • Living systems principles through the philosophy and practice of permaculture design, biophilia and biomimicry.
  • Creative and process-focused problem solving techniques by applying the methods and principles of design thinking
  • A multi-perspective appreciation of ethical issues and their implications for the future consequences of redesigning existing systems and creating new ones.
  • To apply ecological design thinking knowledge and skills to the design of social systems as a part of an emerging new economics
  • Personal and group enquiry practices to raise awareness of the interdependent relationship between the individual, society and nature and between theory and practice
  • Co-creative participatory practices and theoretical principles for new approaches to the ecological design process that include a range of stakeholders in the full lifecycle of projects, and you will apply these both in the studio, on the Dartington Hall Estate and in short placements on live projects

Special Features

An interdisciplinary programme integrating design methods with those of ecology and the social sciences.

An integrative design programme rooted in deep ecological understanding and practice and informed by cutting edge thinking in new economic approaches and social dynamics.

A balanced distribution of time and resources on skill-based and cognitive-based knowledge and between practice and theory.

Access to some of the world’s leading thinkers and practitioners in design, Gaia theory, complexity, climate science, systems thinking, new economics and social change.

Short courses led by internationally recognised thinkers and researchers.

Short practical placements with a range of partner organisations operating at the leading edge of social innovation.

An immersive, integrative and transformational teaching and learning approach rooted in the principles established by Schumacher College and Dartington Hall, and engaged in a living and working community on and around the Dartington Estate in Devon.

Where you will go?

Ecological Design Thinking can be applied to a wide range of contexts, from the personal to the societal. This programme aims to create a new generation of designers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, educators, researchers, consultants and activists. Graduates will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transformation of society.



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Applications for PGDE Primary Teaching in English have now opened for 2018 entry. This course will prepare you for life as a primary teacher, with the skills and knowledge, to influence the lives of children you teach. Read more

Applications for PGDE Primary Teaching in English have now opened for 2018 entry

This course will prepare you for life as a primary teacher, with the skills and knowledge, to influence the lives of children you teach.

The PGDE consists of 18 weeks study at the university, plus 19 weeks in professional practice in schools. The placements in schools are arranged nationally and you will be placed in schools within travelling distance of your home or term-time address.

This programme is offered in partnership with local authorities in eight UHI colleges. You will be required to have a home or term-time address in the local authority area of your chosen campus. Graduates of the course will hold provisional registration as a primary teacher with the General Teaching Council for Scotland.

You will benefit from studying in small, locally-based groups while collaborating remotely with other student teachers and tutors across the university’s network of colleges. The programme overlaps significantly with the PGDE Secondary to offer a cross-sector perspective.

A three-day residential induction is held at the start of the course with a further one in March which focuses on outdoor learning. Each local cohort will also organise a showcase event at the end of the course, as part of developing leadership.

Further information about studying on our PGDE programmes.

Special features

  • Opportunity to follow a teacher education programme across the Highlands and Islands
  • The course will prepare you for life as a reflective professional, supporting high quality learning for the children you teach
  • The course also offers the option of gaining 40 masters level credits by submission of three assignments at SCQF level 11.

Where can I study my course? - Start Date is in August

Argyll College UHI - Oban

Inverness College UHI

Lews Castle College UHI

Moray College UHI

North Highland College UHI - Thurso

Orkney College UHI

Perth College UHI

Shetland College UHI

Taught modules:

Please see our website for detailed content

Collaborative Practice (20 credits)

Enquiry and Practice (20 credits)

 Reflective Practice (20 credits)

Professional Practice (Primary) (60 credits)

Plus professional practice (60 credits, four placements) For this module students will develop their teaching practice and professional identity as a teacher in four blocks of school placements. These are allocated nationally via the Student Placement System to afford experience of the progressive levels of Curriculum for Excellence:

  • 4 weeks in Nursery and Primary 1, and 4 weeks in Primary 2, 3 or 4 [in school one]
  • 5 weeks in Primary 5, 6 or 7 [in school two]
  • 6 weeks in a Primary class not yet experienced [in school three]

Students will gradually increase the duration and scope of their responsibility for learning, teaching and assessment in their school placement class, culminating in classroom leadership for ten consecutive days during the final 6-week placement.

All modules are compulsory, There is the option to submit three assignments at level 11 to gain 40 Masters level credits.

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.

You must apply through the main UCAS undergraduate scheme using code H49 for this programme

If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links below or call on 0845 272 3600.

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements



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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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This programme is specifically to train teachers wanting to teach in education and training sector educational settings, such as further education colleges, and adult and community settings. Read more

This programme is specifically to train teachers wanting to teach in education and training sector educational settings, such as further education colleges, and adult and community settings. Due to government changes, if you complete this award you may also be able to gain employment in a secondary school setting, particularly in the post-14 age range - subject to the completion of Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS).

Course details

Demand for places on this course is very high, so we encourage you to submit your application as early as possible. The programme is delivered full time and part time. The full-time programme is a pre-service award for those intending to teach in the sector and is offered at Teesside University Middlesbrough campus, Darlington College and Stockton Riverside College. The full-time award, delivered at Stockton Riverside College, is specifically for those wanting to be adult literacy or numeracy specialists. The part-time award is offered at Darlington College, Hartlepool College of Further Education, Redcar & Cleveland College, and Stockton Riverside College. 

If you are an international student, you are eligible to apply for the programme delivered at Teesside University campus only (not the colleges).

The part-time programme is available as an in-service award if you are currently employed in teaching or training in the sector. If you are not in a paid teaching post, a pre-service part-time route is available but you must be able to find your own teaching practice. We promote the values of reflective practice, equality of opportunity, inclusiveness and learner autonomy. Both full-time and part-time routes cover a range of topics including planning and assessment, theories and principles for enabling learning, curriculum design and development plus being a professional in the sector. You study specialist modules if you choose to follow the literacy or numeracy subject-specialist programme. Your award title on qualification will also reflect your chosen specialist route rather than the generic award title. Find out about continued professional development at the Education and Training Foundation.

Professional accreditation

This qualification meets the national units of assessment and overarching professional standards. It also meets the national requirements for practitioners carrying out the full teaching role. 

On completion of the full award, you will have met the national requirements for the Diploma in Education and Training and will be in a position to apply for Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills status (QTLS). Please note this course does not confer Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

This course is Ofsted inspected.

What you study

You study a range of modules that takes you from preparing to teach through to more advanced practice skills. You also study issues affecting the education and training educational sector, such as educational policy, quality assurance, and your own personal and professional development needs. 

If you are studying a subject-specialist award, there are modules that develop your subject knowledge and understanding as well as modules that focus on how you develop this into subject-specialist pedagogy in your teaching practice. 

All programmes are mapped to the Professional Standards for Teachers and Trainers in Education and Training – England (The Education and Training Foundation) and are in line with national requirements for Award in Education and Training, Certificate in Education and Training, and Diploma in Education and Training. These are referred to throughout your progression through the programme, as they are the occupational standards used throughout the sector.

Course structure

Core modules (all awards)

  • Educational Theories and Concepts
  • Extending Approaches to Learning and Teaching
  • Introduction to Learning and Teaching
  • Learning and Teaching in the Specialist Subject
  • Theory and Policy in Education

Core modules (Adult Literacy Specialist award only)

  • Concepts and Learning in Literacy
  • Learning and Teaching in Literacy
  • Theories and Frameworks in Literacy

Core modules (Adult Numeracy Specialist award only)

  • Concepts and Learning in Numeracy
  • Learning and Teaching in Numeracy
  • Theories and Frameworks in Numeracy

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

Generally you are taught through seminars, lectures and workshops. A range of specialist tutors contribute to your lecture and seminar sessions – these are supported through our virtual learning environment where you access a range of resources to support course activities.

The course has a substantial element of teaching practice – vital to your learning and development as a practitioner. In addition, you are encouraged to develop your teaching skills by observing experienced practitioners, using simulations and/or training classes, and by watching good practice videos.

Your practice mentor supports your time on placement and helps you develop reflective practice skills as an aid to your learning and professional development. The course also helps develop your employability skills. You develop an individual learning portfolio which holistically tracks your development over the programme with specific reference to your academic and teaching skills.

How you are assessed

Typically you are assessed by a combination of written assessments, reflective teaching journals, teaching portfolios, and observations of your teaching practice.

Within the academic year there is a compulsory (assessed) student conference where you work with fellow subject specialists. If you are already in employment you must make arrangements to attend. The date for the event is identified within induction week.

Employability

Work placement

You must complete a minimum of 100 hours of teaching practice in an appropriate teaching environment. If studying part time these practice hours are split into 40 hours in Year 1 and 60 hours in Year 2. 

At your teaching practice a placement mentor supports you with orientation, with the school/college, and beginning your teaching ideas. This mentor helps you transfer your knowledge from theory to practice, observes your practice and gives you formative and summative feedback towards module outcomes.

Career opportunities

Appropriate careers are in the full teaching role in learning and skills sector educational contexts. Our graduate employment record is very good. Students go on to work in a variety of professions including further education colleges and training organisations. 

Some students gain employment in secondary schools or higher education. Other students have taken the opportunity to further their studies on relevant continuing professional development or masters’ courses at the University.



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