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Masters Degrees (Collections Care)

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. It is aimed at conservators and curators with significant collections care responsibilities, as well as graduates from conservation or other museum related disciplines intending to develop their careers in this area.

The two year course offers a flexible study path to achieve your MA. The curriculum is delivered in themed 5 day modules spread out over the two year programme. Course modules cover a comprehensive programme of theory coupled with practical conservation exercises and visits that focus on key aspects of contemporary collections care and management practice. Residential modules are supported by off-site research assignments and a dissertation.

::You can expect::

- To learn key theoretical concepts and apply them in practical exercises
- To assess and prioritise risks to a collection in order to develop management strategies
- Use of the diverse collection at West Dean in real-life scenarios
- To study all aspects of collections care including context, security, salvage planning, loans and more
- Collaboration with conservation students
- Transferrable skills in research, academic writing, data analysis and critical thinking

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Study within a working historic house and estate
- An interdisciplinary environment
- Networking and building of professional contacts
- Access to a range of experts in different object disciplines

Programme subject to validation.

Programme Aims

The aims of the Masters programme in Collections Care and Management are to:

Practical:

1. Provide a context, environment and study collection where collections care and conservation
management skills can be developed and applied within a working historic house context.

2. To develop core competencies in collections care and conservation management including
understanding object, material and collection contexts and types, agents of deterioration and
how the damage that they cause can be monitored and mitigated, risk assessment and
management, object handling, storage, loans, transport and display; along with skills relating to
budgeting, fundraising and managing people.

Theoretical:

3. Foster a critical awareness of the significance of objects and collections, including their cultural,
historical and site specific context.

4. Develop a critical awareness of key theoretical concepts that underpin collections care and
conservation management, including the agents of deterioration, the principles of risk and
change management.

5. Develop originality in the application of principles and knowledge, coupled with a practical
understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and
interpret knowledge in the field of collections care and conservation management.

Professional:

6. To enable the students' potential and aptitude for professional practice, research and
employment by encouraging self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems and in
planning and implementing projects.

7. To encourage open-minded attitudes and approaches that equip students to become selfmotivated,
independent professionals, able to make decisions confidently in complex and
unpredictable situations

8. Prepare students for professional practice in collections care and conservation management
roles in a range of heritage contexts.

Facilities

Facilities include an analytical laboratory and computer suite. The on-site Art and Conservation Library gives you access to specialist databases and thousands of specialist books and journals.

Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

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The full time, distance learning MA Preventive Conservation course will immerse you in the world of preventive conservation and collections care by engaging you with the complexities and challenges of professional practice. Read more
The full time, distance learning MA Preventive Conservation course will immerse you in the world of preventive conservation and collections care by engaging you with the complexities and challenges of professional practice.

On completion of this one-year course you will possess the specialist knowledge and skills required to provide appropriate strategies for the care, storage, display, transit and environmental management of heritage collections.

During the course you will learn about the physical and chemical characteristics of materials commonly found in collections, preventive conservation policies and procedures, conservation-cleaning processes, environmental management strategies as well as the fundamental chemistry and physics underpinning professional practice. You will also undertake a placement that will allow you to contextualise the theory that you have learnt within professional practice. Personal research is encouraged throughout the course and you are provided with the opportunity to shape assignments in support of its development, which often leads to the focus of the final dissertation.

Northumbria University is the market lead in this fast growing area of conservation practice and provides teaching that is at the forefront of this exciting discipline.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/preventive-conservation-dtdpcz6/

Learn From The Best

The teaching team are members, co-ordinators and directory board members of leading international conservation organisations around the world and have extensive experience in professional practice as well as teaching and learning at a distance.

The teaching team continuously draw on their international networks to identify emerging trends in professional practice. This enables them to ensure that course content remains current and that graduates have the skills and knowledge required by prospective employers.

All staff are research-active and regularly present and publish their work around the world at international peer-reviewed conferences. This places them in a strong position to guide and support you in the publication of your own research after graduation, greatly enhancing your employability.

Teaching And Assessment

This course is delivered in a distance learning format and the none-synchronous delivery provides flexibility as to when, where and at what pace you learn, which is particularly valuable if you do not have English as a first language. The format is invaluable if you do not wish to re-locate but if you wish to continue in employment throughout the programme you are advised to take the part time format.

All learning is student-led. You learn by identifying the area of research that is of interest to you and then develop it through the coursework and assignments using the teaching materials as appropriate. This makes the learning process more engaging, personal and meaningful. The formative and summative assignments and dissertation are designed to help you develop as the critical thinker, reflective practitioner and independent learner required in professional practice.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7017 - Collections Care (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7018 - Conservation Science (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7019 - Conservation Cleaning (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7020 - Work Placed Learning (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7021 - Preventive Conservation Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Learning materials, course and module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides, web-links and reading lists are made available via our innovative e-learning platform Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal online account.

The course content is delivered using smart interactive materials including lectures with voice overs, high quality virtual tours, rotating 3D artefacts with hot spots that can be magnified for examination purposes and audio-visual demonstrations of the processes and procedures used in professional practice. The high quality interactive learning materials have been developed by subject specialists and are available throughout the course so that you can develop and consolidate your knowledge and understanding as often as required. Discussion boards provide regular opportunities for you to discuss academic issues with the other students in your cohort.

You will be fully supported throughout the course by the teaching team who will help you develop your area of personal research, provide weekly feedback on formative course work and provide swift high quality feedback to any concerns or queries that you might have via e mail.

Research-Rich Learning

Research-rich learning is embedded throughout the course and our academics are research-active, publishing cutting-edge work within this specialised field.

The course has a research-based format engendering an enquiring, analytical and creative approach to the challenges of professional practice.

This course provides a large emphasis on both the development of individual research skills and the importance of group work and by the end of your course you will possess the skills required to position yourself as a confident researcher able to identify, deliver and disseminate research that will contribute to professional and enhance your employability.

Give Your Career An Edge

Northumbria University has led in the development of this area of practice and a high percentage of our graduates secure employment within the sector within six months of graduation or earlier.

The work placement will greatly enhance your future career prospects by providing an invaluable opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge within a professional environment. It will allow you to start developing professional networks and help you identify which aspect of professional practice you would most like to pursue.

The high quality learning materials provided throughout your course, teamed with our established record of delivery and international network of contacts places your knowledge and understanding at the forefront of that required by the sector enhancing your employability.

Your Future

On completion of this course you will possess the knowledge and skills required to care for collections and be able to understand, develop and implement appropriate strategies for storage, display, transit and environmental management.

We continue to support your continuous professional development after graduation through our LinkedIn alumni page, which enables us to alert you to potential jobs, conferences and publications.

A range of career options are available to graduates, with many choosing to pursue roles such as preventive conservation officers, environmental managers or collections managers in museums, galleries and heritage organisations.

The number of former graduates working in professional practice within the first six months of graduating is very high and former students work within many high profile organisations around the world including the National Trust, TATE, Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge, Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia, National Museum Qatar, New Brunswick Museum Canada, National Library Israel, Heritage Conservation Centre Singapore, National Gallery Victoria Australia and the National Archives Norway.

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We are highly regarded within the sector nationally and internationally for this vocational MSc Care of Collections programme, which offers exceptional training in preventive conservation and the management of cultural and heritage collections regardless of humanities or science background. Read more
We are highly regarded within the sector nationally and internationally for this vocational MSc Care of Collections programme, which offers exceptional training in preventive conservation and the management of cultural and heritage collections regardless of humanities or science background.

You will become adept in the skills essential for a heritage career including project design and report writing, and gain valuable museum or heritage experience.

Twinned with a heritage organisation in the UK, you will experience collection management and operation in the working environment. You are not expected to have a high level of scientific knowledge for this programme, but a strong interest in the subject is anticipated.

Designed with entry to the heritage profession in mind, our stimulating programme embodies elements of art and science and includes a wide range of transferable skills.

Distinctive features

Our range of programmes is designed for all entry levels, from experienced practitioner to graduate wishing to enter the sector.
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the field.
The degree offers specialist skills for building a portfolio of qualifications for entry to the museum sector.
You will be ‘twinned’ with a real heritage organisation and have the opportunity to study the operation of this organisation and how it relates to the care of collections.
Committed to opening up the profession regardless of discipline background, we do not presume a significant level of scientific knowledge.
High proportion of transferable skills (particularly in research, project design and report writing).

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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The way we support people with mental health difficulties is changing. A new agenda is emerging, focused firmly on recovery, enablement, reducing premature death, improving care and working in an integrated way to make a real difference to people’s lives. Read more
The way we support people with mental health difficulties is changing. A new agenda is emerging, focused firmly on recovery, enablement, reducing premature death, improving care and working in an integrated way to make a real difference to people’s lives. At the University of Hertfordshire, we’ve created our MSc Mental Health and Wellbeing as a direct response and a real opportunity to be part of the change.

Whether you’re working, or hoping to work, in mental health, general health, psychology, social care or education, this Master’s will help you develop the skills and strategies to improve care, develop professionally and accelerate your career. We also strongly encourage applications from service users, families and carers who would like to advance their understanding of mental health.

We’ve brought together acclaimed academics, front-line practitioners, carers and service users to create a course informed by real-life experiences and challenges. Throughout, it emphasises wellbeing, personalised care, enablement, safeguarding and strengths-based approaches, giving you the opportunity to address complex issues and make sound, research-informed decisions.

You’ll develop a systematic understanding of contemporary mental health knowledge, a critical awareness of emerging issues and the tools you need to champion transformational change. It’s a chance to demonstrate originality, initiative, leadership and self reflection, as well as a high level of personal and professional responsibility.

There’s also a real focus on working together across disciplines to provide better care. This MSc is part of our innovative programme of postgraduate wellbeing courses and has strong links to the three other strands: social practice, intellectual and developmental disabilities and children and young people’s health and wellbeing.

You’ll have the opportunity to learn alongside students on these other pathways, gaining insights into current thinking and practice. This encourages an interconnected, integrated approach to caring for people with mental health difficulties – something that’s now seen as pivotal to making positive change in these diverse, demanding and often debilitating conditions.

Course structure

Here at Hertfordshire, you can study for your MSc in Mental Health and Wellbeing part time, on a modular basis. This flexibility makes it a great choice if you’re fitting your studies around your career and other commitments.

Most of our students complete their MSc in two to six years, but there are opportunities to finish earlier, with alternative qualifications:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Wellbeing: 60 completed credits
-Postgraduate Diploma in Wellbeing: 120 completed credits
-MSc Mental Health and Wellbeing: 180 completed credits

Why choose this course?

-Be part of a positive step change in mental health care, support and treatment
-Accelerate your career, demonstrate your strengths and develop integrated, multidisciplinary working practices
-Build a critical awareness of current knowledge and emerging issues, informing your practice and opening up research opportunities
-Shape a highly respected Master’s degree around your own career interests and ambitions
-Learn part time, at a pace that suits you, with the full support of our academic team

Careers

On this relevant, results-focused Master’s, you’ll develop a strong understanding of modern mental health issues, the ability to critically analyse the current evidence base and the confidence to make well-informed decisions that improve people’s lives.
Your new knowledge and skills will make you a hugely valuable asset to any organisation involved in supporting people with mental health difficulties, opening up new opportunities across healthcare, social care and education.

If you’re already working in mental health, it’s an outstanding professional development opportunity and if you’re new to this field it’s a great introduction. You may also decide to continue your studies at PhD level, conducting new research into evolving mental health care challenges and responses.

Teaching methods

Our MSc in Mental Health and Wellbeing is run by a supportive, inspiring academic team here at the University of Hertfordshire. They’ve collaborated extensively with service users and carers to create an incredibly relevant, interesting course that addresses real-world needs.

You’ll learn through lectures, tutorials and masterclasses, as well as flipped classroom approaches, which see you preparing for each session online so your classroom experience can be more interactive and dynamic. We also run sessions in high-tech exemplar classrooms where you’ll be able to learn about integrated working through practical group exercises.

Every core module on the course includes independent study, as well as scheduled online learning, which you’ll do through our StudyNet learning portal. StudyNet’s a supportive online environment that lets you can access your course materials, contact your tutors, debate ideas on discussion boards and work with your peers whenever and wherever you like.

You’ll also be able to use our attractive, on-campus Learning Resources Centres 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They have extensive collections of recommended and related books, journals and digital resources, as well as around 1,200 computers and a team of expert advisors who can help you find what you need.

Structure

Modules
-Applied Health and Social Care Law
-Best Interests Assessor
-Concepts and Theories of Wellbeing
-Dissertation
-Educating the Dementia Workforce
-Integrated Working for Mental Health and Wellbeing
-Integrating Research with Professional Practice
-Introduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-Leading Cultural Change in Dementia
-Psychopharmacology and Medicines Management
-Recovery Values and Practice for Mental Health and Wellbeing
-Safeguarding : Working with Risk and Opportunity
-Solution Focused Brief Therapy

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This well-established programme at the University of Ulster is delivered through the School of Creative Arts and is taught on the Belfast campus. Read more
This well-established programme at the University of Ulster is delivered through the School of Creative Arts and is taught on the Belfast campus. It has many links with the museum and heritage profession both north and south and students have the advantage of meeting with practitioners through lectures and visits. The degree programme has been designed for individuals seeking further career development in the heritage and museum sectors, as well for graduates of Art and Design, Art History, Geography, History, Archaeology and allied disciplines, who wish to develop their research interests in these fields.

Key benefits

- Links with the museum and heritage profession in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and students have the advantage of meeting with practitioners through lectures and visits. Graduates have been successful in securing positions in the museum and heritage sectors.

- We support all students in finding a work placement, which they complete alongside their studies. Recently we have been working closely with Northern Ireland War Memorial. Students have had placements at the Ulster Museum, PRONI and the National Trust.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/ma-cultural-heritage-and-museum-studies-ft-bt

Course detail

- Description -

Key areas of investigation in this MA include:

- Policy concerns relating to heritage, museum and cultural sectors in UK and Ireland;
- Analysis of the social, economic and cultural contexts of museums and heritage;
- Exploration of issues in relation to collections care; exhibitions; learning and management in the heritage sectors;
- Impact of digital technologies on the heritage experience; and,
- Consideration of national issues in the international context.

- Purpose -

The degree programme has been designed for individuals seeking further career development in the heritage and museum sectors, as well for graduates of Art and Design, Art History, Geography, History, Archaeology, Sociology and allied disciplines, who wish to develop their research interests in these fields.

- Teaching and learning assessment -

This course is delivered by academics in the fields of museum, heritage and the arts. We invite practitioners as guest lecturers on the programme. All assessment is by coursework.

Career prospects

The areas graduates have gone on to include:

- Museums, Archive and Galleries, entry level posts such as documentation, education, and outreach;
- Specialist museum-related training e.g. in conservation of museum objects
- Museum based internships
- Archaeology (mainly excavation and research);
- Heritage (such as National Trust) and the Arts
- PhD research

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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Now accepting applications for 2017/18. An international reputation for book conservation skills. Working on live projects, you will apply professional book conservation treatments and critical analysis of treatments. Read more
Now accepting applications for 2017/18

An international reputation for book conservation skills.

Working on live projects, you will apply professional book conservation treatments and critical analysis of treatments. Study of historical book structures will entail research in order to make an accurate model of a chosen historical book structure. In Conservation theory and practice you will explore exhibition issues, metal components of books, paper conservation, disaster response and materials science.

::You can expect::

- To develop excellent practical skills through object-based treatments
- To work on live projects, taking part in decision-making and applying professional conservation treatments
- To perform historical research and interpretation of the objects you work on
- To work with materials from library and archive collections

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Interdisciplinary environment
- Workshop access 7am-10pm, 7 days a week
- Teaches students to understand and apply Icon's Professional Standards in Conservation
- Visits to collections

Programme Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide:

Practical:

1. A context for the analysis, assessment and treatment of historical Library Materials

2. The opportunity to further develop existing specialist craft and conservation skills

3. A research environment for the development and public dissemination of innovative
approaches to the conservation of Books and Library Materials

Theoretical:

1. The opportunity to contribute to the development of historical, cultural and technical
understanding of books through primary research and investigation

2. The opportunity to evaluate methodologies, develop critiques and propose new hypotheses

3. A context for individual inquiry and informed debate across conservation specialisms

Professional:

1. A context for the development of a range of verbal, written and visual skills appropriate for the
communication and documentation of conservation projects and research

2. A context for the development of, and critical reflection upon, personal and professional codes
of practice

3. Opportunities to plan and implement a range of projects that are increasingly technically
complex, and which present challenges of a compound nature

Careers

From the Postgraduate Diploma students often progress to MA Conservation Studies - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation

Work as a conservation professional in a museum, library or archive, with public and private collections. Pursue a career path into collections care and management or as an independent book conservator. Graduates have gone on to work on books at The Bodleian Library in Oxford, Admiralty Library, Portsmouth, Wimborne Minster Library, Chichester Cathedral Library Collection and the Dutch National Archive.

Facilities

You will work in a purpose-built space for book conservation with two workshops as well as a finishing room and science lab. Students each have their own benches with storage and can access the studio from 7am to 10pm, allowing them to take full advantage of their time at West Dean. You will also have access to facilities shared with other departments, including the analytical laboratory, photography space, IT suite, and specialist library.

The on-site Art and Conservation Library puts thousands of specialist books and journals within your reach and you can access specialist databases in the IT suite.

Find out more about facilities here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation/facilities

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. You will develop your skills to professional best practice standards by combining theory and practice to undertake advanced projects. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

You will develop your skills to professional best practice standards by combining theory and practice to undertake advanced projects. A research project is a core component of the programme. You will have the opportunity of a work placement at a museum of private workshop.

::You can expect::

- To develop excellent practical skills through object-based treatments To study ceramic technology, material culture and materials science
- To perform historical research and interpretation of the objects you work on
- To work on artefacts from public and private collections
- Visits to collections, sites and workshops
- Visiting lecturers

Programme Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide:

Practical:

1. A context for the analysis, assessment and treatment of ceramic and related material objects

2. The opportunity to develop sophisticated specialist conservation skills

3. A research environment for the development and public dissemination of innovative
approaches to the conservation of objects

Theoretical:

1. The opportunity to contribute to the development of historical, cultural and technical
understanding of objects and their conservation through primary research and investigation

2. The opportunity to evaluate methodologies, develop critiques and propose new hypotheses

3. A context for individual inquiry and group debate across the conservation specialisms

Professional:

1. A context for the development of a range of verbal, written and visual skills appropriate for the
communication and documentation of conservation projects and research

2. A context for the development of, and critical reflection upon, personal and professional codes
of practice

3. Opportunities to plan and implement a range of projects that are either increasingly technically
more complex, or have issues that are of a compounded or more complex nature

Careers

Become a conservator in a museum, follow a path into collections care or develop your own private conservation practice.

Graduates have had placements at or gone on to work with: The British Museum, The V&A, The Ashmolean Museum, The Metropolitan Museum, National Museums; Liverpool, Cliveden Conservation, Plowden and Smith Ltd. and Sarah Peek Conservation.

Students often progress from the Postgraduate Diploma onto MA Conservation Studies - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation

Facilities

You will work in our well-equipped Ceramics workshop with access to a pottery studio, and our well-equipped analytical laboratory. Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

The on-site Art and Conservation Library puts thousands of specialist books and journals within your reach and you can access specialist databases in the IT suite.

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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

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Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. Read more
Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. In particular, it is intended to equip students with a sound knowledge and critical understanding of current professional principles, good practice and contemporary debates relating to museum and artefact studies.

It aims to help students develop a variety of skills:
Professional skills - relevant to the care, management and exhibition of collections in museums.
Analytical skills - relevant to the study of a wide range of materials and artefacts, from different periods and cultures, and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
Research skills - relevant to studies of museums and artefacts, including an awareness of current theoretical issues.
Communication skills (oral, written and visual) - relevant to work in the museum profession and to academic research.

It also aims to encourage students to take personal responsibility for their own learning, team-work and professional conduct.

Course Structure

Two distinct routes can be followed through the MA in Museum and Artefact Studies. These comprise different combinations of modules.

Route 1

The first route is intended for students who firmly intend to pursue a career in museums and galleries. It comprises six compulsory taught modules:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Care of collections
-Museum communication
-Research paper

Route 2

The second route through the MA provides students with a different choice of modules. It is intended for students with a strong interest in artefact studies, who may wish to pursue a career in the cultural heritage sector or undertake further postgraduate research in museum or artefact studies after completing the MA course, but who also wish to keep their options open. It comprises four compulsory modules (one of which is a dissertation) and a choice of a fifth module:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Dissertation
And either
-Museum communication
Or
-Care of collections
Or
-A module from the MA in Archaeology (e.g. Prehistory; Roman Archaeology; Medieval Archaeology; Post-Medieval Archaeology; or the Archaeology of Egypt, the Near East and India (when available).

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in the Museums sector. Tutorials, seminars and workshops then provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Museum and Artefact Studies through placements and curating an exhibition and/or developing an educational programme for the University Museums.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners , giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject. The programme aims to develop these key attributes in its students thereby preparing them for work or further study once they have completed the programme.

In Terms 1 and 2 students typically attend 3-4 hours a week of lectures, up to 4 hours of tutorials or seminars, in addition to 2 workshops and 2-3 hours of practical sessions working with artefacts or museum environment-related matters or fieldtrips over the term. Students have a 20-day Museum placement at Easter in a museum or archive. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. Professional speakers are brought in to engage the students with issues within the professional body.

In Term 3 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required, to applying them within a real-life museum environment in the module Museum Communications where students work together on a specific project(s) with an opening date in May, June or July. Typically, students could be spending the equivalent of a working week as they complete the work for their projects, under supervision.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent research and research continues in Term 3, where the use of research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the Dissertation research project or the Research Paper. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have between 3 and 5 one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The Dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further academic work while the exhibition and Research Paper route is designed for a more professional environment.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend as well as Friends of the Oriental Museum events.

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This full-time programme aims to educate students to the principles, attitudes and skills that underpin the professional management of historical archives. Read more

Overview

This full-time programme aims to educate students to the principles, attitudes and skills that underpin the professional management of historical archives. It is particularly geared to the ‘sole operator’ who is entrusted with the care and development of archives in voluntary societies, religious institutions, historic houses and other small-scale but important settings. The aim is to educate archivists who will be able to draw up and implement archive management solutions appropriate to such collections.

In addition, the programme aims to give students an understanding of the historical processes that have generated records, the key repositories in which they are held and how to utilise such records in their work as archivists.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-historical-archives

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

The programme runs over two semesters and summer modules. The lecturing staff are drawn from the History Department, Library and An Foras Feasa.

Career Options

Graduates of this course will be well equipped to manage the care of historical archive collections in smaller settings. As with other graduates in History, they can expect to find employment across a wide range of administrative, commercial, and other employments.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-historical-archives#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Our MSc in Children and Young People’s Health and Wellbeing is an innovative, contemporary course unique to the University of Hertfordshire. Read more
Our MSc in Children and Young People’s Health and Wellbeing is an innovative, contemporary course unique to the University of Hertfordshire. Relevant, wide-reaching and multidisciplinary, it equips you with the advanced skills and understanding to make a real difference to children and their families.

We’ve created this new Master’s degree to appeal to anyone working with children and young people, across a whole range of settings, from healthcare to home. Whether you’re a teacher, carer, parent, healthcare practitioner, early years professional, children’s centre worker, youth centre worker or safeguarding specialist, it’s a hugely rewarding development opportunity.

Studying for a Master’s with such an exciting breadth and multidisciplinary approach also gives you the chance to explore relevant disciplines directly affecting younger people. The course is part of the University’s programme of postgraduate wellbeing courses and has strong links to the three other strands: mental health, social practice and intellectual and developmental disability.

Throughout your course you’ll learn alongside students on these other pathways, gaining insights into current thinking and practice. This encourages an interconnected, integrated approach to children and young people’s needs – something that’s becoming an increasingly important part of the way we view and work with children, families and carers today.

Course Structure

Here at Hertfordshire, you can study for your MSc in Children and Young People’s Health and Wellbeing part time, on a modular basis. This flexibility makes it a great choice if you’re fitting your studies around your career and other commitments.

Most of our students complete their MSc in two to six years, but there are opportunities to finish earlier, with alternative qualifications:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Wellbeing: 60 completed credits
-Postgraduate Diploma in Wellbeing: 120 completed credits
-MSc Children and Young People’s Health and Wellbeing: 180 completed credits

Why choose this course?

-Take a unique, highly relevant Master’s degree that develops you professionally, personally, intellectually and academically
-Tackle a subject of growing global importance and make a real difference to children, young people, families and carers
-Advance your career, whether you’re working in healthcare, education, childcare, children’s centres, youth centres or child-focused departments and agencies
-Gain valuable experience of inter-professional practice as part of a diverse, multidisciplinary student community

Careers

We’ve created this rewarding Hertfordshire Master’s to give you advanced skills, practical experience and powerful insights into the health and wellbeing of children and young people.

If you’re developing your existing career in healthcare, education, childcare, safeguarding or welfare, you’ll graduate with a respected, contemporary Master’s qualification and the experience you need to make real career progress. If you’re new to this field, your Master’s will open up career possibilities in all of these settings and demonstrate a real commitment to your specialism.

Teaching methods

Our inspiring academic team has a huge amount of academic and professional experience in children and young people’s health and wellbeing. Together, they’ll support you in developing a deeper knowledge of this rewarding subject, using a whole range of teaching methods.

You’ll learn through lectures, tutorials and masterclasses, as well as flipped classroom approaches, which see you preparing for each session online so your classroom experience can be more interactive and dynamic. We also run sessions in high-tech exemplar classrooms where you’ll be able to learn about integrated working through practical group exercises.

As part of your course you’ll study independently too, conducting research, studying online, watching videos and using discussion boards to debate ideas with fellow students. Through our StudyNet online learning portal, you can access your course materials, contact your tutors and work with your peers whenever and wherever you like.

You’ll also be able to use our attractive, on-campus Learning Resources Centres 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They have extensive collections of recommended and related books, journals and digital resources, as well as around 1,200 computers and a team of expert advisors who can help you find what you need.

Structure

Optional Modules
-Care and Assessment of the Acutely Ill Child
-Care and Assessment of the Acutely Ill Child
-Concepts and Theories of Wellbeing
-Dissertation
-Integrated Working for Children and Young Peoples Health and Wellbeing
-Integrating Research with Professional Practice
-Safeguarding : Working with Risk and Opportunity

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The MClin Res programme will equip students with an in-depth understanding and knowledge and skills in a range of theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary clinical practice contexts. Read more
The MClin Res programme will equip students with an in-depth understanding and knowledge and skills in a range of theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary clinical practice contexts.

The programme is particularly aimed at qualified health professionals from a range of disciplines seeking a career in, or currently engaged in clinical research or wishing to pursue a variety of careers where research is a core component. The majority of modules within the course are shared with other students undertaking MSc and MPhil/PhD study.

The course is delivered mainly online but is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and 1 mid-semester study day in both semester 1 and 2.

Aims

The MClin Res course is tailored to equip Nurses, Midwives, AHPs and other Non- Medical/Dental Healthcare Professionals with essential skills to manage and deliver research in clinical and health and social care settings, and to develop careers in clinical research, clinical and academic practice, or academic research with a strong clinical practice component. The aims of the course are to:
-Enable students to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to clinical practice at an individual and/or organisational level
-Contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence based practice by equipping students with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high quality research in a range of clinical settings
-Enhance the quality and evidence base for clinical research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and research and practice expertise
-Promote lifelong learning in students and enhance their opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training which support and advance clinical knowledge, research and practice

Equip students with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics, logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

Special features

The MClin Res programme has a unique interdisciplinary focus drawing on the expertise of nationally and internationally renowned lecturers and practitioners from many different fields including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, social work, speech and language therapy, audiology, psychology and medicine.

The programme also benefits from strong collaborations across the Faculty and NHS including experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education (MAHSE).

Therefore the delivery of the programme within the context of outstanding multi-professional research expertise, well established partnerships with the NHS, excellent teaching and learning and high student support, means that students undertaking the programme can be assured of an excellent research education and training and an award of which they can be proud.

Teaching and learning

The programme is primarily delivered online to maximise access and increase flexibility. A variety of summative assessment methods are utilised which enable the integration of theory and practice and build on continuous formative assessment exercises which are part of each module with a variety of interactive, stimulating on-line exercises with regular self-assessment and feedback being a key feature.

Online components of the programme are complemented by opportunities for face-face learning and networking between students, programme and research staff through two 4-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools and 2 mid-semester study days.

Facilities

We are based in the Jean McFarlane building housing seminar rooms, IT facilities, clinical and interpersonal skills laboratories and lecture theatres.

The wider facilities of the University are of an excellent standard, with one of the best library collections and resources in Europe. We have extensive experience and good practice in online learning with dedicated e-learning technologists and rich online audio/video technologies.

We were one of the first institutions in the UK to develop a distributed learning PhD/MPhil programme undertaken by a wide range of health and social care practitioners from the UK and overseas.

Career opportunities

The MClin Res is predominantly aimed at health professionals from a range of disciplines who wish to enhance their skills and knowledge in clinically focused research. It is aimed at those who wish to pursue clinical/academic research careers e.g. research nurses, clinical trials coordinators and principal investigators.

The programme provides a comprehensive education and training in research providing an excellent foundation for students who wish to go forward to study for a PhD.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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