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The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. Read more
The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-curating/

This two-part programme is designed to develop professional and academic excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. It's aimed at curators and those with related academic and practical experience who wish to achieve professional excellence in their practice, to innovate in the expanding field of curatorial practice.

MFA Curating at Goldsmiths focuses in-depth on aesthetic, social, political and philosophical questions that are brought to bear in any place or at any event in which contemporary art is situated.

The programme is designed to provide a practice-led research context for students at any stage of their professional practice.

It also enables you to experiment and innovate in the expanded field of curatorial pedagogy, to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis and extend your and other students' knowledge through this process.

Goldsmiths' MFA Curating programme is recognised worldwide for producing highly qualified curators and other arts professionals.

Our graduates find employment in top international museums, commercial galleries, auction houses, magazines, alternative spaces and not-for-profit organisations. Others choose employment as artist’s studio managers; arts education programmers; museum public talks and events organisers; gallery archivists and registrars.

Recent speakers

Recent speakers have included: Iwona Blazwick OBE, Whitechapel Gallery, London; Francesco Bonami, MCA Chicago; Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, 14th Istanbul Biennial; Julia Bryan-Wilson, University of California at Berkeley; Céline Condorelli, artist and co-founder of Eastside Projects, Birmingham; Diedrich Diedrichsen, Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna; Alex Farquharson, Nottingham Contemporary; Ryan Gander, artist; Mark Godfrey, Tate Modern, London; Boris Groys, Center for Art and Media Technology, Karlsruhe; Matthew Higgs, White Columns, New York; Jens Hoffman, Jewish Museum, New York; Laura Hoptman, MoMA, New York; Anthony Huberman, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; James Lingwood, Artangel, London; Gregor Muir, ICA, London; Paul O’Neill, CCS Bard College, New York; Scott Rothkopf, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Adrian Searle, The Guardian; Polly Staple, Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Recent Visiting Tutors

Chris Evans, artist; Lisa La Feuvre, Henry Moore Institute; Goldin+Senneby, Stockholm-based artists; Luis Jacob, Toronto-based artist; Tom Morton, frieze magazine; Paul O Neill, critic and curator; Sally O'Reilly, independent critic and curator; Mike Sperlinger, Lux; Rob Tuffnell, 83 Page Street; Alex Sainsbury, Raven Row; Lucy Byatt, Contemporary Art Society; Gavin Wade, Eastside Projects; Lydia Yee, Barbican Art Gallery; Form/Content

Work experience

The Tate Modern annually offers two hands-on internships to Goldsmiths MFA Curating students, who are given the opportunity to work directly on an exhibition matched to the students' interests. Accepted Goldsmiths curating students are given details on how to apply for a Tate Modern internship prior to starting the school year.

Other institutions with which the Goldsmiths MFA Curating programme has collaborated on real-life curatorial projects include 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London; Form/Content, London; ICA/Fourth Plinth Project, London, and more.

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Guest Research Student

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department
If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Helena Reckitt.

Modules & Structure

In Year One, you're introduced to a series of curatorial concepts and practices through group analysis and guided research. There are also group seminars that look into significant ideas in philosophy and cultural theory to help you think broadly about your own practice

In Year Two, intensive workshops look in depth at a set of artistic and cultural themes chosen by the students. In Year Two you further develop independent curatorial research and practice, working either on your own ideas or with a London-based gallery or institution. The summer term of Year One acts as a transition to Year Two.

Government Art Collection

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Skills
Independent research and practice; public presentation; oral and written communication; project development; exhibition administration; concept development; collaboration; intellectual analysis; catalogue, essay and review writing; research organisation and presentation.

Careers

Graudates from the MFA in Curating go on to work in galleries and museums; as managers and directors in commercial galleries; independent curators; cultural policy makers, teachers and academics; writers and critics.

Recent employers of our MFA Curating students and graduates include:

Public sector

Tate Britain, London
Tate Modern, London
Guggenheim Museum, New York
Documenta, Kassel
Venice Biennale
Athens Biennial
Sydney Biennale
Portikus, Frankfurt
Witte de With, Rotterdam
FRAC Lorraine
Hayward Gallery, London
Hayward Touring Exhibitions, London
Museo d’Arte Moderna, Bologna
Modern Art Oxford
London Olympic Park (art sector)
Artists Space, New York
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds
Art on the Underground, London
Art Space, Auckland, New Zealand
Austrian Cultural Foundation. London
Romanian Cultural Institute, London
Spike Island, Bristol
Nottingham Contemporary, Nottingham

Private sector

176 Gallery, Zabludowicz Collection, London
Bloomberg Space, London
Christie’s, Amsterdam
Deitch Projects, New York
Deste Foundation, Athens
Frith Street Gallery, London
Haunch of Venison, Berlin
Kadist Art Foundation, Paris
Kate MacGarry Gallery, London
Kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Lisson Gallery, London
Matt’s Gallery, London
David Roberts Collection, London
White Cube Gallery, London
Vienna Art Fair, Vienna

Publications

Artforum, New York
Frieze, London
Flash Art International, Milan

Some of our graduates have founded their own projects and galleries, among these:

Lu Jie, Founder and Director, Long March Space, Beijing (number 95 in Art Review Power 100 List 2009)
Sarah Wang, Founding Director of the Creative Intelligence Agency, London
Zhang Wei, Founder and Director, Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou

Other entry requirements

Work experience is absolutely essential to demonstrate that you have a clear sense of current trends and activities in contemporary art. This should be demonstrated through your experience, and expanded upon in your personal statement.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The course provides an excellent overview of every aspect of publishing. It combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, will enhance your employment prospects in publishing and related work. Read more
The course provides an excellent overview of every aspect of publishing. It combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, will enhance your employment prospects in publishing and related work.

The MA in International Publishing is a good choice for students who may already be working in publishing but want to increase their knowledge of international publishing management and issues related to publishing in a global environment. Students focus on international issues in their major project or dissertation.

It is one of a number of courses run by the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies which enjoy a high international standing in the publishing world. We have close links with publishing companies in Oxford and London, and staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-publishing/

Why choose this course?

If you choose to study at Oxford Brookes you will enjoy:
- Excellent employment prospects

- Extensive industry links and networking

- A great location in Oxford, which is a global publishing centre

- Unrivalled access to work experience and International internships

- Specialist careers advice including our Working in Publishing Day

- A large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise

- Comprehensive coverage of publishing, from mass market books to magazines

- Access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes

- A variety of awards to suit your needs and career aspirations

- Access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Book Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library

- The opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt and Bologna

- An industry advisory board with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House

- Links with publishing organizations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes

- An extensive network of alumni throughout the world

- The opportunity to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

Teaching and learning

Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures that provide you with foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable you to achieve the module's learning outcomes

- seminars and workshops that encourage you to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test your understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop your transferable skills, and to encourage deeper learning

- computer workshops to give you the opportunity to test, clarify, and apply your IT skills

- field trips to book fairs and to the industry, for example, printers, publishers, retailers, so that you can observe at first hand aspects of the industry taught in lectures and workshops

- work experience and internship opportunities across a broad range of departments and market sectors

- group work role play simulating new product development in a real-life publishing context

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for the dissertation or major project

- use of resource-based learning materials and virtual learning environment to support student learning through computer-aided assessment and computer-aided learning.

Assessment is primarily by coursework. A limited number of class tests assess your skills in applying marketing terms and in proofreading.

Specialist facilities

Facilities available to publishing students include a purpose-built IT suite with an interactive whiteboard and sound and video projection. All students have the opportunity to learn and use professional software such as Adobe Creative Suite which includes InDesign, Acrobat, Photoshop and other software used for digital production. These technologies are taught in workshops and assessment for some modules involves producing course work using these programmes.

The library carries a comprehensive and up-to-date collection of books, journals and electronic resources relating to publishing. Students have access to many databases including Book Facts Online, the Bookseller, Business Source Complete, Fame, Global Publishing Information Reports, Logos, Mintel, Nielsen Bookscan, and Pirabase.

The library also includes a number of special collections of relevance to publishing students and researchers such as The Booker Prize Archive, André Deutsch Collection, Publishing in Africa Collection and the Book Design Collection.

How this course helps you develop

In addition to the and knowledge of contemporary publishing strategies and issues provided through the formal teaching in the compulsory and optional modules, you will develop a professional network which will enable you to navigate effectively through this international industry. You will gain skills in team working, digital and financial literacy, marketing and sales that combined with an innovative approach to contemporary media issues will enable you to start or to enhance your career in publishing.

Careers

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Arts) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing in Europe. We offer full-time and part-time courses. Our programmes in Publishing provide you with the skills, knowledge and networks to kickstart your career in publishing, or to improve your current position.

Our publishing courses attract graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are seeking entry with advanced standing into the publishing industry. We also attract people wishing to update and enhance their knowledge of publishing practice and people working in publishing who are seeking, for the purpose of career advancement, knowledge outside their own specialist field.

Candidates from around the world enrol on the course to learn about publishing within the context of a global industry - in the past three years we have had postgraduate students from over 30 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

Students leave the course with a broad understanding of the key issues facing the publishing industry in the 21st century. Graduates who have completed publishing courses at Oxford Brookes have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment soon after graduation and have a strong record of career progression.

Our graduates have established an enviable reputation in the publishing industry and they are extremely successful in obtaining good jobs fast. Evidence from our alumni suggests that they are able to enter the industry at a higher level than would otherwise have been possible. The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies has its own vacancy list of jobs in publishing and runs an annual Working in Publishing Day.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girl’s magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

The Centre carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. Read more
The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. It draws on theories of print culture and book history to identify the ideological challenges to the culture of publishing and the ways in which contemporary practice has been shaped by social, economic and technological developments. The course is taught by specialists in the field and is closely linked to our renowned MA in Publishing. The core programme focuses on the theory and practice of authorship, textual production, dissemination and reception in the period 1870 to the present day.

In addition,you have the opportunity to take elective MA modules in Publishing, English and History, enabling the study of the interrelations between these disciplines.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/book-history-and-publishing-culture/

Why choose this course?

- The MA in Book History and Publishing Studies provides you with the academic skills and knowledge to extend your studies in this burgeoning and interdisciplinary field.

- This programme provides you with access to a specific selection of the vocationally oriented modules on the master's publishing programmes.

- The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Arts) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing studies and print culture in Europe. We offer full-time and part-time courses with a variety of exit awards to suit your needs and career aspirations.

- Studying any of the publishing programmes at Oxford Brookes gives you excellent employment prospects, opportunities for extensive industry links and networking in the global publishing centre of Oxford, unrivalled access to work experience and international internships, and specialist careers advice including our Working in Publishing Day.

- You will be part of large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise which will provide you with comprehensive coverage of publishing, from mass market books to magazines; print and digital dissemination.

- You will have access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes, and access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Book Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library.

- You will have the opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt, London and Bologna, and to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

- There is an industry advisory board attached to the publishing courses with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House. Additionally, we have links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods across the course. Most modules use more than one learning and teaching method. This ensures that you are exposed to a range of different learning opportunities, which helps maintain your motivation and interest.

Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures designed to provide students with the foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable them to achieve the learning outcomes for the module

- seminars and workshops designed to encourage students to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test their understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop their transferable skills and to encourage deeper learning

- field trips to book fairs, libraries and publishing archives to enable students to undertake research in print culture and publishing history

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for dissertations or major projects

- resource-based learning materials in several of our modules and virtual learning environment to support student learning through Computer Assisted Assessment and Computer Assisted Learning.

Approach to assessment

Assessment for the programme is by written course work. The assignments include researched essays, project work and the opportunity to contribute to an online journal.

Specialist facilities

Students on the course have access to the Bodleian Library and archives of local publishers, including the Oxford University Press, for research. The library at Oxford Brookes has an extensive collection of texts and journals about publishing, as well as a special collection on publishing in Africa. It also houses the Booker Archive and the André Deutsch Archive.

Field trips

A place on the tutor-led field trip to Frankfurt Book Fair which is held in October is available for applicants who have accepted their place by mid-July. The Bologna Book Fair, which occurs in the spring is also tutor-led with arranged interviews with publishers, but students organise their own flights and accommodation. The London Book Fair, also held in the spring, offers students volunteer opportunities in addition to meetings with publishers and access to many of the seminars that are held during the fair.
Attendance pattern
Attendance at lectures and seminars varies with your chosen modules. In most cases, you will have at least two days in the week without formal tutor contact hours. These times are emphasised here because you can use this time for work experience with local publishers and with fellow students in group work as preparation for presentations and reports.

How this course helps you develop

Academic writing and research skills are honed to a high level during this programme. In the second semester, assessment for the compulsory module involves contribution of a research article for an online journal. Students are also involved in the academic editing and design of the journal which is available to the public. This practice enables student to demonstrate excellence in archival and secondary research activities.

Careers

The course provides excellent prospects for students interested in further academic study in the interdisciplinary fields of media, publishing studies, cultural production and book history. In addition, students go on to work in academic publishing and are equipped to succeed in editorial positions in publishing.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girls' magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

OICPS carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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The DBA is a professional doctorate programme specifically designed for senior managers and other professionals in private, public and non-profit organisations. Read more
The DBA is a professional doctorate programme specifically designed for senior managers and other professionals in private, public and non-profit organisations. You will develop a high level of independent and critical thinking, contributing cutting-edge knowledge through research in your field.

You will attend regular, intensive study workshops, that enable you to budget your time and focus your research effectively. You will be supported throughout the course by a network of like-minded students, as well as a high level of support from the teaching team and research supervisors.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1115-doctor-of-business-administration-dba

What you will study

The delivery is described as ‘taught’ but at DBA level the delivery is much more about a process of engagement between the academic staff and the students. The programme is delivered over five taught workshops, attendance at which is compulsory.

On this course you will study five modules. These are:

- Module One: Developing the Doctoral Research Project (40 credits)
This module is designed to introduce you to doctoral-level research, having already submitted a detailed research proposal as part of the admissions procedure. This will be used as the basis of individual counselling and group work to refine the question and explore the theoretical and practical context of your proposed projects. In the assessment for this module, you will produce a comprehensive contextualisation of your research question. This will include a definition of the question, an introduction to the organisational context, and an introduction to the academic context, together with some consideration of a broad research approach.

- Module Two: The Theoretical and Practical Context for Doctoral Research (140 credits)
In this module, you will be introduced to the importance of setting an appropriate practical and theoretical framework in which to ground your research. In your assessment, you will be expected to set out the detailed practical context of your research, as well as produce a critical literature review. This will set out the background theories from which the academic context is drawn, together with the conceptual frames that will inform the thesis.

- Module Three: The Methodological Framework and Methods for Data Collection (40 credits)
Develop your understanding of the philosophy of research started in module one, and address these issues in more detail. In addition, you will be introduced to a variety of methods for data collection. You will be introduced to data analysis that will be addressed in more detail in module four. For the assessment, you will produce a paper of 10,000 words that clearly sets out and defends your chosen methodological position, as well as similarly setting out and defending your proposed methods for data collection. On successful completion of this module, and before the next module workshop, you will begin engagement with your main data collection.

- Module Four: Analysing, Interpreting and Reflecting on Findings (140 credits)
This workshop will focus on the analysis and presentation of findings in a critical and reflective manner. It is expected that you will have collected some of your data before this workshop, which at a minimum should take the form of a pilot study or may be more substantive data gathering. You will produce an assessment of 15,000-20,000 words that presents a clear analysis of your findings from the data. The exact structure will depend on factors such as the background methodology and the exact data collection and analysis techniques used.

- Module Five: The Nature of the Contribution to Knowledge and Professional Practice (180 credits)
The final module focuses on your contribution to professional and theoretical knowledge. In simple terms, this module is equivalent to the discussion and conclusion chapters of a traditional PhD.

Guidance will be given on what constitutes a contribution to knowledge, in terms of theory, method and practice. In addition, you will attend workshops on structuring your proposed contribution into a thesis. The notion of conceptual framing will be critically revisited to provide a theoretical context for the findings and to ensure you think about where your own work fits into the ongoing research agenda, rather than simply reflecting on what has gone before.

The assessment for module five is crucial to the success of the overall thesis. It forms the core of the DBA, clearly discussing the contribution to knowledge that your findings make to the academic and practical context in which the DBA has been situated.

Learning and teaching methods

The DBA will be delivered at our Treforest Campus over three day blocks, approximately every six months. The workshops will typically span a Thursday, Friday, Saturday to minimise disruption for students. These are supplemented by additional update days where students are recalled for meetings with supervisors and additional input where necessary. The taught workshops are spaced over approximately 30 months, with production of the final assessment document in the months following the final workshop.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Career enhancement to strategic levels in organisations is often sought by successful DBA candidates. DBA graduates have the ability to create and interpret new knowledge through original research. They produce first-class original research of publishable quality that sets them apart from other managers. This encompasses robust design, implementation, execution, and dissemination. This research also makes significant contributions to practice on many levels, within organisations, on an industry level, and on a policy level. Many of our graduates have progressed to senior positions in public sector, private sector, and academia.

Assessment methods

Each module results in the production of an assessed piece of work, the length of which varies depending on the module. For example, the assessment for module one will be in the region of 8,000 words, whereas that for module two may be as much as 20,000 words to reflect the depth of enquiry demanded by that module. In total, you will typically produce some 80,000 words throughout the programme. This is comparable with other methods of doctoral study. Your final examination will involve the submission of an 80,000 word thesis (combination of assignments) and a viva voce.

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This programme is recognised by the ESRC as a research training programme designed to provide participants with a sound background on overall research design and the most up-to-date training in methods and data collection and analysis. Read more
This programme is recognised by the ESRC as a research training programme designed to provide participants with a sound background on overall research design and the most up-to-date training in methods and data collection and analysis.

The core elements of this programme are delivered by staff from across the College of Social Sciences, many of them engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields.

The MA programme includes assessed core modules and short courses (120 credits) and the completion of a 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits), while the Postgraduate Diploma includes the assessed courses only (120 credits).

Modules

Introduction to Social Research
This module aims to provide a general introduction to studying and research methods and prepares you for your dissertation, emphasising key skills such as searching literature, finding datasets and presenting and criticising arguments. It also covers ethics of research, the role of theory and philosophical bases for understanding the social world.

Research Design
This module links the introductory module and data collection module through consideration of research design, questions, warranting practices and sampling methods. All the elements of research design are linked into an over-arching theme of the full cycle of research activity.

Social Research Methods I
This module introduces the principles and practices of data collection and explores rationales of the various methods. It will focus on the different stages of data collection, including various methods used to gather textual and numerical data.

Social Research Methods II
This module introduces students to a range of approaches for analysing and handling data. It will include covering statistical methods for quantitative data and methodological approaches for qualitative data. It emphasises that the method of analysis is not determined by the method of collection.

British Social Policy - Beyond Welfare?
This module provides students with an understanding of recent trends in social policy development and of the current social and economic context of policy making in the UK. The question underpinning the module is 'Where is British Social Policy heading?'

Researching Social Policy
This module is concerned with the politics of social research, rather than research methods and methodology. It addresses issues such as: how are certain topics identified as subjects for research, how is research commissioned and funded, and what are the relationships between research and the policy process. It draws on real-life experiences of doing research and being researched to explore these issues.

The modules on Social Research Methods I and Social Research Methods II cover a wide range of approaches, including the 'qualitative' traditions, plus mixed methods.

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We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. Read more
We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. This Masters in Medieval History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Glasgow is home to the Glasgow Centre of Medieval & Renaissance Studies and the Centre for Scottish & Celtic Studies.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will join an extensive medieval research community. Glasgow has active charter and chronicle research groups in medieval studies, a reading group and regular staff-student seminars. The annual Edwards Lecture is the keynote event in the calendar of this scholarly community.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Medieval History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include
-Chivalry and warfare in late Medieval Europe, c1300-1500
-Constructing faith: systems of belief and religious networks in the Middle Ages
-From antiquity to the Middle Ages
-Introduction to medieval manuscript studies
-Barbarians in the Mediterranean
-Popular revolt in the late Middle Ages
-The Crusades
-The Normans
-Medieval paleography

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Explorations in the Classical tradition
-Inventing the 'Clash of Civilisations': East against West from Homer to Hadrian
-Approaching the past: sources and methods in medieval Scottish and Celtic Studies
-Themes in later medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Heritage and cultural informatics

Courses in Latin, Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career Prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. Read more
Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. The Masters in Modern History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Members of the Centre for Gender History, the Centre for War Studies and the Centre for Scottish Cultural Studies are all leaders in their fields.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also have unparalleled access to Scotland's world-leading collections including the National Library of Scotland, the National Collections and the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
-Internships are available with the Hunterian Museum. There are also opportunities to work closely with other key institutions such as Glasgow Museums and Glasgow Women's Library.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include:
-Secret intelligence in the 20th century
-American material culture
-Introduction to social theory for researchers
-American counterculture
-History of medicine, 1850-2000
-The American way of war
-Topics in historical computing
-Issues, ideologies and institutions of modern Scotland
-Gender, politics and power
-Christianity and sexual revolution.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as;
-The art of war
-Democracy and governance: classical political thought
-Political philosophy
-2D digitisation
-Archives and records theory
-Employers, elites and the state: capitalism in Britain.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Read more
This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Our methodologies are drawn from social, political and cultural history. The Masters in Early Modern History provides you with thorough research training, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Our links with The Hunterian, the University’s own museum and art gallery, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will enjoy ready access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
-The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-A regular Early Modern Research Seminar brings together staff, PhD and Masters students on an informal basis, including eminent active scholars with continuing attachments to history.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Early Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history.

Optional courses - course options may include:
-Politics and literature in Jacobean Scotland
-Print, public opinion and Enlightenment in 18th-century Europe
-The History of Medicine I: studies in the History of medicine before 1850
-Reformation! Europe in the age of religious wars
-Scottish popular culture.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Early modern warfare
-Climate and civilisation
-Lessons from the greats
-Decline and fall: organisational failure, ancient and modern
-The authority of the state and duties of the citizen.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The programme is taught by a team of academics in the social, political and cultural history of Scotland from the medieval period through to the 20th century. Read more
The programme is taught by a team of academics in the social, political and cultural history of Scotland from the medieval period through to the 20th century. It has a particular geographical emphasis on Gaelic Scotland, Scotland’s place in the British Isles and Europe, and on urban Scotland.

Why this programme

-Teaching and research in Scottish history are firmly embedded in the University, giving benefits from synergies with Celtic and Gaelic, archaeology and Scottish literature, all contributing to the work of the Centre for Scottish & Celtic Studies.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will join an extensive medieval research community. Glasgow has active charter and chronicle research groups in medieval studies, a reading group and regular staff-student seminars. The annual Edwards Lecture is the keynote event in the calendar of this scholarly community.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Scottish History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include:
-Politics and literature in Jacobean Scotland
-Culture, politics and society in the Highland clearances
-Interdisciplinary perspectives on Scottish culture
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish studies
-Revolutionary Scotland: literature, culture and politics 1830-1939
-The Scottish Wars of Independence
-Scottish popular culture
-Scottish Reformation

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Monuments in transition in Medieval Scotland
-Records and evidence
-Introduction to museology
-Approaching the past
-Sources for early Medieval Scottish Christianity.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees. In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees.

In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-anthropology/

Current students are engaged in research projects covering a broad range of subjects, located in Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

How do I choose between MRes and MPhil?

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Whether you start registered as MRes or MPhil, upgrading to PhD status takes place at a later date.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

First year
In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

At the end of the first year, MRes students present a 15,000-word dissertation in September, which discusses in depth their proposed research topic and the relevant literature. Students registered for the MPhil present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point.

Thesis

An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/

The MPhil in Visual Anthropology can be achieved through two main strands:

research projects that centre on the study of visual cultures, such as various forms of media representation or art
the use of specific visual methodologies as a central feature of the research project itself

The programme focuses on the visual as a vital and defining factor in the research project as a whole.

Additional practical training can be provided, alongside some access to department audio-visual equipment and facilities, but we generally expect MPhil candidates to have an appropriate level of practical visual production skills and to be largely self-sufficient in this area.

MPhil students are currently carrying out visual projects in Mexico, India, Argentina, Lebanon, Israel, and the UK.

How to choose between MRes and MPhil

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

This programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

Structure

First year
In the first year, the emphasis of the visual anthropology training is on key themes and issues within the sub-field, particularly in relation to your own work. You develop your own research project over the year through the production of several small-scale visual projects. Guidance and feedback on visual and academic work will be provided in the weekly visual practice seminars and through supervision meetings.

In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

MPhil students present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point. An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Assessment

Thesis (including film or photographic portfolio) and viva voce.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

Our students have taken up academic posts in anthropology as well as related fields all over the world; some have joined NGOs or GOs and taken employment as researchers, teachers and in broadcasting.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 2-5 page statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. It is aimed at conservators and curators with significant collections care responsibilities, as well as graduates from conservation or other museum related disciplines intending to develop their careers in this area.

The two year course offers a flexible study path to achieve your MA. The curriculum is delivered in themed 5 day modules spread out over the two year programme. Course modules cover a comprehensive programme of theory coupled with practical conservation exercises and visits that focus on key aspects of contemporary collections care and management practice. Residential modules are supported by off-site research assignments and a dissertation.

::You can expect::

- To learn key theoretical concepts and apply them in practical exercises
- To assess and prioritise risks to a collection in order to develop management strategies
- Use of the diverse collection at West Dean in real-life scenarios
- To study all aspects of collections care including context, security, salvage planning, loans and more
- Collaboration with conservation students
- Transferrable skills in research, academic writing, data analysis and critical thinking

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Study within a working historic house and estate
- An interdisciplinary environment
- Networking and building of professional contacts
- Access to a range of experts in different object disciplines

Programme subject to validation.

Programme Aims

The aims of the Masters programme in Collections Care and Management are to:

Practical:

1. Provide a context, environment and study collection where collections care and conservation
management skills can be developed and applied within a working historic house context.

2. To develop core competencies in collections care and conservation management including
understanding object, material and collection contexts and types, agents of deterioration and
how the damage that they cause can be monitored and mitigated, risk assessment and
management, object handling, storage, loans, transport and display; along with skills relating to
budgeting, fundraising and managing people.

Theoretical:

3. Foster a critical awareness of the significance of objects and collections, including their cultural,
historical and site specific context.

4. Develop a critical awareness of key theoretical concepts that underpin collections care and
conservation management, including the agents of deterioration, the principles of risk and
change management.

5. Develop originality in the application of principles and knowledge, coupled with a practical
understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and
interpret knowledge in the field of collections care and conservation management.

Professional:

6. To enable the students' potential and aptitude for professional practice, research and
employment by encouraging self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems and in
planning and implementing projects.

7. To encourage open-minded attitudes and approaches that equip students to become selfmotivated,
independent professionals, able to make decisions confidently in complex and
unpredictable situations

8. Prepare students for professional practice in collections care and conservation management
roles in a range of heritage contexts.

Facilities

Facilities include an analytical laboratory and computer suite. The on-site Art and Conservation Library gives you access to specialist databases and thousands of specialist books and journals.

Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses (NB this is not an exhaustive list)
-American Way of War
-Approaches to History
-Belief and Conversion in Europe c. 300 – c.1000
-Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective
-Chivalry and Warfare
-Crusading Warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean
-Culture, Politics and Society in Highland Clearances
-Gender and Text
-Gender, Politics and Power
-Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency
-Issues, Ideologies & Institutions in Modern Scotland
-Medieval Palaeography 1
-Medieval Deep Structures of Russia and Eastern Europe
-Scottish Castles and Palaces in European Context, c.1100-1600
-Scottish Radicalism
-Scottish Reformation
-Secularisation and Society: the decline of religion in the west since 1800
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 1
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 2
-Special Topic History 1
-Special Topic in History 2
-The Normans
-The Ottomans in history, 1300–1922
-Thomas Paine as an Enlightenment Revolutionary
-Western Intelligence in an Age of Terror
-Women and Power in Renaissance Italy

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, enhances your employment prospects in the publishing and related media industries. Read more
The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, enhances your employment prospects in the publishing and related media industries.

The MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes is respected throughout the world. The course gives you a broad understanding of the key issues facing the publishing industry in the 21st century, and provides scope to develop specialist skills required for your career development. It also enables in-depth exploration of specialist areas through independent study and a dissertation or a major project.

This is one of a number of courses run by the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies which enjoy a high international standing in the publishing world. We have close links with publishing companies in Oxford, London and the south-east of the UK, and our staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/publishing/

Why choose this course?

Studying Publishing at Oxford Brookes gives you:
- Excellent employment prospects

- Extensive industry links and networking with specialist external speakers

- A great location in Oxford, which is a global publishing centre

- Unrivalled access to work experience and International internships

- Specialist careers advice, including our Working in Publishing Day

- A large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise

- Comprehensive coverage of the industry from mass market trade fiction, illustrated non-fiction, digital and academic publishing, journals, magazines, rights.

- Access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes

- A variety of awards to suit your needs and career aspirations

- Access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Booker Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library

- The opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt and Bologna and London

- An industry advisory board with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House Group

- Links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes

- An extensive network of alumni throughout the world

- The opportunity to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

Teaching and learning

As a student studying with us, you will engage in a range of teaching and learning experiences. Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures that provide you with foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable you to achieve the module's learning outcomes

- seminars and workshops that encourage you to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test your understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop your graduate attributes, and to encourage deeper learning

- computer workshops to give you the opportunity to test, clarify, and apply your digital skills

- field trips to book fairs and to the industry, for example, printers, publishers, retailers, so that you can observe at first hand aspects of the industry taught in lectures and workshops

- work experience and internship opportunities across a broad range of departments and market sectors

- group work role play for example, simulating new product development in a real-life publishing context

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for the dissertation, major project or independent study module

- use of resource-based learning materials and virtual learning environments to support student learning through computer-aided assessment and computer-aided learning.

Assessment is primarily by coursework. A limited number of class tests assess your skills in applying marketing terms and in proofreading.

How this course helps you develop

In addition to the skills and knowledge of contemporary publishing strategies and issues provided through the formal teaching in the compulsory and optional modules, you will develop a professional network which will enable you to navigate effectively through this international industry. You will gain skills in team working, digital and financial literacy, marketing and sales that combined with an innovative approach to contemporary media issues will enable you to start or to enhance your career in publishing.

Our publishing courses attract graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are seeking entry with advanced standing into the publishing industry. We also attract people wishing to update and enhance their knowledge of publishing practice and people working in publishing who are seeking, for the purpose of career advancement, knowledge outside their own specialist field.

Candidates from around the world enrol on the course to learn about publishing within the context of a global industry - in the past three years we have had postgraduate students from over 30 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

Careers

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Art) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing in Europe. Our programmes in Publishing provide you with the skills, knowledge and equally important access to networks that kick-start your career in publishing, or improve your current position.

Graduates who have completed publishing courses at Oxford Brookes have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment soon after graduation and have a strong record of career progression because our courses enjoy a high international standing. Our flexible work experience opportunities with local, regional, national and international publishing enterprises provide you with the essential up-to-date practical knowledge that will enhance your employment prospects on completing the programme. In addition our teaching staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles and a broad range of contacts that are at your disposal for your individual interests in this diverse industry.

While studying with us, you will develop a wide range of publishing and general management skills, including advanced IT proficiency. Graduates who have completed our publishing courses have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment in trade, children's journals, ELT and schools publishing, rights management, digital and production roles. Our alumni have strong records of career progression.

Our graduates have established an enviable reputation in the publishing industry and they are extremely successful in obtaining good jobs fast. Evidence from our alumni suggests that they are able to enter the industry at a higher level than would otherwise have been possible. Our international alumni are working in publishing companies in New York, rights management in Toronto, production in India, digital enterprises in Kenya and a variety of roles throughout European publishing companies. In addition, European and UK students are working in Oxford and Cambridge University Presses, Taylor and Francis, Simon and Schuster, Sage, Penguin, Elsevier, Touch Press, Lion Hudson and Barefoot Books to name only a few.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girl’s magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

The Centre carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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